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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus paecilomyces sp.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process in cludes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces, which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate.

Wu, Jung Fu (Lakewood, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus Paecilomyces sp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Wu, J.F.

1985-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

3

Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Final report, 15 December 1976-31 December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two approaches to ethanol production via thermophilic mixed culture fermentation of pretreated wood were investigated. The initial studies of wood biodelignification by Chrysosporium pruinosum and subsequent mixed culture fermentation to ethanol using a cellulolytic strain of sporocytophaga and a strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus proved to be premature for a development effort. Studies of the fermentation of SO/sub 2//steam-treated poplar by a mixed culture of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum were, however, technically and economically promising. Wood pretreatment to enhance microbial utilization, the microbiology and biochemistry of pure and mixed culture fermentation of cellulose by C. thermocellum and C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum, and techniques for improving ethanol tolerance and yield were investigated. Considerable progress in overcoming the technical barriers to efficient ethanol production from wood have been demonstrated; however, additional studies and development work are required before technical feasibility can be established.

Brooks, R.E.; Su, T.M.; Brennan, M.J. Jr.; Frick, J.; Lynch, M.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Annual report and revised research plan, January 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to demonstrate on a laboratory scale the technical feasibility of the direct microbial conversion of pretreated wood to ethanol. During the first year of this contract, we investigated the feasibility of biologically delignifying wood with C. pruinosum and directly fermenting the pretreated wood to ethanol with a mixed culture. Bench-top fermentations of a thermophilic bacillus growing on glucose and of a mixed culture of thermophilic sporocytophaga (US) and a thermophilic bacillus growing on microcrystalline and amorphous cellulose were evaluated for growth and ethanol production. In the mixed culture fermentation of amorphous and microcrystalline cellulose, the specific rate of substrate depletion was calculated to be 0.087 hr/sup -1/ and 0.0346 hr/sup -1/, respectively. However, defining the growth requirements of C. pruinosum and sporocytophaga (US) proved more difficult than originally anticipated. In order to achieve the program objectives within the contract period, a revised research plan was developed based upon chemical pretreatment and the direct fermentation of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. In place of the biological delignification pretreatment step, we have substituted a chemically supplemented steam pretreatment step to partially delignify wood and to enhance its accessibility to microbial utilization. Clostridium thermocellum, which ferments cellulose directly to ethanol and acetic acid, has replaced the mixed culture fermentation stage for ethanol production. Research on the production of ethanol from xylose by the thermophilic bacillus ZB-B2 is retained as one means of utilizing the hemicellulose fraction of hardwood. Work on the genetic improvement of the ethanol yields of both cultures by suppressing acetic acid production is also retained. The rationale, experimental approach, and economic considerations of this revised research plan are also presented.

Brooks, R.E.; Bellamy, W.D.; Su, T.M.

1978-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 The Department of Energy (Department) has the strategic...

8

Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

Information Center

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of several beakers of gold and orange liquid ethanol. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol...

11

Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fibrominn Biomass Power...

12

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated in the Northern and Eastern areas of the state. The areas of South and West Texas have little to no biomass available to use for cellulosic ethanol. The North East, South East, and Upper Coast districts include forestry waste that increase the amount of available biomass. With 100 percent certainty the North East and South East districts can support four 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plants each. The research found that there is more than enough biomass to support numerous cellulosic ethanol plants in Texas, and decision makers can use the results of this study to identify regions of low and high risk for available biomass from agricultural and forestry waste.

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

RAW MATERIALS EVALUATION AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES FOR CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium on Fuels from Biomass. DOE meeting, Troy, New ~orkSTUDIES FOR CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL C.STUDIES FOR CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL* by

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Genetic manipulation of lignin reduces recalcitrance and improves biomass ethanol production from switchgrass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Switchgrass is a leading dedicated bioenergy feedstock because it is a native, high yielding, perennial prairie grass with broad cultivation range and low agronomic input requirements. Biomass conversion research has developed pilot scale processes for production of ethanol and other alcohols but they remain costly primarily due to the intrinsic recalcitrance of biomass. We show here that switchgrass genetic modification can produce normal plants that have reduced thermochemical and enzymatic recalcitrance. Downregulation of the switchgrass caffeic O-methyltransferase gene decreases lignin content modestly, reduces the syringyl to guaiacyl lignin monomer ratio and increases the ethanol yield by up to a third using conventional biomass fermentation processes. The downregulated lines have wild-type biomass yields but require reduced pretreatment severity and 300-400% lower cellulase dosages for equivalent product yields significantly lowering processing costs. Alternately, our modified transgenic switchgrass lines should yield significantly more fermentation chemicals per hectare under identical process conditions.

Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Fu, Chunxiang [Noble Foundation; Xiao, Xirong [Noble Foundation; Ge, Yaxin [Noble Foundation; Chen, Fang [Noble Foundation; Bouton, Joseph [Noble Foundation; Foston, Marcus [Georgia Institute of Technology; Dixon, Richard A [Noble Foundation; Wang, Zeng-Yu [Noble Foundation; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inbicon Biomass Refinery Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Platforms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for biogas production Inbicon Biomass Refinery Energy integrated solutions Wheat Straw 50 t/h (at 86 % dm) C5 molasses Power The Lignin and biogas are used in power

17

The cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass -- A comparison of selected alternative processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compare the cost of selected alternative processes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In turn, this information will be used by the ARS/USDA to guide the management of research and development programs in biomass conversion. The report will identify where the cost leverages are for the selected alternatives and what performance parameters need to be achieved to improve the economics. The process alternatives considered here are not exhaustive, but are selected on the basis of having a reasonable potential in improving the economics of producing ethanol from biomass. When other alternatives come under consideration, they should be evaluated by the same methodology used in this report to give fair comparisons of opportunities. A generic plant design is developed for an annual production of 25 million gallons of anhydrous ethanol using corn stover as the model substrate at $30/dry ton. Standard chemical engineering techniques are used to give first order estimates of the capital and operating costs. Following the format of the corn to ethanol plant, there are nine sections to the plant; feed preparation, pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and dehydration, stillage evaporation, storage and denaturation, utilities, and enzyme production. There are three pretreatment alternatives considered: the AFEX process, the modified AFEX process (which is abbreviated as MAFEX), and the STAKETECH process. These all use enzymatic hydrolysis and so an enzyme production section is included in the plant. The STAKETECH is the only commercially available process among the alternative processes.

Grethlein, H.E.; Dill, T.

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

Nguyen, Quang A

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

17th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition 2009, Hamburg, Germany Lignocellulosic Ethanol: The Path to Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition 2009, Hamburg, Germany Lignocellulosic Ethanol of transport fuels from biomass is essential if the EU aspiration to substitute 10% of transport fuels investment in R&D in the US, Europe and Asia. The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This process design and technoeconomic evaluation addresses the conversion of biomass to ethanol via thermochemical pathways that are expected to be demonstrated at the pilot level by 2012.

Phillips, S.; Aden, A.; Jechura, J.; Dayton, D.; Eggeman, T.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Softwood Biomass to Ethanol Feasibility Study; Final Report: June 14, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of design and project evaluation work studying various aspects of ethanol related projects including a conceptual ethanol plant located in Martell California.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. At least 80% of the particles pass through a 1/4 inch screen having a 6.3 mm nominal sieve opening but are retained by a No. 10 screen having a 2 mm nominal sieve opening. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This design report describes an up-to-date benchmark thermochemical conversion process that incorporates the latest research from NREL and other sources. Building on a design report published in 2007, NREL and its subcontractor Harris Group Inc. performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for a biomass-to-ethanol process via indirect gasification. The conceptual design presented herein considers the economics of ethanol production, assuming the achievement of internal research targets for 2012 and nth-plant costs and financing. The design features a processing capacity of 2,205 U.S. tons (2,000 metric tonnes) of dry biomass per day and an ethanol yield of 83.8 gallons per dry U.S. ton of feedstock. The ethanol selling price corresponding to this design is $2.05 per gallon in 2007 dollars, assuming a 30-year plant life and 40% equity financing with a 10% internal rate of return and the remaining 60% debt financed at 8% interest. This ethanol selling price corresponds to a gasoline equivalent price of $3.11 per gallon based on the relative volumetric energy contents of ethanol and gasoline.

Dutta, A.; Talmadge, M.; Hensley, J.; Worley, M.; Dudgeon, D.; Barton, D.; Groendijk, P.; Ferrari, D.; Stears, B.; Searcy, E. M.; Wright, C. T.; Hess, J. R.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Permitting Guidance for Biomass Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power plants could contribute significantly to reaching U.S. targets for renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Achieving these goals will require the construction of many new biomass-fired units, as well as the conversion of existing coal-fired units to biomass combustion or co-fired units. New biomass units will require air, water use, wastewater, and, in some cases, solid waste permits. Existing fossil fuel-fired units that will be converted to dedicated biomass-fired units o...

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

30

Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

31

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy In order to meet the...

32

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy In order to meet the federal energy...

33

Techno-Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This techno-economic study investigates the production of ethanol and a higher alcohols coproduct by conversion of lignocelluosic biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas-to-liquids synthesis over a precommercial heterogeneous catalyst. The design specifies a processing capacity of 2,205 dry U.S. tons (2,000 dry metric tonnes) of woody biomass per day and incorporates 2012 research targets from NREL and other sources for technologies that will facilitate the future commercial production of cost-competitive ethanol. Major processes include indirect steam gasification, syngas cleanup, and catalytic synthesis of mixed alcohols, and ancillary processes include feed handling and drying, alcohol separation, steam and power generation, cooling water, and other operations support utilities. The design and analysis is based on research at NREL, other national laboratories, and The Dow Chemical Company, and it incorporates commercial technologies, process modeling using Aspen Plus software, equipment cost estimation, and discounted cash flow analysis. The design considers the economics of ethanol production assuming successful achievement of internal research targets and nth-plant costs and financing. The design yields 83.8 gallons of ethanol and 10.1 gallons of higher-molecular-weight alcohols per U.S. ton of biomass feedstock. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance.

Abhijit Dutta; Michael Talmadge; Jesse Hensley; Matt Worley; Doug Dudgeon; David Barton; Peter Groenendijk; Daniela Ferrari; Brien Stears; Erin Searcy; Christopher Wright; J. Richard Hess

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates process design and technoeconomic criteria for a direct gasification process for conversion of biomass to ethanol. Follow-up to NREL/TP-510-41168.

Dutta, A.; Phillips, S. D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Bieber Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bieber Plant Biomass Facility Bieber Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bieber Plant Biomass Facility Facility Bieber Plant Sector Biomass Location Bieber, California Coordinates 41.1212775°, -121.1441396° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1212775,"lon":-121.1441396,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Plant Biomass Characterization: Application of Solution- and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Biomass Characterization: Application of Solution- and Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy Yunqiao Pu 1,3 , Bassem Hallac 2,3 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 Georgia Institute of...

37

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

38

1 DISTILLERS BY-PRODUCTS AND CORN STOVER AS FUELS FOR ETHANOL PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Dry-grind ethanol plants have the potential to reduce their operating costs and improve their net energy balances by using biomass as the source of process heat and electricity. We utilized ASPEN PLUS software to model various technology bundles of equipment, fuels and operating activities that are capable of supplying energy and satisfying emissions requirements for dry-grind ethanol plants of 50 and 100 million gallons per year capacity using corn stover, distillers dried grains and solubles (DDGS), or a mixture of corn stover and syrup (the solubles portion of DDGS). In addition to their own requirements, plants producing 50 and 100 million gallons of ethanol are capable of supplying 5-7 or 10-14 MegaWatts of electricity to the grid, respectively. Economic analysis showed favorable rates of return for biomass alternatives compared to conventional plants using natural gas and purchased electricity over a range of conditions. The mixture of corn stover and syrup provided the highest rates of return in general. Factors favoring biomass included a higher premium for low carbon footprint ethanol, higher natural gas prices, lower DDGS prices, lower ethanol

Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam; Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn (more)

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 2008 from www.sce.com 9. The California BiomassCollaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Release Date: May 20, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 Go Notice: Changes to Petroleum Supply Survey Forms for 2013 This is the third release of U.S. Energy Information Administration data on fuel ethanol production capacity. EIA first reported fuel ethanol production capacities as of January 1, 2011 on November 29, 2011. This new report contains production capacity data for all operating U.S. fuel ethanol production plants as of January 1, 2013. U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity as of January 1, 2013 PAD District Number of Plants 2013 Nameplate Capacity 2012 Nameplate Capacity (MMgal/year) (mb/d) (MMgal/year) (mb/d) PADD 1 4 360 23 316 21

42

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the processing of the cellulosic feedstock to ethanol wouldcellulosic ethanol that can compete with conventionally produced gasoline. Although the biomass feedstock

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity as of January 1, 2013 PAD District: Number of Plants: 2013 Nameplate Capacity: 2012 Nameplate Capacity

46

Thermophilic Gram-Positive Biocatalysts for Biomass Conversion to Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These new second generation biocatalysts have the potential to reduce the cost of SSF by minimizing the amount of fungal cellulases, a significant cost component in the use of biomass as a renewable resource for production of fuels and chemicals.

Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O.; Maupin-Furlow, J.A.; Preston, J.F.; Aldrich, H.C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Xylose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

SciTech Connect

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Viitanen, Paul V; Stieglitz, Barry

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Xylose utilizing zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Stieglitz, Barry; Viitanen, Paul V

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermochemical Ethanol via Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Technical Report NREL/TP-510-45913 July 2009 Technical Report Thermochemical Ethanol via NREL/TP-510-45913 Direct Gasification and Mixed July 2009 Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Prepared under Task No. BB07.3710 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

50

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity Garretbioprocessing of cellulosic biomass. Bioresour Technol 100:of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity.

Suen, Garret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Biomass Repowering Study for Plant Scholz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company and its subsidiary, Gulf Power, have identified Gulf Powers Plant Scholz as a potential target for conversion from coal firing to 100% biomass firing. Plant Scholz is located in Sneads, Florida, and was built in 1953. It is capable of generating up to 98 MW of electricity (gross) while operating on pulverized coal. Net generation at full load is about 93 MW. Modifying this unit to use wood fuel will significantly reduce air emissions rates for several regulated pollutants and is an optio...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 3550% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass to ethanol, distribution and combustion ofcombustion of lignin produce 6.91*10 5 BTU electricity/ton dry biomass andcombustion represented 46% of the carbon contained in the biomass

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

Shih, Chien-Ju

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Xylan Delignification Process for biomass conversion to ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extrusion process melded with alkaline peroxide chemical pretreatements allows the lignin and hemicellulose in biomass to be solublibzed, and the cellulose component to be made available for enzymatic breakdown. This process is called the Xylan Delignification Process (XDP). In this paper, some results of the XDP on promoting enzymatic breakdown and SSF of corn stalks switch grass and straw are reported. It was found that the XDP process allowed quick (6 hour) and reasonably complete (85--88%) hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction of cornstalks, but was less effective in allowing utilization of the switch grass with 76% yeild noted in 24 hours. Solubilization of the lignin and hemicellulose were not acheived on a first set of corn stalk, switch grass, and straw samples, but was noted on a second straw sample.

Dale, M.C.; Zhao, C.; Lei, S. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States); Tyson, G. [Xylan Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Technoeconomic Analysis of a Lignocellulosic Biomass Indirect Gasification Process to Make Ethanol via Mixed Alcohols Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technoeconomic analysis of a 2000 tonne/day lignocellulosic biomass conversion process to make mixed alcohols via gasification and catalytic synthesis was completed. The process, modeled using ASPEN Plus process modeling software for mass and energy calculations, included all major process steps to convert biomass into liquid fuels, including gasification, gas cleanup and conditioning, synthesis conversion to mixed alcohols, and product separation. The gas cleanup area features a catalytic fluidized-bed steam reformer to convert tars and hydrocarbons into syngas. Conversions for both the reformer and the synthesis catalysts were based on research targets expected to be achieved by 2012 through ongoing research. The mass and energy calculations were used to estimate capital and operating costs that were used in a discounted cash flow rate of return analysis for the process to calculate a minimum ethanol selling price of $0.267/L ($1.01/gal) ethanol (U.S.$2005).

Phillips, S. D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Integrated Biorefinery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pilot plant, researchers study biochemical processes for converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. At NREL, teams of researchers focus on developing an integrated...

59

Raw materials evaluation and process development studies for conversion of biomass to sugars and ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of cellulosic raw materials in the form of agricultural crop residue was analyzed for chemical composition and assessed for potential yields of sugars through chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of these materials. Corn stover was used as a representative raw material for a preliminary process design and economic assessment of the production of sugars and ethanol. With the process as presently developed, 23 gallons of ethanol can be obtained per ton of corn stover at a processing cost of about $1.80 per gallon exclusive of by-product credits. The analysis shows the cost of ethanol to be highly dependent upon (1) the cost of the biomass, (2) the extent of conversion to glucose, (3) enzyme recovery and production cost and (4) potential utilization of xylose. Significant cost reduction appears possible through further research in these directions.

Wilke, C.R.; Yang, R.D.; Sciamanna, A.S.; Freitas, R.P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cellulosic ethanol: progress towards a simulation model of lignocellulosic biomass;  

SciTech Connect

A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials, and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. The force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work will enable full simulations of lignocellulose. This work presents a molecular mechanics force field for lignin that is compatible with the CHARMM potential energy function. The parameterization was based on reproducing quantum-mechanically derived target data. Special care was taken to correctly describe the most common lignin linkage: the {beta}-O-4{prime} bond. The partial atomic charge of the oxygen and carbon atoms participating in the linkage were derived by examining interactions between a lignin fragment model compound and a water molecule. Dihedral parameters were obtained by reproducing QM potential energy profiles, with emphasis placed on reproducing accurately the thermally sampled low energy regions. The remaining bond and angle parameters were derived using the AFMM method. In order to test the validity of the force field a simulation of a lignin-dimer crystal was performed. The overall good agreement between the structural properties of the MD run and the experiment provide confidence that the force field can be used in simulation of biomass. The accurate computer simulation of lignin in lignocellulose will present significant challenges. Unlike many biological macromolecules that have been studied with molecular simulation, both the chemical and three-dimensional structures of lignin are relatively poorly researched. However, the present force field provides a basis for constructing molecular models of lignin systems, and, in combination with a range of biophysical measurements, significant progress in determining structures of lignocellulosic biomass can be expected in the near future.

Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Corn-to-Ethanol Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant The Illinois Ethanol Research Advisory Board manages and operates the

62

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

andtheatmospherefrombiomassburning. ClimaticChangeIntroductiontopyrolysisofbiomass. J. Anal. Appl. Molecular Structure of Plant Biomass-derived Black Carbon (

Keiluweit, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion toconversion of cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals.conversion of cellulosic biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bimodal and multimodal plant biomass particle mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An industrial feedstock of plant biomass particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein the particles are individually characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L, wherein the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces, and wherein the particles in the feedstock are collectively characterized by having a bimodal or multimodal size distribution.

Dooley, James H.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

Tyson, K.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

None

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ethanol Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis biomass in beekers Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol contains the same chemical compound (C2H5OH) found in alcoholic beverages. Studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution. Ethanol is also increasingly available in E85, an alternative fuel that can be used in flexible fuel vehicles. Several steps are required to make ethanol available as a vehicle fuel. Biomass feedstocks are grown and transported to ethanol production

69

Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nove Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nove Power Plant Biomass Facility Nove Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Nove Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Nove Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Owner Itaska Location Brawley, California Coordinates 32.9786566°, -115.530267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9786566,"lon":-115.530267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Plant Biomass Facility Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Facility Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Sauder Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sauder Power Plant Biomass Facility Sauder Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sauder Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Sauder Power Plant Sector Biomass Location Fulton County, Ohio Coordinates 41.5719341°, -84.1435136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5719341,"lon":-84.1435136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

Stowe Power Production Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stowe Power Production Plant Biomass Facility Stowe Power Production Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stowe Power Production Plant Biomass Facility Facility Stowe Power Production Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2290075°, -75.3878525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2290075,"lon":-75.3878525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Bernalillo County, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0177854°, -106.6291304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0177854,"lon":-106.6291304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Facility Rhodia Houston Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Harris County, Texas Coordinates 29.7751825°, -95.3102505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.7751825,"lon":-95.3102505,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Marsh Road Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Mateo County, California Coordinates 37.4337342°, -122.4014193° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4337342,"lon":-122.4014193,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Blue Lake Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Lake Plant Biomass Facility Blue Lake Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Lake Plant Biomass Facility Facility Blue Lake Plant Sector Biomass Location Blue Lake, California Coordinates 40.8829072°, -123.9839488° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8829072,"lon":-123.9839488,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Facility West Point Treatment Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location King County, Washington Coordinates 47.5480339°, -121.9836029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5480339,"lon":-121.9836029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

Brown, D.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Conceptual Design Review for Biomass Repowering at Plant Sweatt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company and its subsidiary Mississippi Power have identified Plant Sweatt as a potential opportunity for biomass repowering. Plant Sweatt is located in Meridian, Mississippi, and became commercially operational in 1953. The facility is capable of generating up to 96 MW of electricity (gross), operating on natural gas. Net generation at full load is about 92 MW. With a relatively high heat rate for a premium fuel, the plant is rarely dispatched. Modifying one of the boilers at Plant Sweatt to bu...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Energy optimization for the design of cornbased ethanol plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we address the problem of optimizing corn-based bioethanol plants through the use of heat integration and mathematical programming techniques. The goal is to reduce the operating costs of the plant. Capital cost, energy usage, and yields all contribute to prduction cost. Yield and energy use also influence the viability of cornbased ethanol as a sustainable fuel. We first propose a limited superstructure of alternative designs including the various process units and utility streams involved in ethanol production. Our objective is to determine the connections in the network and the flow in each stream in the network such that we minimize the energy requirement of the overall plant. This is accomplished through the formulation of a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem involving mass and energy balances for all the units in the system, where the model is solved through two nonlinear programming subproblems. We then perform a heat integration study on the resulting flowsheet; the modified flowsheet includes multieffect distillation columns and further reduces energy consumption. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce the current steam consumption required in the transformation of corn into fuel grade ethanol by more than 40 % compared to initial basic design.

Andreas Peschel; Mariano Martn; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Wade Martinson; Luca Zullo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis Current and Futuristic Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol enzymatic based process. The process design includes the core technologies being researched by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production. In addition, all ancillary areasfeed handling, product recovery and purification, wastewater treatment lignin burner and boiler-turbogenerator, and utilitiesare included. NREL engaged Delta-T Corporation to assist in the process design evaluation, equipment costing, and overall plant integration. The process design and costing for the lignin burner and boiler turbogenerator has been reviewed by Reaction Engineering Inc. and the wastewater treatment by Merrick Company. An overview of both reviews is included here. The purpose of this update was to ensure that the process design and equipment costs were reasonable and consistent with good engineering practice for plants of this type using available technical data. This work has resulted in an economic model that can be used to predict the cost of producing ethanol from cellulosic biomass using this technology if a plant were to be built in the next few years. The model was also extended using technology improvements that are expected to be developed based on the current DOE research plan. Future process designs and cost estimates are given for the years 2005, 2010, and 2015.

Galvez, A.; Ibsen, K.; Majdeski, H.; Ruth, M.; Sheehan, J.; Wooley, R.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis Current and Futuristic Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol enzymatic based process. The process design includes the core technologies being researched by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production. In addition, all ancillary areas--feed handling, product recovery and purification, wastewater treatment lignin burner and boiler--turbogenerator, and utilities--are included. NREL engaged Delta-T Corporation to assist in the process design evaluation, equipment costing, and overall plant integration. The process design and costing for the lignin burner and boiler turbogenerator has been reviewed by Reaction Engineering Inc. and the wastewater treatment by Merrick and Company. An overview of both reviews is included here. The purpose of this update was to ensure that the process design and equipment costs were reasonable and consistent with good engineering practice for plants of this type using available technical data. This work has resulted in an economic model that can be used to predict the cost of producing ethanol from cellulosic biomass using this technology if a plant were to be built in the next few years. The model was also extended using technology improvements that are expected to be developed based on the current DOE research plan. Future process designs and cost estimates are given for the years 2005, 2010, and 2015.

Wooley, R.; Ruth, M.; Sheehan, J.; Ibsen, K.; Majdeski, H.; Galvez, A.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

U.S. Oxygenate Plant Production of Fuel Ethanol (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oxygenate Plant Production of Fuel Ethanol (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ... Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production;

93

American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility American Canyon Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Napa County, California Coordinates 38.5024689°, -122.2653887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5024689,"lon":-122.2653887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Plant No 2 Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No 2 Biomass Facility No 2 Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Plant No 2 Biomass Facility Facility Plant No 2 Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and widespread use of high ethanol blends in flexible-fuel vehicles.

Vimmerstedt, L. J.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Impact of Ethanol Plants on Cropland Values in the Great Plains By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Corn ethanol plants consume large amounts of corn and their location has the potential to alter local crop prices and surrounding agricultural land values. The relationship between ethanol plant location and agricultural land prices is examined using data obtained from the Agricultural Credit Survey administered by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. The findings indicate that the portion of land price changes attributable to location is consistent with previous estimates of basis changes associated with ethanol plant location. As a result, the land markets appear to be rationally adjusting to the location of ethanol plants.

Jason Henderson; Brent A. Gloy; Jason Henderson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

EA-1870: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane County, Utah EA-1870: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane County, Utah Summary This EA evaluates the...

99

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for metabolic engineering of waxes and hydrocarbon biofuels Reinhard Jetter1,2,* and Ljerka Kunst1 biosynthetic pathways can be used in metabolic engineering of plants for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels

Kunst, Ljerka

100

Plant Cell Walls: Basics of Structure, Chemistry, Accessibility and the Influence on Conversion - Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This book is focused on the pretreatment of biomass, a necessary step for efficient conversion of the plant cell wall materials to fuels and other products. Pretreatment is required because it is difficult to access, separate, and release the monomeric sugars comprising the biopolymers within the biomass that can be further upgraded to products through chemical processes such as aqueous phase reforming or biological routes such as fermentation of the sugars to ethanol This resistance to degradation or difficulty to release the monomers (mostly sugars) is commonly referred to as recalcitrance. There are many methods to overcome plant recalcitrance, but the underlying cause of the recalcitrance lies in the complex combination of chemical and structural features of the plant cell walls.

Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Donohoe, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia 1 Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia Energy energy User behaviour ESCOs Biomass Education Architects and engineers Wind Other Financial institutions;Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia 2 Biomass is considered as the most perspective

104

Conceptual Design Review for Biomass Repowering at Plant Barry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company and its subsidiary, Alabama Power, have identified Alabama Power's Plant Barry as a potential target for biomass firing. Plant Barry is located in Bucks, Alabama. Five coal-fired units were built between 1954 and 1971 for a total of 1620 MW capacity. Three natural gasfired combined-cycle combustion turbines (173 MWe each of winter capacity) and two combined-cycle steam turbines (193 MWe each of winter capacity) were installed in 2000. Unit 1 is the boiler being considered initially for ...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Competitiveness of Biomass-Fueled Electrical Power Plants Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competitiveness of Biomass-Fueled Electrical Power Plants Bruce A. McCarl Professor Department with suggested rollbacks in greenhouse gas emissions is by employing power plant fueled with biomass. We examine the competitiveness of biomass-based fuel for electrical power as opposed to coal using a mathematical programming

McCarl, Bruce A.

106

Sustainable biomass power plant location in the Italian Emilia-Romagna region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power plants are very promising for reducing carbon oxides emissions, because they provide energy with a carbon-neutral process. Biomass comes from trees and vegetables, so they provide a renewable type of energy. However, biomass plants location, ... Keywords: Computational sustainability, facility location

Massimiliano Cattafi; Marco Gavanelli; Michela Milano; Paolo Cagnoli

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Land-use Change Effect of Ethanol Plants in Iowa: 1997-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we test the local land-use change effects of ethanol plants in Iowa using county-level panel data between 1997 and 2009. Results show that the establishment of ethanol plants has a significant effect on land-use change in counties where the plants are located. Moreover, locally owned ethanol plants have slightly higher effects than non-locally owned ethanol plants have. Specifically, ceteris paribus, the average effect of a locally (or non-locally) owned 100-million gallon ethanol plant is to increase the corn acreage share by 5.9 (or 5.7) percentage points in its host-county if the plants corn supply area (defined as a round area center at the plant) is completely in the county. The land-use change effect is greater in counties with medium corn share than in counties with either low or high corn shares. Once rotation effects are controlled, the average prices in April for December corn future contracts no longer significantly affect corn acreage share. Key words: land-use change, ethanol plants, Iowa, Arellano-Bond difference GMM estimator.

Ruiqing Miao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation (more)

Ewanick, Shannon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis for Corn Stover  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an update of NREL's ongoing process design and economic analyses of processes related to developing ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks as an alternative to conventional petroleum-based transportation fuels. DOE funds both fundamental and applied research in this area and needs a method for predicting cost benefits of many research proposals. To that end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has modeled many potential process designs and estimated the economics of each process during the last 20 years. This report is an update of the ongoing process design and economic analyses at NREL. We envision updating this process design report at regular intervals; the purpose being to ensure that the process design incorporates all new data from NREL research, DOE funded research and other sources, and that the equipment costs are reasonable and consistent with good engineering practice for plants of this type. For the non-research areas this means using equipment and process approaches as they are currently used in industrial applications. For the last report, published in 1999, NREL performed a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process utilizing co-current dilute acid prehydrolysis with simultaneous saccharification (enzymatic) and co-fermentation. The process design included the core technologies being researched by the DOE: prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production. In addition, all ancillary areas--feed handling, product recovery and purification, wastewater treatment (WWT), lignin combustor and boiler-turbogenerator, and utilities--were included. NREL engaged Delta-T Corporation (Delta-T) to assist in the process design evaluation, the process equipment costing, and overall plant integration. The process design and costing for the lignin combustor and boiler turbogenerator was reviewed by Reaction Engineering Inc. (REI) and Merrick & Company reviewed the wastewater treatment. Since then, NREL has engaged Harris Group (Harris) to perform vendor testing, process design, and costing of critical equipment identified during earlier work. This included solid/liquid separation and pretreatment reactor design and costing. Corn stover handling was also investigated to support DOE's decision to focus on corn stover as a feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol. Working with Harris, process design and costing for these areas were improved through vendor designs, costing, and vendor testing in some cases. In addition to this work, enzyme costs were adjusted to reflect collaborative work between NREL and enzyme manufacturers (Genencor International and Novozymes Biotech) to provide a delivered enzyme for lignocellulosic feedstocks. This report is the culmination of our work and represents an updated process design and cost basis for the process using a corn stover feedstock. The process design and economic model are useful for predicting the cost benefits of proposed research. Proposed research results can be translated into modifications of the process design, and the economic impact can be assessed. This allows DOE, NREL, and other researchers to set priorities on future research with an understanding of potential reductions to the ethanol production cost. To be economically viable, ethanol production costs must be below market values for ethanol. DOE has chosen a target ethanol selling price of $1.07 per gallon as a goal for 2010. The conceptual design and costs presented here are based on a 2010 plant start-up date. The key research targets required to achieve this design and the $1.07 value are discussed in the report.

Aden, A.; Ruth, M.; Ibsen, K.; Jechura, J.; Neeves, K.; Sheehan, J.; Wallace, B.; Montague, L.; Slayton, A.; Lukas, J.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Coverage impacts biomass composition, conversion to ethanol yields and microbial communities during storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased mandates for the production of transportation fuels from renewable resources have thrust the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, e.g., energy crops and agricultural residues, to (more)

Rigdon, Anne R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technology assessment of biomass ethanol : a multi-objective, life cycle approach under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for assessing the current and future utilization of agricultural crops as feedstocks for the production of transportation fuels, specifically, the use of corn grain and stover for ethanol production. ...

Johnson, Jeremy C. (Jeremy Clayton)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

RAW MATERIALS EVALUATION AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES FOR CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) enzyme recovery and production cost and (4) potentialsugars. of ethanol production costs is shown in Table 16.Of the $1.79/gal production cost 75.7% is related to the

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

New Energy Corporation of Indiana final study report on construction of a fuel-grade ethanol plant. Attachment VI. Bid tabulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bid tabulations and engineering bid analysis are presented for each system in the ethanol plant.

Not Available

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Final Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i n a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc. Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1597 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy October 2007 Contents Section Page Contents........................................................................................................................................iii Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1

115

High Starch in Plant Leaves at Senescence - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Currently, there is a great interest in using plant biomass, instead of grain, to produce ethanol. Starch can easily be ...

116

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, the primary barrier to low cost biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to renewable fuels is a plant's recalcitrance to sugar release. The energy-intensive pretreatments (more)

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Demonstration plant for pressurized gasification of biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to design, construct, and operate a pressurized biomass gasification plant in Hawaii will begin in 1991. Negotiations are underway with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) which is co-funding the project with the state of Hawaii and industry. The gasifier is a scale-up of the pressurized fluidized-bed RENUGAS process developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project team consists of Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii, Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC S), The Ralph M. Parsons Company, and IGT. The gasifier will be designed for 70 tons per day of sugarcane fiber (bagasse) and will be located at the Paia factory of HC S on the island of Maui. In addition to bagasse, other feedstocks such as wood, biomass wastes, and refuse-derived-fuel may be evaluated. The demonstration plant will ultimately supply part of the process energy needs for the sugar factory. The operation and testing phase will provide process information for both air- and oxygen-blown gasification, and at both low and high pressures. The process will be evaluated for both fuel gas and synthesis gas production, and for electrical power production with advanced power generation schemes. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Trenka, A.R. (Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, Honolulu, HI (United States)); Kinoshita, C.M.; Takahashi, P.K.; Phillips, V.D. (Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States)); Caldwell, C. (Parsons (Ralph M.) Co., Pasadena, CA (United States)); Kwok, R. (Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Co., HI (United States)); Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P. (Institute of Gas Technology

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia 1 Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia Energy energy User behaviour ESCOs Biomass Education Architects and engineers Wind Other Financial institutions countries it is already implemented for several years. #12;Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia

119

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

120

Forest biomass supply logistics for a power plant using the discrete-event simulation approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the logistics of supplying forest biomass to a potential power plant. Due to the complexities in such a supply logistics system, a simulation model based on the framework of Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) is developed in this study to evaluate the cost of delivered forest biomass, the equilibrium moisture content, and carbon emissions from the logistics operations. The model is applied to a proposed case of 300 MW power plant in Quesnel, BC, Canada. The results show that the biomass demand of the power plant would not be met every year. The weighted average cost of delivered biomass to the gate of the power plant is about C$ 90 per dry tonne. Estimates of equilibrium moisture content of delivered biomass and CO2 emissions resulted from the processes are also provided.

Mobini, Mahdi [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline CO 2 emission factor. Carbon dioxide emissions fromcarbon dioxide emissions are most sensitive to the ethanol yield from the bioenergy crop and the lignin combustion emission factor.carbon dioxide emissions from the production of the bioenergy crop. The overall biomass production emission factors

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Stack Testing of Emissions at a Coal-Fired Power Plant Co-Firing Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future projections of the electricity generation fleet in the United States uniformly show an increase in the number of fossil-fuel plants using various forms of biomass as fuel for at least a portion of their firing. However, there are limited field studies available that measured chemical emissions - beyond those required for permitting - from biomass-fired power plants. This report presents the results of stack testing of an extensive suite of gas and particle phase materials at a biomass ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Engineered plant biomass particles coated with bioactive agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plant biomass particles coated with a bioactive agent such as a fertilizer or pesticide, characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to a grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces.

Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion of Lignocellulosic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis A. Dutta, M. Talmadge, and J. Hensley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado M. Worley and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington D. Barton, P. Groenendijk, D. Ferrari, and B. Stears The Dow Chemical Company Midland, Michigan E.M. Searcy, C.T. Wright, and J.R. Hess Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-51400 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

125

Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Feasibility of converting a sugar beet plant to fuel ethanol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was performed to assess the feasibility of producing fuel ethanol from sugar beets. Sugar beets are a major agricultural crop in the area and the beet sugar industry is a major employer. There have been some indications that increasing competition from imported sugar and fructose sugar produced from corn may lead to lower average sugar prices than have prevailed in the past. Fuel ethanol might provide an attractive alternative market for beets and ethanol production would continue to provide an industrial base for labor. Ethanol production from beets would utilize much of the same field and plant equipment as is now used for sugar. It is logical to examine the modification of an existing sugar plant from producing sugar to ethanol. The decision was made to use Great Western Sugar Company's plant at Mitchell as the example plant. This plant was selected primarily on the basis of its independence from other plants and the availability of relatively nearby beet acreage. The potential feedstocks assessed included sugar beets, corn, hybrid beets, and potatoes. Markets were assessed for ethanol and fermentation by-products saleability. Investment and operating costs were determined for each prospective plant. Plants were evaluated using a discounted cash flow technique to obtain data on full production costs. Environmental, health, safety, and socio-economic aspects of potential facilities were examined. Three consulting engineering firms and 3 engineering-construction firms are considered capable of providing the desired turn-key engineering design and construction services. It was concluded that the project is technically feasible. (DMC)

Hammaker, G.S.; Pfost, H.B.; David, M.L.; Marino, M.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Starch properties, endogenous amylase activity, and ethanol production of corn kernels with different planting dates and drying conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was conducted with aim to understand how planting dates and drying conditions affected starch properties and dry-grind ethanol production of corn kernels. Three (more)

Medic, Jelena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Profitability Comparison Between Gas Turbines and Gas Engine in Biomass-Based Power Plants Using Binary Particle Swarm Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper employs a binary discrete version of the classical Particle Swarm Optimization to compare the maximum net present value achieved by a gas turbines biomass plant and a gas engine biomass plant. The proposed algorithm determines the optimal ...

P. Reche Lpez; M. Gmez Gonzlez; N. Ruiz Reyes; F. Jurado

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of the Potential for the Production of Lignocellulosic Based Ethanol at Existing Corn Ethanol Facilities: Final Subcontract Report, 2 March 2000 - 30 March 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report on opportunities to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. The goals of this study were: (1) To provide the opportunity to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. (2) To take advantage of the grain-processing infrastructure by investigating the co-location of additional biomass conversion facilities at an existing plant site.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For areas with abundant supplies of biomass resources and for areas with limited wind and solar options, biomass energy projects might be a technically and economically viable means to achieve renewable energy goals and mandates. To minimize capital costs associated with these projects, biomass can be fired in a unit modified to fire 100% biomass fuels (that is, biomass repowering) or can be co-fired with coal in an existing coal-fired unit. Both of these methods use existing equipment and facilities. Th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

Carbon Management for a Coal/Biomass to Liquids Plant in Northeast...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon ManageMent for a CoalbioMass to liquids Plant in northeast ohio Background This project involves the development of a carbon management plan for a proposed coal and biomass...

134

Review of Alternatives for Co-firing Biomass in Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update presents information gathered during visits to three European coal-based plants co-fired with biomass. In addition to process details of the plants visited, the report draws together the insight gained of the political and technical approaches that Member States of the European Union (EU) are following to reduce fossil-derived carbon dioxide emissions from their power plants.

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Assessing Available Woody Plant Biomass on Rangelands with Lidar and Multispectral Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of biofuels are produced from corn and grain. The drawback to these sources of biofuels is the vast amount of cultivated land needed to produce substantial amounts of biofuel, potentially increasing the price of food and livestock products. Mesquite trees, a type of woody plant, are a proven source of bioenergy feedstock found on semi-arid lands. The overall objectives of this study were to develop algorithms for determining woody plant biomass on rangelands in Texas at plot-level using terrestrial lidar and at the local scale by integrating reference biomass and multispectral imagery. Terrestrial lidar offers a more efficient method for estimating biomass than traditional field measurements. Variables from the terrestrial lidar point cloud were compared to ground measurements of biomass to find a best fitting regression model. Two processing methods were investigated for analyzing the lidar point cloud data, namely: 1) percentile height statistics and 2) a height bin approach. Regression models were developed for variables obtained through each processing technique for estimating woody plant, above-ground biomass. Regression models were able to explain 81 percent and 77 percent of the variance associated with the aboveground biomass using percentile height statistics and height bins, respectively. The aboveground biomass map was generated by using the cokriging interpolation method with NDVI and ground biomass data. According to cross-validation, ordinary cokriging estimated biomass accurately (R^2 = 0.99). The results of this study revealed that terrestrial lidar can be used to accurately and efficiently estimate the aboveground biomass of mesquite trees in a semi-arid environment at plot level. Moreover, spatial interpolation techniques proved useful in scaling up biomass estimates to local scale.

Ku, Nian-Wei

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Renewable Energy Technology Engineering and Economic Evaluation: Biomass Power Plants 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study prepared an engineering and economic evaluation of 25-, 50-, and 100-MW biomass combustion power plants fired by 100% biomass fuel. The study estimated boiler efficiency, steam cycle heat rate, auxiliary power consumption, net plant heat rate, operation and maintenance (O&M) labor costs, maintenance materials, fuel needs, and raw material requirements. For both capital and annual O&M costs, the costs per kW or MWh are the lowest for 100-MW plants and the highest for 25-MW plants. Due to their ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction (New...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biodiesel, Biomass, CHPCogeneration, Ethanol, Hydrogen, Landfill Gas, Methanol, Microturbines,...

138

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place Tampa, Florida Sector Biomass Product Consortium researching ethanol from...

139

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Ethanol Photo of several beakers of gold and...

140

State-Level Workshops on Ethanol for Transportation: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report on subcontract for holding four state-level workshops (Hawaii, Kentucky, Nevada, California) to facilitate development of ethanol production facilities in those states. In 2002/2003, under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, BBI International conducted state-level workshops ethanol in Hawaii, Nevada, Kentucky and California. These four workshops followed over 30 other workshops previous held under the Ethanol Workshop Series program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Two other workshops were conducted by BBI International during 2003, Oklahoma and Kansas, under contract to the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program. The Ethanol Workshop Series (EWS) was intended to provide a forum for interest groups to gather and discuss what needs to be accomplished to facilitate ethanol production in-state using local biomass resources. In addition, the EWS was to provide a promotional and educational forum for policy makers, community leaders, media and potential stakeholders. It was recognized that to eventually achieve biomass-ethanol production, it was necessary to support grain-ethanol production as a bridge. The long-term goal of the Workshops was to facilitate the development of biomass ethanol plants at a state-level. The near-term goal was to provide correct and positive information for education, promotion, production and use of fuel ethanol. The EWS drew from 65 to over 200 attendees and were deemed by the local organizers to have served the objectives set out by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Graf, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

Robert Finley

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten Island, the Proctor and Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. This appendix to the final report provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Biomass Conversion Process Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture A novel biomass-to-ethanol process developed, integrated, and demonstrated at pilot scale at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the basis for one of the world's first cellulosic ethanol demonstration plants. The 74,000-ft 2 plant in Vonore, Tennessee, began production in January 2010. Through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DuPont, NREL and DuPont scientists and engineers developed a unique low-cost pretreatment process that converts raw biomass to ethanol in high yields. The process was developed to facilitate the commercial readiness of lignocellulosic ethanol, which is ethanol produced from nonfood biomass feedstocks such as corn stover, agricultural waste, and energy crops.

144

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Regulation of plant biomass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as raw materials by humans for a myriad of applications, such as burning for energy, pulping and paper of a particular plant is greatly influenced by the efficiency of photosyn- thesis, which supplies raw materials,2 and Zheng-Hua Ye3 Plant biomass used for cellulosic biofuel production is primarily from vegetative tissues

Ye, Zheng-Hua

145

Environmental Assessment for the Design and Construction of a Fuel Ethanol Plant, Jasper County, Indiana DOE/EA 1517  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

517 517 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Design and Construction of a Proposed Fuel Ethanol Plant, Jasper County, Indiana April 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Environmental Assessment Design and Construction of a Proposed Fuel Ethanol Plant, Jasper County, Indiana TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ...................................................................................................IV GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................ V UNITS OF MEASUREMENT ................................................................................................................. VII

146

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

147

Plant Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Debra Mohnen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Debra Mohnen 1.2 Cell Wall Synthesis and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Al Darvill TASK 1. Nucleotide-sugar/polysaccharide domain - Bar-Peled TASK 2. Cellulose domain - Kalluri TASK 3. Xylan and other hermiceluloses domain - York TASK 4. Pectin domain - Mohnen TASK 5. APAP1 domain - Tan TASK 6. Lignin domain - Dixon TASK 7. Transcription factor domain - Dixon TASK 8. Cellular/subcellular localization domain - Hahn 1.2.1: Cell Wall Synthesis and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity (Darvill) 1.1 TOP and Elite Populus and Switchgrass and System Analysis Lead: Tuskan / Dixon 1.1.2: TOP and Elite Line Analysis Platform and Protocols (Nelson) 1.1.1: Selection of the TOP Populus and Switchgrass Lines

148

Invariant scaling relationships for interspecific plant biomass production rates and body size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationships for plant annualized biomass produc- tion (``growth'') rates, different measures of body size (dry scale as the 3 4-power of body mass M over 20 orders of magnitude of M (i.e., G M3/4); plant body length L (i.e., cell length or plant height) scales, on average, as the 1 4-power of M over 22 orders

Enquist, Brian Joseph

149

Small-Scale, Biomass-Fired Gas Turbine Plants Suitable for Distributed and Mobile Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of small-scale, biomass-fired gas turbine plants that use an indirectly-fired gas turbine cycle. Such plants were originally thought to have several advantages for distributed generation, including portability. However, detailed analysis of two designs revealed several problems that would have to be resolved to make the plants feasible and also determined that a steam turbine cycle with the same net output was more economic than the gas turbine cycle. The incre...

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EM Celebrates Ribbon Cutting for New Biomass Plant at Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrates Ribbon Cutting for New Biomass Plant at Savannah Celebrates Ribbon Cutting for New Biomass Plant at Savannah River Site EM Celebrates Ribbon Cutting for New Biomass Plant at Savannah River Site March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured from left are Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga; DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Dave Moody; SRNS Infrastructure Maintenance and Engineering Manager John Stafford; DOE Federal Projects Director Jim DeMass; Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D’Agostino; DOE-Savannah River Assistant Manager Karen Guevara; Ameresco Federal Programs Director Nicole Bulgarino; Ameresco Executive Vice President Keith Derrington; U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC); Ameresco Program Manager Ken Chacey; and Ameresco President and CEO George Sakellaris.

152

Conceptual Design Review for Biomass Repowering at Plant Mitchell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant Mitchell Unit 3 is a 165-MW (gross) pulverized-coal-fired boiler located in Albany, Georgia. Unit 3 began operations in 1964 and8211due to tightening environmental requirements and relatively high operating costs8211the plant is presently scheduled for closure within the next decade. In response to anticipated increased demand/requirements for renewable power generation, Southern Company / Georgia Power is conducting a study to determine the feasibility of repowering the plant to be fueled entirely...

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

154

Biomass Lignin Binder for Coal Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the production of a waste stream consisting of lignin from a dilute acid hydrolysis process for making ethanol fuel from cellulosic biomass. The lignin waste stream was then evaluated as a possible binder to hold coal fines in a useable form for fuel in a coal-fired power plant. The production and use of a lignin-rich waste stream is of interest because it would enable a biomass energy content in the fuel for the coal-fired power plant, while using waste coal and waste biomass. The ...

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

Utilization of emergent aquatic plants for biomass-energy-systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review was conducted of the available literature pertaining to the following aspects of emergent aquatic biomass: identification of prospective emergent plant species for management; evaluation of prospects for genetic manipulation; evaluation of biological and environmental tolerances; examination of current production technologies; determination of availability of seeds and/or other propagules, and projections for probable end-uses and products. Species identified as potential candidates for production in biomass systems include Arundo donax, Cyperus papyrus, Phragmites communis, Saccharum spontaneum, Spartina alterniflora, and Typha latifolia. If these species are to be viable candidates in biomass systems, a number of research areas must be further investigated. Points such as development of baseline yield data for managed systems, harvesting conceptualization, genetic (crop) improvement, and identification of secondary plant products require refinement. However, the potential pay-off for developing emergent aquatic systems will be significant if development is successful.

Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Scantland, D.A.; Groet, S.S.; Lawhon, W.T.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design of a pilot silvicultural biomass farm at the Savannah River Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metrek has designed a detailed plan for the establishment and operation of a 1000-acre silvicultural biomass farm at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. The plan includes a discussion of possible sites, layout and design, and installation and operation. The estimated costs of installation and operation are also presented.

Salo, D.J.; Henry, J.F.; Inman, R.E.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Treutlen County, Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 15, 2007 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PLANT, TREUTLEN COUNTY, GEORGIA SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. DOE, through its Golden Field Office, in Golden, Colorado, would provide funding to Range Fuels, Inc., a Colorado based corporation, to support the construction and initial operation of the proposed plant. All discussion, analysis and findings related to the potential impacts of construction and operation ofthe proposed cellulosic ethanol plant (including the applicant-committed practices presented in the Proposed Action) are contained in the Final EA. The Final EA is hereby incorporated

158

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

starch. Although corn ethanol is a significant improvementexclusively from corn starch, and ethanol produced fromexclusively from corn starch, and ethanol produced from

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Interactions of Lignin and Hemicellulose and Effects on Biomass Deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

777- 93. Himmel ME. Biomass recalcitrance : deconstructingEthanol from Cellulosic Biomass. Science. 1991 Mar 15;251(from Lignocellulosic Biomass - Technology, Economics, and

Li, Hongjia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

8. Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8. Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels B. Fuel Ethanol Production and Market Conditions Ethanol is consumed as fuel in the United States primarily as "gasohol"--a blend ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS SRS Biomass Cogeneration Plant Tech Stage: Deployed (Operational) Energy Savings Performance Contract Project ID: Task Order No.-KL46299M The technical solution has been deployed to the A-Area at Savannah River Site. Page 1 of 2 Savannah River Site South Carolina Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Challenge In order to meet the federal energy and environmental management requirements in Presidential Executive Order 13423, DOE Order 430.2B, and the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, DOE Secretary Samuel Bodman encouraged the DOE federal complex to utilize third party financing options like the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). Specifically, this innovative renewable steam plant meets two of the TEAM initiatives, which strengthens the federal requirements by requiring that DOE sites (1)

162

Economic Assessment of a Conceptual Biomass to Liquids Bio-Syntrolysis Plant  

SciTech Connect

A series of assessments evaluated the economic efficiency of integrating a nuclear electric power plant with a biomass to SynFuel plant under three market scenarios. Results strongly suggest that a nuclear assisted-BioSyntrolysis Process would be as cost competitive as other carbon feedstock to liquid fuels concepts while having significant advantages regarding CO2 greenhouse gas production. This concept may also be competitive for those energy markets where energy dense, fossil fuels are scarce while wind, hydroelectric, or other renewable energy sources can be produced at a relatively low cost. At this time, a realistic vision of this technologys deployment of a biomass to synfuel plants powered by a nuclear 1100 MWe reactor. Accompanying an area of 25 miles by 25 miles, this integrated Enterprise could produce 24,000 BBLs of SynFuel daily; or 0.2% of the U.S.s imported oil.

M. M. Plum; G. L. Hawkes

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Place Marion, Indiana Zip 46952 Product Ethanol producer developina a 151 mlpa plant in...

165

Tracking Dynamics of Plant Biomass Composting by Changes in Substrate Structure, Microbial Community, and Enzyme Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

Wei, H.; Tucker, M. P.; Baker, J. O.; Harris, M.; Luo, Y. H.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S. Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ethanol Tolerant Yeast for Improved Production of Ethanol from ...  

Inventors: Audrey Gasch, Jeffrey Lewis Ethanol production from cellulosic biomass can make a significant contribution toward decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels.

167

An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity  

SciTech Connect

Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini), which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome?s predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy.

Suen, Garret; Barry, Kerrie; Goodwin, Lynne; Scott, Jarrod; Aylward, Frank; Adams, Sandra; Pinto-Tomas, Adrian; Foster, Clifton; Pauly, Markus; Weimer, Paul; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Osterberger, Jolene; Harkins, Timothy; Slater, Steven; Donohue, Timothy; Currie, Cameron; Tringe, Susannah G.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Detroit Lakes Energy Systems Study: Phase I extension. Final report, August 1, 1978-January 15, 1979. [Biomass for power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the resource availability of biomass and the potential of utilization of renewable energy systems in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota is presented. The feasibility of retrofitting the existing power plant to house a biomass energy system is discussed. Survey and evaluation of current off-the-shelf farm implement equipment which can be adapted to the handling of selected biomass materials is presented. Density studies on sunflower stalks, grain straw, and forest residues are included. (DC)

Not Available

1979-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion of Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover D. Humbird, R. Davis, L. Tao, C. Kinchin, D. Hsu, and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Schoen, J. Lukas, B. Olthof, M. Worley, D. Sexton, and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Seattle, Washington and Atlanta, Georgia Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-47764 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

170

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery - the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant; Biomass Program (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

great ideas into viable solutions great ideas into viable solutions requires the ability to test theories under real world conditions. Few companies have the resources to build pilot-scale processing plants to test their ideas. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) helps by sharing its world-class equipment and expertise with industry and other research organizations through a variety of contractual arrangements. At the NREL campus in Golden, Colo., researchers use state-of-the-art laboratories to develop and improve the technologies that convert biomass to fuels, chemicals, and materials. One of the most important tools available to biomass researchers is the Biochemical Pilot Plant housed in the Alternative Fuels User Facility (AFUF). In this facility,

171

Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. Photo of two men standing in front of large sugar cane plants. Sugar cane is used in Hawaii and other locations to produce energy and ethanol for alternative fuels. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops.

172

Nitrogen oxides emission control through reburning with biomass in coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen from coal-fired power stations are considered to be major pollutants, and there is increasing concern for regulating air quality and offsetting the emissions generated from the use of energy. Reburning is an in-furnace, combustion control technology for NOx reduction. Another environmental issue that needs to be addressed is the rapidly growing feedlot industry in the United States. The production of biomass from one or more animal species is in excess of what can safely be applied to farmland in accordance with nutrient management plans and stockpiled waste poses economic and environmental liabilities. In the present study, the feasibility of using biomass as a reburn fuel in existing coal-fired power plants is considered. It is expected to utilize biomass as a low-cost, substitute fuel and an agent to control emission. The successful development of this technology will create environment-friendly, low cost fuel source for the power industry, provide means for an alternate method of disposal of biomass, and generate a possible revenue source for feedlot operators. In the present study, the effect of coal, cattle manure or feedlot biomass, and blends of biomass with coal on the ability to reduce NOx were investigated in the Texas A&M University 29.31 kW (100,000 Btu/h) reburning facility. The facility used a mixture of propane and ammonia to generate the 600 ppm NOx in the primary zone. The reburn fuel was injected using air. The stoichiometry tested were 1.00 to 1.20 in the reburn zone. Two types of injectors, circular jet and fan spray injectors, which produce different types of mixing within the reburn zone, were studied to find their effect on NOx emissions reduction. The flat spray injector performed better in all cases. With the injection of biomass as reburn fuel with circular jet injector the maximum NOx reduction was 29.9 % and with flat spray injector was 62.2 %. The mixing time was estimated in model set up as 936 and 407 ms. The maximum NOx reduction observed with coal was 14.4 % and with biomass it was 62.2 % and the reduction with blends lay between that of coal and biomass.

Arumugam, Senthilvasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 5 and 6, October 1, 1998 through March 30, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

Dale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 7, 8 and Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast stran, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

Cale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Pyrolysis of Biomass. 1. Fundamentals. Energy Fuelsof the Pyrolysis of Biomass. 1. Fundamentals. Energy Fuelsand Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry. Biomass

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Identify Cellulosic Biomass, Pretreatments, and EnzymeFundamental Factors Affecting Biomass Enzymatic Reactivity.U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ethanol-blended Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol-Blended Ethanol-Blended Fuels A Study Guide and Overview of: * Ethanol's History in the U.S. and Worldwide * Ethanol Science and Technology * Engine Performance * Environmental Effects * Economics and Energy Security The Curriculum This curriculum on ethanol and its use as a fuel was developed by the Clean Fuels Development Coalition in cooperation with the Nebraska Ethanol Board. This material was developed in response to the need for instructional materials on ethanol and its effects on vehicle performance, the environment, and the economy. As a renewable alternative energy source made from grain and other biomass resources, ethanol study serves as an excellent learning opportunity for students to use in issue clarification and problem-solving activities. Ethanol illustrates that science and technology can provide us with new

178

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

179

QUANTITY AND CAPACITY EXPANSION DECISIONS FOR ETHANOL IN NEBRASKA AND A MEDIUM SIZED PLANT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn-based ethanol is the leader of sustainable sources of energy in the United States due to the abundance of corn and the popularity of ethanol-gasoline (more)

Khoshnoud, Mahsa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mercury emission control for coal fired power plants using coal and biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a leading concern among the air toxic metals addressed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) because of its volatility, persistence, and bioaccumulation as methylmercury in the environment and its neurological health impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports for 2001 shows that total mercury emissions from all sources in USA is about 145 tons per annum, of which coal fired power plants contribute around 33% of it, about 48 tons per annum. Unlike other trace metals that are emitted in particulate form, mercury is released in vapor phase in elemental (Hg0) or oxidized (Hg2+, mainly HgCl2) form. To date, there is no post combustion treatment which can effectively capture elemental mercury vapor, but the oxidized form of mercury can be captured in traditional emission control devices such as wet flue gas defulrization (WFGD) units, since oxidized mercury (HgCl2) is soluble in water. The chlorine concentration present during coal combustion plays a major role in mercury oxidation, which is evident from the fact that plants burning coal having high chlorine content have less elemental mercury emissions. A novel method of co-firing blends of low chlorine content coal with high chlorine content cattle manure/biomass was used in order to study its effect on mercury oxidation. For Texas Lignite and Wyoming coal the concentrations of chlorine are 139 ppm and 309 ppm on dry ash free basis, while for Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass it is 2,691 ppm. Co-firing experiments were performed in a 100,000 BTU/hr (29.3 kWt) Boiler Burner facility located in the Coal and Biomass Energy laboratory (CBEL); coal and biomass blends in proportions of 80:20, 90:10, 95:5 and 100:0 were investigated as fuels. The percentage reduction of Hg with 95:5, 90:10 and 80:20 blends were measured to be 28- 50%, 42-62% and 71-75% respectively. Though cattle biomass serves as an additive to coal, to increase the chlorine concentration, it leads to higher ash loading. Low Ash and High Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass have 164% and 962% more ash than Wyoming coal respectively. As the fraction of cattle biomass in blend increases in proportion, ash loading problems increase simultaneously. An optimum blend ratio is arrived and suggested as 90:10 blend with good reduction in mercury emissions without any compromise on ash loading.

Arcot Vijayasarathy, Udayasarathy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Biomass, Leaf Area, and Resource Availability of Kudzu Dominated Plant Communities Following Herbicide Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens the forests of the southern U.S. Five herbicides were tested with regard to their efficacy in controlling kudzu, community recover was monitored, and interactions with planted pines were studied. The sites selected were old farm sites dominated by kudzu.These were burned following herbicide treatment. The herbicides included triclopyr, clopyralid, metsulfuron, tebuthiuron, and picloram plus 2,4-D. Pine seedlings were planted the following year. Regression equations were developed for predicting biomass and leaf area. Four distinct plant communities resulted from the treatments. The untreated check continued to be kudzu dominated. Blackberry dominated the clopyradid treatment. Metsulfron, trychlopyr and picloram treated sites resulted in herbaceous dominated communities. The tebuthiuron treatment maintained all vegetation low.

L.T. Rader

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Collaborative Research: Metabolic Engineering of E. coli Sugar-Utilization Regulatory Systems for the Consumption of Plant Biomass Sugars.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to metabolically engineer the E. coli sugar-utilization regulatory systems (SURS) to utilize sugar mixtures obtained from plant biomass. Of particular relevance is the implementation of a metabolic engineering cycle aided by functional genomics and systems biology tools. Our findings will help in the establishment of a platform for the efficient production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. Our research has improved the understanding of the role of SURS in regulating sugar utilization and several other cellular functions. For example, we discovered that Mlc, a global regulatory protein, regulates the utilization of xylose and demonstrated the existence of an important link between catabolite repression and respiratory/fermentative metabolism. The study of SURS mutants also revealed a connection between flagellar biosynthesis and catabolite repression. Several tools were also developed as part of this project. A novel tool (Elementary Network Decomposition, END) to help elucidate the network topology of regulatory systems was developed and its utility as a discovery tool was demonstrated by applying it to the SURS in E. coli. A novel method (and software) to estimate metabolic fluxes that uses labeling experiments and eliminates reliance on extracellular fluxes was also developed. Although not initially considered in the scope of this project, we have developed a novel and superior method for optimization of HPLC separation and applied it to the simultaneous quantification of different functionalities (sugars, organic acids, ethanol, etc.) present in our fermentation samples. Currently under development is a genetic network driven metabolic flux analysis framework to integrate transcriptional and flux data.

Ramon Gonzalez (PI); J. V. Shanks (Co-PI); K-Y. San (Co-PI).

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Prices Find ethanol fuel prices and trends. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. The use of ethanol is widespread-almost all gasoline in the U.S. contains

185

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass for Fuels Production, 566,B. , 2002. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process DesignSummary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

U.S. ethanol production and the Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

187

Feasibility study for a 10 MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The issues of the geothermal resource at Brady's Hot Springs are dealt with: the prospective supply of feedstocks to the ethanol plant, the markets for the spent grain by-products of the plant, the storage, handling and transshipment requirements for the feedstocks and by-products from a rail siding facility at Fernley, the probable market for fuel ethanol in the region, and an assessment of the economic viability of the entire undertaking.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Topical report on sources and systems for aquatic plant biomass as an energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is documented on the mass cultivation of aquatic plants and systems design that is available from the literature and through consultation with active research scientists and engineers. The biology of microalgae, macroalgae, and aquatic angiosperms is discussed in terms of morphology, life history, mode of existence, and ecological significance, as they relate to cultivation. The requirements for growth of these plants, which are outlined in the test, suggest that productivity rates are dependent primarily on the availability of light and nutrients. It is concluded that the systems should be run with an excess of nutrients and with light as the limiting factor. A historical review of the mass cultivation of aquatic plants describes the techniques used in commercial large-scale operations throughout the world and recent small-scale research efforts. This review presents information on the biomass yields that have been attained to date in various geographical locations with different plant species and culture conditions, emphasizing the contrast between high yields in small-scale operations and lower yields in large-scale operations.

Goldman, J.C.; Ryther, J.H.; Waaland, R.; Wilson, E.H.

1977-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomassorganic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastesthat can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

190

Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Progress report, June 15, 1996--March 10, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to facilitate conversion of plant biomass to usable energy by developing transgenic plants that express genes for microbial cellulases, which can be activated after harvest of the plants. In particular, we want to determine the feasibility of targeting an endoglucanase and a cellobiohydrolase to the plant apoplast (cell wall milieu). The apoplast not only contains cellulose, the substrate for the enzymes, but also can tolerate large amounts of foreign protein. To avoid detrimental effects of cellulase expression in plants, we have chosen enzymes with high temperature optima; the genes for these enzymes are from thermophilic organisms that can use cellulose as a sole energy source.

Danna, K.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

192

Source/Sink Matching for U.S. Ethanol Plants and Candidate Deep Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data on the 140 existing and 74 planned ethanol production facilities and their proximity to candidate deep geologic storage formations. Half of the existing ethanol plants and 64% of the planned units sit directly atop a candidate geologic storage reservoir. While 70% of the existing and 97% of the planned units are within 100 miles of at least one candidate deep geologic storage reservoir. As a percent of the total CO2 emissions from these facilities, 92% of the exiting units CO2 and 97% of the planned units CO2 emissions are accounted for by facilities that are within 100 miles of at least one potential CO2 storage reservoir.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A to produce CH4 or added to soil directly as an amendment.In this study, fresh and anaerobically digested digested plant biomass in soil. J. En- viron. Qual. 16:25-28. Anaerobic digestion of organic materials

Florida, University of

194

Feasibility study for biomass power plants in Thailand. Volume 2. appendix: Detailed financial analysis results. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

This study, conducted by Black & Veatch, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report presents a technical and commercial analysis for the development of three nearly identical electricity generating facilities (biomass steam power plants) in the towns of Chachgoengsao, Suphan Buri, and Pichit in Thailand. Volume 2 of the study contains the following appendix: Detailed Financial Analysis Results.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Integrating and Piloting Lignocellulose Biomass Conversion Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on NREL's integrated biomass conversion capabilities. Presented at the 2009 Advanced Biofuels Workshop in Denver, CO, Cellulosic Ethanol session.

Schell, D. J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.to Fermentable Sugar. GCB Bioenergy 2009; 1: 51-61. Himmel

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Feedstocks to Feedstocks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Feedstocks Map of the United States BioFuels Atlas Use this interactive map to compare biomass feedstocks and biofuels by

198

Cardinal Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cardinal Ethanol is in the process of building an ethanol plant in East Central Indiana, near Union City. Coordinates 39.184005, -78.164049 Loading map......

199

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy andU.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy andBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply.

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Corn Ethanol and Wildlife: How are Policy and Market Driven Increases in Corn Plantings Affecting Habitat and Wildlife.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since 2005, government incentives have driven massive growth in the corn ethanol industry, increasing demand for corn for ethanol by 200%. Corn prices have risen (more)

Griffin, Elizabeth; Glaser, Aviva; Fogel, Gregory; Johnson, Kristen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

202

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion torole of biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Low pHof Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Place Casselton, North Dakota Zip 58012 Product Owner of a USD 200m 120m-gallon ethanol plant in...

204

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Through biomass research, NREL is developing technologies to convert biomass-plant matter such as...

205

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

206

Minimally refined biomass fuels: an economic shortcut  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic shortcut can be realized if the sugars from which ethanol is made are utilized directly as concentrated aqueous solutions for fuels rather than by further refining them through fermentation and distillation steps. Simple evaporation of carbohydrate solutions from sugar cane or sweet sorghum, or from hydrolysis of starch or cellulose content of many plants yield potential liquid fuels of energy contents (on a volume basis) comparable to highly refined liquid fuels like methanol and ethanol. The potential utilization of such minimally refined biomass derived fuels is discussed and the burning of sucrose-ethanol-water solutions in a small modified domestic burner is demonstrated. Other potential uses of sugar solutions or emulsion and microemulsions in fuel oils for use in diesel or turbine engines are proposed and discussed.

Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

New bern biomass to energy project Phase I: Feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weyerhaeuser, together with Amoco and Carolina Power & Light, performed a detailed evaluation of biomass gasification and enzymatic processing of biomass to ethanol. This evaluation assesses the potential of these technologies for commercial application to determine which technology offers the best opportunity at this time to increase economic productivity of forest resources in an environmentally sustainable manner. The work performed included preparation of site-specific plant designs that integrate with the Weyerhaeuser New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill to meet overall plant energy requirements, cost estimates, resource and product market assessments, and technology evaluations. The Weyerhaeuser team was assisted by Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation and technology vendors in developing the necessary data, designs, and cost information used in this comparative study. Based on the information developed in this study and parallel evaluations performed by Weyerhaeuser and others, biomass gasification for use in power production appears to be technically and economically viable. Options exist at the New Bern mill which would allow commercial scale demonstration of the technology in a manner that would serve the practical energy requirements of the mill. A staged project development plan has been prepared for review. The plan would provide for a low-risk and cost demonstration of a biomass gasifier as an element of a boiler modification program and then allow for timely expansion of power production by the addition of a combined cycle cogeneration plant. Although ethanol technology is at an earlier stage of development, there appears to be a set of realizable site and market conditions which could provide for an economically attractive woody-biomass-based ethanol facility. The market price of ethanol and the cost of both feedstock and enzyme have a dramatic impact on the projected profitability of such a plant.

Parson, F.; Bain, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biomass electricity plant allocation through non-linear modeling and mixed integer optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Electricity generation from the combustion of biomass feedstocks provides low-carbon energy that is not as geographically constricted as other renewable technologies. This dissertation uses (more)

Smith, Robert Kennedy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

SciTech Connect

Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration ('biochar'). Here we present a molecular-level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. BET-N{sub 2} surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy are used to show how two plant materials (wood and grass) undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring temperature increases from 100 to 700 C. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct categories of char consisting of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by disordered graphitic crystallites. The molecular variations among the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to persist in the environment and function as environmental sorbents.

Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P.S.; Johnson, M.G.; Kleber, M.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels.from lignocellulosic biomass (Blanch et al. , 2008): long-in the degradation of biomass. RESULTS NIMS analysis of

Reindl, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Gasifier system identification for biomass power plants using response surface method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass in the form of wood has been used by human as a source of energy for a long period of time. Recently, the use of renewable energy sources has been widely experienced in domestic, commercial, and industrial appliances. This has resulted in a greater ... Keywords: biomass, gasifier System, identification, modelling, response surface method

J. Satonsaowapak; T. Ratniyomchai; T. Kulworawanichpong; P. Pao-La-Or; B. Marungsri; A. Oonsivilai

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Three-dimensional image-based modelling of linear features for plant biomass estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass estimation is important for biological research and agricultural management. Low-cost two-dimensional 2D computer vision has been applied to non-contact biomass estimation. However, the rapid increase of computing power has enabled the use of ...

RanNisim Lati, Alex Manevich, Sagi Filin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline CO 2 emission factor. Carbon dioxide emissions fromcarbon dioxide from fermentation and lignin combustion. The factorscarbon dioxide emissions are most sensitive to the ethanol yield from the bioenergy crop and the lignin combustion emission factor.

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY) .......................................................................... 91 Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass) ......................................................................................................................... 111 Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members, and Project Advisors

215

DOE/EA-1647: Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S u p p l e m e n t a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t a n d N o t i c e o f W e t l a n d s I n v o l v e m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (formerly Range Fuels Inc.) Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1647 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy January 2009 Contents Section Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................... v 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action ..........................................................2

216

Byproducts can make coal plants green  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-locating ethanol plants at coal-burning sites, along with the use of biomass gasification to boost coal-fired plant output, can have positive economic and environmental benefits. Adding a biomass gasifier to an older coal-fired plant would inject gas with up to 10% of the fuel value in the coal and increase steam generation by the same amount. Sawdust can be injected as a reburn fuel without the need for gasification. A pre-scrubber would be added before the existing SO{sub 2} scrubber and waste heat from the boiler in the form of low-pressure steam would be sent to a co-located ethanol plant. This would lead to a decrease in emissions of NOx, mercury and SO{sub 2}, less mercury in the gypsum, a large greenhouse gas reduction, reduced net fuel cost, and revenue from hydrochloric acid by- product and from selling low-pressure steam to the ethanol plant. The Blue Flint Ethanol facility uses waste heat from Grand River Energy's 1,100 MW Coal Creek Station in South Jordan, Utah. The new generation of US ethanol plants is likely to use switchgrass and other cellulosic materials as feedstock. Straw and other forms of biomass have high chlorine content. PVC waste can be added to optimise the chlorine content of the scrubber. A chlorine pre-scrubber before the SO{sub 2} scrubber would capture HCl. 1 fig., 1 photo.

McIlvaine, B. [McIlvaine Co. (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Biomass Cofiring Update 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy source. When cofired with coal in a plant that would normally fire 100% coal as the fuel, biomass becomes a renewable source of electricityfor that fraction of electricity that is generated from the biomass fraction of the heat in the fuel mix to the power plant. For electric power generation organizations that have coal-fired generation, cofiring biomass with coal will often be the lowest-cost form of renewable power.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts Hua Song Lingzhi Zhang Umit S. Ozkan* November 6 th , 2007 Heterogeneous Catalysis Research Group Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 *Ozkan.1@osu.edu Biomass to Hydrogen (Environmentally Friendly) Plant cultivation Plant cultivation Saccharification Saccharification / / Fermentation Fermentation Anaerobic digestion Anaerobic digestion Residues of Residues of agroindustries agroindustries and cultivations and cultivations Municipal Solid Waste Municipal Solid Waste (organic fraction) (organic fraction) Distillation Distillation Reformation of ethanol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

222

A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

Dale, M.C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Background Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass ...

224

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass include ...

225

An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity for local farmers and investors.

Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

752; 752; NO. OF PAGES 6 Please cite this article in press as: Elkins JG, et al. Engineered Q1microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/ j.copbio.2010.05.008 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass James G Elkins, Babu Raman and Martin Keller In order for plant biomass to become a viable feedstock for meeting the future demand for liquid fuels, efficient and cost- effective processes must exist to breakdown cellulosic materials into their primary components. A one-pot conversion strategy or, consolidated bioprocessing, of biomass into ethanol would provide the most cost-effective route to renewable fuels and the realization of this technology is being actively pursued by both multi-disciplinary research centers and

227

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Transportation and Site Location Analysis for Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment (RIBA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The farmgate cost and available supply of biomass often exhibit considerable variation within a State. This variation, combined with the relatively high cost of transporting bulky biomass material, produces a wide range of expected delivered feedstock costs across a State. As a consequence, both production and transportation costs must be well-modeled when analyzing potential locations for conversion facilities. The Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment system consists of two phases. The descriptive phase characterizes a farmgate cost and supply surface for switchgrass production over a given State. These results are passed to the analytical phase, where a transportation model is used to compute the marginal cost of supplying an ethanol plant at a prescribed level of demand. The model generates a marginal cost surface that illustrates the most promising areas for locating an ethanol plant. Next, a sequential location model simulates the commercial development of ethanol production facilities. This model considers every road network node as a potential site and generates a sequence of likely plant locations. Results from the RIBA analysis demonstrate that the cost of switchgrass can increase dramatically from one location to another. This variation will seriously effect the economics of conversion in the proper sizing and locating of ethanol plant facilities.

Noon, C.E.; Daly, M.J.; Graham, R.L.; Zahn, F.B.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) Corporate HQ: Old Town, Maine Proposed Facility Location: Old Town, Maine Description: Develop, design, and install a biorefinery facility in an existing pulp mill to demonstrate the production of cellulosic ethanol from lignocellulosic (wood) extract. CEO or Equivalent: Edward Paslawski, Chairman and CEO of Red Shield Environmental, LLC Participants: University of Maine, American Process Inc. Production: * Capacity of 2.2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * University of Maine proprietary process for pre-extracting hemicelluloses during the pulping process * 80 dry tons/day hemicellulose extract from woody biomass

230

Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Annual report, March 11, 1997--March 14, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to facilitate conversion of plant biomass to usable energy by developing transgenic plants that express genes for microbial cellulases, which can be activated after harvest of the plants. In particular, the feasibility of targeting an endoglucanase and a cellobiohydrolase to the plant apoplast (cell wall milieu) is to be determined. To avoid detrimental effects of cellulose expression in plants, enzymes with high temperature optima were chosen; the genes for these enzymes are from thermophilic organisms that can use cellulose as a sole energy source. During the past year (year 2 of the grant), efforts have been focused on testing expression of endoglucanase E{sub 1}, from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, in the apoplast of both tobacco suspension cells and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using the plasmids constructed during the first year, transgenic cells and plants that contain the gene for the E{sub 1} catalytic domain fused to a signal peptide sequence were obtained. This gene was constructed so that the fusion protein will be secreted into the apoplast. The enzyme is made in large quantities and is secreted into the apoplast. More importantly, it is enzymatically active when placed under optimal reaction conditions (high temperature). Moreover, the plant cells and intact plants exhibit no obvious problems with growth and development under laboratory conditions. Work has also continued to improve binary vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, to determine activity of E{sub 1} at various temperatures, and to investigate the activity of the 35S Cauliflower Mosaic Virus promoter in E. coli. 9 figs.

Danna, K.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

Antonopoulos, A A

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

DOE/EA-1647: Finding of No Significant for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Treutlen County, Georgia (01/14/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 January 14, 2009 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PLANT, TREUTLEN COUNTY, GEORGIA SUMMARY: In October 2007, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. Subsequent to the issuance of a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the October 2007 EA, changes were proposed for the design and operating parameters of the facility. In compliance with NEPA (42 U.S. Code [USe] §§ 4321 et seq.) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Section 1021.330) and procedures, DOE completed a supplemental environmental assessment (SEA) to examine the potential environmental impacts associated with

234

Pilot plant studies of the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in several areas of research. The following cellulosic raw materials were selected for study: wheat, barley, and rice straws, rice hulls, sorghum, corn stover, cotton gin trash, newsprint, ground wood, and masonite steam-treated Douglas fir and redwood. Samples were collected, prepared, and analyzed for hexosans, pentosans, lignin, ash, and protein. Results of acid extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis are discussed. Yields of glucose, polyglucose, xylose, and arabinose are reported. Progress in process design and economic studies, as well as pilot plant process development and design studies, is summarized. (JGB)

Wilke, C.R.

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Applying SE Methods Achieves Project Success to Evaluate Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

Applying basic systems engineering (SE) tools to the mission analysis phases of a 2.5-million dollar biomass pre-processing project for the U.S. Department of Energy directly assisted the project principal investigator understand the complexity and identify the gaps of a moving-target project and capture the undefined technical/functional requirements and deliverables from the project team and industrial partners. A creative application of various SE tools by non-aerospace systems engineers developed an innovative big picture product that combined aspects of mission analysis with a project functional flow block diagram, providing immediate understanding of the depth and breath of the biomass preprocessing effort for all team members, customers, and industrial partners. The big picture diagram became the blue print to write the project test plan, and provided direction to bring the project back on track and achieve project success.

Larry R. Zirker; Christopher T. Wright, PhD; R. Douglas Hamelin

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Supergen Biomass and Bioenergy Consortium Theme 6 Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ethanol and biodiesel) dispensed through existing petroleum retail stations. Alternative and renewable ................................................................................................................................................... 23 Biodiesel/Renewable Diesel (BiomassBased Diesels (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline) or any blend level in between. Biodiesel also is being

237

Complete genome sequences for the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic plant biomass-degrading bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis, Caldicellulosiruptor kristjanssonii, Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis, Caldicellulosiruptor owensenis, and Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains the most thermophilic, plant biomass-degrading bacteria isolated to date. Previously, genome sequences from three cellulolytic members of this genus were reported (C. saccharolyticus, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis). To further explore the physiological and biochemical basis for polysaccharide degradation within this genus, five additional genomes were sequenced: C. hydrothermalis, C. kristjanssonii, C. kronotskyensis, C. lactoaceticus, and C. owensensis. Taken together, the seven completed and one draft-phase Caldicellulosiruptor genomes suggest that, while central metabolism is highly conserved, significant differences in glycoside hydrolase inventories and numbers of carbohydrate transporters exist, a finding which likely relates to variability observed in plant biomass degradation capacity.

Blumer-Schuette, Sara E. [North Carolina State University; Ozdemir, Inci [North Carolina State University; Mistry, Dhaval [North Carolina State University; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kelly, Robert M [North Carolina State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Biomass Energy Services Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy Services Inc Place Tifton, Georgia Zip 31794 Product Biodiesel plant developer in Cordele, Georgia. References Biomass Energy Services Inc1 LinkedIn Connections...

239

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

240

List of Ethanol Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Incentives Ethanol Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 67 Ethanol Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 67) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Steam-system upgrades Water Heaters Windows Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Water Heat Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Natural Gas Yes Alcohol Fuel Credit (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Commercial Industrial Ethanol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants and Enzymes for Biofuels Production. Science. 2007;Lignocellulose. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2009; 2:11. KumarPretreatment. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2010; 3:27. Lionetti

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A1 CO 2 from Lignin Combustion A11 Existing Biomass A5 A14of biomass to ethanol, and the distribution and combustionthe Combustion of Lignin lb grid electricity CO2/ton biomass

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cellulosic biomass could help meet Californias transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof. Yangin the conversion of biomass to ethanol. American InstituteNY. p 15. Dale BE. 1983. Biomass refining protein and

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cellulosic ethanol Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural residues, other lignocellulosic raw materials or energy crops. These lignocellulosic raw materials are more widely available than the standard material used for ethanol. They are also considered to be more sustainable, however they need to be broken down (hydrolysed) into simple sugars prior to distillation, a much more complex process than the first generation bioethanol. It first must go through pretreatment,hydrolysis then a conversion. Research since the 1970s and large investments are being made in the US and Europe to speed up development of this route to bioethanol. Biomass refineries like Inbicon in Denmark are producing

246

Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Clark, David P. (Carbondale, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental effects of planting biomass crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous. and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington`s industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state`s total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state`s energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents a carbon cycle, where plants absorb carbon dioxide during growth, "recycling" the carbon released #12;Program ObjectivesProgram Objectives Integrated PEM Fuel Cell System Ethanol based Power Plant 10PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc. Thomas

256

Development of a Low NOx Burner System for Coal Fired Power Plants Using Coal and Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low NOx burner (LNB) is the most cost effective technology used in coal-fired power plants to reduce NOx. Conventional (unstaged) burners use primary air for transporting particles and swirling secondary air to create recirculation of hot gases. LNB uses staged air (dividing total air into primary, secondary and tertiary air) to control fuel bound nitrogen from mixing early and oxidizing to NOx; it can also limit thermal NOx by reducing peak flame temperatures. Previous research at Texas A&M University (TAMU) demonstrated that cofiring coal with feedlot biomass (FB) in conventional burners produced lower or similar levels of NOx but increased CO. The present research deals with i) construction of a small scale 29.31 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) LNB facility, ii) evaluation of firing Wyoming (WYO) coal as the base case coal and cofiring WYO and dairy biomass (DB) blends, and iii) evaluating the effects of staging on NOx and CO. Ultimate and Proximate analysis revealed that WYO and low ash, partially composted, dairy biomass (LA-PC-DB-SepS) had the following heat values and empirical formulas: CH0.6992N0.0122O0.1822S0.00217 and CH_1.2554N_0.0470O_0.3965S_0.00457. The WYO contained 3.10 kg of Ash/GJ, 15.66 kg of VM/GJ, 0.36 kg of N/GJ, and 6.21 kg of O/GJ while LA-PC-DB-SepS contained 11.57 kg of Ash/GJ, 36.50 kg of VM/GJ, 1.50 kg of N/GJ, and 14.48 kg of O/GJ. The construction of a LNB nozzle capable of providing primary, swirled secondary and swirled tertiary air for staging was completed. The reactor provides a maximum residence time of 1.8 seconds under hot flow conditions. WYO and DB were blended on a mass basis for the following blends: 95:5, 90:10, 85:15, and 80:20. Results from firing pure WYO showed that air staging caused a slight decrease of NOx in lean regions (equivalence ratio, greater than or equal to 1.0) but an increase of CO in rich regions (=1.2). For unstaged combustion, cofiring resulted in most fuel blends showing similar NOx emissions to WYO. Staged cofiring resulted in a 12% NOx increase in rich regions while producing similar to slightly lower amounts of NOx in lean regions. One conclusion is that there exists a strong inverse relationship between NOx and CO emissions.

Gomez, Patsky O.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Biomass Supply Chain: Issues and Lessons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the risks in the supply chain for biomass fuels delivered to plants for electric power generation. The intent is to reduce plant operating risks by increasing awareness of potential problems, make specific suggestions for the improvement of biomass assessments, and identify useful areas for further research. A biomass assessment is currently the key tool for identifying the risks pertinent to a specific proposed biomass plant. Three biomass assessments are compared regarding what...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biomass Cofiring Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared as a 147how tomanual for those interested in biomass cofiring in cyclone- or pulverized-coal-fired boilers. It contains information regarding all aspects of biomass cofiring, including biomass materials and procurement, handling, storage, pulverizing, feeding, gaseous emissions, ash handling, and general economics. It relies on actual utility experience over the past many years from plants mainly in the United States, but some experience also in Europe and Australia. Many ...

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biomass Cofiring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, primarily wood waste such as sawdust, has been cofired in over twenty utility coal-fired boilers in the United States at cofiring levels where the biomass provides from 1% to 10% of the heat input to the boiler. These guidelines present insights and conclusions from five years of EPRI assessment and testing of biomass cofiring and will enable utility engineers and power plant managers to evaluate their own options and plan their own tests.

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Interactions of Lignin and Hemicellulose and Effects on Biomass Deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion toof Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion toconversion, detailed chemical composition data and cellulose characteristics were measured by standard biomass

Li, Hongjia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Variability for Biomass Production and Plant Composition in Sericea Lespedeza Germplasm. Final report on a Field and Laboratory Research Program, September 30, 1990--December 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sericea lespedeza [Lespedeza cuneata] is a deep-rooted legume that can be established successfully on eroded and depleted croplands. It is tolerant of drought, high levels of aluminum, and low soil fertility; environmental conditions found throughout the southeastern region of the USA. Sericea lespedeza is capable of improving soil by increasing its organic matter and nitrogen content rapidly. A field with a four year stand of sericea lespedeza grown for soil conservation or biomass production may have over 7 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} of residues on the surface. Once established, sericea lespedeza maintenance costs are relatively small compared to other plants. While most herbaceous plants require nitrogen fertilization, sericea lespedeza fixes its own. Compared to most other crops, relatively few diseases and insect problems are associated with sericea lespedeza. A field experiment aimed at measuring biomass yield of 81 genotypes of sericea lespedeza over time and variation in biomass composition was conducted. Genotype R194-79-290-9 had the highest mean biomass yield and, consistently, ranked among the top four during the years that this study was conducted. Other genotypes that also had a good performance over the four years are the cultivar Serala and the breeding line 75-2-3. No significant differences were found among genotypes for percentage of crude protein content. There were significant differences among genotypes for neutral detergent fiber, hemicellulose, and holocellulose content. There were not significant differences among genotypes for acid detergent fiber, lignin and cellulose content. Further testing of the best genotypes should be conducted at several locations to determine the genotype to be released for the specific purpose of biomass production. Screening of accessions from the Plant Introduction System should be conducted to determine their variability for lignin and crude protein content.

Mosjidis, J.A. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Soils

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching/Washing Laboratory-Scale Pilot Plant Equipment Selection and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus is an opportunity to solve the many problems facing the ability of firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials for the production of energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is interested in fostering the development of this potential game-changing biomass preteatment technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI sponsored through ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

265

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from...

266

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Biomass Interest Group Meetings - 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biomass Interest Group (BIG) provides technology updates and information exchange for funders of EPRI Program 84.005. The group sponsors research projects and technology summaries. This report assembles presentation materials from webcasts and other meetings conducted by the Biomass Interest Group in 2007. Presentations covered several technologies including the prospect of using cellulosic feedstock in the production of ethanol, as well as gasification, the synthesis of biodiesel, and the cofiring o...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

269

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

270

Biomass Commercialization Prospects the Next 2 to 5 Years; BIOMASS COLLOQUIES 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four colloquies held in the first quarter of 2000 examined the expected development of biomass commercialization in the next 2 to 5 years. Each colloquy included seven to ten representatives from key industries that can contribute to biomass commercialization and who are in positions to influence the future direction. They represented: Corn Growers, Biomass Suppliers, Plant Science Companies, Process Engineering Companies, Chemical Processors, Agri-pulp Suppliers, Current Ethanol Producers, Agricultural Machinery Manufacturers, and Enzyme Suppliers. Others attending included representatives from the National Renewable Energy Lab., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, environmental groups, grower organizations, and members of the financial and economic development community. The informal discussions resulted in improved awareness of the current state, future possibilit ies, and actions that can accelerate commercialization. Biomass commercialization on a large scale has four common issues: (1) Feedstock availability from growers; (2) Large-scale collection and storage; (3) An economic process; (4) Market demand for the product.

Hettenhaus, J. R.; Wooley, R.; Wiselogel, A.

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance Henrik Vibeenergy stored in plant biomass. The papers in this volumefeedstocks development and biomass deconstruction. Keywords

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain 0961-9534/92 $5.00 + 0 saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process is a favored option for conversion of the lignocellulosic biomass biomass, ethanol, woody crops, herbaceous crops, agricultural residues. 1. INTRODUCIION Although ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

273

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOEs ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Breaking the Biological barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda  

SciTech Connect

A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic, renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years. Fuels derived from cellulosic biomass - the fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matter - offer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels. These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure. The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7-9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme. The core barrier is cellulosic-biomass recalcitrance to processing to ethanol. Biomass is composed of nature's most ready energy source, sugars, but they are locked in a complex polymer composite exquisitely created to resist biological and chemical degradation. Key to energizing a new biofuel industry based on conversion of cellulose (and hemicelluloses) to ethanol is to understand plant cell-wall chemical and physical structures - how they are synthesized and can be deconstructed. With this knowledge, innovative energy crops - plants specifically designed for industrial processing to biofuel - can be developed concurrently with new biology-based treatment and conversion methods. Recent advances in science and technological capabilities, especially those from the nascent discipline of systems biology, promise to accelerate and enhance this development. Resulting technologies will create a fundamentally new process and biorefinery paradigm that will enable an efficient and economic industry for converting plant biomass to liquid fuels. These key barriers and suggested research strategies to address them are described in this report. As technologies mature for accomplishing this task, the technical strategy proceeds through three phases: In the research phase, within 5 years, an understanding of existing feedstocks must be gained to devise sustainable, effective, and economical methods for their harvest, deconstruction, and conversion to ethanol. Research is centered on enzymatic breakdown of cellulosic biomass to component 5- and 6-carbon sugars and lignin, using a combination of thermochemical and biological processes, followed by cofermentation of sugars to specified endproducts such as ethanol. Processes will be integrated and consolidated to reduce costs, improve efficacy, reduce generation of and sensitivity to inhibitors, and improve overall yields and viability in biorefinery environments. The technology deployment phase, within 10 years, will include creation of a new generation of energy crops with enhanced sustainability, yield, and composition, coupled with processes for simultaneous breakdown of biomass to sugars and cofermentation of sugars via new biological system

Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Municipal solid waste plants convert garbage to electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

276

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol and plant-based biodiesel ( Box 1). Although bio-acid pathway Currently, biodiesel production uses plant oilsbeen developed for use as biodiesel. However, if biodiesel

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New Bern Biomass to Energy Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry is the fourth largest consumer of energy in the United States. The industry recognizes that it can increase its energy production by increasing the utilization of available biomass resources, or by increasing the efficiency of available conversion technologies. Weyerhaeuser, Stone and Webster, Amoco, and Carolina Power & Light performed a detailed study of biomass gasification and enzymatic processing of biomass to ethanol. This evaluation assessed the potential of these techn...

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Blue Flint Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Ethanol Flint Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Flint Ethanol Place Underwood, North Dakota Zip ND 58576 Product Joint Venture bentween Great River Energy and Headwaters Incorporated, was established to build and operate a 50 million gallon per year dry mill ethanol plant in Underwood, North Dakota. References Blue Flint Ethanol[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Flint Ethanol is a company located in Underwood, North Dakota . References ↑ "Blue Flint Ethanol" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Blue_Flint_Ethanol&oldid=342914" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

279

Ethanol Plant Production of Fuel Ethanol  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 080913 081613...

280

Highwater Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highwater Ethanol Highwater Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Highwater Ethanol Place Lamberton, Minnesota Zip MN 56152 Product Highwater Ethanol LLC is the SPV behind the 195mLpa ethanol plant being constructed in Lamberton, Minnesota, US. Coordinates 44.233433°, -95.262294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.233433,"lon":-95.262294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A1 CO 2 from Lignin Combustion A11 Existing Biomass A5 A14from the Combustion of Lignin lb/ton biomass A14 CO 2biomass and soil and the carbon dioxide emitted from farming, conversion to ethanol, and the distribution and combustion

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NREL: Biomass Research - Amie Sluiter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter (aka Amie D. Sluiter, Amie Havercamp) is a scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Bioenergy Center in Golden, Colorado. Research Interests Amie Sluiter began research in the biomass-to-ethanol field in 1996. She joined the Biomass Analysis Technologies team to provide compositional analysis data on biomass feedstocks and process intermediates for use in pretreatment models and techno-economic analyses. The results of wet chemical analysis provide guidance on feedstock handling, pretreatment conditions, economic viability, and life cycle analyses. Amie Sluiter has investigated a number of biomass analysis methods and is an author on 11 Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAPs), which are being used industry-wide. She has taught full biomass compositional analysis

283

DOE/EA-1517: Environmental Assessment for the Design and Construction of a Fuel Ethanol Plant, Jasper County, Indiana (April 2005)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on action by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funding available to support a proposal by the Iroquois Bio-energy Company (IBEC), an Indiana limited liability company, to construct a fuel ethanol plant in Jasper County, Indiana (the proposed plant). Congress has acknowledged the merit of this project by providing specific funding through DOE. Consequently, DOE proposes to provide partial funding to IBEC to subsidize the design and construction of the proposed plant (the Proposed Action). In accordance with DOE and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations, DOE is required to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of DOE facilities, operations, and related funding decisions. The proposal to use Federal funds to support the project requires DOE to address NEPA requirements and related environmental documentation and permitting requirements. In compliance with NEPA (42 U.S.C. {section} 4321 et seq.) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR section 1021.330) and procedures, this environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Action and a No Action Alternative.

N /A

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ethanol annual report FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

286

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane derived from anaerobic digestion of biomass. TWh =is often considered for anaerobic digestion, ethanol fermen-as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas (

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

derived from biomass, including biogas, biodiesel, ethanol,in the absence of oxygen environment to produce biogas.The biogas generated from anaerobic digestion of biosolids

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass, including biogas, biodiesel, ethanol, methanol,vegetable oil. For example, biodiesel can be produced fromTransesterification - Biodiesel Figure 1.1 Conversion of

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Performance Of Clostridium Phytofermentans For Biofuels Production From Lignocellulosic Biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative transportation fuel with the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. Source-separated organic waste (more)

Percy, Benjamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. , 26(of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450. Yang, B. ,cost cellulosic ethanol. Biofuels, Bioprod. Biorefin. , 2(

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Investigation of an integrated switchgrass gasification/fuel cell power plant. Final report for Phase 1 of the Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program, has the goal of converting switchgrass grown on marginal farmland in southern Iowa into electric power. Two energy conversion options are under evaluation: co-firing switchgrass with coal in an existing utility boiler and gasification of switchgrass for use in a carbonate fuel cell. This paper describes the second option under investigation. The gasification study includes both experimental testing in a pilot-scale gasifier and computer simulation of carbonate fuel cell performance when operated on gas derived from switchgrass. Options for comprehensive system integration between a carbonate fuel cell and the gasification system are being evaluated. Use of waste heat from the carbonate fuel cell to maximize overall integrated plant efficiency is being examined. Existing fuel cell power plant design elements will be used, as appropriate, in the integration of the gasifier and fuel cell power plant to minimize cost complexity and risk. The gasification experiments are being performed by Iowa State University and the fuel cell evaluations are being performed by Energy Research Corporation.

Brown, R.C.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Organization of American States (OAS) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.sepa-americas.net/p Program Start 2008 Program End 2009 Country Belize UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References OAS Project Database[1] "The main objective of the Project is to assess the market potential for cellulosic ethanol in Belize through sustainable implementation of cellulosic ethanol technology utilizing agricultural and forest residues as primary biomass feedstock. A supplementary objective will be to help prepare for potential future cellulosic ethanol projects in other Caribbean

295

Why is marsh productivity so high? New insights from eddy covariance and biomass measurements in a Typha marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miao, S.L. , 2001. Growth, biomass allocation and nutrientfrom eddy covariance and biomass measurements in a Typhaof photosynthate to plant biomass (Amthor, 1989). This

Rocha, Adrian V.; Goulden, Michael L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Economics of Ethanol from Sweet Sorghum Using the MixAlco Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source Pump Drain pipe Liner Cover Biomass Gravel Sugar JuiceGrain LeavesBagasse Fermentation Fermentation Co-generation Other uses DDGS Ethanol Ethanol Electricity Heat Sweet Sorghum Pretreatment fermentation Dewater Acid springing Hydrogenation Lime kiln Biomass Lime Calcium carbonate Carboxylate salts

297

Biomass One LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass One LP Place White City, Oregon Product Owner and operator of a 25MW wood fired cogeneration plant in Oregon. References Biomass One LP1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

298

Ethanol production using corn, switchgrass, and wood; Biodiesel production using soybean and sunflower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy outputs from ethanol produced using corn, switchgrass, and wood biomass were each less than the respective fossil energy inputs. The same was true for producing biodiesel using soybeans and sunflower, however, the energy cost for producing soybean biodiesel was only slightly negative compared with ethanol production. Findings in terms of energy outputs compared with the energy inputs were: Ethanol production using corn grain required 29% more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Ethanol production using switchgrass required 50 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Ethanol production using wood biomass required 57 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Biodiesel production using soybean required 27 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced (Note, the energy yield from soy oil per hectare is far lower than the ethanol yield from corn). Biodiesel production using sunflower required 118 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced.

David Pimentel; Tad W. Patzek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biomass Characterization: Recent Progress in Understanding Biomass Recalcitrance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reviews Reviews Biomass Characterization: Recent Progress in Understanding Biomass Recalcitrance Marcus Foston and Arthur J. Ragauskas BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Abstract The ever-increasing global demand for energy and materials has a pronounced effect on worldwide economic stability, diplomacy, and technical advancement. In response, a recent key research area in bio- technology has centered on the biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to simple sugars. Lignocellulosic biomass, converted to fer- mentable sugars via enzymatic hydrolysis of cell wall polysaccharides, can be utilized to generate a variety of downstream fuels and chemicals. Ethanol, in particular, has a high potential as transportation fuel to supplement or even replace

302

Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Place Colusa, California Zip 95932 Sector Biomass Product Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation is dedicated to converting biomass to energy for transport, and holds a US patent to make ethanol from waste biomass. Coordinates 39.21418°, -122.008594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.21418,"lon":-122.008594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Other Biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Biomass Other Biomass Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Fee to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Facility Fee The cost to submit an air quality permit application for an ethanol production plant is $1,000. An annual renewal fee is also required for the

307

Diversified Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Diversified Ethanol Place Northbrook, Illinois Zip 60062 Product A division of OTCBB-traded ONYI that is building an ethanol plant in Iowa. Coordinates 42.12972°, -87.831564° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.12972,"lon":-87.831564,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

309

Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 27,197 26,722 26,923 26,320 25,564 27,995 1981-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 628 784 836 842 527 636 2004-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 25,209 24,689 24,786 24,186 23,810 26,040 2004-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 523 404 487 460 431 473 2004-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 450 432 430 432 415 429 2004-2013 West Coast (PADD 5)

310

Genome-Enabled Advancement of Biomass to Biofuel Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Without these achievements, an industrially significant process for biomass fermentation to ethanol would not be economically possible. The development of a fermentation process with economic return on investment can be successfully developed with the technical learning achieved

Patrick O'Mullan, PhD

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc...

312

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

314

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria ...  

Plant biomass represents a vast and renewable source of energy. However, harnessing this energy requires breaking down tough lignin and cellulose cell ...

315

Mediterranean land abandonment and associated biomass variation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is an important factor in environmental processes, such as erosion, carbon storage, climate change and land degradation. Human-induced changes in plant community systems and (more)

Hoogeveen, S.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ethanol and Classic Cars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have ethanol in them; the typical one is E10 which is 10% ethanol. But there's also E85 which is 85% ethanol. The basic rule is E10 is ok for everything, but E85 can only be...

317

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Fowler, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Horton, Philip G. (Gainesville, FL); Ben-Bassat, Arie (Gainesville, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Beall, David S. (Gainesville, FL); Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H. (Gainesville, FL); Guimaraes, Walter V. (Vicosa, BR); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Miyazaki, JP); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL); Shanmugam, Keelnatham T. (Gainesville, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

Dale, Bruce E.; Lynd, Lee R.; Laser, Mark

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Researchers at the Biomass Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARVEST OF ENERGY Researchers at the Biomass Energy Center are homing in on future fuels --By David--seriously for much longer than that. These are just a few examples of biomass, plant matter that can be transformed into fuels and other energy products. Like petroleum and coal, biomass contains carbon taken from

Lee, Dongwon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass Joseph B. Binder and Ronald T. Raines1 19, 2009) Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels of biomass into monosaccharides. Add- ing water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic

Raines, Ronald T.

322

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS-WOOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS-WOOD Power plant LIENZ Austria By the year 2010, 12% of the gross inland this goal, intensified use needs to be made of biomass, both for heating purposes and for power generation to this rule. Thus, for instance, the town of Lienz started up the largest biomass facility of Austria

323

Biomass Resources, Technologies, and Environmental Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, a renewable energy source, is essentially solar energy captured and stored in plants via photosynthesis. For electric power generation organizations that have expertise and assets in combustion or gasification, biomass can be the most appropriate renewable energy source. This report addresses the size and cost of the biomass resource, while describing the technologies and environmental issues involved.

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Southeastern United States Biomass Resource Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent financial incentives for renewable energy have stimulated interest in potential uses of biomass. In the southeastern United States, acquisition and integration of wood waste generated by sawmills and other wood processing companies is of specific interest to fossil plants. In this study, two biomass resource surveys were conducted and combined to assess cost implications of and potential for biomass cofiring in this region.

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

US Ethanol Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investment bank and advisory firm, Geneva Capital, created in 2006 to develop 6 bioethanol plants in the US. References US Ethanol Holdings1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

326

Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Direct use geothermal energy utilization for ethanol production and commercial mushroom growing at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Technical feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is concerned with the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating two geothermally cascaded facilities, a bio-mass fuel ethanol production facility and a mushroom growing facility, where Geothermal Food Processors presently operates the world's largest direct-use geothermal vegetable dehydration facility. A review and analysis of the data generated from the various project tasks indicates that existing, state-of-the-art, ethanol production and mushroom growing technologies can be successfully adapted to include the use of geothermal energy. Additionally, a carefully performed assessment of the geothermal reservoir indicates that this resource is capable of supporting the yearly production of 10 million gallons of fuel ethanol and 1.5 million pounds of mushrooms, in addition to the demands of the dehydration plant. Further, data indicates that the two facilities can be logistically supported from existing agricultural and commerce sources located within economical distances from the geothermal source.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biomass in Multifunction Crop Plants: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-163  

SciTech Connect

An array of cellulase, hemicellulase, and accessory enzymes were tested for their ability to increase the conversion levels and rates of biomass to sugar after being subjected to thermochemical pretreatment. The genes were cloned by Oklahoma State University and expressed, purified, and tested at NREL. Several enzymes were noted to be effective in increasing conversion levels, however expression levels were typically very low. The overall plan was to express these enzymes in corn as a possible mechanism towards decreased recalcitrance. One enzyme, cel5A endoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, was transformed into both tobacco and corn. The transgenic corn stover and tobacco were examined for their susceptibility to thermochemical pretreatment followed by enzymatic digestion.

Decker, S. R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Qing an Cogeneration Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qing an Cogeneration Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Qing'an Cogeneration Plant Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 152400 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass...

331

EPRI Biomass Interest Group Meeting, November 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the winter 2003 meeting of the Biomass Interest Group (BIG). The meeting was held in Chino, California at Inland Empire Utility Agency's (IEAU) office. The meeting featured presentations on the following general topics: Biomass Cofiring -- Presentations were made on the European experience, with particular emphasis on the United Kingdom, firing biomass/coal pellets at Allegheny Energy's R. Paul Smith station, and firing sawdust at AEP's Picway plant. Biomass Gasificat...

2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

336

Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 3  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the third edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of the Biomass Program and the Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis in the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use. This is the first edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book and is currently only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and BioOil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is about the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include measures of conversions, biomass characteristics and assumptions for selected tables and figures. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 4  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the fourth edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also two appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Biomass Energy Data Book, 2011, Edition 4  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the fourth edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.[copied from http://cta.ornl.gov/bedb/pdf/BEDB4_Front_Matter.pdf

Wright, L.; Boundy, B.; Diegel, S.W.; Davis, S.C.

340

Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition 2  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Energy Data Book is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Biomass Program in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program of the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a convenient reference, the book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize the biomass industry, from the production of biomass feedstocks to their end use, including discussions on sustainability. This is the second edition of the Biomass Energy Data Book which is only available online in electronic format. There are five main sections to this book. The first section is an introduction which provides an overview of biomass resources and consumption. Following the introduction to biomass, is a section on biofuels which covers ethanol, biodiesel and bio-oil. The biopower section focuses on the use of biomass for electrical power generation and heating. The fourth section is on the developing area of biorefineries, and the fifth section covers feedstocks that are produced and used in the biomass industry. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also four appendices which include frequently needed conversion factors, a table of selected biomass feedstock characteristics, assumptions for selected tables and figures, and discussions on sustainability. A glossary of terms and a list of acronyms are also included for the reader's convenience.

Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Badger, Philip C [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass Interest Group Meeting Minutes March 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Spring 2004 meeting of the Biomass Interest Group (BIG). The meeting was held in Washington, D.C. at the EPRI office. The meeting featured presentations on the following topics: State Environmental Legislation - Implications for Biomass Update on Cofiring at Southern Company's Generating Plants: Plant Gadsden and Mitchell Updates EERC Program on Testing Biomass Impact on Catalyst Performance Summary and Conclusions from Allegheny Energy's Cofiring Pr...

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier DOE Hydrogen Program Contractors biomass #12;Approach Outline Gasifier Pilot Plant· Develop subsystems for the hydrogen production system heated gasifier Q Air N2 H2O CO2 O2 Steam H2 CO CO2 CmHn Biomass 45 kg/hr Biomass 180 kg/hr Sand Bed: 43

343

Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow through the system without requiring any equipment or process changes. (10) Although the above attempt failed, the plant is still interested in producing briquettes. (11) An economic analysis of investing in a production facility manufacturing such briquettes was conducted to determine the economic viability of the project. Such a project is estimated to have an internal rate of return of 14% and net present value of about $400,000. (12) An engineering independent study class (4 students) is now working on selecting a site near the power plant and determining the layout of the future plant that will produce briquettes.

H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is geographically located to be able to service a regional market. Other states have active incentive programs to promote the industry. Mississippi has adopted an incentive program for ethanol and biodiesel; however, the State legislature has not funded this program, leaving Mississippi at a disadvantage when compared to other states in developing the bio-based liquid fuel industry. With all relevant factors being considered, Mississippi offers several advantages to developing the biodiesel industry. As a result of AgraPure's work and plan development, a private investor group has built a 7,000 gallon per day facility in central Mississippi with plans to build a 10 million gallon per year biodiesel facility. The development of a thermochemical conversion/generation facility requires a much larger financial commitment, making a longer operational time necessary to recover the capital invested. Without a renewable portfolio standard to put a floor under the price, or the existence of a suitable steam host, the venture is not economically viable. And so, it has not met with the success of the biodiesel plan. While the necessary components regarding feedstocks, location, permitting and technology are all favorable; the market is not currently favorable for the development of this type of project. In this region there is an abundance of energy generation capacity. Without subsidies or a Mississippi renewable portfolio standard requiring the renewable energy to be produced from Mississippi raw materials, which are not available for the alternative energy source selected by AgraPure, this facility is not economically viable.

Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) Place Oshkosh, Wisconsin Product Utica Energy, founded by 5 investing farmers built an ethanol plant west of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. References Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) is a company located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utica_Energy_LLC_formerly_Algoma_Ethanol&oldid=352687" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

348

NREL: Biomass Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Below are news stories related to NREL biomass research. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. August 21, 2013 Can "Drop-In" Biofuels Solve Integration Issues? Lab works to create biofuels indistinguishable from conventional

349

Nedak Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nedak Ethanol LLC Nedak Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Nedak Ethanol LLC Place Atkinson, Nebraska Zip 68713 Product NEDAK Ethanol, LLC is a Nebraska limited liability company, which was formed on December 15, 2003 for the purpose of constructing and operating an ethanol plant near Atkinson, Nebraska. Coordinates 34.52909°, -78.168819° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.52909,"lon":-78.168819,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Ethanol Corp Place Houston, Texas Zip 77055 Sector Biomass Product Focused on developing biomass preprocessing technology to efficiently produce cellulosic feedstocks for ethanol producers. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

351

Florida Biomass Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Florida Biomass Energy Group Place Gulf Breeze, Florida Zip 32561 Sector Biomass Product Florida Biomass Energy Group is a Florida limited liability corporation whose business is the development and operation of closed-loop, biomass-fired electrical generating plants. References Florida Biomass Energy Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Florida Biomass Energy Group is a company located in Gulf Breeze, Florida . References ↑ "Florida Biomass Energy Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Florida_Biomass_Energy_Group&oldid=345419" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

352

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

353

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

354

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russell Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Russell Biomass Place Massachusetts Sector Biomass Product Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at...

355

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Biomass Place India Sector Biomass Product Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References Star Biomass1 LinkedIn...

356

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

357

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

358

In Sweden, as in many other coun-tries Ethanol is the most wide-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined heat, power and wood biofuel pellets plant in the North of Sweden. The production of ethanol WOOD ENERGY N°7 37 ssfilter Drier Production of pellets Biogas Ethanol District PLANT To develop the technology for ethanol production from wood residues, some regional companies, five

359

and Office of Biomass Programs Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subcontract 4000006704The energy balance calculation for corn ethanol has been a controversial and often distorted subject in the political arena. Congress is now in the process of crafting a comprehensive energy bill, and the ongoing debate over policies to increase fuel ethanol use has raised the publics awareness of the energy balance issue. The Senate version of the energy bill includes a Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) provision for motor fuels that would increase the amount of fuel derived from biomass sources from 2.3 billion gallons in 2004 to 5 billion gallons by 2012. Last year (2001), the U.S. produced 1.77 billion gallons of ethanol from biomass sources. It is expected that most of the RFS requirement will be met by ethanol, with biodiesel making up the remainder. Almost all the fuel ethanol used in the U.S. today is derived from corn, but a small amount is also produced from other grains such as wheat and sorghum. Corn Ethanol Energy Balances In the early eighties, some studies concluded that the energy inputs for producing corn ethanol were greater than or about equal to the energy contained in the ethanol product. In the last twenty years, significant advances in farming techniques and improvements in ethanol production have occurred, and recent studies have concluded that the energy balances are now

David Andress

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ethanol | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RIS? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RIS?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

362

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Corporate Tax Incentive Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/biofuels/Pages/biofuelsIncentives.aspx Summary Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all corn and cellulosic ethanol producers is $5 million for each taxable year. Unused ethanol credits from

363

Biomass Cofiring with Natural Gas in California: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report by EPRI for the California Energy Commission presents the major cost and performance parameters of systems that enable natural gas to be augmented by 10 percent biomass fuel. The basic natural gas fired power plant is taken to be a 400 MWe natural gas-turbine/combined-cycle (NGCC). The biomass component is to generate 40 MWe from biomass fuel. Two forms of the biomass section of the power plant are considered: (1) biomass gasification with the gas derived from the biomass combined with the na...

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 705716 UK biomass energy since 1990: the mismatch between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oil from fast pyrolysis, producing hydrogen from biomass for use in fuel cells). Consequently, biomass the scale of `medium' plant and the potential role of biomass pyrolysis or gasification technologies,11 technologies but references to biomass pyrolysis or biomass gasifica- tion are noticeably absent. The glossary

Heinke, Dietmar

365

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ethanol production using a soy hydrolysate-based medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method for the production of ethanol that utilizes a soy hydrolysate-based nutrient medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium nutrient medium in conjunction with ethanologenic bacteria and a fermentable sugar for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. The invention offers several advantages over presently available media for use in ethanol production, including consistent quality, lack of toxins and wide availability.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

368

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

369

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biomass Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Technology Analysis Biomass Technology Analysis Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are essential to our research and development efforts. They provide an understanding of the economic, technical, and even global impacts of renewable technologies. These analyses also provide direction, focus, and support to the development and commercialization of various biomass conversion technologies. The economic

370

Biomass processing and solar process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which biomass can supply useful energy depends on the available integrated solar flux density over the year, the photosynthesis yield, the harvest factor, the energy gain, and the conversion efficiency of biomass into the desired energy carrier. Using these factors, an equation is presented to determine the area required for a given annual demand. In particular, the production of ethanol from biomass is considered, based on recent data from the national alcohol program Proalcool in Brazil. Finally, an estimate is given how solar process heat can improve the yield of alcohol or provide other base material for the chemical industry such as ethylene and synthesis gas from biomass. 9 references, 4 tables.

Sizmann, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

372

Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and

William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nipa (Nypa fruticans) sap as a potential feedstock for ethanol production Pramila Tamunaidu1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in surface area. ? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Bioethanol derived from bio and could become a source of bioethanol that will unlikely adversely influence food prices (Cassman steps: pretreatment of biomass, hydrolysis of biomass, fermentation of released sugars, and ethanol

Takada, Shoji

374

Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Ethanol LLC Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place Bakersfield, California Product Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Kansas Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas Ethanol LLC Kansas Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Kansas Ethanol LLC Place Lyons, Kansas Zip 67554 Product Constructing a 55m gallon ethanol plant in Rice County, Kansas Coordinates 43.72394°, -96.871179° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.72394,"lon":-96.871179,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Review of the Research Strategy for Biomass-Derived Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The report is a review of the R and D strategy for the production of transportation fuel from biomass. Its focus is on ethanol and biodiesel. Its review includes the DG's Office of Fuels Program Development Program.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Growing Energy Biomass crops as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide our heat, electricity and liquid transport fuels. It is widely agreed that wind, wave, tidal carbon emissions set by the Kyoto Protocol are to be met. Biomass from crop plants can make an important of research activities aimed at the sustainable production of biomass from energy crops for heat and power

Rambaut, Andrew

380

Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schiller Biomass Con Biomass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass...

382

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Place Hastings, Nebraska Product Ethanol producer and supplier References Chief Ethanol Fuels...

383

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

384

Preprocessing Moist Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biorefinery Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system of a lignocellulosic biorefinery. Preprocessing is generally accomplished using industrial grinders to format biomass materials into a suitable biorefinery feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many factors affect machine efficiency and the physical characteristics of preprocessed biomass. For example, moisture content of the biomass as received from the point of production has a significant impact on overall system efficiency and can significantly affect the characteristics (particle size distribution, flowability, storability, etc.) of the size-reduced biomass. Many different grinder configurations are available on the market, each with advantages under specific conditions. Ultimately, the capacity and/or efficiency of the grinding process can be enhanced by selecting the grinder configuration that optimizes grinder performance based on moisture content and screen size. This paper discusses the relationships of biomass moisture with respect to preprocessing system performance and product physical characteristics and compares data obtained on corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw as model feedstocks during Vermeer HG 200 grinder testing. During the tests, grinder screen configuration and biomass moisture content were varied and tested to provide a better understanding of their relative impact on machine performance and the resulting feedstock physical characteristics and uniformity relative to each crop tested.

Neal Yancey; Christopher T. Wright; Craig Conner; J. Richard Hess

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each source of biofuel · Potential for environmental impacts · Comparative results · Conclusions #12;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

386

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

387

Biomass power plant on campus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??California is recognized as one of the greenest states among all the states in Northern America. Thus it is bound that California has lots of (more)

Shah, Sagar R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The feasibility of ethanol production in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural interests across Texas are looking at the possibility of an ethanol industry in Texas. Continued conflict in the Middle East, the ban of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in California, and low commodity prices have all lead to increased interest in ethanol throughout the state of Texas. There have been several ethanol feasibility studies conducted. Most studies have been focused in other states, and only one incorporated risk on input and output prices. Very little research has been done in Texas. Previous studies are typically for a generic location and only looked at ethanol production from corn. This study looks at four different plant sizes in three different regions using corn and grain sorghum. This study incorporates risk on input prices (corn, grain sorghum, natural gas, and electricity) and the output prices of ethanol and dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS). The regions that were analyzed in the study are the Texas Panhandle, the Central Texas region, and the Southeast Texas region. The results indicate that the only plants expected to generate a positive net present value (NPV) were the larger grain sorghum based plants in the Texas Panhandle. The smaller sorghum based plants in the Panhandle did not have a positive NPV. The only other plants that were close to having a positive net present value were the grain sorghum plants in the Central Texas Region. Sorghum in the Southeast Texas Region was not feasible. Using corn as the feedstock was not as feasible in any region. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that a small increase in the net income in the form of increased revenue or reduced costs would make all the plants profitable.

Herbst, Brian Keith

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fermentation method producing ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Dalal, Rajen (Chicago, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

%22Trojan Horse%22 strategy for deconstruction of biomass for biofuels production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of renewable biofuels to displace fossil fuels currently consumed in the transportation sector is a pressing multiagency national priority (DOE/USDA/EERE). Currently, nearly all fuel ethanol is produced from corn-derived starch. Dedicated 'energy crops' and agricultural waste are preferred long-term solutions for renewable, cheap, and globally available biofuels as they avoid some of the market pressures and secondary greenhouse gas emission challenges currently facing corn ethanol. These sources of lignocellulosic biomass are converted to fermentable sugars using a variety of chemical and thermochemical pretreatments, which disrupt cellulose and lignin cross-links, allowing exogenously added recombinant microbial enzymes to more efficiently hydrolyze the cellulose for 'deconstruction' into glucose. This process is plagued with inefficiencies, primarily due to the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, mass transfer issues during deconstruction, and low activity of recombinant deconstruction enzymes. Costs are also high due to the requirement for enzymes and reagents, and energy-intensive cumbersome pretreatment steps. One potential solution to these problems is found in synthetic biology-engineered plants that self-produce a suite of cellulase enzymes. Deconstruction can then be integrated into a one-step process, thereby increasing efficiency (cellulose-cellulase mass-transfer rates) and reducing costs. The unique aspects of our approach are the rationally engineered enzymes which become Trojan horses during pretreatment conditions. During this study we rationally engineered Cazy enzymes and then integrated them into plant cells by multiple transformation techniques. The regenerated plants were assayed for first expression of these messages and then for the resulting proteins. The plants were then subjected to consolidated bioprocessing and characterized in detail. Our results and possible implications of this work on developing dedicated energy crops and their advantage in a consolidated bioprocessing system.

Simmons, Blake Alexander; Sinclair, Michael B.; Yu, Eizadora; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Hadi, Masood Z.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Biomass Research - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pilot plant accommodates bench-to-pilot-scale processes for converting cellulosic biomass into a variety of fuels and chemicals at process throughputs of up to one ton of dry...

392

OpenEI - ethanol  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Tue, 14 Dec 2010...

393

Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description and move this content to a more...

394

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enzyme complexes to convert a potentially wide range of lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol and other vendible products. CEO or Equivalent: Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech Inc Founder...

395

Hydrothermal dissolution of biomass and gasification to hydrogen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is a term for all organic materials that stem from plants. It has wide applications as a source of fuel and as a raw (more)

Hashaikeh, Raed

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This executive summary provides an overview of an NREL assessment to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region around Greensburg, Kansas.

Haase, S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Application of CHL model for estimating biomass pyrolysis yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of wood biomass represents a valid technique for recovering "green" fuel from residues of forestry and other activities, in agriculture as in industry, where wood and other plant residues are available. Wood biomass is essentially a composite ... Keywords: CHL model, biogas yield, biomass, numerical analysis, pyrolysis, rate estimation

Francesco Marra

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Doubling the estimate of invertebrate biomass in a rainforest canopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of invertebrate biomass in a rainforest canopy Martin D. F. Ellwood & William A. Foster University Museum ............................................................................................................................................................................. Forest canopies represent the functional interface between 90% of the Earth's terrestrial biomass a basic understanding of how the biomass of plants and animals is distributed throughout forest canopies

Foster, William A.

400

Modeling Swtichgrass Biomass Production and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Swtichgrass Biomass Production and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions Weiyuan Zhu, Johan in the atmosphere have led to renewed interest in energy from plant biomass. Surfing the internet or flipping to a series of concerns, apprehensions and challenges presented by a shift to a heavier reliance on biomass

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION  

SciTech Connect

Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

John McDaniel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

John McDaniel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

408

Teller, Brittany Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels in Communities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teller, Brittany 374099 Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels the trophic structure of their invaded territories in terms of biomass. If invasive plant species reduce native plant biomass it is expected that the higher trophic levels that depend on native plants

Knight, Tiffany

409

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:25am Addthis Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops. Biomass energy takes many forms and can have a wide variety of applications

411

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

412

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35[degrees]C to about 40[degrees]C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35{degrees}C to about 40{degrees}C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

416

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Taylor Biomass Energy LLC TBE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy LLC TBE Biomass Energy LLC TBE Jump to: navigation, search Name Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) Place Montgomery, New York Zip 12549-9900 Sector Biomass Product Montgomery-based municipal-solid-waste (MSW) recovery and recycling firm providing biomass gasification units in addition to operating its own gasifier plants. References Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) is a company located in Montgomery, New York . References ↑ "Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Taylor_Biomass_Energy_LLC_TBE&oldid=352048" Categories:

419

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. Place Nanping City, Fujian Province, China Zip 365001 Sector Biomass Product Chinese developer of a CDM registered biomass plant. References Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. is a company located in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China . References ↑ "[ Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kaisheng_Biomass_Residue_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=347879" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

420

Sunnyside Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sunnyside Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunnyside Ethanol Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip PA 15237 Product Pennsylvania based company created for the specific purpose...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ethanol India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Ethanol India Place Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India Sector Biofuels Product Maharashtra-based biofuels consultancy firm. References Ethanol India1...

422

Northstar Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northstar Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Northstar Ethanol Place Lake Crystal, Minnesota Zip 56055 Product Corn-base bioethanol producer in Minnesotta References...

423

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC)...

424

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.the plant cell wall for bioenergy. Oxford: Blackwell Pub. ;the Plant Cell Wall for Bioenergy. Wiley-Blackwell; 2008.

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Projects Biochemical Conversion Projects A photo of a woman looking at the underside of a clear plastic tray. The tray has a grid of small holes to hold sample tubes. An NREL researcher examines a sample tray used in the BioScreen C, an instrument used to monitor the growth of microorganisms under different conditions. NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock Fermenting these biomass intermediates using biocatalysts (microorganisms including yeast and bacteria) Processing the fermentation product to yield fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels. Among the current biochemical conversion RD&D projects at NREL are: Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

426

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3086  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-added product, such as pellets, heat, power, ethanol, or chemicals. In addition to various kinds of chips of fossil fuels. Woody biomass, or forest biomass, also comes in a variety of forms as forest products. Wood. The kind of product manufactured in the woods is important to mills that produce the next value

427

AlternativeAlternative FeedstocksFeedstocks for the Petrochemical Industryfor the Petrochemical Industry from Biomassfrom Biomass LigninsLignins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oil from fast pyrolysis, producing hydrogen from biomass for use in fuel cells). Consequently, biomass the scale of `medium' plant and the potential role of biomass pyrolysis or gasification technologies,11 technologies but references to biomass pyrolysis or biomass gasifica- tion are noticeably absent. The glossary

428

U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Office Of Biomass Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Jonathan L. Male May 27, 2010 Biomass Program * Make cellulosic ethanol cost competitive, at a modeled cost for mature technology of $1.76/gallon by 2017 * Help create an environment conducive to maximizing production and use of biofuels- 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels per year by 2022 (EISA) Feedstocks Biofuels Infrastructure Integrated Biorefineries Conversion Develop and transform our renewable and abundant, non-food, biomass resources into sustainable, cost-competitive, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower. Focus on targeted research, development, and demonstration * Through public and private partnerships * Deploy in integrated biorefineries

429

Striving Toward Energy Sustainability: How Plants Will Play a Role in Our Future (453rd Brookhaven Lecture)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Edible biomass includes sugars from sugar cane or sugar beets, starches from corn kernels or other grains, and vegetable oils. The fibrous, woody and generally inedible portions of plants contain cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, three key cell-wall components that make up roughly 70 percent of total plant biomass. At present, starch can readily be degraded from corn grain into glucose sugar, which is then fermented into ethanol, and an acre of corn can yield roughly 400 gallons of ethanol. In tapping into the food supply to solve the energy crisis, however, corn and other crops have become more expensive as food. One solution lies in breaking down other structural tissues of plants, including the stalks and leaves of corn, grasses and trees. However, the complex carbohydrates in cellulose-containing biomass are more difficult to break down and convert to ethanol. So researchers are trying to engineer plants having optimal sugars for maximizing fuel yield. This is a challenge because only a handful of enzymes associated with the more than 1,000 genes responsible for cell-wall synthesis have had their roles in controlling plant metabolism defined. As Richard Ferrieri, Ph.D., a leader of a biofuel research initiative within the Medical Department, will discuss during the 453rd Brookhaven Lecture, he and his colleagues use short-lived radioisotopes, positron emission tomography and biomarkers that they have developed to perform non-invasive, real time imaging of whole plants. He will explain how the resulting metabolic flux analysis gives insight into engineering plant metabolism further.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Ph.D., Medical Department)

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mascoma Mascoma Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Vonore, Tennessee Description: The partnership aims to establish an approximately 85 tonnes per day cellulosic ethanol facility in the Niles Ferry Industrial Park, in Monroe County, Tennessee. The facility will produce 2 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol annually and generate process heat through the combustion of byproduct lignin. CEO or Equivalent: Bruce A. Jamerson, CEO Participants: University of Tennessee, Genera Energy LLC Production: * Capacity of 2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * Mascoma proprietary biochemical conversion process * Switchgrass, hardwood chips State of Readiness: * Estimated to be operational in 2009

432

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Short Communication Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chemicals in the U.S. Bob Wallace, Director Penn State BioEnergy BridgeTM Associate Director: Biomass Energy and Infrastructure Development Biomass Conversion Processes End Uses Systems Analyses Biomass Feedstocks Life Cycle and Economic Development Research Education Extension Facilities Testing ·Plant Production ·Biomass Harvest

Tang, Juming

434

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for analytical pyrolysis. Biomass Analysis. All biomass samples were Technol 42: 649­661. 44. Evans RJ, Milne TA (1987) Molecular characterization of the pyrolysis of biomass fuels from lignocel- lulosic biomass is a plant's recalcitrance to releasing sugars bound in the cell

435

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms. Battelle ...

436

Biomass power: An old resource for a new technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As many as 50,000 MW of electricity could be generated by biomass power plants in the year 2010 with advanced technologies and improved feedstock supplies. This pamphlet describes the current status and capacity of biomass power plants in the US, advanced technologies under development, a way to guarantee a dedicated fuel supply, and sources for further information.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DOE Selects Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal Funding DOE Selects Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal Funding March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis Projects to Develop Fermentative Organisms to Speed Ethanol Refining WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner today announced just over $23 million in federal funding, subject to negotiation of final project plans and funding, for five projects focused on developing highly efficient fermentative organisms to convert biomass material to ethanol. This research will further President Bush's goals of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012 and, along with increased automobile fuel efficiency, reducing America's gasoline consumption by 20 percent in ten

438

Energy and Society (ER 100/200, PP 184/284) Fall 2013 Topics: Biomass, Transportation, Climate Change Problem Set #7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Society (ER 100/200, PP 184/284) Fall 2013 Topics: Biomass, Transportation, Climate/184], 125 [200/284] 1. Electric Vehicles and Biomass When you think of modern bioenergy, you probably think of ethanol used for transportation fuel. But as we learned in lecture, biomass can also be used in power

Kammen, Daniel M.

439

Biomass Energy R&D in the San Francisco Bay Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is plant matter such as trees, grasses, agricultural crops or other biological material. It can be used as a solid fuel, or converted into liquid or gaseous forms, for the production of electric power, heat, chemicals, or fuels. There are a number of ways of getting energy from biomass, and a number of factors influence the efficiency of the conversion process. All biomass can be easily combusted. The heat of combustion can be used as heat, or can be used to run gas/steam turbines to produce electricity. However, most biomass combustion processes are inefficient and environmentally non-benign. The main pollutants from direct biomass combustion are tars, particulates, and VOCs. Biodiesels can be made from oils obtained from plants/crops such as soybean, peanuts and cotton. The oils from these sources are mainly triglycerides of fatty acids and not directly suitable as diesel substitutes. Transesterification processes convert the triglycerides into simple esters of the corresponding fatty acids (for example, Fatty Acid Methyl Ester or FAME), which can be directly substitutes for diesel fuels. Starches, sugars and cellulose can be fermented to produce ethanol, which can be added to gasoline, or used directly as an engine fuel. Fermentation of starches and sugars is established technology, practiced for thousands of years. Fermentation of cellulose to make ethanol is relatively harder, requiring additional intermediate steps to hydrolyze the cellulose first by adding acids or by raising temperature. Forestry wastes predominantly comprise cellulose and lignin. Lignin cannot be fermented using the current bio-organisms, and, as mentioned above, even cellulose is difficult to ferment directly. In such cases, a suite of alternative technologies can be employed to convert the biomass into liquid fuels. For example, the biomass can be gasified with the use of air/oxygen and steam, the resultant syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be cleaned to remove tars and particulates, the gas can be shifted to obtain the proper balance between hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and the balanced gas can be converted into either methanol or other hydrocarbons with the use of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The liquid fuels thus produced can be transported to the point of use. In addition, they can be reformed to produce hydrogen to drive fuel cells. In addition to agriculture and forestry, a third, and significant, source for biomass is municipal waste. The biomass component of municipal wastes consists mainly of cellulose (paper products and yard wastes) and lignin (yard wastes). This waste can be combusted or gasified, as described above. All the technologies mentioned above are relatively mature, and are being practiced in some form or another. However, there are other technologies that may be promising, yet present significant challenges and may require more work. An example of this is the use of bacteria to use light to decompose water to yield hydrogen.

Upadhye, R

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Frontier Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frontier Ethanol LLC Frontier Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Frontier Ethanol LLC Place Gowrie, Iowa Product Owner and operator of a bioethanol plant near Gowrie, Iowa. Coordinates 42.28227°, -94.290334° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.28227,"lon":-94.290334,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass ethanol plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas June 16, 2010 - 1:09pm Addthis Community Power Corporation's modular biomass systems can generate up to 100 kilowatts of energy. | Courtesy of Community Power Corporation Community Power Corporation's modular biomass systems can generate up to 100 kilowatts of energy. | Courtesy of Community Power Corporation Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Increased ethanol production will help revitalize the rural economy and decrease America's dependence on foreign oil, but there are other ways to create opportunities in the farmlands. For Robb Walt, president of Community Power Corporation (CPC) in Littleton, Colo., one answer is community-scale, bio-energy service companies, or

442

Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas Modular Biomass Systems Could Boost Rural Areas June 16, 2010 - 1:09pm Addthis Community Power Corporation's modular biomass systems can generate up to 100 kilowatts of energy. | Courtesy of Community Power Corporation Community Power Corporation's modular biomass systems can generate up to 100 kilowatts of energy. | Courtesy of Community Power Corporation Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Increased ethanol production will help revitalize the rural economy and decrease America's dependence on foreign oil, but there are other ways to create opportunities in the farmlands. For Robb Walt, president of Community Power Corporation (CPC) in Littleton, Colo., one answer is community-scale, bio-energy service companies, or

443

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ethanol | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ethanol ethanol Dataset Summary Description These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics representative exposed to gasoline containing various levels of ethanol. These materials are representative of those used in gasoline fuel storage and dispensing hardware. All values are compared to the original untreated condition. The data sets include results from specimens exposed directly to the fuel liquid and also a set of specimens exposed only to the fuel vapors. Source Mike Kass, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords compatibility elastomers ethanol gasoline plastics polymers Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon plastics_dma_results_san.xlsx (xlsx, 4.9 MiB)

445

Aspen Process Flowsheet Simulation Model of a Battelle Biomass-Based Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch Liquefaction and Combined-Cycle Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This study was done to support the research and development program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels using current state-of-the-art technology. The Mitretek study investigated the use of two biomass gasifiers; the RENUGAS gasifier being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology, and the indirectly heated gasifier being developed by Battelle Columbus. The Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio indirectly heated biomass gasifier was selected for this model development because the syngas produced by it is better suited for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with an iron-based catalyst for which a large amount of experimental data are available. Bechtel with Amoco as a subcontractor developed a conceptual baseline design and several alternative designs for indirect coal liquefaction facilities. In addition, ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation models were developed for each of designs. These models were used to perform several parametric studies to investigate various alternatives for improving the economics of indirect coal liquefaction.

None

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Eccleshall Biomass Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eccleshall Biomass Ltd Eccleshall Biomass Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Eccleshall Biomass Ltd Place Eccleshall, United Kingdom Zip ST21 6JL Sector Biomass Product Developing a 2.2MW biomass plant. Coordinates 52.857769°, -2.24958° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.857769,"lon":-2.24958,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creek Ethanol LLC Creek Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Prairie Creek Ethanol, LLC had planned to build a 55m gallon (208m litre) per year ethanol plant in Wesley, Iowa, but, as of 23 May 2008, the board of directors voted to recommend to the members of the company to dissolve the company as soon as possible. Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Biomass Power...

450

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report Ethanol buses were demonstrated within BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST). This report describes the problems at the sites and how they were solved. The aim of the report is to guide other local transport authorities on how to deal with the questions raised when a bus demonstration begins. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

451

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Biomass Analytical Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the pertinent LAPs. Workbooks are available for: Wood (hardwood or softwood) Corn stover (corn stover feedstock) Biomass hydrolyzate (liquid fraction produced from...

452

Biomass fuels: a national plan  

SciTech Connect

The options and potentials of biomass fuel production for the U.S. are reviewed. The following options are discussed: plant or vegetable oils, direct combustion of wood, production of biogas, and alcohol fuels. It is considered essential that a national planning model is developed to integrate the biofuel requirements for arable land and commercial forests with those for food and other traditional uses. (Refs. 32)

Mitchell, T.E.; Schroer, B.J.; Ziemke, M.C.; Peters, J.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Levelland Hockley County Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Levelland Hockley County Ethanol LLC Levelland Hockley County Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Levelland/Hockley County Ethanol LLC Place Levelland, Texas Zip 79336 Product Levelland/Hockley County Ethanol, LLC was formed to construct, own, and operate a 40m gallon per year ethanol production plant. Coordinates 33.58733°, -102.378549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"image