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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

Skelton, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Place Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. References Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd is a company located in Jiangsu Province, China . References ↑ "[ Lianyungang Baoxin Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lianyungang_Baoxin_Biomass_Cogeneration_Co_Ltd&oldid=348336" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

3

Cogeneration project evaluation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a guide for evaluating and implementing cogeneration projects in North Carolina. It emphasizes economic assessment and describes cogeneration technologies and legal guidelines. Included are hypothetical projects to illustrate tax and cash flow calculations and a discussion of cogeneration/utility system interconnection. In addition, the manual contains utility rate schedules and regulations, sources of financing, equipment information, and consulting assistance.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy and exergy analyses of biomass cogeneration systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass cogeneration systems can generate power and process heat simultaneously from a single energy resource efficiently. In this thesis, three biomass cogeneration systems are examined.… (more)

Lien, Yung Cheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Anqiu Shengyuan Biomass Cogeneration Co Ltd Place Anqiu, Shandong Province, China Zip 262100 Sector...

6

Cogeneration Project Analysis Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not long ago, to evaluate the feasibility of a cogeneration project, a simple economic analysis, that considered capital required, operations and maintenance savings, was sufficient. However, under present economic uncertainties (and highly competitive business environment) the situation has changed dramatically. It is now essential to do an in-depth evaluation to insure that very diverse and applicable factors are determined and properly evaluated. This paper will go beyond the "nuts and bolts" analysis of cogeneration economics. It will enumerate and discuss diverse factors, such as, but not limited to: Fuel Considerations, Heat System Analysis, Electric Power Considerations, Key Technical Project Considerations, and Economic Analysis.

Robinson, A. M.; Garcia, L. N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Sector Biomass Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Biomass cogeneration, Port Townsend, Washington Study by Honors 220c, Energy & Environment,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass cogeneration, Port Townsend, Washington Study by Honors 220c, Energy & Environment, Humans. ! ! ! ! ! ! Peter Rhines, May 2012 #12;Port Townsend Cogeneration Project Study: Group One Gillian Kenagy, Maddy Cogeneration Plant, the amount, form, availability, and costs of the slash needs to be quantified. In Bill Wise

9

Baytown Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Baytown Cogeneration Project installed a GE 7FA gas turbine generator that produces 160 MW of electricity and 560-klB/hr of superheated 1500-psig steam. All of the steam and electricity are consumed by the ExxonMobil Refinery & Chemical Plant Complex. Small sales of electricity are possible in winter months. The new Cogen Unit allowed the complex to shutdown three inefficient, 1960’s vintage, steam and electricity generators to improve steam and power generation efficiency and to reduce environmental emissions. The 1500-psig steam generated by Cogen reduces the firing on the conventional boilers which are used in the olefins plant to drive extraction/condensing steam turbines. The lower pressure extracted steam is both used within the olefins plant and exported throughout the refining/chemicals complex.

Lorenz, M. G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and...

11

CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C) PETITION TO AMEND THE CALFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL DECISION SUPPLEMENTAL DATA SUBMITTED JANUARY 12-20, 2012 #12;CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C Safety Orientation that will insure #12;CROCKETT COGENERATION PROJECT (92-AFC-1C) PETITION TO AMEND

12

Why Cogeneration Development Projects Fail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration projects that are organized by developers fail to reach fruition for reasons other than the basic economical or technical soundness of the opportunity. Cogeneration development projects fail because of misunderstanding by the host or other participants of their obligations, inadequate management support by the host organization, regulatory changes, environmental difficulties, overly high expectations of profit, changes in fuel economics, utility policy changes, changing financial markets, and a variety of other issues. Each of these potential problem areas will be discussed briefly, examples will be given, and remedies will be suggested. Most of these potential problems then can be either avoided or attenuated by advanced provisions so that they will not become fatal flaws to project completion.

Greenwood, R. W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council July 12, 2004 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your reference is the abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. This document is designed to correct information and further explain what was provided in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-megawatt gas-fired combined cycle cogeneration facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional

14

Co-generation and Co-production Opportunities with Biomass and Waste Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes a status update on the use of gasification technologies for biomass and waste fuels, either in dedicated plants or as partial feedstocks in larger fossil fuel plants. Some specific projects that have used gasification and combustion of biomass and waste for power generation and the co-generation of power and district heat or process steam, particularly in Europe, are reviewed in more detail. Regulatory and tax incentives for renewable and biomass projects have been in place in most W...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Catawba County, North Carolina Coordinates 35.6840748°, -81.2518833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.6840748,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry India Helping Reduce the Risk of Global Warming Greenhouse Gas Pollution Prevention (GEP) Project in India India is the world’s fifth largest, and second fastest growing, source of greenhouse gas emissions. The GEP Project, conducted under an agreement with USAID-India and NETL, has helped to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal- and biomass-fired power plants. The Project has directly contributed to reducing emissions of CO2 by 6 to 10 million tons per year. India is the largest producer of sugar and also contains vast reserves of coal. Under the Project’s Advanced Bagasse Cogeneration Component, cogeneration (production of electricity and steam) using biomass fuels year-round in high efficiency boilers in sugar mills is promoted. Experts feel that, using the concept of sugar mill cogeneration, that as much as 5,000 megawatts of electricity can be generated through efficient combustion of bagasse in Indian sugar mills.

17

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility March 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Amy Caver (803) 952-7213 March 12, 2012 amy.caver@srs.gov CarolAnn Hibbard, (508) 661-2264 news@ameresco.com AIKEN, S.C. - Today, Under Secretary of Energy Thomas D'Agostino joined U.S. Representative Joe Wilson (R-SC) and other senior officials from the Department of Energy (DOE) and Ameresco, Inc.NYSE:AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, to mark the successful operational startup of a new $795M renewable energy fueled facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 34-acre SRS Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of

18

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility SRS Marks Successful Operational Startup of New Biomass Cogeneration Facility March 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Amy Caver (803) 952-7213 March 12, 2012 amy.caver@srs.gov CarolAnn Hibbard, (508) 661-2264 news@ameresco.com AIKEN, S.C. - Today, Under Secretary of Energy Thomas D'Agostino joined U.S. Representative Joe Wilson (R-SC) and other senior officials from the Department of Energy (DOE) and Ameresco, Inc.NYSE:AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, to mark the successful operational startup of a new $795M renewable energy fueled facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 34-acre SRS Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of

19

Regulatory Requirements for Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1978 Congress passed three energy acts that encouraged cogenerators and small power producers by removing existing state and federal controls or exempting qualified energy producers from new regulations. In 1980 new tax incentives were provided for cogenerators and energy conservation. This paper outlines the portions of these acts that affect cogenerators and also discusses legal issues raised in two judicial opinions that have been issued that could change fundamental concepts in the acts as passed. The possible result of these court actions on the future of cogeneration is also discussed.

Curry, K. A., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

22

HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project is an arrangement between Houston Lighting & Power Company and E. I. Du Pont de Nemours whereby the utility-owned cogeneration facility supplies a portion of the Du Pont process steam requirements. The facility consists of two cogeneration systems, each comprised of a natural gas fired GE 80 MW Frame 7EA, or equivalent, exhausting into a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Gas turhines are equipped with steam injection capability for power augmentation. Supplementary fireable HRSG's provide additional supply reliability for the steam host. Electricity from the project is delivered into HL&P's System through a new 138 KY substation. Such an arrangement offers Du Pont a significant cost saving opportunity as less efficient steam raising equipment is displaced. It also provides HL&P ratepayers with significant benefits, given the fuel efficiencies associated with cogeneration projects.

Vadie, H. H.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS ERIC D. LARSON Milano Milan, Italy ABSTRACT Cogeneration of heat and power at kraft pulp/paper mills from on-site bioma modeling of gasifier/gas turbine pulp-mill cogeneration systemsusing gasifier designs under commercial

24

Financing Co-generation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1980's will be a decade of intense adjustment by busine3s to the cost of money and energy. American Industry will require enormous amounts of capital for energy conservation to remain competitive. However, the average 3.8 percent after tax profit generated by energy intensive industries will not be sufficient to provide the capital required for both normal business expansion and energy conservation projects. Debt financing for energy saving equipment will adversely impact balance sheet figures and liquidity. It appears that only a few of the largest industrial firms have the cash flow to internally finance energy conserving cost reduction projects. These cost reduction projects will reinforce existing dominant cost advantages of industry leaders.

Young, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

26

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Presentation covers the FUPWG Fall Meeting,...

27

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

Not Available

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

30

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province Speaker(s): Giuseppe Muliere Date: June 23, 2009 - 12:30pm Location: 90-3122 The aim of this work is to analyze...

31

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through implementation and organisation of Industrial biomasse ressourcer fra det omkringliggende nærområde kan erhverves, og hvilke der er interessante

32

Review of the Regional Biomass Energy Program: Technical projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes technical projects of the regional Biomass Energy Program. Projects included are as follows: economic impact studies for renewable energy resources; alternative liquid fuels; Wood pellets fuels forum; residential fuel wood consumption; waste to energy decision-makers guide; fuel assessment for cogeneration facilities; municipal solid waste combustion characteristics.

Lusk, P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.

Wiltsee, G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High Efficiency Gas Turbines Overcome Cogeneration Project Feasibility Hurdles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration project feasibility sometimes fails during early planning stages due to an electrical cycle efficiency which could be improved through the use of aeroderivative gas turbine engines. The aeroderivative engine offers greater degrees of freedom in terms of power augmentation through steam injection, NOx control without selective catalytic reduction, (SCR), reduced down time during maintenance and dispatchability. Other factors influencing enhanced aeroderivative economics are complete generator set packaging at the factory and full string testing before the delivery. A wide variety of hosts, including institutions, utilities, municipalities and industrial factories are observing that their cogeneration projects move faster by implementing aeroderivative gas turbine generation packages.

King, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act ("PURPA") of 1978 was born out of the energy crisis of the 1970s. It reawakened the nearly dormant interest in industrial power generation and attached a new name, "cogeneration." PURPA has enabled cogeneration to develop and prosper in North America. Indeed, there is not an area of the industrial USA that has not been touched, and it is now spreading around the world.

Jenkins, S. C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fundamentals of a Third-Party Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is an increasing number of 2-10 MW cogeneration projects involving retrofits at institutional and industrial installations. This type of project requires that the cogeneration equipment be (a) designed and sized to match the electrical and thermal usage of the facility and (b) retrofitted or integrated physically with the facility. Third-party ownership and operation of these installations offer significant advantages such as no capital investment and no risk by the user, technical expertise to handle the more involved implementation of retrofit projects, and the ability to combine cogeneration with other energy conservation measures to reduce total energy costs for many facilities by 15-30%. This paper describes certain fundamentals required for the successful implementation of a third-party cogeneration project such as the 2.5 MW installation at York Hospital in York, Pennsylvania. The most significant fundamentals are the contract between the user and the third party, early contact with the electric utility and gas distribution companies, the ability to keep the capital cost low, the selection of a contractor with retrofit experience, the capability to obtain fuel at favorable terms and conditions, and a practical approach toward operation and maintenance.

Grantham, F.; Stovall, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council September 5, 2003 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your review is the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-Megawatt Gas-Fired Combined Cycle Cogeneration Facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional power transmission grid. To integrate the new power generation into the transmission grid, Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) may need to re-build 4.7 miles of an existing 230-kV

38

Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

NONE

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sensitivity Analysis of Factors Effecting the Financial Viability of Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration represents an alternative available for industry to take advantage of energy conservation through simultaneous generation of thermal energy and electricity. A positive regulatory climate can further contribute to economic viability. However, the economic viability can be impacted by different variables. Presented are a series of sensitivity analyses which were developed for cogeneration projects which indicate the relative impact on project economics.

Clunie, J. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Prospects for biomass-to-electricity projects in Yunnan Province, China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts have been underway since 1989 to assess the prospects for biomass-to-electricity projects in Yunnan Province. Results of prefeasibility studies for specific projects suggest that they are both financially and technically viable. Because of low labor costs and favorable climate biomass can be grown on marginal and underutilized land and converted to electricity at costs lower than other alternatives. Bases on current plantation establishment rates, the potential size of the biomass resource can easily support over 1 GW of electric generating capacity in small-sized (up to 20-40 MW) cogeneration and stand-alone projects. These projects, if implemented, can ease power shortages, reduce unemployment, and help sustain the region`s economic growth. Moreover, the external environmental benefits of biomass energy are also potentially significant. This report briefly summarizes the history of biomass assessment efforts in Yunnan Province and discusses in more detail twelve projects that have been identified for U.S. private sector investment. This discussion includes a feasibility analysis of the projects (plantation-grown biomass and its conversion to electricity) and an estimate of the biomass resource base in the general vicinity of each project. This data as well as information on power needs and local capabilities to manage and operate a biomass-to-electricity project are then used to rank-order the twelve projects. One cogeneration and one stand-alone facility are recommended for additional study and possible investment.

Perlack, R.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their respective decision-making processes associated with the Applicant's request to interconnect to Bonneville's transmission system and proposed location of the project within wetland areas. Therefore, this Draft EIS serves as the environmental review document for SEPA and for NEPA as required by Bonneville for the interconnection and the Corps for its 404 individual permit. The EIS addresses direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the proposed project, and potential mitigation measures proposed by the Applicant, as well as measures recommended by EFSEC. The information and resulting analysis presented in this Draft EIS are based primarily on information provided by the Applicant in the ASC No. 2002-01 (BP 2002). Where additional information was used to evaluate the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, that information has been referenced. EFSEC's environmental consultant, Shapiro and Associates, Inc., did not perform additional studies during the preparation of this Draft EIS.

N /A

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

43

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

44

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendices Appendices DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 SITING AND WETLAND 404(b)1 ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP CHERRY POINT COGENERATION PROJECT [REVISED] Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Submitted by: Golder Associates Inc. March 2003 013-1421.541 March 2003 i 013-1421.541 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED 5 3. ALTERNATIVES 6 3.1 No Action Alternative 6 3.1.1 Self-Reliance 6 3.1.2 Efficiency 6 3.1.3 Reliability 6 3.1.4 Other Impacts of the No Action Alternative 7 3.2 Project Site Location Alternative Selection Process 7 3.2.1 Sufficient Acreage Available

45

Natural Gas Procurement Challenges for a Project Financed Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A decision to project finance a 110 megawatt combined cycle cogeneration facility in 1986 in place of conventional internal financing greatly changed the way in which natural gas was normally procured by Union Carbide Corporation. Natural gas supply security for the term of financing was a major concern of the financing interest, while competitive fuel cost greatly concerned Union Carbide. In addition, the natural gas contract had to be in place prior to construction financing finalization. This paper will explore the thought process that went into evaluating the various natural gas supply proposals that ultimately resulted in the final contractual arrangements. While the information presented will be deliberately non-specific to the suppliers involved or the contractual terms, the discussion will cover the following areas: PROJECT FINANCING REQUIREMENTS, GAS SUPPLY CONSIDERATIONS, SUPPLY TRANSPORTATION EXPEDITIOUS INTERNAL APPROVAL, and SUPPLIER INTANGIBLES.

Good, R. L.; Calvert, T. B.; Pavlish, B. A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and

William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Qing an Cogeneration Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qing an Cogeneration Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Qing'an Cogeneration Plant Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 152400 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass...

48

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts proceeded, and Carbona completed the gasifier island design package. Nexant has completed the balance of plant support systems design and the design for the biomass feed system. Work on the Technoeconomic Study is proceeding. Approximately 75% of the specified hardware quotations have been received at the end of the reporting period. A meeting is scheduled for July 23 rd and 24 th to review the preliminary cost estimates. GTI presented a status review update of the project at the DOE/NETL contractor's review meeting in Pittsburgh on June 21st.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1 During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier. The gasification tests were completed. The GTI U-GAS model was used to check some of the early test results against the model predictions. Additional modeling will be completed to further verify the model predictions and actual results.

Unknown

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Natural gas and waste coal fines were evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. A design was developed for a cofiring combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures in a power generation boiler, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. Following the preliminary design, GTI evaluated the gasification characteristics of selected feedstocks for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembled an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test were used to confirm the process design completed in Phase Task 1. As a result of the testing and modeling effort, the selected biomass feedstocks gasified very well, with a carbon conversion of over 98% and individual gas component yields that matched the RENUGAS{reg_sign} model. As a result of this work, the facility appears very attractive from a commercial standpoint. Similar facilities can be profitable if they have access to low cost fuels and have attractive wholesale or retail electrical rates for electricity sales. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. Phase II has not been approved for construction at this time.

Francis S. Lau

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts proceeded, and Carbona completed the gasifier island design package. Nexant has completed the balance of plant support systems design and the design for the biomass feed system. Work on the Technoeconomic Study is proceeding. Approximately 75% of the specified hardware quotations have been received at the end of the reporting period. A meeting is scheduled for July 23 rd and 24 th to review the preliminary cost estimates. GTI presented a status review update of the project at the DOE/NETL contractor's review meeting in Pittsburgh on June 21st.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Biomass Project Developing a portfolio of sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Biomass Project Field Day Developing a portfolio of sustainable bioenergy feedstock information View the project webpage at http://goo.gl/uUFyv For questions about the Landscape Biomass Field Please enter the farm on the west side off of Unicorn Ave near the "Landscape Biomass Project

Moore, Lisa Schulte

56

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of 2002. GTI worked with DOE to develop the Statement of Work for the supplemental activities. DOE granted an interim extension of the project until the end of January 2002 to complete the contract paperwork. GTI worked with Calla Energy to develop request for continued funding to proceed with Phase II, submitted to DOE on November 1, 2001.

Unknown

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1 During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier. GTI determined that the mini-bench feed system could not handle ''raw'' biomass samples. These clogged the fuel feed screw. GTI determined that palletized samples would operate well in the mini-bench unit. Two sources of this material were identified that had similar properties to the raw fuel. Testing with these materials is proceeding.

Unknown

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to Design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Biomass Project Developing a portfolio of sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Biomass Project Field Day Developing a portfolio of sustainable bioenergy feedstock information View the project webpage at http://goo.gl/uUFyv For questions about the Landscape Biomass Field register at http://www.aep.iastate.edu/biomass by July 25, 2012.Thank you! #12;FEEL Uthe Farm Agronomy Farm

Beresnev, Igor

63

Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd. Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 156300 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass project developer. References Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd. is a company located in Heilongjiang Province, China . References ↑ "[ Heilongjiang Jiansanjiang Nongkensanjiang Cogeneration Co Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Heilongjiang_Jiansanjiang_Nongkensanjiang_Cogeneration_Co_Ltd&oldid=346437"

64

Bagasse-based cogeneration projects in Kenya. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

A Definitional Mission team evaluated the prospects of the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) funding a feasibility study that would assist the Government of Kenya in developing power cogeneration plants in three Kenyan sugar factories and possibly two more that are now in the planning stage or construction. The major Kenyan sugar producing region around Kisumu, on Lake Victoria has climatic conditions that permit cane growing operations ideally suitable for cogeneration of power in sugar factories. The total potentially available capacity from the proposed rehabilitation of the three mills will be approximately 25.15 MW, or 5.7 percent of total electricity production.

Kenda, W.; Shrivastava, V.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

New bern biomass to energy project Phase I: Feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weyerhaeuser, together with Amoco and Carolina Power & Light, performed a detailed evaluation of biomass gasification and enzymatic processing of biomass to ethanol. This evaluation assesses the potential of these technologies for commercial application to determine which technology offers the best opportunity at this time to increase economic productivity of forest resources in an environmentally sustainable manner. The work performed included preparation of site-specific plant designs that integrate with the Weyerhaeuser New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill to meet overall plant energy requirements, cost estimates, resource and product market assessments, and technology evaluations. The Weyerhaeuser team was assisted by Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation and technology vendors in developing the necessary data, designs, and cost information used in this comparative study. Based on the information developed in this study and parallel evaluations performed by Weyerhaeuser and others, biomass gasification for use in power production appears to be technically and economically viable. Options exist at the New Bern mill which would allow commercial scale demonstration of the technology in a manner that would serve the practical energy requirements of the mill. A staged project development plan has been prepared for review. The plan would provide for a low-risk and cost demonstration of a biomass gasifier as an element of a boiler modification program and then allow for timely expansion of power production by the addition of a combined cycle cogeneration plant. Although ethanol technology is at an earlier stage of development, there appears to be a set of realizable site and market conditions which could provide for an economically attractive woody-biomass-based ethanol facility. The market price of ethanol and the cost of both feedstock and enzyme have a dramatic impact on the projected profitability of such a plant.

Parson, F.; Bain, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 The Department of Energy (Department) has the strategic...

68

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation...

69

SUBJECT: SYCAMORE COGENERATION PROJECT (84-AFC-6C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modifications to Operate the Combustion Gas Turbine Unites in an Extended Startup Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) to amend the Energy Commission’s Final Decision (Decision) for the Sycamore Cogeneration project. Staff prepared an analysis of this proposed change and a copy is enclosed for your information and review. The Sycamore Cogeneration project is a 300 megawatt cogeneration power plant located approximately five miles north of the City of Bakersfield, and five miles east of

Edmund G. Brown

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sweet-Talking the Climate? Evaluating Sugar Mill Cogeneration and Climate Change Financing in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004).   Bagasse  Cogeneration  ??  Global  Review  and ?Promotion  of  biomass  cogeneration  with  power  export WADE  2004.   Bagasse  Cogeneration  –  Global  Review  and 

Ranganathan, Malini; Haya, Barbara; Kirpekar, Sujit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story Success Story Success Story Naval Medical Center San Diego Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Co-Generation Project Karen Jackson, SDG&E Karen Jackson, SDG&E Project Manager Project Manager Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Energy Team Contract Energy Team Contract ' ' s Lead s Lead NAVFAC Contractor NAVFAC Contractor ' ' s Guide: s Guide:   Partnering Philosophy Partnering Philosophy - - " " We W are partners e are partners in every contract we award. Partnering is in every contract we award. Partnering is an attitude that we both work hard to an attitude that we both work hard to develop, an it requires both of us to take develop, an it requires both of us to take some extra risk and trust one another. some extra risk and trust one another.

72

Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power  

SciTech Connect

Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Projects Biochemical Conversion Projects A photo of a woman looking at the underside of a clear plastic tray. The tray has a grid of small holes to hold sample tubes. An NREL researcher examines a sample tray used in the BioScreen C, an instrument used to monitor the growth of microorganisms under different conditions. NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock Fermenting these biomass intermediates using biocatalysts (microorganisms including yeast and bacteria) Processing the fermentation product to yield fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels. Among the current biochemical conversion RD&D projects at NREL are: Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

74

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information CoalBiomass Feed and Gasification Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification FE0005293 Development of Kinetics and Mathematical...

75

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0201)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary-1 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is a Federal power marketing agency in the U.S. Department of Energy. BPA is considering whether to transmit (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, gas-fired combustion turbine power generation plant in Morrow County, Oregon. The proposed power plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy when completed. The proposed plant would be built in phases. The first combustion turbine would be built as quickly as possible. Timing for the second combustion turbine is uncertain. As a Federal agency subject to the Nation Environ- mental Policy Act, BPA must complete a review of environmental impacts before it makes a

76

Cogeneration Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration, the sequential use of a fuel to generate electricity and thermal energy, has become a widely discussed concept in energy engineering. American-Standard, a world-wide diversified manufacturing corporation, has actively been pursuing cogeneration projects for its plants. Of concern to us are rapidly escalating electrical costs plus concern about the future of some utilities to maintain reserve capacity. Our review to date revolves around (1) obtaining low-cost reliable fuel supplies for the cogeneration system, (2) identifying high cost/low reserve utilities, and (3) developing systems which are base loaded, and thus cost-effective. This paper will be an up-to-date review of our cogeneration planning process.

Mozzo, M. A. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

78

DOE/EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the

79

High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam cycle/cogeneration: lead project strategy plan  

SciTech Connect

The strategy, contained herein, for developing the HTGR system and introducing it into the energy marketplace is based on using the most developed technology path to establish a HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) Lead Project. Given the status of the HTGR-SC/C technology, a Lead Plant could be completed and operational by the mid 1990s. While there is remaining design and technology development that must be accomplished to fulfill technical and licensing requirements for a Lead Project commitment, the major barriers to the realization a HTGR-SC/C Lead Project are institutional in nature, e.g. budget priorities and constraints, cost/risk sharing between the public and private sector, Project organization and management, and Project financing. These problems are further complicated by the overall pervading issues of economic and regulatory instability that presently confront the utility and nuclear industries. This document addresses the major institutional issues associated with the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project and provides a starting point for discussions between prospective Lead Project participants toward the realization of such a Project.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

EA-1475: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa 75: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa EA-1475: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to provide partial funding for (1) the design and construction of a biomass storage, handling, and conveying system into the boiler at the Ottumwa Generating Station near Chillicothe, Iowa; (2) operational testing of switchgrass as a biomass co-fire feedstock at OGS; and (3) ancillary activities related to growing, harvesting, storing, and transporting switchgrass in areas of the Rathbun Lake watershed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 11, 2003 EA-1475: Final Environmental Assessment Chariton Valley Biomass Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

82

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

83

Opportunity for cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lethbridge Regional Hospital is a 264-bed acute care center that offered an excellent opportunity to use a cogeneration system to provide a substantial portion of the hospital`s electrical and steam requirements. Cogeneration is the cost-effective production of two useful forms of energy using a single energy source. The Lethbridge Regional Hospital cogeneration plant produces electrical energy and heat energy using natural gas as the single energy source. The cogeneration project has helped the facility save money on future utility bills, lowered operating costs and produced a cleaner source of power.

Manning, K. [Lethbridge Regional Hospital, Alberta (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel synthesis reactor. NREL investigates thermochemical processes for converting biomass and its residues to fuels and intermediates using gasification and pyrolysis...

86

AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is geographically located to be able to service a regional market. Other states have active incentive programs to promote the industry. Mississippi has adopted an incentive program for ethanol and biodiesel; however, the State legislature has not funded this program, leaving Mississippi at a disadvantage when compared to other states in developing the bio-based liquid fuel industry. With all relevant factors being considered, Mississippi offers several advantages to developing the biodiesel industry. As a result of AgraPure's work and plan development, a private investor group has built a 7,000 gallon per day facility in central Mississippi with plans to build a 10 million gallon per year biodiesel facility. The development of a thermochemical conversion/generation facility requires a much larger financial commitment, making a longer operational time necessary to recover the capital invested. Without a renewable portfolio standard to put a floor under the price, or the existence of a suitable steam host, the venture is not economically viable. And so, it has not met with the success of the biodiesel plan. While the necessary components regarding feedstocks, location, permitting and technology are all favorable; the market is not currently favorable for the development of this type of project. In this region there is an abundance of energy generation capacity. Without subsidies or a Mississippi renewable portfolio standard requiring the renewable energy to be produced from Mississippi raw materials, which are not available for the alternative energy source selected by AgraPure, this facility is not economically viable.

Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Utility-Affiliated Cogeneration Developer Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will address cogeneration from a utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective on cogeneration as it relates to the development and consumption of power available from a cogeneration project. It will also go beyond this perspective to assess likely structure of the industry in 1985 and beyond.

Ferrar, T. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

White Pine Co. Public School System Biomass Conversion Heating Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The White Pine County School District and the Nevada Division of Forestry agreed to develop a pilot project for Nevada using wood chips to heat the David E. Norman Elementary School in Ely, Nevada. Consideration of the project was triggered by a ''Fuels for Schools'' grant that was brought to the attention of the School District. The biomass project that was part of a district-wide energy retrofit, called for the installation of a biomass heating system for the school, while the current fuel oil system remained as back-up. Woody biomass from forest fuel reduction programs will be the main source of fuel. The heating system as planned and completed consists of a biomass steam boiler, storage facility, and an area for unloading and handling equipment necessary to deliver and load fuel. This was the first project of it's kind in Nevada. The purpose of the DOE funded project was to accomplish the following goals: (1) Fuel Efficiency: Purchase and install a fuel efficient biomass heating system. (2) Demonstration Project: Demonstrate the project and gather data to assist with further research and development of biomass technology; and (3) Education: Educate the White Pine community and others about biomass and other non-fossil fuels.

Paul Johnson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

White Pine Co. Public School System Biomass Conversion Heating Project  

SciTech Connect

The White Pine County School District and the Nevada Division of Forestry agreed to develop a pilot project for Nevada using wood chips to heat the David E. Norman Elementary School in Ely, Nevada. Consideration of the project was triggered by a ''Fuels for Schools'' grant that was brought to the attention of the School District. The biomass project that was part of a district-wide energy retrofit, called for the installation of a biomass heating system for the school, while the current fuel oil system remained as back-up. Woody biomass from forest fuel reduction programs will be the main source of fuel. The heating system as planned and completed consists of a biomass steam boiler, storage facility, and an area for unloading and handling equipment necessary to deliver and load fuel. This was the first project of it's kind in Nevada. The purpose of the DOE funded project was to accomplish the following goals: (1) Fuel Efficiency: Purchase and install a fuel efficient biomass heating system. (2) Demonstration Project: Demonstrate the project and gather data to assist with further research and development of biomass technology; and (3) Education: Educate the White Pine community and others about biomass and other non-fossil fuels.

Paul Johnson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

The McNeil Biomass Project, IG-0630 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The McNeil Biomass Project, IG-0630 The McNeil Biomass Project, IG-0630 The Departmetn of Energy invests about 80 million annualy in biomass programs, focusing on the use of...

93

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

94

Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (DOE/EIS-0349) (11/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Cherry Poi BP Cherry Poi nt Cogeneration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0349, August 2004). Under the proposed action, Bonneville will offer contract terms for interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (Project) with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS), as requested by BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP) and proposed in the FEIS. The proposed Project involves constructing and operating a new 720-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power generation facility at a 265-acre site adjacent to BP's existing Cherry Point Refinery between Ferndale and

95

Panel: Regulatory governance and adaptation to climate change GREEN POLITICS AND NEW INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES: THE AQUITAINE PAPER INDUSTRY AND BIOMASS COGENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: As the European forest industry takes up the challenge of certification, it is also called upon to develop a strategy which mitigates the effects of climate change. From the latter perspective, the forest industry is solicited to pursue the carbon neutrality of its activity (through the Exchange Trade System). Today, public policies have thus led the forestry industry to develop green energy by biomass cogeneration. Cogeneration is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, both of which are used in paper-making. The aim of policy is to extend such production of electricity to cover domestic consumption. Such a path makes the forest and paper industries go deeper in the sustainability of their activities but it also makes them develop new strategies. From the point of view of political science, this new policy and industrial orientation can be best examined through analyzing the making and implementing of the territorial environmental strategies that cover both certification and forestry programs. In industrial terms, such a strategy not only challenges current practices of local resources provision and the valorisation of wood wastes, but more fundamentally still it constitutes the development of a new path, a new market and new constraints (in terms of norms and competition). The aim of our proposal is to highlight the displacements of

Yves Montouroy I; Arnaud Sergent Ii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Why Cogeneration? 24MW of local renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Cogeneration? · 24MW of local renewable energy · Reduced emissions and cleaner air · Retain 300 Wood Chips Sawdust Pulp Paper Emissions Production #12;Port Townsend Paper - Cogeneration Biomass

97

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cogeneration/Cogeneration - Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the rationale for cogeneration and basic turbine types available. Special considerations for cogeneration in conjunction with solid waste firing are outlined. Optimum throttle conditions for cogeneration are significantly different than normal practice for condensing units. The basic approach to cycle optimization is outlined with some typical examples offered.

Pyle, F. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Developer's Role in the Cogeneration Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although cogeneration technology is well-established, the business is new and still taking shape. Cogeneration projects involve a diverse mix of organizations, including equipment suppliers, engineering and construction firms, fuel suppliers, operators, financiers and regulatory agencies. Because of this complexity, an increasing number of projects are being sponsored by cogeneration developers, who design, construct, own and operate the facilities. The benefits energy users gain from third-party developed cogeneration projects and how the developer brings together these groups to effectively implement cogeneration projects will be described.

Whiting, M. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Projects Microalgal Biofuels Projects A photo of a man in a white lab coat holding a glass flask that contains a small amount of clear green liquid. An NREL researcher analyzes algae samples for oil content using the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter. NREL's microalgal biofuels projects focus on determining the feasibility and economic capability of employing algae as a cost-effective feedstock for fuel production. NREL researchers pioneered developing microalgal biofuels by leading the U.S. Department of Energy Aquatic Species Program from 1979 to 1996. Among NREL's RD&D projects in converting microalgae to biofuels are: Development of Algal Strains NREL and Chevron Corp. are collaborating to develop techniques to improve the production of liquid transportation fuels using microalgae. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

Jonathan Bolling

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cogeneration Operational Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A great deal of the discussions concerning congeneration projects are focused on the "avoided cost" and other legal issues which effect these projects. These areas are extremely important and are essential to the success of the venture. Equally important, however, are the operational Issues which impact the utility and the cogenerator. This paper addresses the utility perspective in regard to possible impact of cogeneration systems on utility service to other customer, safety and substation operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both the cogenerator and the utility have an interest in solving these problems.

Williams, M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes A photo of a control room with four large computer screens. A man and a woman are looking at the screens. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit is equipped with sophisticated process monitoring and operation control systems. NREL is focused on integrating all the biomass conversion unit operations. With extensive knowledge of the individual unit operations, NREL is well-positioned to link these operations together at the mini-pilot and pilot scales. Among the integrated biorefinery projects are: Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative Sorghum shows promising characteristics as a feedstock for biofuel production. However, little basic research data exists. NREL is performing integrated research on sorghum by studying it at every step along the

104

NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects A photo of a large white tank the size of a water heater. Several metal fittings stick out of the sides of the tank. Thin tubes are attached to some of the fittings and lead to flow meters and other metal pipes. Researchers use experimental data from this four-inch fluidized bed reactor to develop and validate gasification process models. NREL uses chemical analysis to study biomass-derived products online during the conversion process. Catalysts are used in the thermochemical conversion process to convert tars (a byproduct of gasification) to syngas and to convert syngas to liquid transportation fuels. Among the chemical and catalyst science projects at NREL are: Catalyst Fundamentals NREL is working to develop and understand the performance of catalyst and

105

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

List of CHP/Cogeneration Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP/Cogeneration Incentives CHP/Cogeneration Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 279 CHP/Cogeneration Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 279) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive New Mexico Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier CHP/Cogeneration Geothermal Electric Photovoltaics

107

Industrial Cogeneration Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the sequential use of a single fuel source to generate electrical and thermal energy. It is not a new technology but an old, proven one whose interest has been reawakened. American Standard has had concerns regarding electrical pricing to our facilities as well as reserve generating capacity margins of some electrical utilities. Because of these concerns, we have been reviewing the potential of cogeneration at some of our key facilities. Our plan is to begin with a Pilot Plant 500 KW steam turbine generator to be installed and operating in 1986. Key points to be discussed in the paper are: 1. Relationship with outside parties, i.e., state agencies and the utility, regarding the project. 2. Engineering of the System. 3. Economics of the Project.

Mozzo, M. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-Scale Eucalyptus Energy Farms and Power Cogeneration1 Robert C. Noronla2 The initiation of a large-scale cogeneration project, especially one that combines construction of the power generation supplemental fuel source must be sought if the cogeneration facility will consume more fuel than

Standiford, Richard B.

109

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Department of Energys Administration of Energy Savings Performance Contract Biomass Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration of Energy Savings Performance Contract Biomass Projects DOE/IG-0892 August 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Administration of Energy Savings Performance Contract Biomass Projects" BACKGROUND Currently, biomass is the single largest source of renewable energy in the United States. Biomass technologies convert fuels developed from various feed stocks to heat and/or electricity and can be used in place of fossil fuels in most energy applications, such as steam boilers, water

111

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Biomass Repowering Options for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to help organizations with fossil-fired generation assets better understand their options for taking advantage of biomass-derived fuels at existing facilities. It considers plant conversions that completely replace fossil fuels through repowering as well as options that focus on high-percentage cofiring of biomass along with fossil fuels. Drawing on the experiences of operating facilities that have converted to biomass and from prior work, the analysis underlying this report...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - H2 Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Pressurizing CoalBiomass Mixtures Using Posimetric Solids Pump Technology PDF-626KB (Feb 2011) Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for...

113

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cogeneration Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay Lecture at NITIE on March 18 Electricity Electricity Heat Heat Cogeneration SHP #12;Cogeneration Concept Boiler 90% Power plant 40% Where is the scope for improvement? Cogeneration- Simultaneous generation of heat and power (motive power

Banerjee, Rangan

115

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

117

Determination of the potential market size and opportunities for biomass to electricity projects in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts are currently underway to assess the market potential and prospects for the US private sector in biomass energy development in Yunnan Province. Among the specific objectives of the study are to: estimate the likely market size and competitiveness of biomass energy, assess the viability of US private sector ventures; assess non-economic factors (e.g., resource, environmental, social, political, institutional) that could affect the viability of biomass energy; and recommend appropriate actions to help stimulate biomass initiatives. Feasibility studies show that biomass projects in Yunnan Province are financially and technically viable. Biomass can be grown and converted to electricity at costs lower than other alternatives. These projects if implemented can ease power shortages and help to sustain the region`s economic growth. The external environmental benefits of integrated biomass projects are also potentially significant. This paper summarizes a two-step screening and rank-ordering process that is being used to identify the best candidate projects for possible US private sector investment. The process uses a set of initial screens to eliminate projects that are not technically feasible to develop. The remaining projects are then rank-ordered using a multicriteria technique.

Perlack, R.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Microsoft Word - 564M_Biomass_Project Descriptions FINAL 120409...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 More...

120

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russell Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Russell Biomass Place Massachusetts Sector Biomass Product Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Biomass Place India Sector Biomass Product Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References Star Biomass1 LinkedIn...

122

Cogeneration development and market potential in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Xin, D. [State Planning Commission of China, Beijing, BJ (China). Energy Research Inst.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Bayou Cogeneration Plant- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bayou Cogeneration Plant is a prime example of the high fuel efficiency and consequent energy savings an industrial company can realize from cogeneration. A joint venture of Big Three Industries, Inc., and General Electric Company, this $100 million power plant became operational late last year and produces approximately 1.4 million lb/hr of process steam and 300 MW of electricity. As the turnkey supplier, General Electric was responsible for the entire project from cycle engineering through start up and is currently operating and maintaining the plant. This paper describes the factors which led Big Three Industries to build a cogeneration power plant and the route selected for project implementation. Also included is a brief profile of project implementation, highlighting the responsibilities of the turnkey supplier and specific steps taken to compress the project into a 20-month schedule, resulting in significant cost savings and enabling Big Three to realize cogeneration benefits as early as possible.

Bray, M. E.; Mellor, R.; Bollinger, J. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

On-site cogeneration for office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of alternative means of enhancing the economic attractiveness of cogeneration for use in office buildings. One course of action designed to achieve this end involves directing the exhaust heat of a cogeneration unit through an absorption chiller to produce cooling energy. Thus, the units could be operated more continuously, particularly if thermal storage is incorporated. A second course of action for improving the economics of cogeneration in office buildings involves the sale of the excess cogenerated waste heat. A potential market for this waste heat is a district heating grid, prevalent in the downtown sections of most urban areas in the US. This project defines a realistic means to guide the integration of cogeneration and district heating. The approach adopted to achieve this end involved researching the issues surrounding the integration of on-site cogeneration in downtown commercial office buildings, and performing an energy and economic feasibility analysis for a representative building. The technical, economic and legal issues involved in this type of application were identified and addressed. The research was also intended as a first step toward implementing a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of office building cogeneration in San Francisco. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Policy considerations for biomass commercialization and its impact on the Chariton Valley biomass project  

SciTech Connect

Growing biomass energy crops on erosive lands, then using them as a substitute fuel in coal-fired power plants can reduce air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion and water pollution. Regrettably, the current market value of biomass, which is higher relative to coal, prevents this substitution. Left out of the equation are the costs of related environmental damages and the public expenditures for their prevention. The cumulative value of the benefits derived from substituting biomass for coal likely outweighs the current market price difference, when the public costs and benefits of clean air and water are considered. Public policy to encourage substitution of biomass for coal and other fossil fuels is a vital component in the commercialization of energy crops. This is specifically demonstrated in south central Iowa where switchgrass is being considered as a coal substitute in the Chariton Valley Resource Conservation and Development (RC and D) area. Marginal land use, rural development, and soil, air and water quality concerns are all drivers for policies to increase the value of switchgrass compared to coal.

Cooper, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cogeneration: The Need for Utility-Industry Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is receiving increasing attention because of its potential for efficient utilization of energy. Many recent cogeneration studies, however, have concentrated on the benefits and costs of cogeneration to industry, giving little consideration to utility roles and perspectives. This paper provides an overview of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate industrial cogeneration applications, taking into account utility interactions and impacts. Recent changes in federal legislation, particularly the enactment of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), have attempted to remove many of the institutional barriers which in the past made industry hesitant to invest in cogeneration. However, to implement the most attractive cogeneration systems industry must consider the changing economics of utility power generation. Also, despite the attractiveness of cogeneration, many industrial managers are reluctant to invest scarce capital in an area which they do not consider a natural extension of their business. At the same time, many utilities facing slower load growth and economic/environmental /institutional constraints on capacity expansion are willing to consider cogeneration as an option. Cogeneration projects can be highly complementary to the traditional utility business and possibly offer an attractive profit potential. Also, utilities can offer industry the needed expertise to implement and operate cogeneration systems. Considerable benefits may therefore be derived from cooperative cogeneration ventures among utilities and industrial firms. Many different organizational and financial arrangements can be structured, including third party financing. The, paper will briefly discuss the need for and benefits of cooperative efforts and provide illustrative examples of different institutional arrangements.

Limaye, D. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants November 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy today announced projects selected for more than $24 million in grants to research and develop technologies to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. Of the $24.4 million announced today, DOE plans to invest up to $4.9 million with USDA contributing up to $19.5 million. Advanced biofuels produced through this funding are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent compared to fossil fuels. "The selected projects will help make bioenergy production from renewable

128

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants November 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy today announced projects selected for more than $24 million in grants to research and develop technologies to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. Of the $24.4 million announced today, DOE plans to invest up to $4.9 million with USDA contributing up to $19.5 million. Advanced biofuels produced through this funding are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent compared to fossil fuels. "The selected projects will help make bioenergy production from renewable

129

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poso Cogeneration Poso Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Poso Cogeneration Place Bakersfield, California Zip 93308 Product California-based project developer for the Mt Poso Cogeneration project near Bakersfield, California. Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

Biomass One LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass One LP Place White City, Oregon Product Owner and operator of a 25MW wood fired cogeneration plant in Oregon. References Biomass One LP1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

134

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

135

Cogeneration`s role in the emerging energy markets: A report from the University of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utilities required to satisfy the university`s electrical, steam and chilled water needs are generated at the cogeneration facility located in the center of the main campus. The building housing this cogeneration facility was constructed in 1909, at this time it contained a cogeneration facility. The original facility produced 1/100 the capacity of the new facility, yet it was housed in the same area. This existing facility burned coal until April 16, 1932, when the last coal train to pass through the campus on the Colorado and Southern tracks whistled at the campus crossing at 8:45 in the evening. This signaled the end to the cogeneration era at the Boulder campus until September 27, 1992, when once again the university began commercial operation of the new cogeneration facility. Implementation of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act of 1978 (PURPA) encouraged the development of cogeneration facilities due to their inherent energy efficiency. The federal government encouraged the development of cogeneration facilities by removing several major obstacles that historically deterred its full development. It was because of this act, coupled with the fact that the university is interested in energy conservation, reliable energy supply, has a large utility load and wishes to save money that they proceeded with their project. The paper describes the cogeneration system process and power options.

Swoboda, G.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Engineering and Utilities Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Microsoft Word - 564M_Biomass_Project Descriptions FINAL 120409  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Grant Amount Non-Fed Amount Project Location (City) Project Location (State) Description 1) Pilot and Demonstration Scale FOA - Pilot Scale Algenol Biofuels Inc. $25,000,000 $33,915,478 Freeport TX This project will make ethanol directly from carbon dioxide and seawater using algae. The facility will have the capacity to produce 100,000 gallons of fuel- grade ethanol per year. American Process Inc. $17,944,902 $10,148,508 Alpena MI This project will produce fuel and potassium acetate, a compound with many industrial applications, using processed wood generated by Decorative Panels International, an existing hardboard manufacturing facility in Alpena. The pilot plant will

137

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Third Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 240 to 258, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,547 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 416 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Of the 258 signed contracts and committed projects, 83 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 779 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 38 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 797 MW to 848 MW, and 19 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 152 MW to 159 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 21, with a generating capability of 528 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind farm projects, totaling 257 to 262 MW. There are 94 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There are 50 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 112 MW, as well as 67 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E is planning to construct.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cogeneration- The Rest of the Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyone is praising the daylights out of cogeneration these days. And while it may be the best energy system design, there are numerous questions that should be asked before anyone jumps on the bandwagon. We are not seeing enough sobriety and good old engineering conservatism. Since when are we designing systems without checking our assumptions? Where have professionalism, ethics and care gone? Why is it that only five of the past 100 cogeneration evaluations we reviewed were conservative and fair representations? This paper illustrates a step-by-step approach to checking the accuracy of a cogeneration project. Illustrations of typical errors and their consequences are also developed. Potential industrial and commercial users should find this list helpful in evaluating requests for proposals (RFPs). Electric and gas utilities could use this list to assist customers when looking closely at cogeneration. And regulators and their staffs should consider the potential for unscrupulous tricks and traps to be played on unsuspecting or naive buyers.

Gilbert, J. S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cogeneration Can Add To Your Profits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predicted rapid escalation of gas and electric costs, particularly in those utility systems predominantly fired by gas, make it important for both industry and utilities to evaluate the role of cogeneration in their future plans. Industries requiring a continuous supply of steam and with fuel available at a cost not significantly higher than the utility will usually find that cogeneration with its higher fuel effectiveness can offer a significant saving in their costs of steam and powers at a return on investment above their required 'hurdle rate.' Also, cogeneration can offer important advantages to utilities, particularly those faced with the need to increase near term capacity but uncertainty as to the long term load growth. Cogeneration plants have a permit/construction period of two to three years and are rarely over 100 MW in size. To the extent sizable continuous steam loads are present in the utility system, cogeneration alleviates the uncertainty in projecting the need conventional large utility plants, adds efficient capacity in smaller increments and if jointly or wholly owned by industry reduces the capital costs to the utility. The PURPA regulations, with their procedures for calculating avoided cost, limit the benefits the utility and their customers can directly receive from industrially-owned cogeneration. They can share in the benefits if they are adequate to permit industry to receive a reasonable savings and return on their investment and a contract is negotiated to permit the utility and its customers to receive the remainder. Under the present PURPA, the utility can own up to 50% of a cogeneration plant and under this ownership arrangement, the utility and its customers can directly receive the benefits of cogeneration. When is cogeneration advantageous and what are the interactions between the industrial sites' energy requirements, the cogeneration plant configuration and its economics? Economics are the 'bottom line' in determining the potential for installing a cogeneration plant. In this paper, the performance and cost characteristics of various types of cogeneration plants, with emphasis on gas turbine plants, will be described together with their matching to the site energy requirements and the effect that these interactions together with fuel cost and electric power rates have on the economic benefits

Gerlaugh, H. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cogeneration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogeneration Technologies Place Houston, Texas Zip 77070 Sector Biomass, Solar Product Provides efficient systems in the fields of demand management, biofuel, biomass and solar CHP systems. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

142

Thermal tracking cogeneration -- A new or old idea? Cogeneration for multi-thermal loads  

SciTech Connect

The idea of designing a cogeneration project that produces electricity based on the existing heating load is common to many cogeneration projects, but may be limiting the ultimate potential to the end user. Cogeneration which is developed as a power generator producing a small amount of steam for a host load is also common. However, the idea of designing a cogeneration facility to track multiple utility loads is not as common. Where the concept has been used, the projects have been very successful. This article has been written as a primer for professionals looking for ideas when performing analysis of a potential cogeneration project, and as a thought-provoker for end users. The authors will look at each of the possible loads, outline various technical considerations and factors, look at the factors impacting the economics, and lay out an approach that would provide assistance to those trying to analyze a cogeneration project without specialized engineering assistance. Regulatory, legal and financing issues are covered in other sources.

Geers, J.R. [PLM Technologies, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

cogeneration | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cogeneration cogeneration Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are four electricity generation datasets: quarterly net electricity by fuel type from 1974 to 2010 (in both GWh and PJ); annual net electricity generation by fuel type- cogeneration separated (1975 - 2009); and estimated generation by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009). The fuel types include: hydro, geothermal, biogas, wind, oil, coal, and gas. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas coal cogeneration Electricity Generation geothermal Hydro Natural Gas oil wind Data

144

Case Studies of Industrial Cogeneration in the U. S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a survey and evaluation of plant-specific information on industrial cogeneration. The study was performed as part of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate Dual Energy Use Systems (DEUS). The purpose of this project was to evaluate site specific data on DEUS from the utility perspective, identify promising candidates, and define R&D opportunities. The first major task in this DEUS project was a survey of industrial cogeneration sites to identify the technoeconomic and institutional factors affecting the success of cogeneration systems in industry. Sites were selected based on a mix of industry types, geographic location, type of cogeneration system, generating capacity, age of plant and other characteristics. Site-specific surveys were conducted and supplemented by information from secondary sources such as FERC and DOE statistical data systems. This paper presents information on 17 cogeneration facilities. Also presented is information on the perspectives of the relevant utilities.

Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Hough, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design and Evaluation of Alternative Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the fall of 1973, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRIY initiated a program for design and evaluation of alternate cogeneration systems. The primary objective of the study is to analyze the overall system (industry and utility) value of cogeneration. A state-of the-art assessment of cogeneration was initiated, in which 17 cogeneration systems were studied in detail. Following the Completion of the case studies, project definition was begun to determine preferred cogeneration systems. From this activity a screening model was developed. The model will be linked to existing methodology to assess the question of capacity credit. Concurrent to the development of the model are a series of cogeneration conceptual designs. The first of these have been completed for pulp and paper industry. The designs were done for two 1985 market pulp mills: one in New England, and the other in the Northwest. The second set of conceptual designs are being performed for two enhanced oil recovery sites. Two additional site specific conceptual designs are planned.

Mauro, R. L.; Hu, S. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

COGEN3: Cogeneration analysis software Version 1. 3: User's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing the most economical cogeneration system for a specific facility involves selecting exactly the right combination of technology, operating schedule, and fuel from a large number of options. The COGEN3 code enables utilities to optimize all aspects of a cogeneration project from conceptual design to economic resources.

Duff, M.C.; Price, W.G.; Davis, A.N.; Manuel, E.H.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Industrial cogeneration optimization program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

PETITION FOR POST CERTIFICATION PROJECT MODIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Authority Procter & Gamble Cogeneration Project Docket No. 93-AFC-2 December 2007 Prepared for: Sacramento Cogeneration Authority Prepared by: 2870 Gateway Oaks Drive, Suite 150 Sacramento, CA 95833 #12

149

Switchgrass biomass energy storage project. Final report, September 23, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the Chariton Valley RC&D Inc., a USDA-sponsored rural development organization, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Energy Bureau (IDNR-EB), and IES Utilities, a major Iowa energy company, is directed at the development of markets for energy crops in southern Iowa. This effort is part of a statewide coalition of public and private interests cooperating to merge Iowa`s agricultural potential and its long-term energy requirements to develop locally sustainable sources of biomass fuel. The four-county Chariton Valley RC&D area (Lucas, Wayne, Appanoose and Monroe counties) is the site of one of eleven NREL/EPRI feasibility studies directed at the potential of biomass power. The focus of renewable energy development in the region has centered around the use of swithgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.). This native Iowa grass is one of the most promising sustainable biomass fuel crops. According to investigations by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), switchgrass has the most potential of all the perennial grasses and legumes evaluated for biomass production.

Miller, G.A.; Teel, A.; Brown, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's Power Industry," Cogeneration Technolo- gy, V o l .tion Development," Cogeneration Technol- ogy, V o l . 41, NE Y NATIONAL LABORATORY Cogeneration Development and Market

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Guide to natural gas cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This user-oriented guide contains expert commentary and details on both the engineering and economic aspects of gas-fired cogeneration systems. In this completely undated second edition, is a thorough examination of equipment considerations and applications strategies for gas engines, gas turbines, steam engines, and electrical switch-gear. Clear guidelines show how to select the prime mover which is best suited for a specific type of application. It describes which methods have proven most effective for utilizing recoverable heat, how to determine total installed capacity, and how to calculate the required standby capacity. The second edition provides an assessment of recent technological developments. A variety of case studies guide through all types of natural gas cogeneration applications, including both commercial and industrial, as well as packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. Drawing upon the expertise of numerous authorities from the American Gas Association, this fully illustrated guide will serve as a valuable reference for planning or implementing a natural gas-fired cogeneration project.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NREL: Biomass Research - Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam Plant with Efficient Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam Plant with Efficient Biomass Cogeneration January 30, 2013 The 1940s central steam plant at the Marine Corps Recruiting Depot (MCRD) on Parris Island, seven miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina, has far exceeded its projected life and is no longer cost-effective to operate. MCRD staff tasked NREL to help replace this artifact with an efficient biomass cogeneration facility. NREL will assess needs and help develop a request for proposal for designing and constructing the new facility. After the initial site review, the NREL assessment team will: Verify existing resources and biomass costs Optimize facility size and location Model the entire system and generate a process flow diagram Estimate costs and create an economic evaluation

153

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter - March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the First Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 204 to 224, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,246 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 259 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. Of the 224 signed contracts and committed projects, 70 were cogeneration and solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 687 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 30 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 744 MW to 821 MW, and 12 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 118 MW to 126 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 17, with a generating capability of 330 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 9 wind farm projects, totaling 184 to 189 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 9 other projects under active discussion. There are 38 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 103 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 183 MW. In addition, there are 29 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of March 31, 1983.

None

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proceedings: 1986 EPRI cogeneration symposium  

SciTech Connect

On October 14-15, 1986, EPRI sponsored a Symposium on cogeneration to examine the major issues of current interest to utilities. The Symposium, held in Washington, DC, provided a forum for the review and exchange of information on the recent cogeneration experiences of utilities. Specific topics discussed were federal cogeneration regulations and their impacts on utilities, cogeneration trends and prospects, utility leadership in cogeneration ventures, strategic utility planning relative to cogeneration, small cogeneration: implications for utilities; and electric alternatives to cogeneration. Some of the critical issues relative to cogeneration from the utility perspective were explored in case studies, discussions and question/answer sessions. This report contains the 24 papers presented and discussed at the Symposium. They are processed separately for the data base.

Limaye, D.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cogeneration: An Industrial Steam and Power Option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities of all sizes have the ability to reduce and better control both power and steam costs with a cogeneration system. Unlike the larger systems that sell almost all of the cogenerated power to a regulated electric utility, these internal use systems use the cogenerated power on-site to reduce power purchases. Ranging from a few hundred kilowatts to tens of megawatts, they are somewhat smaller than the Wholesale Power systems; system size is determined by the industrial plant's electric and thermal requirements and not by an external need for power by a utility. These systems can be very cost effective but require considerably more engineering analysis of site conditions than is typical for a Wholesale Power Project; it is necessary to analyze the industrial host's power and thermal requirements on an hour by hour basis. Moreover, because economic viability is dependent upon displacing some or all of the industrial site's purchased power requirements, considerable attention must be given to the analysis of the local utility's retail rates. This paper describes the concept of an Internal Use cogeneration system and reviews some of the key factors that must be considered in evaluating the viability of a cogeneration facility at any specific industrial site.

Orlando, J. A.; Stewart, M. M.; Roberts, J. R.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Integration of Cogeneration and Space Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the production of electrical and thermal energy from a single fuel source. In comparison, electric power generation rejects the useful heat energy into lakes or other heat sinks. Electric generation alone provides approximately 30 percent of its prime energy for useful end-use energy, while cogeneration makes approximately 80-85 percent of its prime energy source available for useful work (Figure A). The application of the thermal energy is critical to the economic analysis of a cogeneration project since nearly two-thirds of the energy and economic savings are produced by the hot water and/or exhaust gases. Finding a productive and economical application for the thermal energy is extremely important.

Phillips, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evaluating Sites for Industrial Cogeneration in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is an industrial energy conservation technology that is particularly suited to urban applications. Large cities and metropolitan areas have large numbers of energy intensive industrial firms as well as commercial buildings; universities and hospital complexes; and new, densely populated residential developments that have large thermal and electric demands. Potential sites have been evaluated as part of a project to encourage industrial cogeneration applications in Chicago. Energy-intensive industries and commercial, industrial, and residential facilities were grouped by energy use type. Natural gas and electricity consumption data then were used to develop energy use profiles by energy use type and location. Complementary thermal energy use profiles and the geographical proximity of firms and facilities were used to exclude unfavorable sites. Thirty-four sites were then evaluated in detail and ranked according to their suitability for consideration in detailed feasibility studies of different cogeneration technologies.

Fowler, G. L.; Baugher, A. H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR #12;PT COGENERATION LLC A wood-burning cogeneration power plant - Generates electricity (for sale off paper making process, black and white liquor , sludge #12;SLASH BURNING Slash burned in 2008: Jefferson

159

SRS Biomass Startup NR-03 12 12 - DOE FINAL.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACTS FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACTS FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Amy Caver (803) 952-7213 March 12, 2012 amy.caver@srs.gov CarolAnn Hibbard, (508) 661-2264 news@ameresco.com SRS MARKS SUCCESSFUL OPERATIONAL STARTUP OF NEW BIOMASS COGENERATION FACILITY Senior DOE Officials and SC Congressional Leadership Gather to Celebrate Major Renewable Energy Project AIKEN, S.C. - (March 12) Today, Under Secretary of Energy Thomas D'Agostino joined U.S. Representative

160

Where is the Cogeneration Business Going?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration proponents are still haling the wonders and marvels of cogeneration in the hope of convincing customers to adopt this energy option. Despite the hype, fewer and fewer cogeneration projects are being adopted. Why? Where is the business going? Is the bloom off the rose? The answer may be all too obvious. Historically (three to eight years ago), cogeneration was pursued largely because of inadequate or, in some way, failing boilers at industrial plants. These steam generators would have to be replaced or upsized anyway and customers used the combination of capital offsets and low operating efficiencies to justify cogeneration. In cases where these industrial firms did not want anything but the end result (i.e., added steam capacity at some reasonable price) they signed up with energy deal makers who sold them steam at some discount from current costs. Where regulatory agencies forced electric utilities to buy power at levelized or in inflated avoided costs, free steam deals were offered to secure an appropriate steam host. But times have changed. Why are customers interested in cogeneration now? Boiler and chiller-related inadequacies are still present, but power quality has risen to the number one driver (outside of regulatory or electric utility incentives). That may seem somewhat of a surprise since electric utilities are historically more reliable than cogenerators. The best cogeneration systems in the United States achieve 98% availabilities. There isn't a major electric utility that delivers less than 99.9+%. Why the interest? The first reason is momentaries. Many electric utilities do not even keep track of their service disruptions shorter than one minute in duration. Reclosers and other system operations that produce multiple cycle interruptions do not effect annual percent availability, but they sure do effect customers! The reason why is also obvious: microprocessors. Customers are increasing their use of computers in process control and office automation. This combination makes customer productivity and performance extremely power sensitive. Banks and insurance carriers are similarly affected. With the power availability scare so prevalent in the Northeast, and the threat of voltage reductions and interruptions, it is small wonder more customers aren't cogenerating. Part of the reason as well is that thermal efficiency, the very backbone of the reason cogeneration was spawned in 1978, is currently almost a dead issue. PURPA compliance is virtually a non-issue. Customers are even dropping in simple emergency generators and foregoing the heat recovery altogether! How can they make this judgement? Simple! The lure of the current low gas prices has lulled them into benign neglect of the intrinsic cogeneration power generation efficiency. They simply cannot justify heat recovery in the cogeneration system design! Isn't that ironic given the rebirth of cogeneration in 1978 to reduce our dependence on foreign oil by taking advantage of this intrinsic power generation efficiency.

Gilbert, J. S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NISCO Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NISCO Cogeneration facility utilizes two fluidized bed boilers to generate 200 MW of electricity and up to 80,000 LBS/HR of steam for process use. The partnership, of three industrial electricity users, Citgo, Conoco, and Vista Chemical, and the local utility, Gulf States utilities, was formed in the late 1980's. In August and September 1992 two fluidized bed boilers were brought into operation to repower existing turbine generating equipment. The fluidized bed units were designed to utilize 100 percent petroleum coke, a locally produced fuel. Petroleum coke is a high heating value, low volatile, high sulfur fuel which is difficult to utilize in conventional boilers. It is readily available in most areas throughout the world, including North and South America. Because of superior environmental performance, lower capital cost, and fuel versatility, circulating fluidized bed boilers were selected to repower the existing turbines. Fluidized bed boilers were ideally suited for a repowering application. Existing equipment matched or was modified for utilization in the project optimizing capital cost. The fluidized bed boilers, designed and fabricated by Foster Wheeler, are each capable of producing 825,000 LBS/HR of steam. This paper describes the results attained at NISCO during the first full year of operation. The design attributes of the project which enabled a successful and efficient unit startup are explained. Descriptions of design enhancements and modifications installed during the first year to improve the operability of the repowered facility are included. This paper describes technology and experiences of value to those considering steam generating unit repowering or construction.

Zierold, D. M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The global dimension of the endomorphism ring of a generator-cogenerator for a hereditary artin algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global dimension of the endomorphism ring of a generator-cogenerator for a hereditary artin a -module which is both a generator and a cogenerator. We are going to describe the possibilities is called a generator if any projective module belongs to add M; it is called a cogenerator if any injective

Ringel, Claus Michael

163

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cogeneration for industrial and mixed-use parks. Volume 3. A guide for park developers, owners, and tenants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Using cogeneration in mixed-use and industrial parks can cut energy costs ad smooth out peak load demands - benefits for servicing utilities and park owners and tenants. The two handbooks developed by this project can help utilities identify existing or planned parks as potential cogeneration sites as well as help developers and park owners evaluate the advantages of cogeneration. The second handbook (volume 3) describes the benefits of cogeneration for park developers, owners, and tenants.

Schiller, S.R.; Minicucci, D.D.; Tamaro, R.F.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced systems demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume III. Equipment specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains all of the equipment specifications to be utilized for the proposed biomass co-generation plant in Maine. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Dynamics of Cogeneration or "The PURPA Ameoba"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PURPA legislatively removed obstacles that had previously served as disincentives to the development of cogeneration. As a result, projects that met certain fuel efficiency standards and other criteria could now theoretically move forward. Because of a number of institutional and technical reasons, the nature of the cogeneration industry has undergone significant changes during its brief life span. Since the passage of PURPA, the entire cogeneration situation on all fronts (the Utility commissions, utilities, and cogenerators) can be characterized as very dynamic. State Utility Commissions are struggling to implement rational policies to deal with the very complex matrix of issues and concerns. Utilities attitudes have changed as they recognize the inevitability of cogeneration and attempt to integrate lit into their system. Cogenerators approach to projects have undergone changes in response to economic realities and the developing policies of the Commissions and the utilities. Past and present trends in the dynamic development of cogeneration are identified in this paper land the reasons for their existence are examined. An understanding of the basic reasons for these trends helps provide insight into where the industry may be headed in the future.

Polsky, M. P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Florida Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Biomass Energy, LLC Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Florida-based biomass project developer. References Florida Biomass Energy, LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

168

Cogeneration for resort hotels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resort Hotels should be considered for application of co-generation to take advantage of higher thermal efficiency and consequent energy cost avoidance. Modern resort hotels require comfort and reliability from mechanical and electrical systems on an around the clock basis. Load profiling reveals simultaneous process heating and electricity use requirements that aid in the selection and sizing of co-generation equipment. Resort Hotel needs include electrical loads for lighting, fan motors, elevators, escalators and receptacle uses. Process heat demands arise from kitchen, servery, banquet, restaurant, laundry, and bakery functions. Once the loads requiring service have been quantified and realigned (shifted) to maximize simultaneous demands the engineering task of co-generation application becomes one of economics. National legislation is now in place to foster the use of co-generating central utility plants. Serving utility companies are now by law required to buy back excess energy during periods of reduced hotel demands. Resort Hotel loads, converted into electricity and heat demands are tabulated in terms of savings (positive cash flow) or costs (negative cash flows). Cash flow tabulations expressed in graphs are included. The graphs show the approximate simple payback on initial costs of co-generation systems based on varying electricity charges.

Baker, T.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration and cogeneration. Additionally, this report describes long-term strategies, pathways, and milestones to take

170

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cogeneration Economics for Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the incentives for cogeneration, describing pertinent legislation and qualification requirements for cogeneration benefits, and indicates the performance and economic characteristics of combined cycle cogeneration applications. The Fuel Use Act (FUA) restricts the use of un-renewable or premium fuels (e.g., natural gas and oil) for high-load-factor or base-load power generation. The Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) encourages high-efficiency cogeneration by providing exemptions to the restrictions and requiring that utilities purchase cogenerated power at rates corresponding to the costs they "avoid" by not generating this power.

Ahner, D. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cogeneration Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative What is Cogeneration? Cogeneration, (also% (a typical power plant has a 35% efficiency rate). Newer cogeneration microturbines al- low for cogeneration to be used directly in residential and commercial buildings. CHP systems can run on various fu

Paulsson, Johan

173

Generation Cogeneration [the data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal and natural-gas power plants lose as waste heat two-thirds of the energy they produce. Combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems¿what used to be called cogeneration-attain 80 percent efficiency by capturing the heat and using it locally. CHP predates ...

P. Patel-Predd

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cogeneration Markets: An Industry in Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The year 1986 saw three fundamental changes in the character of development of cogeneration on the U.S. Gulf Coast. First, numerous large projects were cancelled, delayed, or drastically down-sized during 1986. Most capacity reduction or delay was accountable to very large, multiple gas turbine combined cycle systems, including much more electric generating capability than was matched with or needed to serve a useful process steam demand. Second, previously initiated projects designed wholly or largely to supply legitimate thermal demands generally sent forward. Third, there was a threefold increase in wheeling of cogenerated electricity out of HL&P’s service area to the service areas of other utilities. All of these effects are traceable to rapidly declining rates at which HL&P purchases electricity and to increased demand for electricity by some other utilities. These trends imply a future for cogeneration in the HL&P service area characterized by construction of small projects intended to serve plant internal thermal and electrical loads only and/or development of a few relatively large projects for sale to other electric utilities.

Breuer, C. T.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

DOE/SC-ARM-13-014 Biomass Burning Observation Project Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Biomass Burning Observation Project Science Plan LI Kleinman AJ Sedlacek September 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

176

Definition: Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cogeneration The production of electric energy and another form of useful thermal energy through the sequential use of energy [as defined under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA)].[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Cogeneration power plants produce electricity but do not waste the heat this process creates. The heat is used for district heating or other purposes, and thus the overall efficiency is improved. For example could the efficiency to produce electricity be just 20%, and the overall efficiency after heat extraction could reach be 85% for a cogeneration plant. It has to be considered that there is not always use for heat., Bioenergy cogeneration describes all technologies where heat as well as

177

Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed generating resources. Also provided is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed of cogeneration and distributed generation in the Northwest. Cogeneration and distributed generation infrastructure requirements. In contrast, cogeneration and distributed generation are sited with respect to some

178

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro. Bob Koon 10 April 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro, and are there other biomass projects competing for it? 2. Air quality, including particulates and winds and human the town? How many jobs will be created? Will this save the paper mill or is it independent? Generally what

182

Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Place Texas Utility Id 4383 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

183

IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name IPT SRI Cogeneration Inc Place California Utility Id 9297 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

184

Clear Lake Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clear Lake Cogeneration LP Place Idaho Utility Id 3775 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

185

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l as a detailed guide to cogeneration-application procedures1.1 is a guide to these changes i n cogeneration development

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cogeneration System Design Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commercial or industrial firm contemplating cogeneration at its facilities faces numerous basic design choices. The possibilities exist for fueling the system with waste materials, gas, oil, coal, or other combustibles. The choice of boiler, engine, turbine, generator, switchgear, and balance of plant can be bewildering. This paper presents an overview and a systematic approach to the basic system alternatives and attributes. The presentation illustrates how these options match the electrical and thermal needs of a firm, and what kind of operating economics and system paybacks have been achieved. Several cogeneration options are also illustrated to eliminate the problems and uncertainties of dealing with uninterested or non-cooperative utilities, as well as to minimize system costs.

Gilbert, J. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Overview of Cogeneration at LSU.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cogeneration (or Combined Heat and Power) continues to gain importance in power production because of its high efficiency, environmental friendliness, and flexibility. Louisiana State University… (more)

Buckley, Robert,Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Economics of Cogeneration Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and choice of a specific cogeneration system is a process of selecting and deciding from numerous alternatives, including the option not to cogenerate. The final system specification is in reality the result of an extensive tradeoff analysis. The reason for performing a thorough tradeoff analysis is to design a cogeneration system that will meet or surpass stated technical, operational and economic criteria. This paper outlines the steps necessary to select the preferred cogeneration system through the use of standard economic evaluation techniques.

Fisk, R. W.; Hall, E. W.; Sweeney, J. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Part-load cogeneration technology meets chilled water and steam requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Louisiana State University`s Energy Savings Performance Contract with CES/Way was a groundbreaking project that applied part-load cogeneration technology to a large university campus to meet chilled water and steam requirements for expansion needs. Simultaneously, the project provided these utilities at no additional out of pocket cost to the institution by using the innovative financing mechanism of performance contracting, in which project savings pay for the investment. In addition, the work is performed via a cogeneration system operating most of the year at part-load. This mechanical cogeneration project could also be termed a thermal cogeneration project, as it provides a dual thermal benefit from a single input energy source. Not only did the project achieve the projected energy savings, but the savings proved to be so dependable that the University opted for an early buyout of the project from CES/Way in 1994, after only about two years of documented savings.

Leach, M.D. [CES/Way International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Northeast regional biomass program. Retrospective, 1983--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten years ago, when Congress initiated the Regional Biomass Energy Program, biomass fuel use in the Northeast was limited primarily to the forest products industry and residential wood stoves. An enduring form of energy as old as settlement in the region, residential wood-burning now takes its place beside modern biomass combustion systems in schools and other institutions, industrial cogeneration facilities, and utility-scale power plants. Biomass today represents more than 95 percent of all renewable energy consumed in the Northeast: a little more than one-half quadrillion BTUs yearly, or five percent of the region`s total energy demand. Yet given the region`s abundance of overstocked forests, municipal solid waste and processed wood residues, this represents just a fraction of the energy potential the biomass resource has to offer.This report provides an account of the work of the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) over it`s first ten years. The NRBP has undertaken projects to promote the use of biomass energy and technologies.

Savitt, S.; Morgan, S. [eds.] [Citizens Conservation Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Biomass production by fescue and switchgrass alone and in mixed swards with legumes. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the role of biomass in alleviating potential global warming, the absence of information on the sustainability of biomass production on soils of limited agricultural potential is cited as a major constraint to the assessment of the role of biomass. Research on the sustainability of yields, recycling of nutrients, and emphasis on reduced inputs of agricultural chemicals in the production of biomass are among the critical research needs to clarify optimum cropping practice in biomass production. Two field experiments were conducted between 1989 and 1993. One study evaluated biomass production and composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown alone and with bigflower vetch (Vicia grandiflora L.) and the other assessed biomass productivity and composition of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown alone and with perennial legumes. Switchgrass received 0, 75 or 150 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} or was interseeded with vetch. Tall fescue received 0, 75, 150 or 225 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually or was interseeded with alfalfa (Medicago L.) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). It is hoped that production systems can be designed to produce high yields of biomass with minimal inputs of fertilizer N. Achievement of this goal would reduce the potential for movement of NO{sub 3} and other undesirable N forms outside the biomass production system into the environment. In addition, management systems involving legumes could reduce the cost of biomass production.

Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Univ. of Agronomy

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act) implementation: Policy issues and choices: The Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide some guidance in the structuring of state rules for the implementation of Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act (PURPA) of 1978. The problem posed here is how might rules be structured to allow for the development of biomass facilities which qualify, but which are not biased in favor of non-renewable resources. Such protects are likely to have different requirements necessary for their development than, for example, hydroelectric facilities. In a general comparison of the two, biomass projects will be fuel and fuel contract dependent, less capital intensive, and more likely to be dispatchable on an annual basis. In addition, biomass facilities may be cogenerators and have available to them more than one revenue stream. Biomass facilities may also be more likely than the hydros to go out of business during the term of the contract.

Salgo, H.

1986-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

194

EUROPEAN COGENERATION CERTIFICATE TRADING- ECOCERT Demand creation and scheme interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As interest in market-based domestic mechanisms has increased in the EU, a tradable certificate scheme for CHP is an option. During the period January 2002- April 2003, within the European Cogeneration Certificate Trading (ECoCerT) project, activities have been undertaken in a series of phases to analyse a CHP certificate scheme. The ECoCerT project was financially supported

M. G. Boots

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic assessment model, and a data base to track customers over time. A case study is presented describing the background, procedures, and results of a cogeneration investigation for Northeast Utilities.

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY) .......................................................................... 91 Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass) ......................................................................................................................... 111 Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members, and Project Advisors

197

Assessment of cogeneration technologies for use at Department of Defense installations. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of two types of energy, usually electricity and thermal energy, from a single energy source such as natural gas or diesel fuel. Cogeneration systems can be twice (or more) as efficient than conventional energy systems since both the electricity and the available thermal energy produced as a by-product of the electric generation, are used. This study identified cogeneration technologies and equipment capable of meeting Department of Defense (DOD) requirements for generation of electrical and thermal energy and described a wide range of successful cogeneration system configurations potentially applicable to DOD energy plants, including: cogeneration system prime movers, electrical generating equipment, heat recovery equipment, and control systems. State of the art cogeneration components are discussed in detail along with typical applications and analysis tools that are currently available to assist in the evaluation of potential cogeneration projects. A basic analysis was performed for 55 DOD installations to determine the economic benefits of cogeneration to the DOD. The study concludes that, in general, cogeneration systems can be a very cost effective method of providing the military with its energy needs.

Binder, M.J.; Cler, G.L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electrical Cogeneration ……………………. …………… 16 2.4.OptimalELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A thesis submitted inFOR ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A solar tracker and

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Recanati, Catherine

200

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume V. Electrical and instrumentation elementary diagrams and instrument indexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains detailed drawings and diagrams of electrical systems and instruments which will be included in a biomass cogeneration facility in Maine. (DMC)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Alternatives to Industrial Cogeneration: A Pinch Technology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pinch Technology studies across a broad spectrum of processes confirm that existing plants typically consume 15-40% more thermal energy than they should. Consequently, many cogeneration schemes have been based on thermal requirements and characteristics that are inconsistent with a properly designed and integrated process. Pinch Technology studies also frequently identify projects, based on conventional technology, that require lower capital outlays, achieve more rapid paybacks, and entail less risk than those associated with proposed cogeneration projects. Cogeneration schemes that survive the scrutiny of Pinch Technology are often smaller -- but invariably more cost-effective -- than those being contemplated or now being operated. Most importantly, only the results of such a study truly enable the process operator to evaluate the relative merits of cogeneration and other options for reducing operating costs. Recognizing that cogeneration will, at times, be an appropriate part of an industrial process, utilities have an opportunity to work with their industrial customers using Pinch Technology to insure that the alternatives are properly defined and well understood. Recent case study results show that such cooperation can often yield sounder capital investment decisions and lower operating costs for the industrial operator and load-building and load-retention opportunities for the utility.

Karp, A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

MIT: $avings through cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has installed an `inside-the-fence` cogeneration plant as a way of controlling costs for their increasing electric power and steam requirements. The cogeneration system fits neatly on one side of the campus power plant, with the GT10A gas turbine in an enclosure. The generator is located on one end, the HRSG to the side. On the instrument/control side, the gas turbine is equipped with a Westinghouse DCS control system. A Horriba emission monitoring system keeps track of pollution. Power in excess of the 22 MW produced by the gas turbine-generator must be purchased from the local utility. As requirements rise in future years, this could become more common, which may lead MIT, in 4-5 years, to convert to a combined cycle system. The steam-generating capabilities of the HRSG are adequate for the addition of a 10-MW backpressure steam turbine, should they make this decision. 3 figs.

Barker, T.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

Western, E.R. (Oryx Energy Co., Fellows, CA (US)); Nass, D.W. (Chas. T. Main Inc., Pasadena, CA (US))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Eligibility Utility...

206

A Feasibility Study of Fuel Cell Cogeneration in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Up until now, most of the literature on fuel cell cogeneration describes cogeneration at commercial sites. In this study, a PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell cogeneration system was designed for an industrial facility and an economic analysis was performed. The US DOE Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database was examined to determine what industry considers a good investment for energy saving measures. Finally, the results of the cogeneration analysis and database investigation were used to project the conditions in which the PC25C might be accepted by industry. Analysis of IAC database revealed that energy conservation recommendations with simple paybacks as high as five years have a 40% implementation rate; however, using current prices the simple payback of the PC25C fuel cell exceeds the likely lifetime of the machine. One drawback of the PC25C for industrial cogeneration is that the temperature of heat delivered is not sufficient to produce steam, which severely limits its usefulness in many industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of the system is highly dependent on energy prices. A five year simple payback can be achieved if the cost of electricity is $0.10/kWh or greater, or if the cost of the fuel cell decreases from about $3,500/kW to $950/kW. On the other hand, increasing prices of natural gas make the PC25C less economically attractive.

Phelps, S. B.; Kissock, J. K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cogeneration as a retrofit strategy  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the retrofitting of cogeneration in industrial plants. The paper describes a cost analysis, feasibility analysis, prime movers, induction generation, developing load profile, and options and research. The prime movers discussed include gas turbines, back-pressure turbines, condensing turbines, extraction turbines, and single-stage turbines. A case history of an institutional-industrial application illustrates the feasibility and benefits of a cogeneration system.

Meckler, M. [Meckler Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Screen payback on cogeneration-system options  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are charts that provide a quick look at the relationship among the primary variables that affect the viability of a cogeneration project. The graphs are not intended to be complete feasibility studies, but rather screening aids for understanding the important interrelationships. Use of the charts will enable engineers to compare the predominant system options: gas turbine with heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG), diesel engine with HRSG, and fired boiler with steam turbine. The three options are presented separately because of differing capital costs and heat balances.

Wilson, F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

210

Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Does Cogeneration Make Sense for Me? Agency/Company /Organization: University of Illinois at Chicago Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.chpcentermw.org/pdfs/Toolbox__TechBrief.pdf This guide provides a few simple questions and calculations, including an example calculation, for facility owners who want to begin to understand

211

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

SRW Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRW Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name SRW Cogeneration LP Place Texas Utility Id 17483 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

213

Applying SE Methods Achieves Project Success to Evaluate Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

Applying basic systems engineering (SE) tools to the mission analysis phases of a 2.5-million dollar biomass pre-processing project for the U.S. Department of Energy directly assisted the project principal investigator understand the complexity and identify the gaps of a moving-target project and capture the undefined technical/functional requirements and deliverables from the project team and industrial partners. A creative application of various SE tools by non-aerospace systems engineers developed an innovative “big picture” product that combined aspects of mission analysis with a project functional flow block diagram, providing immediate understanding of the depth and breath of the biomass preprocessing effort for all team members, customers, and industrial partners. The “big picture” diagram became the blue print to write the project test plan, and provided direction to bring the project back on track and achieve project success.

Larry R. Zirker; Christopher T. Wright, PhD; R. Douglas Hamelin

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Industrial Plant Objectives and Cogeneration System Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a cogeneration system requires a definition of plant management's objectives in addition to process energy demands. And, these objectives may not be compatible with options that will yield the most attractive rate of return. This paper will review cogeneration system application criteria and illustrate how plant objectives can influence the cogeneration system selection.

Kovacik, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cogeneration Economics and Financial Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has received much attention as a way to improve the efficiency of energy generation and conversion. This interest has been stimulated by higher energy costs for fuel and electricity as well as economic incentives granted by the federal government for industrial cogeneration. This paper discusses a variety of cogeneration systems applied at specific sites drawn from the major industrial sectors - food, textiles, pulp and paper, chemicals, and petroleum refining. Various technologies are considered. Capital and operating cost estimates are developed for the most promising systems to calculate cash flows and determine return on investment for a industrial ownership options of these facilities. Conclusions summarize the relation between technology, relative electric energy costs, and fuel costs.

Kusik, C. L.; Golden, W. J.; Fox, L. K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optimal Scheduling of Cogeneration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant, feeding its output water into a district-heating grid, may include several types of energy producing units. The most important being the cogeneration unit, which produces both heat and electricity. Most plants also have a heat water storage. Finding the optimal production of both heat and electricity and the optimal use of the storage is a difficult optimization problem. This paper formulates a general approach for the mathematical modeling of a cogeneration plant. The model objective function is nonlinear, with nonlinear constraints. Internal plant temperatures, mass flows, storage losses, minimal up and down times and time depending start-up costs are considered. The unit commitment, i.e. the units on and off modes, is found with an algorithm based on Lagrangian relaxation. The dual search direction is given by the subgradient method and the step length by the Polyak rule II. The economic dispatch problem, i.e. the problem of determining the units production giv...

Erik Dotzauer; Kenneth Holmström

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Price incentives of industrial cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the strategies of current national energy policy is to promote the combined production of electricity and steam at industrial sites. The impact of relative electricity and fuel prices on the decision to cogenerate is examined here. The strategy of the study is to compare the costs of two firms that are identical except for the way they acquire electricity: one firm purchases electricity while the other cogenerates. Using this framework, the relationship between the elasticity of the price of electricity with respect to the price of fuel and the parameters of the production function is shown to be a key to the decision to cogenerate. Some preliminary empirical estimates of this relationship are also presented.

Maddigan, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Taylor Biomass, LLC (Taylor) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support the construction and startup of a biomass gasification-to energy facility at a 95-acre recycling facility in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, NY. The Project would involve the construction of a Post-Collection Separation Facility, a Gasification System and a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Island.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INJECTIVE COGENERATORS AMONG OPERATOR BIMODULES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Given C ?-algebras A and B acting cyclically on Hilbert spaces H and K, respectively, we characterize completely isometric A, B-bimodule maps from B(K, H) into operator A, B-bimodules. We determine cogenerators in some classes of operator bimodules. For an injective cogenerator X in a suitable category of operator A, B-bimodules we show: if A, regarded as a C ?-subalgebra of A?(X) (adjointable left multipliers on X), is equal to its relative double commutant in A?(X), then A must be a W ?-algebra. 1.

Bojan Magajna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EPRI Cogeneration Models -- DEUS and COPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Fall of 1978, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a program for the design and evaluation of alternate cogeneration systems. The primary objective of the study is to analyze the overall system value of cogeneration. A portion of the study involved the development of a simulation model for evaluation of cogeneration systems on a site specific basis. Dual Energy Use Systems (DEUS) model contains an extensive data base with which to cost and size many different cogeneration systems and compare them with the no-cogeneration system for the same process. A financial and institutional model has been developed to follow the after tax cash flows from the attractive cogeneration configurations identified in DEUS. The financial model, Cogeneration Options Evaluation (COPE), is designed to consider the financial and regulatory implications for the utility, the industry and where relevant, third parties, for all practically feasible combinations of ownership.

Mauro, R.; Hu, S. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses electric rate alternatives to cogeneration for the industrial customer and attempts to identify the effects on the utility company, the industrial customer as well as remaining customers. It is written from the perspective of one company and its exposure to cogenerstion within its service territory.

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent compared to fossil fuels. "The selected projects will help make bioenergy production from renewable...

226

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

227

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ibid. “SB 704 – Energy to Biomass Program Documents Page. ”Jersey Clean Energy Program. “Biomass System Helps LumberCriteria for Sustainable Biomass Projects. ” http://

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place Norcross, Georgia Zip 30092 Sector Biomass Product Project developer...

229

A Cogeneration Overview by a Large Electric and Gas Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become a "buzz" word in the energy industry of late and it is appropriate to review the history, benefits, penalties, and attitudes that apply to cogeneration. By cogeneration, we mean the production of industrial process steam as a ...

Rudolph D. Stys; Arthur W. Quade

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Cogeneration Plant: Meeting Long-Term Objectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to meet economic objectives of cogeneration projects, reliable operation must be achieved. The key to successful operation is proper preparation beginning at the economic justification stage and continuing through conceptual design, detailed design, construction and commissioning and start-up. Key points that affect the economics of future operation are listed. Problems can occur during operation, even with the best of preparation. Remedies are suggested in the potential problem areas of fuel supply, power sales, energy costing, accounting, and equipment capacity.

Greenwood, R. W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

232

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

233

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commercial Buildings across the United States Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small...

234

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under...

235

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS SRS Biomass Cogeneration Plant Tech Stage: Deployed (Operational) Energy Savings Performance Contract Project ID: Task Order No.-KL46299M The technical solution has been deployed to the A-Area at Savannah River Site. Page 1 of 2 Savannah River Site South Carolina Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Challenge In order to meet the federal energy and environmental management requirements in Presidential Executive Order 13423, DOE Order 430.2B, and the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, DOE Secretary Samuel Bodman encouraged the DOE federal complex to utilize third party financing options like the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). Specifically, this innovative renewable steam plant meets two of the TEAM initiatives, which strengthens the federal requirements by requiring that DOE sites (1)

236

Simulation aids cogeneration system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems using gas turbines and heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in chemical process industries (CPI) plants. Because these plants are quite expensive and the HRSG is an important part of the system, it is prudent to analyze the heat-recovery system or simulate its performance well in advance of finalizing plant specifications. Simulation is a method of predicting the performance of the HRSG under different operating modes and gas and steam conditions without physically designing the equipment. Such a study will provide the engineer with valuable information about the HRSG and its performance capabilities. The simulation results could influence the choice of steam system parameters and the selection of the steam or gas turbine. In addition, one may also obtain information about the performance of the HRSG and the cogeneration system. This article explains what HRSG simulation is and the basic methodology. Its applications are then illustrated through several examples.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Regulator's View of Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission regulates essentially all types of public utilities and has the authority to investigate issues of public interest. To establish a point of reference, Pennsylvania's utilities contribute about 5 percent of the total national electric generation. In view of the energy requirements of Pennsylvania's industry and the impact of increasing energy costs on employment the Commission directed its technical staff to investigate the potential for industrial cogeneration and a pricing formula consistent with the electric utilities' costs. The Commission's technical staff has completed proposed regulations to implement the provisions of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) Section 210 concerning small power producers. The regulations incorporate suggestions from both potential producers and utilities. Staff has devised a strategy for utility purchases of energy and capacity which should be of interest to regulators in other jurisdictions, encourage potential cogenerators and satisfy utilities.

Shanaman, S. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Superposition, A Unique Cogeneration Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial steam systems provide opportunities for the economic cogeneration of heat energy and shaft power. Progressive plant owners and managers have utilized these potentials. Too often opportunities are not exploited. A plant that is expanding, is being substantially modernized, or is converting from petroleum fuels to coal, should carefully examine cogeneration design options. Depending on the thermodynamic condition of throttle steam for its major turbines, a high pressure/temperature power plant may be SUPERPOSED on the existing plant. Extraction/backpressure turbogenerators can exhaust into retained high performance turbines and to process steam loads. They will produce high value, favorably priced power for in-plant use and/or sale to the franchised utility. The concepts are not new, but increasing tendencies to fuel conversion and the combining of cycles should prompt unique applications. Microcomputer modeling and systems analyses are used to develop examples.

Viar, W. L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Interconnection Provider Arkansas Public Service Commission The Cogeneration Rules are enforced by the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are designed to ensure that all power producers looking to sell their power to residents of Arkansas are necessary, benefit the public and are environmentally friendly. Under these rules new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation Self-Use Electricity Rate Total Heat Supplythan those for electricity rates, seri- ously affectingthe local utilities' electricity rates. Cogenerators pay .02

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cogeneration of cooling energy and fresh water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A design simulation of the cogeneration system allowed to chose the best HD unit configuration, while a TRNSYS off-design simulation revealed the main design variables… (more)

PICINARDI, ALBERTO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Applied Control Strategies at a Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of “classical strategies for dynamic control” on authentic cogeneration processes. These strategies are applied… (more)

Burns, Joseph William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CHP/Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of CHPCogeneration Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCHPCogeneration&oldid267...

245

Continuous countercurrent chromatographic separator for the purification of sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Final project report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of pure sugars is required to enable production of fuels and chemicals from biomass feedstocks. Hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose (principal constituents of biomass) produces sugars that can be utilized in various fermentation process to produce valuable chemicals. Unfortunately, the hydrolysis process also liberates chemicals from the biomass that can be toxic to the fermenting organisms. The two primary toxic components of biomass hydrolyzate are sulfuric acid (catalyst used in the hydrolysis) and acetic acid (a component of the feed biomass). In the standard batch chromatographic separation of these three components, sugar elutes in the middle. Batch chromatographic separations are not practical on a commercial scale, because of excess dilution and high capital costs. Because sugar is the {open_quotes}center product,{close_quotes} a continuous separation would require two costly binary separators. However, a single, slightly larger separator, configured to produce three products, would be more economical. This FIRST project develops a cost-effective method for purifying biomass hydrolyzate into fermentable sugars using a single continuous countercurrent separator to separate this ternary mixture.

Wooley, R.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Chariton Valley Biomass Project Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass is a warm-weather, native Iowa grass that grows well on marginal land. It has been identified and extensively studied for its potential as a biomass energy crop, especially its potential for use as co-fire feedstock in coal-burning plants. In this environmental assessment (EA), the term ''co-fire'' refers to the burning of switchgrass in the OGS boiler in conjunction with coal, with the goal of reducing the amount of coal used and reducing emissions of some objectionable air pollutants associated with coal combustion. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide partial funding for (1) the design and construction of a biomass (switchgrass [Panicum virgatum]) storage, handling, and conveying system into the boiler at the Ottumwa Generating Station (OGS) near Chillicothe, Iowa; (2) operational testing of switchgrass as a biomass co-fire feedstock at OGS; and (3) ancillary activities related to growing, harvesting, storing, and transporting switchgrass in areas of the Rathbun Lake watershed. Chillicothe is in Wapello County on the south side of the Des Moines River, approximately 16 kilometers (10 miles) northwest of Ottumwa, Iowa, and 130 kilometers (80 miles) southeast of Des Moines. The OGS is a 725-megawatt (MW) maximum output, low-sulfur, pulverized coal-burning plant jointly owned by several Iowa utilities and operated by Alliant Energy. The plant is located about 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) northwest of Chillicothe, Iowa, on the Des Moines River. The following three-phase switchgrass co-fire test campaign has been planned and partially implemented at OGS: During Phase 1, which occurred from November 2000 through January 2001, Alliant Energy conducted Co-fire Test 1 at OGS. Phase 2 testing, the Proposed Action, would consist of two additional co-fire tests. Co-fire Test 2, which would utilize some residual equipment from Co-fire Test 1 and also test some new equipment, is currently planned for September/October 2003. It would be designed to test and demonstrate the engineering and environmental feasibility of co-firing up to 11.3 tonnes (12.5 tons) of switchgrass per hour and would burn a maximum of 5,440 tonnes (6,000 tons) of switchgrass. Co-fire Test 3, which is tentatively planned for winter 2004/2005, would test the long-term (approximately 2,000 hours) sustainability of processing 11.3 tonnes (12.5 tons) per hour. Co-fire Test 3 would be conducted using a proposed new process building and storage barn that would be constructed at the OGS as part of the Proposed Action. Phase 3, commercial operations, may occur if Phase 2 indicated that commercial operations were technically, environmentally, and economically feasible. Continuous, full-scale commercial operations could process up to 23 tonnes (25 tons) of switchgrass per hour, generate 35 MW per year of OGS's annual output, and replace 5 percent of the coal burned at OGS with switchgrass. Chariton Valley Resource Conservation and Development Inc. (Chariton Valley RC&D), a rural-development-oriented, non-profit corporation (Chariton Valley RC&D 2003a) and Alliant Energy would implement Phase 3 at their discretion after the completion of the Phase 2 co-fire tests. DOE's Proposed Action would support only Phase 2 testing; that is, Co-fire Tests 2 and 3. DOE has no plans to provide financial support for the commercial operations that would be performed during Phase 3. The new construction that DOE proposes to partially fund would include a new switchgrass processing facility and equipment and a new storage barn that would be used for Co-fire Test 3. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental impacts that could result from the Proposed Action. It also evaluates the impacts that could occur if DOE decided not to partially fund the Proposed Action (the No Action Alternative). No other action alternatives are analyzed because (1) no generating plants other than OGS have the installed infrastructure and operating experience necessary to conduct Phase 2 co-fire testing, and (2) the Rathbun Lake watershed is the only viable

N /A

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

248

Utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the cogeneration industry to address electric power market requirements, some market observations and forecasts, and changes in the cogeneration industry are discussed. It is concluded that utility planning will increasingly need to account for the noted changing power market characteristics. Effective planning for electric utilities will require recognition of the competitive nature of the power business.

Ferrar, T.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cogeneration Considerations in the 1980's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing cost of both purchased fuel and power will be the incentive to maximize the output available from cogeneration energy supply systems. This paper reviews steam and combined cycle cogeneration systems available to industrials requiring large quantities of process heat and power. Examples are developed to illustrate the economic benefit of improved systems as energy costs increase.

Kovacik, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Identifying Energy Systems that Maximize Cogeneration Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the maximizing of Regional Cogeneration Energy Savings utilizing various technologies and fuels within a given service region. A methodology is developed to establish the allocation of power to the individual cogenerators such that overall energy economic benefits are maximized while process steam needs are simultaneously satisfied. Application of the methodology is illustrated and discussed.

Ahner, D. J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of unbalanced faults on transient stability of cogeneration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effects of unbalanced faults on the transient stability of a real cogeneration plant. First, a brief is given for the structure of the cogeneration system. Use of the electromagnetic transient program (EMTP) constructs the cogeneration ... Keywords: CCT curve, EMTP, cogeneration plant, transient stability, unbalanced faults

Wei-Neng Chang; Chia-Han Hsu

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 MW) biomass and other renewable projects that supply powerBiomass projects were also eligible for incentives through RIREF’s “2002 Renewable Generation Supply”

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

254

Design Considerations for Large Industrial Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems have been contributing to the profitability of many industrial plants for years. However, with the renewed interest in energy and conservation as the cornerstone of the National Energy Act, it is important that the alternatives available to fully exploit this technology be fully understood. This paper will review the considerations required to develop meaningful cogeneration systems. Turbine types, ratings, steam conditions and other parameters will be discussed and their impact on economics will be illustrated. Furthermore, the influence of tax incentives on the economics of cogeneration systems will be explored.

Kovacik, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Microgy Cogeneration Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Systems Inc Cogeneration Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Microgy Cogeneration Systems Inc Place Tarrytown, New York Zip 10591 Product New York-based Microgy Cogeneration Systems develops, owns and operates anaerobic digester systems. Coordinates 41.080075°, -73.858649° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.080075,"lon":-73.858649,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Management decisions for cogeneration : a survey analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology. It employs alpha factor analysis techniques to develop ...

Radcliffe, Robert R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Plymouth Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Plymouth Cogeneration LP Place New Hampshire Utility Id 15112 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

259

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Management decisions for cogeneration : executive summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes two interdependent studies which explore the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology. They employ ...

Radcliffe, Robert R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hunterdon Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunterdon Cogeneration LP Place New Jersey Utility Id 8927 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

262

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Morris Cogeneration LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Morris Cogeneration LLC Place Illinois Utility Id 54755 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

264

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes application considerations, design criteria, design features, operating characteristics and performance of a 200 MW combined cycle cogeneration plant located at Occidental Chemical Corporation's Battleground chlorine-caustic plant at La Porte, Texas. This successful application of a total energy management concept utilizing combined cycle cogeneration in an energy intensive electrochemical manufacturing process has resulted in an efficient reliable energy supply that has significantly reduced energy cost and therefore manufacturing cost.

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Considerations for Gas Turbine Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The success of a cogeneration system depends upon the system being available, i.e. operating and meeting its demands under expected environmental conditions. A high availability in turn, depends on both Reliability (indicating how often the system fails), and Maintainability (indicating how fast it can be returned to a satisfactory operating state). A low availability will adversely effect important economic criteria for the project such as Discounted Cash Flow and Payback. This paper provides a structure by which these important parameters can be addressed at the design evaluation stage. The paper discusses reliability methods and practical aspects such as installation and operation considerations, including air filtration, fuel conditioning and compressor washing.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

UNITAR boosts cogeneration for heavy crude production  

SciTech Connect

The UNITAR/UNDP Information Center for Heavy Crude and Tar Sands publicized the favorable effect of cogeneration on the economics of generating steam for in situ recovery of heavy oil. Although cogeneration of electricity with the production of steam for heavy crude production is a rapidly growing activity in California, it is still unknown in other countries where heavy crude is produced. The study concentrated on two specific cases: a heavy crude cogeneration plant in Kern County in California and a heavy crude production plant at Wolf Lake in Alberta, Canada. A comparison of the two cases showed that due to the specific conditions in California, cogeneration can reduce, in this specific case, the cost of production of heavy crude by $4.80 per barrel whereas in the case of Wolf Lake, cogeneration would not be economic (electricity prices in relation to natural gas prices are much lower in Canada). One of the purposes of the UNITAR study was to direct attention in other countries producing heavy crude to the advantages of cogeneration.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Potential for Biomass District Energy Production in Port Graham, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaboration between The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Chugachmiut – A Tribal organization Serving the Chugach Native People of Alaska and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program. It was conducted to determine the economic and technical feasibility for implementing a biomass energy system to service the Chugachmiut community of Port Graham, Alaska. The Port Graham tribe has been investigating opportunities to reduce energy costs and reliance on energy imports and support subsistence. The dramatic rise in the prices of petroleum fuels have been a hardship to the village of Port Graham, located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Port Graham Village Council views the forest timber surrounding the village and the established salmon industry as potential resources for providing biomass energy power to the facilities in their community. Benefits of implementing a biomass fuel include reduced energy costs, energy independence, economic development, and environmental improvement. Fish oil–diesel blended fuel and indoor wood boilers are the most economical and technically viable options for biomass energy in the village of Port Graham. Sufficient regional biomass resources allow up to 50% in annual heating savings to the user, displacing up to 70% current diesel imports, with a simple payback of less than 3 years for an estimated capital investment under $300,000. Distributive energy options are also economically viable and would displace all imported diesel, albeit offering less savings potential and requiring greater capital. These include a large-scale wood combustion system to provide heat to the entire village, a wood gasification system for cogeneration of heat and power, and moderate outdoor wood furnaces providing heat to 3–4 homes or community buildings per furnace. Coordination of biomass procurement and delivery, ensuring resource reliability and technology acceptance, and arbitrating equipment maintenance mitigation for the remote village are challenges to a biomass energy system in Port Graham that can be addressed through comprehensive planning prior to implementation.

Charles Sink, Chugachmiut; Keeryanne Leroux, EERC

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

270

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY not substantively affect the findings or recommendations of the study. 2. Introduction The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is developing a comprehensive forest biomass-to- electricity model to identify and analyze

271

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

272

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

273

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

274

Overview of the Chariton Valley switchgrass project: A part of the biomass power for rural development initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of renewable energy in Iowa is centering on the use of agricultural crops to generate electricity. Switchgrass, a native grass of Iowa, is one of the most promising biomass producers. Chariton Valley RC and D Inc., a USDA affiliated rural development organization based in southern Iowa and Alliant Power, a major Iowa energy company, are leading a statewide coalition of public and private interests to develop a sustainable biomass industry. Chariton Valley RC and D is working with local producers and the agricultural professionals to develop a biomass supply infrastructure. Alliant Power is working to develop the technology to convert agricultural crops to energy to serve as the basis for sustainable commercial energy production. Iowa State University and others are assessing the long-term potential of gasification for converting switchgrass to energy. Plans call for modifications to a 750 MW Alliant Power coal plant that will allow switchgrass to be co-fired with coal. A 5% co-fire rate would produce 35 MW of electrical power production and require 50,000 acres of dedicated biomass supply in southern Iowa. Growing biomass crops on erosive lands, then using them as a substitute fuel in coal-fired boilers can potentially reduce air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion and water pollution.

Cooper, J.; Braster, M. [Chariton Valley Resource Conservation and Development, Inc., Centerville, IA (United States); Woolsey, E. [E.L. Woolsey and Associates, Prole, IA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Applicant Location Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requested Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Pablo, MT $850,000 This project will evaluate the technical and economic viability of a co-generation biomass fuel power plant. The plant would use fuels from tribal forest management activities to provide between 2.5 to 20 megawatts (MW) of electricity to heat tribal buildings or sell on the wholesale market. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Fort Yates, ND $430,982 This project will perform a feasibility study over the course of two years on three tribal sites to support the future development of 50 to 100 MW of wind power. Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ $347,090 This project will conduct a feasibility study to explore potential

276

The Role of Feasibility Analysis in Successful Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the energy crisis has given new impetus to cogeneration, many of the considerations that led to its decline during the 20th century still remain. The long hiatus of cogeneration, its reintroduction in new forms, and the emergence of new market considerations leave potential designers and owners unaware of the variety of problems that can cause failure of cogeneration systems or reduce their profitability. Studies of operating and failed cogeneration plants show that feasibility analyses of potential cogeneration installations have been inadequate, resulting in a high failure rate for systems installed in recent decades. Generalizations are drawn from these case studies about the factors that most commonly contribute to success and to failure of cogeneration. Fortunately, certain critical factors favor the application of cogeneration in the industrial sector. The cogeneration feasibility analysis methodology developed by the author is described.

Wulfinghoff, D. R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

SciTech Connect

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cogeneration: back on the front burner  

SciTech Connect

State-of-the-art technology for cogeneration includes: Process steam supplied by back pressure of extraction steam-turbine generators; Gas turbines and waste-heat boilers; Diesel engines and waste-heat boilers. In addition, there are a variety of combinations and permutations of state-of-the-art technology such as combined cycles exemplified by gas turbines combined with steam cycles, ''tri-generation'' involving diesel engines to supply shaft power, jacket engines to supply shaft power, jacket cooling water for process heating use, and hot exhaust gases for space heating or to generate steam in waste-heat boilers. Energy savings attributable to cogeneration have averaged 15-20%. Typical investments required for coal-fired steam-turbine cogeneration facilities are on the order of $25 million for a facility consuming 250 million Btu/hour and some analysts see cogeneration supplying 30% of industrial power by the mid-80's. A tabulation summarizes energy savings if cogeneration were implemented in selected plants in the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, andnd petroleum refining sectors of industry.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Negotiating a Favorable Cogeneration Contract with your Utility Company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A relatively small cogenerator may find it difficult to negotiate a favorable cogeneration contract with a relatively large utility. This paper will tell prospective cogenerators some things they can do to make sure the contract they negotiate meets their energy needs while achieving their financial objectives.

Lark, D. H.; Flynn, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Economics of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency electrical equipment often offers commercial building owners a higher rate of return than cogeneration, with much lower technical and financial risks. The rate of return for cogeneration systems proved much lower when using high-efficiency equipment rather than conventional equipment as the baseline in analyzing cogeneration economics.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS Prepared For REPORT (FAR) TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS EISG://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Two-Phase Flow Turbine For Cogeneration, Geothermal, Solar And Other Applications EISG

283

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Supply for Bioenergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Supply for Bioenergy and Bioproducts Project Summary Full Title: Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton...

284

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production and combustion testing of biomass-coal fuelsbiomass is defined to include bio-product gasification, combustion,landfill gas combustion. Support for Biomass Projects

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

During the early years (1958 to 1963), three types of fuel cells were under development: phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. Between 1963 and 1971, the IGT research and development effort concentrated on the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate technologies; since 1971, emphasis has been on the molten carbonate fuel cell. IGT believes MCFC is best suited to meet the goals of the electric industry and the requirements of industrial cogeneration. Through the years, IGT has conducted system studies to evaluate the role that each one of the three fuel cell types can play in industrial cogeneration. This paper briefly discusses the status of the three technologies, the potential industrial cogeneration market, the application of fuel cells to this market, and the potential fuel savings for several industrial categories.

Camara, E.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Extra cogeneration step seen boosting output 20%  

SciTech Connect

Cogenerators can now buy a prototype 6.5 MW, pre-packaged cogeneration system that incorporates an added step to its cycle to reduce fuel use by 21%. Larger, custom-designed systems will be on the market in 1985. Fayette Manufacturing Co. will offer the Kalina Cycle system at a discount price of $8.2 million (1200/kW) until the systems are competitive with conventional units. The system varies from conventional cogeneration systems by adding a distillation step, which permits the use of two fluids for the turbine steam and operates at a higher thermodynamic efficiency, with boiling occuring at high temperature and low pressure. Although theoretically correct, DOE will withhold judgment on the system's efficiency until the first installation is operating.

Burton, P.

1984-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Petroleum Coke: A Viable Fuel for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke is a by-product of the coking process which upgrades (converts) low-valued residual oils into higher-valued transportation, heating and industrial fuels. Pace forecasts that by the year 2000 petroleum coke production will increase from 36 million to 47 million short tons/year. Because the crude pool will continue to become more sour and refiners treat the coker as the "garbage can" the quality of the petroleum cokes will generally degrade- contain higher sulfur and trace metal levels. The U.S. produces nearly 70% of the total and is expected to maintain this share. Domestic markets consumed less than half of the U.S. production; 80% of the high sulfur fuel grade production from the Gulf coast is exported to Japan or Europe. Increasing environmental concerns could disrupt historic markets and threaten coker operations. This would create opportunities for alternate end-uses such as cogeneration projects. The Pace Consultants Inc. continuously monitors and reports on the petroleum coke industry-production and markets-in its multi-client publication The Pace Petroleum Coke Ouarterly. The information presented in this paper is based on this involvement and Pace's experience in single and multi client consulting activities related to the petroleum refining and petroleum coke industries. The purpose is to provide a review of the existing world petroleum coke industry with particular emphasis on the U.S. production and markets. Forecasted production levels and critical factors which could alter the historic market disposition of petroleum coke are addressed.

Dymond, R. E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Coal-Fired Fluidized Bed Combustion Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of an environmentally acceptable multifuel technology, such as fluidized bed combustion, has encouraged many steam producers/ users to investigate switching from oil or gas to coal. Changes in federal regulations encouraging cogeneration have further enhanced the economic incentives for primary fuel switching. However, this addition of cogeneration to the fuel conversion analysis considerably complicates the investigation. A system design for cogeneration of steam and electricity at a nominal 40,000 pound per hour capacity utilizing fluidized bed combustion is described. The basic system incorporates silo storage of coal, ash, and limestone with dense phase conveying. The system generates power utilizing either a backpressure turbine or a condensing turbine with steam extraction. Three case studies performed for specific end users are presented. The interaction among plant steam requirements, rate purchase structure, and electrical energy buy back rate is discussed. How these factors interact determine the final design and the choice of fuels is illustrated. Because the decision to switch fuel, as well as to cogenerate, is usually economically motivated, an in-depth understanding of the steam/electrical needs and interactions is critical. How these considerations are integrated in the system and the effect they have on the monetary returns are discussed. Electric rate agreements vary significantly from one state to another. Therefore, the examples selected are intended to provide, insight into this variability. For example, one rate structure encourages solid fuel cogeneration. The second is a block structure with low sell back rates making cogeneration difficult to justify. How these rate schedules affected the recommended design illustrates that the system selection is very important.

Thunem, C.; Smith, N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Guide to natural gas cogeneration. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

Guide to natural gas cogeneration is the most extensive reference ever written on the engineering and economic aspects of gas fired cogeneration systems. Forty-one chapters cover equipment considerations and applications for gas engines, gas turbines, stem engines, electrical switchgear, and packaged systems. The text is thoroughly illustrated with case studies for both commercial and industrial applications of all sizes, as well as for packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. A special chapter illustrates market opportunities and keys to successful development. Separate abstracts of most chapters and several appendices have been prepared.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cogeneration: Where will it fit in the deregulated market?  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration due to potentially high efficiency can be very competitive in a deregulated market. Cogeneration can achieve extremely high levels of thermal efficiency, much higher than the most advanced and sophisticated combined cycle power plants generating only electric power. Thermal efficiency is one of the key factors in determining the power plant economics and feasibility. High efficiency means a lesser amount of fuel is used to generate the same amount of energy. In turn, burning a lesser amount of fuel means that fewer pollutants will be emitted. The paper first describes cogeneration plants, then discusses the importance of thermal load availability, cogeneration and distributed generation and other issues affecting cogeneration.

Fridman, M. [Armstrong Service, Cerritos, CA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"In December of 1987, Union Carbide successfully brought on line a 110,000 KVA combined cycle cogeneration facility. The construction, commissioning and start up of this complex facility was accomplished in a remarkably short twelve months. As with all projects of any magnitude, there were several technical challenges that developed during the course of the year. These challenges and the Project Team response will be discussed in some detail. Some areas include: 1. Procurement 2. Technical review of specs and drawings 3. Existing manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system / instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts, the cogeneration facility achieved 100% of design output on December 22, 1987 without any significant impact on the manufacturing facility."

Good, R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Flexibility and economics of combustion turbine-based cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this paper is to discuss various options that affect the efficiency of combustion turbine cogeneration plants and the commensurate net worth impact to the firm. Topics considered include technical evaluation parameters, an efficiency definition, a cogeneration heat rate definition, the qualitative value of efficiency and the cogeneration heat rate, economic evaluation techniques, industrial processes suitable for cogeneration, equipment requirements, the combustion turbine package, the heat recovery steam generator package, balance of plant equipment, engineering and construction, the total cost of incorporating the cogeneration plant, cogeneration with the basic combustion turbine/heat recovery steam generator (CT/HRSG) cycle, cogeneration-steam production increase by ductburning, dual-pressure HRSG, the backpressure steam turbine, supercharging, separating electrical power generation from steam demand, and incorporating a backup source of steam generation.

Wohlschlegel, M.V.; Marcellino, A.; Myers, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Cogeneration : A Regulatory Guide to Leasing, Permitting, and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook focuses on cogeneration development. It is one of a series of four guidebooks recently prepared to introduce the energy developer to the federal, state and local agencies that regulate energy facilities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington (the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory). It was prepared specifically to help cogeneration developers obtain the permits, licenses and approvals necessary to construct and operate a cogeneration facility. The regulations, agencies and policies described herein are subject to change. Changes are likely to occur whenever energy or a project becomes a political issue, a state legislature meets, a preexisting popular or valuable land use is thought threatened, elected and appointed officials change, and new directions are imposed on states and local governments by the federal government. Accordingly, cogeneration developers should verify and continuously monitor the status of laws and rules that might affect their plans. Developers are cautioned that the regulations described herein may only be a starting point on the road to obtaining all the necessary permits.

Deshaye, Joyce; Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The success of cogeneration in Europe  

SciTech Connect

The European engineers take a different approach to designing cogeneration plants. Instead of building large gas turbines or combined cycle plants whose main target is to produce electricity and then trying to utilize as much heat as possible, European engineers target the replacement of the base heat supply of certain, small scale entities. By focusing on the annual heat demand graph, the basic layout for maximum utilization is determined. If a plant can use all or a majority of the electricity, the by-product, produced in this combined process, the perfect requirements are a given. Today cogeneration is one of the prime technologies available to achieve two valuable goals: efficient usage of limited resources and air pollution reduction. In every major European country there is a non-profit organization promoting the usage of cogeneration and acting as a platform for the various interests involved. These national institutions are members of Cogen Europe, a non-profit organization based in Brussels, Belgium, whose main focus is to promote cogeneration to a multinational level.

Hunschofsky, H. [CMG Sourcing International, Boston, MA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Combined Cycle Cogeneration at NALCO Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nalco Chemical Company, while expanding their corporate headquarters, elected to investigate the potential for cogeneration. The headquarters complex has a central physical plant for heating and chilling. The authors describe the analysis approach for determining the most economical system design. Generation capacity ranging from 2.7 MW up to 7.0 MW in both simple cycle cogeneration and combined cycle cogeneration was analyzed. Both single pressure and dual pressure waste heat boilers were included in the evaluation. In addition, absorption chilling and electrical centrifugal chilling capacity expansion were integrated into the model. The gas turbine selection procedure is outlined. Bid evaluation procedure involved a life cycle cost comparison wherein the bid specification responses for each model turbine were incorporated into the life cycle facility program. The recommendation for the facility is a 4.0MW combined cycle cogeneration system. This system is scheduled for startup in October of 1985. Most major equipment has been purchased and the building to house the system is nearing completion. A discussion of the purchase and scheduling integration will be included.

Thunem, C. B.; Jacobs, K. W.; Hanzel, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Proceedings: Electric Alternatives to Commercial Cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide the latest technical, marketing, and financial information on the application of high-efficiency and load-managed electrical equipment and on cogeneration in the commercial sector. Utilities can use this information to provide a menu of end-use options to their customers and to encourage equipment installations that benefit both customers and the utility.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping cogeneration systems, over two-thirds of the energy is in the exhaust gases leaving the gas turbine. In bottoming cycles, where steam and/or electrical power are generated from heating process exhaust streams, the heat recovery design is of primary concern. John Zink Company, since 1929, has specialized in the development, design, and fabrication of energy efficient equipment for the industrial and commercial markets. The paper outlines the design, installation and performance of recently supplied gas turbine cogeneration heat recovery systems. It also describes; several bottoming cycle thermal system designs applied to incinerators, process heaters, refinery secondary reformers and FCC units. Overall parameters and general trends in the design and application of cogeneration thermal systems are presented. New equipment and system designs to reduce pollution and increase overall system efficiency are also reviewed.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Investigation of an integrated switchgrass gasification/fuel cell power plant. Final report for Phase 1 of the Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program, has the goal of converting switchgrass grown on marginal farmland in southern Iowa into electric power. Two energy conversion options are under evaluation: co-firing switchgrass with coal in an existing utility boiler and gasification of switchgrass for use in a carbonate fuel cell. This paper describes the second option under investigation. The gasification study includes both experimental testing in a pilot-scale gasifier and computer simulation of carbonate fuel cell performance when operated on gas derived from switchgrass. Options for comprehensive system integration between a carbonate fuel cell and the gasification system are being evaluated. Use of waste heat from the carbonate fuel cell to maximize overall integrated plant efficiency is being examined. Existing fuel cell power plant design elements will be used, as appropriate, in the integration of the gasifier and fuel cell power plant to minimize cost complexity and risk. The gasification experiments are being performed by Iowa State University and the fuel cell evaluations are being performed by Energy Research Corporation.

Brown, R.C.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

COGENMASTER: A model for evaluating cogeneration options: Final report, Volume 2, User's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COGENMASTER model was developed in this project. COGENMASTER is a micro-computer based menu-driven model which enables the user to examine the technical aspects of various types of cogeneration projects, evaluate their economic feasibility, and prepare detailed cash flow statements that spell out the costs and benefits to project participants. The model is designed to objectively evaluate and screen cogeneration options by comparing them to a base case scenario in which electricity is purchased from the utility and thermal energy is produced on-site. The model consists of many modules that may be individually edited. The different modules that constitute COGENMASTER are the technology, load shape, rates, sizing, operating, cash-flow, financing, pricing and simulation modules. A load shape library of electric and thermal loads in nine commercial buildings and seven weather zones was also developed as part of this project. In addition, a technology database of six generic cogeneration systems is also included in the package. The model has been written for IBM-PC compatible computers with 512K memory, a floppy drive and a hard disk.

Balakrishnan, S.; Limaye, D.R.; Ross, C.; Gavelis, B.; Scott, S.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Humboldt County RESCO Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESCO Project RESCO Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Humboldt County RESCO Project Agency/Company /Organization Redwood Coast Energy Authority Focus Area People and Policy, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass - Biofuels, Biomass, Biomass - Biomass Combustion, Biomass - Biomass Gasification, Biomass - Biomass Pyrolysis, Biomass - Landfill Gas, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy, Wind Phase Create a Vision Resource Type Technical report Availability Free - Publicly Available Publication Date 4/1/2010 Website http://cal-ires.ucdavis.edu/fi Locality Humboldt County References Humboldt County RESCO Project[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Environmental Aspects 4 Related Tools 5 References Overview This introductory document outline's Humboldt county's vision for a local

306

Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key functionality of a virtual power plant is to increase the value of the produced power by clustering different plants. The first step of the optimisation concerns the local operation of the individual power generator, the second step is to calculate the contribution to the virtual power plant. With small extensions the suggested MILP algorithm can be used for an overall EEX (European Energy Exchange) optimised management of clustered CHP systems in form of the virtual power plant. This algorithm has been used to control cogeneration plants within a distribution grid. (author)

Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Management Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19f Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation Gas, Chemical Complex, Cogeneration Prepared for presentation at the 2002 Annual Meeting, Indianapolis and Cogeneration Analysis System is an advanced technology for energy conservation and pollution prevention

Pike, Ralph W.

308

Co-generation at CERN Beneficial or not?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A co-generation plant for the combined production of electricity and heat has recently been installed on the CERN Meyrin site. This plant consists of: a gas turbine generator set (GT-set), a heat recovery boiler for the connection to the CERN primary heating network, as well as various components for the integration on site. A feasibility study was carried out and based on the argument that the combined use of natural gas -available anyhow for heating purposes- gives an attractively high total efficiency, which will, in a period of time, pay off the investment. This report will explain and update the calculation model, thereby confirming the benefits of the project. The results from the commissioning tests will be taken into account, as well as the benefits to be realized under the condition that the plant can operate undisturbed by technical setbacks which, incidentally, has not been entirely avoided during the first year of test-run and operation.

Wilhelmsson, M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle and back pressure turbine exhausting to useful process, identifies potential energy savings. Process Power Recovery: Replacing pressure reducing valve with steam turbine produces mechanical or electrical energy in conjunction with process heat. Steam vs. Electric Motor: Comparison of electric motor operating cost with steam turbines to show that cost-savings depend on application. Waste Heat Recovery: The addition of a steam turbine can justify waste heat projects that were previously not feasible on an economic basis.

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Reference guide to small cogeneration systems for utilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressure and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.

Rodden, R.M.; Boyen, J.L.; Waters, M.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomass—organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes—that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

314

Cogeneration Design Considerations for a Major Petrochemical Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The step increase in energy cost brought about in 1973 has permanently changed the way in which petrochemical production facilities are designed, operated, and maintained. Highly visible energy conservation programs consisting of steam trap repair, insulation, and turning off unused equipment in the late 1970’s gave way to industrial wide shutdown of older, less efficient production facilities in the 1980’s. The subject petrochemical facility’s energy use peaked in early 1981. Several small projects were instituted to accommodate a declining steam load and increasing amounts of low pressure steam venting. However, as steam load was dropping, electrical rates were increasing both from rising natural gas costs and utility construction of a nuclear power plant. As a result, energy costs seemed almost an uncontrollable cost in late 1982. This paper addresses the design considerations and the following distinct steps taken in the development process of a 100 megawatt cogeneration power plant currently under construction at the petrochemical facility. The paper addresses the following distinct steps taken in the design process. 1. Examination of past, current, and future electricity and steam demand. 2. Examination of the regulatory climate and opportunities for firm power sales. 3. Economic evaluation of different fuel and power cost projections and their impact on cycle and equipment selection. 4. Evaluation of the reliability required by current and associated future standby power contracts. 5. Examination of outside forces that impact the design. 6. Selection of final design. The above considerations led to a unique efficient design that incorporates 100% steam condensing capability and independent dual train operating capability. The subject cogeneration plant is scheduled to be in full operation in December of 1987.

Good, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

316

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

317

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

318

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

319

Micro cogeneration: roadblocks to mass markets  

SciTech Connect

The market for micro cogeneration using units of 30 kW or less is in its infancy, and is currently limited to health care, recreation, lodging, and multi-unit residential facilities. There have been some inroads into the restaurant and fast food outlets, light industry, and some supermarkets. A mass market potential will require the industry to produce a module that is as generic as a home air conditioner or heat pump. In order for modular cogenerators to be look upon as appliances, they must be assembled as a package at the factory for easy installation and maintenance. Some utilities can create barriers to interconnections, which would have a negative effect on the market.

Ross, J.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Closed cycle cogeneration for the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While present energy needs can be met with available supplies of fossil fuels, the need to plan for the eventual elimination of dependence on premium fuels in utility and industrial applications remains urgent. One of the most promising power conversion technologies for these needs is the closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) configured for power and heat production. Closed cycle gas turbines have been in commercial use, principally in Europe, for over four decades. That experience base, combined with emerging awareness of potential CCGT applications, could lead to the operation of coal-fired CCGT cogeneration systems in the U.S. within the next decade. This paper discusses the multi-fuel capability of the CCGT and compares its performance as a flexible cogeneration system with that of a more conventional steam turbine system.

Crim, W.M.; Fraize, W.E.; Kinney, G.; Malone, G.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cogeneration with Thermionics and Electrochemical Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermionic energy converters convert high-temperature heat into high-current low-voltage direct current, rejecting heat at a temperature that is high enough to generate process steam. Electrochemical cells are high-current low-voltage devices, which are ideally suited for coupling to the output of the thermionic converters. A test is under way in which an array of thermionic converters is coupled to a industrial heater. The array will be tested to yield thermionic performance data. These data will be used in the design of a thermionic cogeneration system specifically applied to the chlorine caustic soda industry. A full-scale cogeneration installation of this type is expected to produce about 12 kilowatts of direct current power for each million Btu fired.

Miskolczy, G.; Goodale, D.; Huffman, F.; Morgan, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) This is the approved...

323

SOFC modeling for the simulation of residential cogeneration systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvements have been made to the fuel cell power module (FCPM) within the SOFC cogeneration simulation code developed under the umbrella of the International Energy… (more)

Carl, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An Assessment of Economic Analysis Methods for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration feasibility studies were conducted for eleven state agencies of Texas. A net present value (NPV) analysis was used to evaluate candidate cogeneration systems and select the optimum system. CELCAP, an hour-by-hour cogeneration analysis computer program was used to determine the costs used in the NPV analysis. The results of the studies showed that the state could save over $6,000,000 per year in reduced utility bills. Different methods of analyzing the economic performance of a cogeneration system are presented for comparison. Other implications of the study are also discussed.

Bolander, J. N.; Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A solar tracker and concentrator was designed and assembled for the purpose of cogeneration of thermal power and electrical power using thermoelectric technology. A BiTe… (more)

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Environmental management accounting for an Australian cogeneration company.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research explores whether Environmental Management Accounting can be applied to assist an Australian cogeneration company in improving both its financial performance as well as… (more)

Niap, D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to encourage the development of alternative energy, cogeneration, and small hydropower facilities. The statute requires utilities to enter into long-term contracts with these...

328

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume IV. Design drawings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains design drawings for the biomass cogeneration plant to be built in Maine. The drawings show a considerable degree of detail, however, they are not to be considered released for construction. There has been no actual procurement of equipment, therefore equipment drawings certified by suppliers have not been included. (DMC)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC Name Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC Address 1001 McKinney Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Biomass Product Development and construction of patented biomass fueled system for co-generation of heat and electricity Website http://www.zilkha.com/ Coordinates 29.757092°, -95.363961° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.757092,"lon":-95.363961,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Program on Technology Innovation: Projecting Future Fossil- and Biomass-Fueled Power Generation System Configurations: Year 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation mix in the year 2030 will likely look somewhat different from the present, as growth in generating capacity and regulatory initiatives to reduce emissions lead to changes in the U.S. power generation fleet. Chemical pollutants emitted from this future generation mix are likely to differ from those at present, including changes to the characteristics and amounts of chemicals released to air, wastewater, and solid waste streams. This report presents interim results of a project to predict he...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

2003 Biomass Interest Group Annual Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biomass Interest Group (BIG) provides a special focus for biomass energy research through EPRI. This annual summary provides a description of BIG meetings and projects in 2003, research results on several key BIG topics (including gasification, digestion, and cofiring studies), and an overview of EPRI's biomass research program.

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

NREL: Biomass Research - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the key to moving advanced biofuel technologies into the market. Explore NREL's biomass projects for examples of stakeholder partnerships. We provide opportunities to...

334

Biomass Energy Program Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

window for the most recent grant opportunity closes November 26, 2012.''''' The Michigan Biomass Energy Program (MBEP) provides funding for state bioenergy and biofuels projects...

335

EPRI Biomass Interest Group Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI8217s Biomass Interest Group (BIG) provides topical reviews of major areas of interest in the field of biomass-to-power. Part of that review consists of periodic meetings to review existing EPRI BIG projects, discuss topics of interest or concern, hear from industry experts, and visit sites that highlight significant technical developments. In 2006, the EPRI BIG had three meetings. The first meeting was Thursday, April 6 in Golden, Colorado. The group reviewed ongoing projects and then toured the DO...

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass projects through the Green Power Partnership Program: $2.72 million in the form of TRC price

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

On solving the profit maximization of small cogeneration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration is a high-efficiency technology that has been adapted to small and micro scale applications. In this work, the development and test of a numerical optimization model is carried out in order to implement an analysis that will lead to the ... Keywords: cogeneration model, numerical optimization, thermoeconomics

Ana C. M. Ferreira; Ana Maria A. C. Rocha; Senhorinha F. C. F. Teixeira; Manuel L. Nunes; Luís B. Martins

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Maximum Fuel Energy Saving of a Brayton Cogeneration Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An endoreversible Joule-Brayton cogeneration cycle has been optimized with fuel energy saving as an assessment criterion. The effects of power-to-heat ratio, cycle temperature ratio, and user temperature ratio on maximum fuel energy saving and efficiency ... Keywords: cogeneration cycle, fuel energy saving, thermodynamic optimization

Xiaoli Hao; Guoqiang Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fuzzy evaluation of cogeneration alternatives in a petrochemical industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper derives fuzzy net present value (NPV) and pay back year (PBY) models as decision indexes for cogeneration alternatives decision-making. The Mellin transform is employed to establish the means and variances of the fuzzy indexes in order to ... Keywords: Cogeneration, Economic decision analysis, Fuzzy algebra, Fuzzy ranking, Mellin transform

J. N. Sheen

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An expert system prototype for designing natural gas cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration plants are units that simultaneously produce electricity and useful heat from the same fuel. In such plants different components (prime movers, pumps, steam generators, etc.) are combined in order to meet electricity and useful heat loads ... Keywords: Cogeneration, Engineering design, Expert systems, Natural gas

José Alexandre Matelli; Edson Bazzo; Jonny Carlos da Silva

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass Meeting, September 23, 2004, Orlando, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Biomass Interest Group (BIG) meets three times per year and its purpose is to evaluate, fund, discuss, and identify projects that produce power from biomass sources. This CD contains presentations made at the September 2004 meeting: 1. Minutes - September 2004 (Agenda and Attendee List included) 2. Dave O'Connor, EPRI Biomass Program Manager -- Biomass Energy 84E for Renewable Energy Advisory Meeting Sept 22, 2004 3. Darren Ishimura, Hawaiian Electric Company -- Hawaiian Electric Update: RPS and B...

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the study, Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration in Pennsylvania, performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Pennsylvania Governor's Energy Council. The study could well be the most comprehensive statewide evaluation of industrial cogeneration yet conducted. Although a multitude of estimates of cogeneration potential have surfaced in recent years, this study examined cogeneration opportunities in much greater detail for the following factors: 1. Sales of cogenerated electricity to all major utilities were valued using the estimated PURPA rates based on the Public Utility Commission rules. The demonstrated effects of the wide variation of expected PURPA utility purchase rates on industry-specific economical cogeneration potential further underscores the significance of these rates; 2. Industrial energy consumption (including the use of feedstocks and internally generated fuels) reflected the most accurate data available at both the state and national levels; 3. Pennsylvania-specific forecasts of industrial growth for each major manufacturing industry were incorporated; 4. Forecasts of fuel and electricity price changes were also state-specific rather than national or regional; 5. Discounted cash flow economic analyses were performed for cases in which existing combustion systems both did and did not require replacement as well as for expansions of existing industrial plants and new plants for the years 1985, 1990, and 2000; 6. Emerging technologies such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed and applied to determine likely levels of market penetration; 7. Sensitivity of cogeneration feasibility with respect to alternative; 8. Ownership and financing arrangements (such as utility and third party ownership) as well as changes in forecasts of PURPA and retail electricity rates, fuel prices, industrial growth rates, and cogeneration technology capital costs and operating characteristics were examined; 9. To more accurately assess the potential for additional cogeneration development, a detailed survey was conducted identifying all existing cogenerators in Pennsylvania; 10. Case study economic analyses were performed for 30 companies to further illustrate cogeneration feasibility; and 11. Barriers to and opportunities for greater industrial cogeneration were identified and a booklet to market cogeneration to industry was developed.

Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2011 State of Technology and Projections to 2017  

SciTech Connect

Review of the the status of DOE funded research for converting biomass to liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating for fiscal year 2011.

Jones, Susanne B.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two-stage absorption chillers of the type used at Rice University Cogen Plant offer the most attractive utilization of recoverable thermal energy. With a coefficient of performance (COP) up to 1.25, the two-stage, parallel flow absorption chiller can offer over fifty (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction.

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Breaking the ties that bind: New hope for biomass fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

viable process for making biofuels from cellulosic biomass," adds Langan, director of the biofuels project. Funding for the project comes from Laboratory-Directed Research and...

347

Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Volume II. Appendix A. Conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications. Appendix B. Characterization of cogeneration systems (near-term technology). Appendix C. Optimized cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect

This appendix to a report which evaluates the technical, economic, and institutional aspects of industrial cogeneration for conserving energy in the food, chemical, textile, paper, and petroleum industries contains data, descriptions, and diagrams on conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications for cogeneration facilities; characterization of cogeneration systems in terms of fuel utilization, performance, air pollution control, thermal energy storage systems, and capital equipment costs; and optimized cogeneration systems for specific industrial plants. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

349

The Utilities' Role in Conservation and Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as an effective 'deliverer' of energy conservation services and alternative energy supply options, such as cogeneration, rather than merely as a 'facilitator' of their development by other parties. Amendments to current legislation are required to remove the barriers to utility participation and to provide electric utilities with appropriate incentives to deliver conservation and alternative power sources in their own self-interest. That utility self-interest can take the form of benefits to its ratepayers or stockholders -- or, optimally, to both. Moreover, adequate, reliable and economical electric energy from the utility grid is vital to our nation's economic well-being. A financially healthy electric utility industry is essential to the realization of this goal. Therefore, as we continue to refine a national energy policy, we must give this requisite careful attention when developing positions on conservation, cogeneration, equitable rate design, and all of the other elements, for they are inextricably related.

Mitchell, R. C., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

NREL: Computational Science - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels Wind Energy Simulations Inverse Design Staff Printable Version Projects The Computational Science Center supports projects across a wide...

351

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

352

A Survey of State Clean Energy Fund Support for Biomass August 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technologies, two of which involved biomass projects: · Tier 1 (biomass, waste tire and solar" and defines renewable energy as "solar energy, wind, ocean thermal energy, wave or tidal energy, fuel cells combustion. Support for Biomass Projects Projects involving biomass (as well as wind or solar energy

353

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hotel dual-cogeneration plant saving 33% on electricity costs  

SciTech Connect

Hotel Del Coronado in California has two cogeneration systems in operation, one gas turbine based, the other an advanced solar photovoltaic installation which cuts its electric bill by $400,000 per year. In order to make the new installation as unobstrusive as possible, the gas turbine and waste heat boiler units were placed underground. The sunlight-to-electricity efficiency of the photovoltaic cogeneration system is about 8% and the thermal conversion efficiency about 50%. That makes for an overall 58% cogeneration efficiency. The design uses silicon solar cells specially designed for concentrator application.

Stambler, I.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biomass Interest Group Meetings - 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biomass Interest Group (BIG) provides technology updates and information exchange for funders of EPRI Program 84.005. The group sponsors research projects and technology summaries. This report assembles presentation materials from webcasts and other meetings conducted by the Biomass Interest Group in 2007. Presentations covered several technologies including the prospect of using cellulosic feedstock in the production of ethanol, as well as gasification, the synthesis of biodiesel, and the cofiring o...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

357

Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) Cogeneration Personal Property Tax Credit (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info Start Date 07/25/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Energy Division The District of Columbia Council created a personal property tax exemption for solar energy systems and cogeneration systems within the District by enacting B19-0749 in December of 2012. Eligible solar systems Solar energy is defined by D.C. Code § 34-1431 to mean "radiant energy, direct, diffuse, or reflected, received from the sun

358

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Maine's Small Power Production and Cogeneration statute says that any small

359

Research of Heat Storage Tank Operation Modes in Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates typical operation modes of the heat storage tank in the small-scale cogeneration (CHP) plant, analyses formation of thermal stratifi-cation in such storage… (more)

Streckien?, Giedr?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Guidelines for Assessing the Feasibility of Small Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has long been practiced by large industrial firms, which have relatively constant demands for both electricity and heat. In recent years cogeneration has also become attractive for smaller energy users as a result of the great escalation of energy prices in the last decade and the passage of PURPA. Where electric rates are sufficiently high, cogeneration can be feasible for entities having energy bills as low as $500,000 per year, including small industrial firms, office buildings, hospitals, colleges, and shopping centers. This paper will present guidelines for assessing the feasibility of cogeneration for small to medium sized energy users, and it will describe the commercially available technologies that can be utilized.

Whiting, M., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Distributed Generation Case Study: Industrial Process Heating (Cogeneration)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details candidate distributed generation (DIS-GEN) options and the process used to select a cogeneration system for potential development at an industrial site. The local utility commissioned this evaluation to explore energy partnership opportunities with its customer.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

363

Innovative thermal cooling cycles for use in cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses working fluids, the use in thermodynamic cycles and cogeneration. An emphasis is put on energy efficiency of the cycles and alternative fluids. 16 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (CBS)

Skalafuris, A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report  

SciTech Connect

Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Cogeneration Control, Optimization, and Management: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of cogeneration power plants can now be assessed on line in real time using a distributed microprocessor-based data acquisition and control system. A representative implementation is described for cogeneration power in a food processing plant. The COPA (COgeneration Performance Assessment) package comprises separate, distributed control modules for data input, performance analysis for each plant device, overall plant performance summary, and operator displays. Performance of each of the respective cogeneration devices is assessed relative to a performance model of the device, thus an accurate assessment of performance is provided under all load conditions. Operator displays provide real time depiction of the performance of each device and the overall plant performance. Deterioration of performance of a device is quantified in terms of the cost of additional fuel requirements and/or the value of power not produced.

Hinson, F.; Curtin, D.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

367

Hema Sri Power Projects Ltd HSPPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Sector Biomass Product Setting up biomass and waste-to-energy power projects. References Hema Sri Power Projects Ltd. (HSPPL)1...

368

Puerto Rico`s EcoElectrica LNG/power project marks a project financing first  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On Dec. 15, 1997, Enron International and Kenetech Energy Services achieved financial close on the $670 million EcoElectrica liquefied natural gas terminal and cogeneration project proposed for Puerto Rico. The project involves construction of a liquefied natural gas terminal, cogeneration plant, and desalination unit on the southern coast of Puerto Rico, in the Penuelas/Guayanilla area. EcoElectrica will include a 500-mw, combined-cycle cogeneration power plant fueled mainly by LNG imported from the 400 MMcfd Atlantic LNG project on the island of Trinidad. Achieving financial close on a project of this size is always a time-consuming matter and one with a number of challenges. These challenges were increased by the unique nature of both the project and its financing--no project financing had ever before been completed that combined an LNG terminal and power plant. The paper discusses the project, financing details and challenges, key investment considerations, and integrated project prospects.

Lammers, R. [Enron International, Houston, TX (United States); Taylor, S. [Kenetech Energy Systems Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work at the Institute of Gas Technology on fuel cell technology for commercial application has focused on phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. The author describes the status of the three technologies, and concludes that the MCFC in particular can efficiently supply energy in industrial cogeneration applications. The four largest industrial markets are primary metals, chemicals, food, and wood products, which collectively represent a potential market of 1000 to 1500 MEe annual additions. At $700 to $900/kW, fuel cells can successfully compete with other advanced systems. An increase in research and development support would be in the best interest of industry and the nation. 1 reference, 5 figures, 5 tables.

Camara, E.H.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Cogeneration Opportunities in Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1983, Texas Governor Mark White initiated an energy cost containment program for the largest state agencies. The Energy Management Group of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Texas A&M University was called on to provide technical support in the area of cogeneration. Ten agencies were selected for detailed study. This paper gives some information on the results of the studies performed on the University of Houston and Southwest Texas State University. In both cases, simple payback was conservatively estimated at around four years. When the two systems were sized so that they would not be in a position of selling excess power, their combined savings were estimated at over $2.7 million annually.

Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Bolander, J. N.; Seshan, S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cogeneration System Size Optimization Constant Capacity and Constant Demand Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a quasi-linear optimization model for a cogeneration system subject to constant heat and power demands or loads. The linear model is next modified to a non-linear one to account for economies of scale. The models define the necessary and sufficient conditions for system size optimality. Thus, the underlying methodology constitutes the foundation for a subsequent series of more sophisticated cogeneration design models. Several examples are presented to illustrate the models.

Wong-Kcomt, J. B.; Turner, W. C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biomass Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program Biomass Energy Program Biomass Energy Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $75,000 Program Info State Alabama Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by project and interest rate Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on loans to install approved biomass projects. Technical assistance is also available through the program. Industrial, commercial and institutional facilities; agricultural property owners; and city, county, and state government entities are eligible.

374

Clean fractionation of biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ADDENDUM: CHANGES TO REVISED COGENERATION PROJECT COMPENSATORY MITIGATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes requested at that meeting are discussed here under five topics and presented in the order that they are presented in the Plan. 1. East Restoration Area The wetland planned for restoration in the East Restoration Area will now be expanded to total 0.5 acre in size. As discussed in Section 4.6, the Plan had only intended to restore the 0.2 acre of existing wetland area within the East Restoration Area. Figure 3 Restoration Areas Plan – Topography and Plant Community Distribution has been revised to demonstrate the change. As previously, post-mitigation topography of the East Restoration Area will direct most surface and subsurface runoff to the wetland area. A portion of this water will travel directly from the upland area to be re-created within the Restoration Area. The remaining moisture will enter the wetland as surface water diverted to the seasonally inundated wetland area from a ditch that will be installed along the south edge of the East Restoration Area. As explained in the Plan, the surface water delivery will be designed to minimize intra-seasonal water level fluctuation and prevent flooding.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Biomass Interest Group Meeting Summary, June 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Biomass Interest Group (BIG) met June 29 and 30, 2004, at the offices of We Energies in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This report summarizes the meeting, which included presentations on such topics as gasification, cofiring, waste digestion, and state legislation affecting the biomass energy industry. The BIG meets three times per year and its purpose is to evaluate, fund, discuss, and identify projects that produce power from biomass sources.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of gasification technology to convert biomass to electric power has increased substantially over the last 10 years. Many new projects, using a wide range of gasification technologies, have been developed and become operational. Some of the key driving factors for biomass gasification-to-power facilities include:Abundant local supplies of biomass, at low or no cost, for use as a feedstock for gasification-to-power facilities.Federal and state tax credits ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Use of Biomass for Power Generation in the U.S  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of the renewed U.S. market interest in biomass-fueled power generation and a concise look at what's driving interest in biomass-fueled generation, the challenges faced in implementing biomass-fueled generation projects, and the current and future state of biomass-fueled generation. Topics covered include: an overview of biomass-fueled generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in biomass-fueled generation; an evaluation of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of biomass-fueled generation projects; a description of the various feedstocks that can be used for biomass-fueled generation; an evaluation of the biomass supply chain; a description of biomass-fueled generation technologies; a review of the economic drivers of biomass-fueled generation project success; and, profiles of major biomass-fueled generation developers.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schiller Biomass Con Biomass...

380

Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

383

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As of September 28, 2001, all the major project tasks have been completed. A presentation was given to the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) and the North Dakota Division of Community Services (DCS). In general, the feasibility study has resulted in the following conclusions: (1) Municipal wood resources are sufficient to support cofiring at the NDSP. (2) Steps have been taken to address all potential fuel-handling issues with the feed system design, and the design is cost-effective. (3) Fireside issues of cofiring municipal wood with coal are not of significant concern. In general, the addition of wood will improve the baseline performance of lignite coal. (4) The energy production strategy must include cogeneration using steam turbines. (5) Environmental permitting issues are small and do not affect economics. (6) The base-case economic scenario provides for a 15-year payback of a 20-year municipal bond and does not include the broader community benefits that can be realized.

Darren D. Schmidt

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Overview of biomass thermochemical conversion activities funded by the biomass energy systems branch of DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in the development of renewable energy sources through research and development programs sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch. The overall objective of the thermochemical conversion element of the Biomass Energy Systems Program is to develop competitive processes for the conversion of renewable biomass resources into clean fuels and chemical feedstocks which can supplement fuels from conventional sources. An overview of biomass thermochemical conversion projects sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch is presented in this paper.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Ergun, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A major cogeneration system goes in at JFK International Airport. Low-visibility privatization in a high-impact environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growing energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.

Leibler, J. [Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York, NY (United States); Luxton, R. [Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration Partners, Jamaica, NY (United States); Ostberg, P. [CEA Kennedy Operators, Inc., Jamaica, NY (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Biomass Interest Group: Technical Report for 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the meetings and projects of the EPRI Biomass Interest Group (BIG) from October 2001 through September 2002. The report also presents analysis by EPRI concerning several subjects that were addressed by BIG and the EPRI biomass research program.

2002-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Application of Cogeneration to Small Commercial Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-generation is sometimes defined as a customer owned, electrical generating system capable of feeding power back into the Electric Utility lines for compensation. For a long time, the Electric Utility Companies took the position that a customer could use electrical generating equipment for 'Emergency Standby', but only when the Utility power was not available. After all, the power company was in the business of selling power, and didn't want to have its customers in competition with them, whenever they wanted to generate their own power. With the Energy shortage of 1973 and subsequent events, where increased demands for more power were being made upon the Utilities, coupled with complex restrictions being placed upon the construction of new power plants, the utilities found that they needed all the help they could get to meet their peak demands. Recent Supreme Court rulings have now mandated that Utility companies must accept customer generated power, whenever the customer has excess generating capacity, and he should be compensated for same at reasonable rates. These decisions have opened up a 'Pandora's Box' of possible application problems for Design Engineers, which must be carefully addressed.

Cooper, D. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1-000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1-000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals initial ideals of generic * *lattice ideals are generic. Cohen-Macaulayness for cogeneric ideals is characterized combina* *torially; in the cogeneric case the Cohen-Macaulay type is greater than or equal

Miller, Ezra N.

392

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1{000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Symbolic Computation (1999) 11, 1{000 Generic and Cogeneric Monomial Ideals EZRA MILLER, BERND by simplicial complexes. There are numerous equivalent ways to say that a monomial ideal is generic or cogeneric lexicographic initial ideals of generic lattice ideals are generic. Cohen-Macaulayness for cogeneric ideals

Miller, Ezra N.

393

SS 2006 Selected Topics CMR Minimal infinite cogeneration-closed subcategories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SS 2006 Selected Topics CMR Minimal infinite cogeneration-closed subcategories. Claus Michael C is finite. Finally, C is cogeneration-closed, provided it is also closed under submodules. Given subcategory containing X . Theorem. Let C be an infinite cogeneration-closed subcategory of mod . Then C

Ringel, Claus Michael

394

SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Michael J. Carl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B.Sc., University of Guelph, 2005 Supervisory Committee Dr made to the fuel cell power module (FCPM) within the SOFC cogeneration simulation code developed under

Victoria, University of

395

THE GROWTH OF A C0-SEMIGROUP CHARACTERISED BY ITS COGENERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GROWTH OF A C0-SEMIGROUP CHARACTERISED BY ITS COGENERATOR TANJA EISNER AND HANS ZWART Abstract cogenerator V (or the Cayley transform of the generator) or its resolvent. In particular, we extend results of its cogenerator. As is shown by an example, the result is optimal. For analytic semigroups we show

396

Biomass Energy Program Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants < Back Eligibility Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source U.S. Department of Energy's State Energy Program (SEP) State Michigan Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by solicitation; check website for each solicitation's details Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation '''''The application window for the most recent grant opportunity closed November 26, 2012.''''' The Michigan Biomass Energy Program (MBEP) provides funding for state bioenergy and biofuels projects on a regular basis. Funding categories typically include biofuels and bioenergy education, biofuels

397

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Influence of Regulation on the Decision to Cogenerate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will be primarily on the Public Utility Commission of Texas' Substantive Rules that explicitly address cogeneration (Section 23.66). The original rules, which were implemented following the mandate of the Texas legislature, have undergone substantial change. More specifically, rules have been structured to promote a market for capacity without harming existing and future ratepayers. Discussion will focus on how the existing rules can directly influence the decision to cogenerate. Part One provides a brief history of the Section 23.66 rules. Part Two discusses the pricing methodology adopted by the Commission for "firm" and "as-available" power supplied to a utility. Part Three presents a brief discussion of the wheeling rule that was recently adopted by the Commission. Part Four discusses the importance of standby rates on the decision to cogenerate. A discussion of the problems that may arise from traditional cost allocation methodologies for the design of standby rates is also provided.

King, J. L. II

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of In-Plant Cogeneration Using a Microcomputer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of in-plant cogeneration opportunities requires quantification of several factors. These include, among others, the profiles of plant steam and electricity usage, the temperature and pressure of primary header steam, the dollar value of all energy (steam or electricity) bought, produced, and sold, and turbine/generator operating efficiencies at various loads. Since all of these factors can be quantified, and because a standard procedure can be defined for evaluating in-plant cogeneration opportunities, this task is ideally suited for a digital computer. This paper discusses the development and methodology of a microcomputer program to analyze in-plant cogeneration opportunities. User-oriented features of the program are highlighted and thermodynamic and financial computational routines are discussed. The results obtained by this program for a case study are presented.

Schmidt, P. S.; Fisher, D. B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

403

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The forth reporting period (July 1 - September 30) included ongoing kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing biomass. Modeling of biomass reburning concentrated on description of biomass performance at different reburning heat inputs. Reburning fuel was assumed to undergo rapid breakdown to produce various gaseous products. Modeling shows that the efficiency of biomass is affected by its composition. The kinetic model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 2.

NONE

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

406

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to… (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Key Publications Newsletter Project Fact Sheets Biomass Basics Multimedia Webinars Databases Analytical Tools Glossary Student & Educator...

409

Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the textile industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power sequentially with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. The state-of-the-art combined cycle system consisting of combustion turbines, heat recovery steam generators, and steam turbine-generator units, offers a high efficiency method for the production of electrical and heat energy at relatively low installed and operating costs. This paper describes the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology.

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gas Turbine Cogeneration Plant for the Dade County Government Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A government complex consisting of a number of State, County, and City buildings is currently under construction in the downtown area of Miami, Florida. Thermo Electron Corporation and Rolls- Royce Inc. are providing a unique fuel saving cogeneration system to supply the air conditioning and electrical power requirements of the complex. This $30 million cogeneration plant will occupy a portion of a multiple-use building which will also house offices, indoor parking facilities, and additional building support systems. Locating such a powerplant in downtown Miami presents significant construction scheduling, environmental, and engineering challenges. Issues such as space limitations, emissions, noise pollution, and maintenance have been carefully addressed and successfully resolved.

Michalowski, R. W.; Malloy, M. K.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hotel gets 1-yr. payback from propane-fired cogenerator  

SciTech Connect

A Philadelphia Ramada Inn recovered the costs of a $150,000 propane-fired cogenerator system within a year. The system reduced the energy consumed for hot water and air conditioning by 35% and reversed the high energy costs the hotel incurred when it was forced to shift from natural gas to electricity. The 170 horsepower system, which handles a variety of liquid and gaseous fuels as well as propane, replaces two boilers that were used to heat water. The hotel supplements cogenerated power with purchases from the utility. Waste heat is recaptured for space and water heating. The system's overall efficiency is 96%.

Barber, J.

1983-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For areas with abundant supplies of biomass resources and for areas with limited wind and solar options, biomass energy projects might be a technically and economically viable means to achieve renewable energy goals and mandates. To minimize capital costs associated with these projects, biomass can be fired in a unit modified to fire 100% biomass fuels (that is, biomass repowering) or can be co-fired with coal in an existing coal-fired unit. Both of these methods use existing equipment and facilities. Th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd Place China Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass project developer. References Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd is a company located in China . References ↑ "Shanxi Milestone Biomass Energy Development Co Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Shanxi_Milestone_Biomass_Energy_Development_Co_Ltd&oldid=350885" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

419

Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt Ltd Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt. Ltd. Place Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India Zip 416 012 Sector Biomass Product Kolhapur-based biomass project developer References Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt. Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt. Ltd. is a company located in Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India . References ↑ "Sinewave Biomass Power Pvt. Ltd." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sinewave_Biomass_Power_Pvt_Ltd&oldid=351109" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

420

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Missouri Division of Energy, identifies and evaluates technological options and describes the current status of various energy resource conservation technologies applicable industry and the economic, institutional and regulatory factors which could affect the implementation and use of these energy technologies. An industrial energy manual has been prepared, identifying technologies with significant potential for application in a specific company or plant. Six site-specific industrial case studies have been performed for industries considered suitable for cogeneration, waste heat recovery or alternative fuel use. These case studies, selected after a formal screening process, evaluate actual plant conditions and economics for Missouri industrial establishments. It is hoped that these case studies will show, by example, some of the elements that make energy resource conservation technologies economically a technically feasible in the real world.

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Backpressure Steam Cogeneration: A History and Review of the "Cheapest Power You'll Never Buy"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of backpressure steam turbines to make low-cost electricity is a well established technology with a long and illustrious history and a value that became lost as industry switched from home-grown power generation to centralized utility power in the 30's and 40's. Cogeneration, once the normal and very efficient way of making power for most industries, cities, and even small towns, was left behind as utilities gradually moved toward large central station plants located far from city centers or industries that could serve as thermal loads. As a result, the average efficiency of electricity production dropped from 85% to 35% from 1935 to 1975. Now, however, the utility paradigm is changing again as deregulation spreads from state to state with its promise of more competition and better pricing for electricity users, and its accompanying proliferation of new rules and new players. In this environment, the value of a technology that allows industries and institutions to make cheap power as a function of their thermal load is re-emerging. This paper will review the history of backpressure steam cogeneration; the particular market niche of small systems -those under 10 MW; the advent of packaged systems and the advantages these bring to the under 10 MW market; and why this technology is particularly beneficial in a deregulated environment. We will also review the required circumstances for a successful project, and review first-pass financial evaluation techniques. Finally we will describe a few systems currently in use.

Geoffroy-Michaels, E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) is planning, to design, construct and operate a Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). This facility will be located on a site easement near the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar company (KC&S) Paia Sugar Factory on Maui, Hawaii. The proposed BGF Project is a scale-up facility, intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of emerging biomass gasification technology for commercialization. This Executive Summary summarizes the uses of this Environmental Assessment, the purpose and need for the project, project,description, and project alternatives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Economic comparison of cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives for industry  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines various cogeneration alternatives available today and provides an economic comparison for a range of conditions that will enable the most significant factors to be considered in the selection of cogeneration alternatives, and to determine which alternatives are most suitable for the particular application. The cogeneration methods considered are: a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by an unfired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired high-pressure heat recovery boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, and a conventional coal-fired boiler and a noncondensing steam turbine-generator. It is concluded that over a wide range of financial and operating conditions, almost all of the cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives are more economical than continued operation of an existing conventional boiler generating steam only.

Cahill, G.J.; Germinaro, B.D.; Martin, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fired heater versus CCGT/cogeneration cycle parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results are given of a newly designed coal-fired, closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) for a cogeneration plant. The coal burning heater is the most costly unit of such a system. The interrelationship between the technical and economic feasibility of the heater and turbine parameters are discussed. 7 refs.

Campbell, J. Jr.; Lee, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A computer simulation model for examining cogeneration alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer simulation model that was used to analyze the technical and economic aspects of specific cogeneration applications. The model was coded in the APL language and runs on the Scientific Time Sharing System. ...

P. F. Schweizer; R. E. Sieck

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analysis of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency and load-managed electric cooling and water heating technologies often provide a better rate of return for commercial building owners, with lower capital outlay and lower technical risk than cogeneration. Commercially available equipment typical of these electric technologies include high-efficiency chillers, thermal energy storage, heat recovery chillers, heat recovery heat pumps, and heat pump water heaters.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Gr\\"obner bases of ideals cogenerated by Pfaffians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterise the class of one-cogenerated Pfaffian ideals whose natural generators form a Gr\\"obner basis with respect to any anti-diagonal term-order. We describe their initial ideals as well as the associated simplicial complexes, which turn out to be shellable and thus Cohen-Macaulay. We also provide a formula for computing their multiplicity.

De Negri, Emanuela

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Neural management for heat and power cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the problem of finding the optimum load allocation on machines and apparatuses in complex Cogeneration Heat and Power (CHP) plants. A methodology based on Neural Networks (NN) has been developed. A database has been populated by ... Keywords: CHP, Diagnosis, Neural networks, Optimisation, Plant models

Giovanni Cerri; Sandra Borghetti; Coriolano Salvini

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Biomass Power...

433

Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fibrominn Biomass Power...

434

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Biomass Analytical Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the pertinent LAPs. Workbooks are available for: Wood (hardwood or softwood) Corn stover (corn stover feedstock) Biomass hydrolyzate (liquid fraction produced from...

435

Innovative hybrid gas/electric chiller cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

January Progress--A kick-off meeting was held in San Diego with Alturdyne on January 21st. The proposed hybrid gas/electric chiller/cogenerator design concept was discussed in detail. The requirements and functionality of the key component, a variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator was presented. Variations of the proposed design were also discussed based on their technical feasibility, cost and market potential. The discussion is documented in a Trip Report. February Progress--After significant GRI/Alturdyne discussion regarding alternative product design concepts, the team made a decision to continue with the proposed product design, a hybrid chiller capable of also providing emergency power. The primary benefits are: (a) the flexibility and operating cost savings associated with the product's dual fuel capability and (b) the emergency power feature. A variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator would significantly increase the cost of the product while providing marginal benefit. (The variable speed, constant frequency motor generator is estimated to cost $25,000 versus $4,000 for a constant speed version). In addition, the interconnection requirements to the electric grid would significantly limit market penetration of the product. We will proceed with a motor/generator design capable of serving as the electric prime mover for the compressor as well as the generator for emergency power needs. This component design is being discussed with two motor manufacturers. The first generation motor/generator will not be a variable speed, constant frequency design. The variable speed, constant frequency capability can be an advancement that is included at a later time. The induction motor/synchronous generator starts as a wound rotor motor with a brushless exciter and control electronics to switch between induction mode and synchronous mode. The exciter is a three-phase exciter with three phase rotating diode assembly. In the induction motor mode, the field windings are shorted out by SCRs located across the field. In the synchronous mode, a small ct on one of the exciter leads would power the rotating exciter electronics. Upon sensing exciter current, the electronics would automatically open the SCRs allowing synchronous operation. Quotes will be obtained from American Motor and Reuland, two motor/generator vendors. March Progress--A product layout was completed. The width is reduced significantly from the original hybrid design because the evaporator and condenser tube in shell heat exchangers are located below the engine/motor/compressor drive-line. Alturdyne is searching for a consultant to perform a drive-line torsional analysis. This analysis is necessary to ensure that the drive-line is not subject to undue vibrations operating through its entire speed range. Much effort was directed toward motor/generator selection. A decision was made to use Reuland Electric. A motor with double-end shafts will be purchased. The design effort which will be completed at Alturdyne will involve the modification of the wound rotor motor to also provide synchronous power. Work has been completed on developing the new controller which will be utilized for the original hybrid product as well as this advanced product. Work continues toward developing a manufacturing cost estimate. A detailed bill of material will be developed for the product. Key components include the engine, compressor and motor/generator.

Nowakowski, G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates annual dynamic load of a real project to calculate the first investments, annual operation cost and LCC (life cycle cost) of the four schemes, which are electric chillers, electric chillers with ice-storage system, absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant and absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant along with ice-storage system. On the basis of the results, the paper analyzes the prospect of the absorption refrigeration using municipal excess heat, as well as the reasonable heat price, which provides a theoretical basis for municipal heating and cooling co-generation development.

Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cogenerator to quit Con Ed by selling kWh to neighbor  

SciTech Connect

Selling 125 kilowatts of electricity around the clock to a nearby supermarket will make cogeneration feasible for the Flagship Restaurant in White Plains, NY, allowing it to drop off Consolidated Edison's grid and pay for a necessary backup generator, according to John Prayias, the restaurant's owner. The ambitious $536,000 project, which will be financed conventionally with a commercial bank loan, will eliminate the Flagship's $70,000 electricity costs and the $7240 spent of heating and domestic hot water, Prayias said. By selling the power to the supermarket at 9 cents per kilowatt hour - 3 cents less than Con Ed's rate of 12 cents per kWh - the restaurant will collect $120,000 a year in revenues - just about enough to cover the cost of diesel fuel for the 350-kW system and pay for monitoring and maintenance.

Springer, N.

1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use at a Kraft pulp mill in the United States is analyzed in detail. Annual average process steam and electricity demands in the existing mill are 19.3 MMBtu per ADST and 687 kWh per ADST, respectively. This is relatively high by industry standards. The mill meets nearly all its electricity needs with a back-pressure steam turbine. Higher electricity to heat ratios is an industry wide trend and anticipated at the mill. The potential for self-sufficiency in energy using only black liquor and bark available on-site is assessed based on the analysis of the present energy situation and potential process changes. The analysis here suggests that steam and electricity demand could be reduced by 89% by operating consistently at high production rates. Process modifications and retrofits using commercially proven technologies could reduce steam and electricity demand to as low as 9.7 MMBtu per ADST, a 50% reduction, and 556 kWh per ADST, a 19% reduction, respectively. Electricity demand could increase to about 640 kWh per ADST due to closed-cycle operation of the bleach plant and other efforts to improve environmental performance. The retrofitted energy efficient mill with low environmental impact could be self-sufficient in steam and electricity using conventional technology, such as a back pressure steam turbine or a condensing extraction steam turbine. In addition to meeting mill energy demand, about 1,000 kWh per ADST would be available for export from the mill if gasification/combined cycle technology were used instead.

Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Overview of Renewable Energies in Colombia: Advances in Biomass Power Cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical review related to the contributions of technology development in the search for optimal solutions at the local level to face the renewable energies challenge. This, considering that those processes of promoting the development ...

D. Ortiz; M. Gualteros; E. Hurtado

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass cogeneration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

Thomas Mason

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

A big leap forward for biomass gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the McNeil Generating Station in Vermont, the first industrial scale-up of Battelle Columbus Laboratory`s biomass gasification process. The plant is part of a major US DOE initiative to demonstrate gasification of renewable biomass for electricity production. The project will integrate the Battelle high-through-put gasifier with a high-effiency gas turbine. The history of the project is described, along with an overview of the technology and the interest and resources available in Vermont that will help insure a successful project.

Moon, S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cogeneration Energy Profitability from the Energy User and Third-Party Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the relationship between major energy costs such as: fuel, electricity, and thermal energy and their effect on cogeneration profits and economics from both the energy user and the third party perspective. The relationship between the prime mover efficiency and cogeneration operating profits is given. Optimum sizing philosophies for the cogeneration plant from both the energy user and the third party positions are presented. Several unique graphs are provided to illustrate and clarify the material.

Polsky, M. P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Evaluation and Design of Utility Co-Owned Cogeneration Systems for Industrial Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, is currently evaluating the potential of utility co-owned cogeneration facilities in industrial parks. This paper describes part of the work performed by one of EPRI's contractors, Impell Corporation, chosen by EPRI to support the industrial parks study. Cogeneration benefits for park owners, tenants and the local utilities are presented. A method developed for selecting industrial park sites for cogeneration facilities and design and financing options are also discussed.

Hu, D. S.; Tamaro, R. F.; Schiller, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Christina Snow, Compliance Office SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (85-AFC-3C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petition with the California Energy Commission requesting to modify the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The 225-megawatt project was certified by the Energy Commission on May 14, 1987, and began commercial operation on May 1, 1989. The facility is located in Fellows in Kern County, California and uses cogeneration steam to aid in the enhanced oil recovery process. Air Quality technical staff reviewed the petition to amend and requested additional revisions for consistency with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) Authority to Construct (ATC) permit. A modification of the petition to amend was submitted and posted online and docketed on November 19, 2010. The proposed amendment requests administrative modifications to Units A, B and C and revision of unit B’s DLN9 Combustion System to a DLN1+ Combustion System. Energy Commission staff reviewed the petition and assessed the impacts of this proposal on environmental quality, public health and safety, and proposes the modifications to the Air Quality Conditions of Certification as noted in the attached analysis. It is staff’s opinion that, with the implementation of the revised air quality condition, the project will remain in compliance with applicable laws, ordinances, regulations, and standards and that the proposed modifications will not result in a significant adverse direct or cumulative impact to the environment (Title 20, California Code of Regulations, Section 1769). The amendment petition and staff’s analysis have been posted on the Energy Commission’s webpage at:

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

NREL: Biomass Research - Eric P. Knoshaug  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eric P. Knoshaug Eric P. Knoshaug Photo of Eric Knoshaug Eric P. Knoshaug is a senior scientist in the Applied Science section of the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He joined NREL in August 2000 and has since worked on engineering yeast for efficient utilization of biomass-generated pentose sugars, protein design and evolution for increased activity on recalcitrant biomass substrates, and increasing lipid production in microalgae. Current projects include: Pentose utilization in yeast Algal growth systems Algal lipid production and nitrogen stress responses Enzymatic degradation of algal biomass. Research Interests Microbiology Molecular biology Microbial physiology Fermentation and growth systems development Metabolic engineering

449

BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the ninth reporting period (September 27--December 31, 1999), EER prepared a paper Kinetic Model of Biomass Reburning and submitted it for publication and presentation at the 28th Symposium (International) on Combustion, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, July 30--August 4, 2000. Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. A preliminary report is included in this quarterly report.

Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey; Vitali Lissianski

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

PTC, ITC, or Cash Grant? An Analysis of the Choice Facing Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an open-loop, direct-combustion solid biomass project over aclosed-loop, direct-combustion solid biomass project. Few (

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Biomass reburning - Modeling/engineering studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the eleventh reporting period (April 1--June 30, 2000), EER and NETL R&D group continued to work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 5. This report includes results from Task 3 physical modeling of the introduction of biomass reburning in a working coal-fired utility boiler.

Sheldon, M.; Marquez, A.; Zamansky, V.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x}control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the eighth reporting period (July 1--September 26, 1999), Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. This report includes summary of the findings; complete information will be submitted in the next Quarterly Report.

Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Biomass Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on...

455

Small Modular Biomass Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet that provides an introduction to small modular biomass systems. These systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and people without power. They use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, and animal manures.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

TORREFACTION OF BIOMASS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical pre-treatment of biomass within a narrow temperature range from 200°C to 300°C, where mostly the hemicellulose components of a biomass depolymerise.… (more)

Dhungana, Alok

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

459

Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSE Inc. recently completed the design, construction and start-up of a cogeneration plant in which waste heat in the high temperature flue gases of three existing coke calcining kilns is recovered to produce process steam and electrical energy. The heat previously exhausted to the atmosphere is now converted to steam by waste heat recovery boilers. Eighty percent of the steam produced is metered for sale to a major oil refinery, while the remainder passes through a steam turbine generator and is used for deaeration and feedwater heating. The electricity produced is used for the plant auxiliaries and sold to the local utility. Many design concepts were incorporated into the plant which provided for high plant availability, reliability and energy efficiency. This paper will show how these concepts were implemented and incorporated into the detailed design of the plant while making cogeneration a cost effective way to save conventional fuels. Operating data since plant start-up will also be presented.

Coles, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Evaluation of Thermal Efficiency and Energy Conservation of an Extraction / Condensing Cogeneration System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The extraction-condensing cogeneration system is a popular technology for heat and power integration which can be used by petrochemical process. To compare with back pressure… (more)

Ko, Yi-tsung

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z