Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

2

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

3

Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Personal) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $100,000 per claimant over the life of the program Total credits granted by the Department may not exceed $900,000 per fiscal year Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State Wisconsin Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 10% of the cost of eligible equipment Provider Wisconsin Department of Revenue In May 2010, Wisconsin enacted legislation allowing taxpayers to claim a tax credit from income or franchise taxes of 10% of the cost of equipment primarily used to harvest or process woody biomass for use as a fuel or as a component of fuel. The adopted law creates identical tax credits in the

4

Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $100,000 per claimant over the life of the program Total credits granted by the Department may not exceed $900,000 per fiscal year Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 Expiration Date 01/01/2016 State Wisconsin Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 10% of the cost of eligible equipment Provider Wisconsin Department of Revenue In May 2010, Wisconsin enacted legislation allowing taxpayers to claim a tax credit from income or franchise taxes of 10% of the cost of equipment primarily used to harvest or process woody biomass for use as a fuel or as a component of fuel. The adopted law creates identical tax credits in the

5

Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Corporate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporate Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

6

Woody Biomass Harvesting and Processing Tax Credit (Personal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Personal Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

7

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Corporate Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Incentive Inactive Date 12312019 Implementing Sector State...

9

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Personal Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

10

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Opportunities for agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Industry Opportunities for agriculture R. Blaauw J. van Haveren E. L International Certification Services EESV according to ISO 9001:2000. Title Biomass for the Dutch Chemical for biomass 18 3.1 General developments 18 3.2 Developments of the Dutch chemical industry towards a bio

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

11

Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nation’s power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the country’s current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: • Biomass Availability – By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee • Sustainability – Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be accomplished in a sustainable manner • Feedstock Infrastructure – An integrated feedstock supply system must be developed and implemented that can serve the feedstock needs of the biorefinery at the cost, quality, and consistency of the set targets • System Profitability – Economic profitability and sustainability need to be ensured for all required participants in the feedstock supply system. For each step in the biomass supply process—production, harvesting and collection, storage, preprocessing, system integration, and transportation—this roadmap addresses the current technical situations, performance targets, technical barriers, R&D needs, and R&D priorities to overcome technical barriers and achieve performance targets. Crop residue biomass is an attractive starting feedstock, which shows the best near-term promise as a biorefinery feedstock. Because crop residue is a by-product of grain production, it is an abundant, underutilized, and low cost biomass resource. Corn stover and cereal straw are the two most abundant crop residues available in the United States. Therefore, this roadmap focuses primarily on the R&D needed for using these biomass sources as viable biorefinery feedstocks. However, achieving the goal of 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock will require the use of other biomass sources such as dedicated energy crops. In the long term, the R&D needs identified in this roadmap will need to accommodate these other sources of biomass as well.

J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Harvesting technology and catch-to-biomass dependence: The case of small pelagic fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvesting technology and catch-to-biomass dependence: The case of small pelagic fish Pedro Gajardo on the dependence of the stationary solutions upon the nonlinear catch-to-biomass parameter. Given the emphasis

Ramírez, Héctor

13

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

14

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

15

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Grant Program Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas Active Policy Yes Inactive Date 83119 Implementing Sector StateProvince...

17

ANALYSIS OF BIOMASS HARVEST, HANDLING, AND COMPUTER MODELING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass materials are currently considered for use in direct combustion systems, and for value added products. The major roadblock associated with implementation of biomass into… (more)

Brownell, Douglas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Sustainable Strategies of Biomass Harvesting: From North Carolina to Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that used wood pellets for fuel, and a combined heat and power plant that used waste and wood fuels. After potential of wood products in Sweden, the technologies for harvesting are quite underdeveloped throughout, and touring Umeå's new CPH facility, which is powered primarily by forest residues. Topics of discussion

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

19

Demonstration of the BioBaler harvesting system for collection of small-diameter woody biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a project to investigate sustainable forest management practices for producing wood chips on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the ORNL steam plant, the BioBaler was tested in various Oak Ridge locations in August of 2011. The purpose of these tests and the subsequent economic analysis was to determine the potential of this novel woody biomass harvesting method for collection of small-diameter, low value woody biomass. Results suggest that opportunities may exist for economical harvest of low-value and liability or negative-cost biomass. (e.g., invasives). This could provide the ORR and area land managers with a tool to produce feedstock while improving forest health, controlling problem vegetation, and generating local employment.

Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Caffrey, Kevin R [ORNL; Barnett, Elliott J [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Brummette, Mark W [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

Highwood, Ellie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Agricultural Biomass to Energy Program (California) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Performance-Based Incentive Applicable Sector Biomass Facility Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive No Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

23

Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has the potential to be used as a cellulosic feedstock for ethanol production due to its diversity and wide adaptation to many different climates. With a wide range of diversity, this crop could be tailored specifically for use as a feedstock for ethanol production. Other factors such as water use efficiency, drought tolerance, yield potential, composition, and established production systems also make sorghum a logical choice as a feedstock for bioenergy production. The objectives of this study were to better understand the biomass potential of different types of sorghum that may be used for energy production, and determine the composition of these sorghums over the season to better understand biomass yield and composition over time. Six commercial sorghum cultivars or hybrids that represent sorghum types from grain to energy were evaluated near College Station, Texas during the 2008 and 2009 cropping years. An optimal harvest window (defined by maximum yield) was established for all genotypes, and significant variation was seen among the genotypes for fresh and dry biomass production. The later maturity genotypes, including the photo-period sensitive and modified photo-period sensitive type sorghums, produced the highest yields (up to 24 dry Mg/ha). Compositional analysis using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIR) for lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose was performed on a dry matter basis for the optimal harvest window for each genotype. Significant differences were seen in 2009 between the genotypes for lignin, hemicellulose, cellulose, ash and protein; with the earlier genotypes having higher percentage of lignin, and the later genotypes having lower percentages of lignin. Genotype x Environment interactions were also seen, and show the significance that rainfall can have. Based on this research, grain sorghum could be harvested first, followed by photo-period insensitive forage varieties, then moderately photo-period sensitive forage varieties followed by dedicated bioenergy sorghums (that are full photo-period sensitive), allowing for a more constant supply of feedstock to processing plants. Sweet sorghums would also allow the end user to obtain biomass when needed, however these types of sorghum may be much better suited to a different end application (i.e. crushing the stalks to obtain the juice).

Borden, Dustin Ross

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative April 15, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, April 15, 2011- To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to $30 million over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

25

Agricultural-Waste Biomass for Hydrogen Adsorption via Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional infiltration of this biomass carbon via silicon melt and vapor is attempted for the production of silicon carbide material structures with more favorable ...

26

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota. 9:05 am Overview of Renewable Energy and Environmental, Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, A signature program of the Institute on the Environment

Minnesota, University of

29

Physical and Chemical Characteristics of High-Tonnage Sorghum for an Extended Biomass Harvesting Season and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing differences in United States energy consumption and production has influenced the passing of legislation for biomass fuel production. To determine feasibility of energy crops for alternative fuels, research is needed to investigate dry matter yield over an extended harvest season; physical characteristics need to be described for potential harvesting problems; chemical characteristics described to identify selective harvest potential, optimal harvest timing, losses during harvest and storage; various harvest techniques investigated to identify potential cost savings; and impact of various storage techniques on quantity and quality of deliverable biomass. This study investigated the use of two sorghum varieties as a potential bioenergy feedstock where 20 ha were planted for three years. Standing crop samples were collected from August through January to document changes in dry matter yield, moisture, height, fiber content, proximate and ultimate analysis. The sorghum was cut and conditioned – as a two-cutting ratoon or single-cutting – using various mower-conditioners and windrow samples taken daily to determine best method of field drying, quantify dry matter loss and soil entrainment. Two storage methods were utilized – baling with wrapping in a tubeline, and chopping and compressing in bag using a modified cotton module builder – to determine best method of storage for reduced dry matter loss. The optimal time of harvest for maximum dry matter occurred with the November once-cut where 30 Mg ha^-1 was documented, but comparable yields were observed with the two-cutting scenario. Fiber content increased with maturity, peaked, and declined, while ash content and moisture decreased with maturity. The achievement of 55% moisture in January shows field curing to be necessary for transportation at any significant distance, but soil entrainment – as measured by ash concentration – was not found to be a significant problem after conditioning, multiple windrow inversions, and harvesting. The geometric mean length of particle was determined to be 1.4 to 3.7 times lower than nominal chop length, indicating potential cost savings in comminution. Dry matter loss estimates during storage proved difficult due to mobility of moisture throughout the packages, where losses were documented up to 40%. Module packages tended to have lower dry matter and constituent losses than bales.

Hartley, Brandon

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Convergence of Agriculture and Energy: II. Producing Cellulosic Biomass for Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35-50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on geographical factors such as biomass species, yield, location, climate, local economy, as well as the types of systems used for harvesting, collection, preprocessing, and transportation. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence the selection of pioneer biorefinery locations, and these same factors will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Due to geographic variability and complex distributed supply system dynamics, estimating feedstock costs and supplies has been a major source of uncertainty.

Steven L. Fales; Wallace W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

32

First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

34

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

35

Harvesting a renewable resource under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a valuable renewable resource whose biomass X2003. “Harvesting a renewable resource under uncertainty,”Harvesting a Renewable Resource under Uncertainty 1 (with

Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

37

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

38

First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a… (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Trends and outlook for biomass energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among renewable energy resources, biomass is one of the most promising, with the potential for providing electricity through combustion, gasification, and biochemical processes as well as supplying gaseous and liquid fuels that can compete with conventional energy sources in large-scale applications. The production of biomass for energy purposes can also offer environmental benefits. The most notable is the potential for providing energy with little or no net buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere if the biomass is produced renewably. Biomass also has the potential to help revitalize the rural sector of the economy. A domestic natural resource, biomass can be grown and harvested, which requires labor. The biomass power industry can therefore create jobs in harvesting and transporting biomass and in the related industries of fertilizers, pesticides, and agricultural equipment. In the future, biomass facilities will be larger and more efficient and, as such, an important alternative for energy generators. This article summarizes the factors relating to the use of biomass as a fuel source, the technology options for power generation, and examines the trends and outlook for biomass energy generation in the United States.

Green, J.H. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States). Research and Development)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY to treatment prescriptions and anticipated outputs of sawlogs and biomass fuel? How many individual operations biomass fuel removed. Typically in plantations. 50% No harvest treatment

42

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned...

43

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Environmental effects of planting biomass crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous. and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30 X 30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30 X 30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the mitigation of predicted global climate change. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Grosshans, Raymond R.; Kostelnik, Kevin, M.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30x30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30x30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Raymond R. Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jacob J. Jacobson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomass—organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes—that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

48

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Biomass Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technologies August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic...

50

The cultivation and harvesting of micro-algal biomass from the Hartbeespoort Dam for the production of biodiesel / Jacobus Petrus Brink.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable energy sources such as biomass are becoming more and more important as alternative to fossil fuels. One of the most exciting new sources of… (more)

Brink, Jacobus Petrus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Biomass/Biogas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass/Biogas Biomass/Biogas < Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Agricultural residues are defined as the residues from production of the following crops. * Corn * Wheat * Soybeans * Cotton * Sorghum * Barley * Oats * Rice * Rye * Canola * Beans * Peas * Peanuts * Potatoes * Safflower * Sunflower * Sugarcane * Flaxseed Forest residues are defined as logging residues and other removals. These include material already utilized as well as material that is disposed as waste. Logging residues are the unused portions of trees cut by logging (tops and branches) and left to be burned or decay in the woods. Other removals include trees removed as a part of thinning projects, land clearings, and forest health uses that are not directly associated with round wood product harvests. Primary mill residues include wood materials

52

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from...

53

Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned...

54

Analysis of Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options within a Multi-sector Economic Framework  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National-scale analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options is generally carried out using top-down economic models with moderate energy detail but very limited detail in agriculture and forestry. However, a complete analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options requires an improved representation of agriculture within the top-down economic models used for analysis of climate policy. Greenhouse gas mitigation options within the agricultural sector include changes in afforestation of agricultural lands, crop and livestock management practices, harvesting of biomass crops for fuel, and the sequestration of carbon in agricultural soils. Analysis of such options is usually carried out in a bottom-up model such as the Agricultural Sector Model (ASM). We report on activities to combine the bottom-up agricultural detail from ASM with the top-down economic and energy structure used at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which has been used extensively for analysis of alternative carbon mitigation strategies.

Sands, Ronald D.; Mccarl, Bruce A.; Gillig, Dhazn; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Gale, J.; Kaya, Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3091  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3091 Biomass Harvesting Won't biomass harvesting ruin our forests? That's a good question, and the answer of woody biomass harvesting are the effects on soil nutrient and water cycles, depletion of nutrients from

56

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying &...

57

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

 The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass.  The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

58

The Impact of Biomass Feedstock Supply Variability on the Delivered Price to a Biorefinery in the Peace River Region of Alberta, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residue feedstock availability in a given region can vary significantly over the 20 25 year lifetime of a biorefinery. Since delivered price of biomass feedstock to a biorefinery is related to the distance travelled and equipment optimization, and transportation distance increases as productivity decreases, productivity is a primary determinant of feedstock price. Using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) modeling environment and a standard round bale harvest and delivery scenario, harvest and delivery price were modelled for minimum, average, and maximum yields at four potential biorefinery sites in the Peace River region of Alberta, Canada. Biorefinery capacities ranged from 50,000 to 500,000 tonnes per year. Delivery cost is a linear function of transportation distance and can be combined with a polynomial harvest function to create a generalized delivered cost function for agricultural residues. The range in delivered cost is substantial and is an important consideration for the operating costs of a biorefinery.

Stephen, Jamie [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Kloeck, T. [Alberta Agriculture; Townley-Smith, Lawrence [AAFC; Stumborg, Mark [AAFC

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability  

SciTech Connect

If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Billion-ton update: Biomass supply for a bioenergy andfor Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the UnitedUtilization of biomass for the supply of energy carriers,

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit...

62

Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings For...

63

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative...

64

Bamboo: An Overlooked Biomass Resource?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bamboo is the common term applied to a broad group (1250 species) of large woody grasses, ranging from 10 cm to 40 m in height. Already in everyday use by about 2.5 billion people, mostly for fiber and food within Asia, bamboo may have potential as a bioenergy or fiber crop for niche markets, although some reports of its high productivity seem to be exaggerated. Literature on bamboo productivity is scarce, with most reports coming from various parts of Asia. There is little evidence overall that bamboo is significantly more productive than many other candidate bioenergy crops, but it shares a number of desirable fuel characteristics with certain other bioenergy feedstocks, such as low ash content and alkali index. Its heating value is lower than many woody biomass feedstocks but higher than most agricultural residues, grasses and straws. Although non-fuel applications of bamboo biomass may be actually more profitable than energy recovery, there may also be potential for co-productio n of bioenergy together with other bamboo processing. A significant drawback is the difficulty of selective breeding, given the lack of knowledge of flowering physiology. Further research is also required on propagation techniques, establishment and stand management, and mechanized harvesting needs to be developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass: Biomass: Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Traditional and Thermal Use of Biomass Traditional use of biomass, particularly burning wood, is one of the oldest manners in which biomass has been utilized for energy. Traditional use of biomass is 14% of world energy usage which is on the same level as worldwide electricity usage. Most of this consumption comes from developing countries where traditional use of biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy usage [1] and greater than 75% of primary energy use is in the residential sector. The general trend in developing countries has been a

66

Researchers at the Biomass Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARVEST OF ENERGY Researchers at the Biomass Energy Center are homing in on future fuels --By David--seriously for much longer than that. These are just a few examples of biomass, plant matter that can be transformed into fuels and other energy products. Like petroleum and coal, biomass contains carbon taken from

Lee, Dongwon

67

Forest-based biomass supply curves for the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Nationwide county-level supply curves have been estimated for forest-based biomass in order to help evaluate their potential contributions to producing biofuels. This paper builds on the estimates of potential supply in the USDA / DOE Billion Ton supply (BTS) study. Forest biomass sources include logging residue, thinnings, other removals, unused mill residue, urban wood waste and conventional sourced wood (pulpwood size material). To make the estimates it is assumed that lower cost forest biomass will be supplied from integrated harvesting operations which also remove sawlogs and pulpwood. It is assumed that such removals can be estimated at the county level in two steps. First as a portion of recent estimates of logging residues and second by simulated thinning operations that use tops, branches and small trees for biomass. Supply from thinning dense forest stands is assumed to occur over 30 years as in the original Billion Ton Supply Study. Harvest and stumpage costs are estimated for each of these methods. Final supply estimates for each county assume supply that is half way between the two estimates. Preliminary forest and agricultural biomass supply estimates have been used to indicate that for a marginal cost of $44 per oven dry ton (odt) at forest roadside or farm gate forest and agricultural feedstocks could produce 20 billion gallons of advanced biofuels as called for under the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. Forests could provide about 40 million odt of biomass per year at about $44 per odt to produce 4 billion gallons and agricultural feedstocks could provide about 200 million odt and produce 20 billion gallons of biofuel.

Kenneth Skog; Jamie Barbour; Marilyn Buford; Dennis Dykstra; Patti Lebow; Pat Miles; Bob Perlack; Bryce Stokes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

AGRICULTURAL REPORT SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Secure America's energy future through renewable biofuels 5. Mitigate and adapt agriculture to variations will harvestprocessor will harvest and process theand process the product for wholesaleproduct for wholesale

69

Biomass Energy Production Incentive (South Carolina) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, CHPCogeneration, Landfill Gas Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State...

70

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incentive Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Thermal polyerization Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory...

71

The Importance of Wildlife Harvest to Human Health and Livelihoods in Northeastern Madagascar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USD) Mean Price/kg b 0.68 – 1.08 c BUSHMEAT BIOMASS HARVESTbiomass for each species (H s ) by their respective pricesbiomass harvested as not all individuals within species that are harvested were adults. Bushmeat prices

Golden, Christopher DeWeir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

73

Assessment of utilization and downtime of a commercial level multi-pass corn stover harvesting systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With commercial scale cellulosic ethanol in the formative stages of building large-scale feedstock supply chains there is a requirement for biomass harvesting equipment to be… (more)

Covington, Benjamin Ross

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester  

SciTech Connect

The authors are solely responsible for the content of this technical presentation. The technical presentation does not necessarily reflect the official position of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE), and its printing and distribution does not constitute an endorsement of views which may be expressed. Technical presentations are not subject to the formal peer review process by ASAE editorial committees; therefore, they are not to be presented as refereed publications. Citation of this work should state that it is from an ASAE meeting paper. EXAMPLE: Author's Last Name, Initials. 2004. Title of Presentation. ASAE Paper No. 04xxxx. St. Joseph, Mich.: ASAE. For information about securing permission to reprint or reproduce a technical presentation, please contact ASAE at hq@asae.org or 269-429-0300 (2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, MI 49085-9659 USA). Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Biomass Energy Program (Alabama) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Last modified on January 8, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Alabama Name Biomass Energy Program Incentive Type State Grant Program Applicable Sector Agricultural,...

76

Flash hydrogenation of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to obtain process chemistry information on the rapid hydrogenation of biomass (wood and other agricultural products) to produce light liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks. The process is referred to as Flash Hydropyrolysis. The information will be of use in the design and evaluation of processes for the conversion of biomass to synthetic fuels and petrochemical feedstocks. Results obtained in an initial experiment are discussed.

Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment (Redirected from Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

78

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

79

Life cycle assessment and biomass carbon accounting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biomass feedstocks Biomass feedstocks and the climate implications of bioenergy Steven Hamburg Environmental Defense Fund Slides adapted from Reid Miner NCASI On the landscape, the single-plot looks like this 75 Harvested and burned for energy In year zero, the plot is harvested and the wood is burned for energy 1.1 Year 1 After regeneration begins, the growing biomass sequesters small amounts of CO2 annually 2.1 Year 2 2.8 Year 3 ??? Year X, until next harvest Σ = . Over time, if carbon stocks are returned to pre-harvest levels... ...the net emissions over this time are zero. single plot analysis Net Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Time Time Biomass energy Fossil fuel energy single plot analysis Net Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Cumulative

80

IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Siting & Permitting Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas...

82

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loan Program Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category...

83

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

84

Ris Energy Report 2 Biomass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6.1 Risø Energy Report 2 Biomass production This chapter mainly concerns the production of ligno- cellulosic biomass for generating heat and power. To date, such material has been available almost exclusively in the form of surplus or waste biomass from forestry or agriculture. However, as the demand

85

Clean fractionation of biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

87

Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Harvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Materials Energy Harvestingfor Energy Harvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

Brochu, Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Biomass power for rural development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Agency/Company /Organization: California Biomass Collaborative Partner: Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html Locality: California Cost: Free Provides energy cost and financial assessment tools for biomass power, bio gas, biomass combined heat and power, and landfill gas. Overview The California Biomass Collaborative provides energy cost and financial

90

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this trend will continue, especially if the prices for fossil fuels continue to increase. Other direct, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological iomass energy is energy derived from organic matter of recent biological origin. Common forms of biomass

Lee, Dongwon

91

Comparison of three remote sensing techniques to measure biomass on CRP pastureland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass from land enrolled into CRP is being considered as a biofuel feedstock source. For sustainable production, harvesting, and soil protection, technology is needed that… (more)

Porter, Tucker Fredrick.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion Biomass Energy Forestry Biochemical Biopower - Logging - Anaerobic digestion - Heat - Wood, paper mills - Hydrolysis/ Fermentation - Electricity Agricultural Thermal/chemical

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change Solutions;2 Table of Contents 1. Policy Setting 2. Biomass Volumes 2.1. Woody Biomass 2.1.1. Annual Residue Production 2.1.2. Pulp Chips 2.1.3. Existing Hog Fuel Piles 2.1.4. Forest Floor Biomass 2.2. Agricultural

94

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.J. R. , and Veres, P. : Biomass burning in Siberia andOpen burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1, 2002. [7] “Darpa energy harvesting projects. ” http://Optimized piezoelectric energy harvesting circuit usingAn environmental energy harvesting framework for sensor

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Harvest Aids in Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growers can obtain higher prices and increased profits for their grain sorghum by applying harvest aids, which are chemicals that bring the grain to a more uniform percentage of moisture at harvest. This publication explains what causes uneven moisture, how harvest aids work, how to determine physiological maturity, what materials are available and how to prevent premature crop lodging.

Stichler, Charles; Livingston, Stephen

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Short Communication Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chemicals in the U.S. Bob Wallace, Director Penn State BioEnergy BridgeTM Associate Director: Biomass Energy and Infrastructure Development Biomass Conversion Processes End Uses Systems Analyses Biomass Feedstocks Life Cycle and Economic Development Research Education Extension Facilities Testing ·Plant Production ·Biomass Harvest

Tang, Juming

99

Vibration Harvesting using Electromagnetic Transduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wide bandwidth piezoelectric energy harvesting,” Appliedtuning of piezoelectric vibration energy scavengingof electric energy harvesting using piezoelectric windmill,”

Waterbury, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Arkansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document consists of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner agricultural crop, agricultural waste, municipal waste and industrial waste in Arkansas that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

102

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

103

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Biomass Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program Biomass Energy Program Biomass Energy Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $75,000 Program Info State Alabama Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by project and interest rate Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on loans to install approved biomass projects. Technical assistance is also available through the program. Industrial, commercial and institutional facilities; agricultural property owners; and city, county, and state government entities are eligible.

105

Active Energy Harvesting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Harvesting energy from the ambient environment is an enabling technology for wide deployment of wireless sensor networks. Converting mechanical energy to electrical energy using piezoelectric… (more)

Liu, Yiming

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

108

Biomass Burning: A Driver for Global Change!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning includes the burning of the world''s vegetation---forests, savannas, and agricultural lands---to clear the land and change its use. Only in the past decade have researchers realized the important contributions of biomass burning to the ...

Levine J. S.; III W. R. Cofer; Jr D. R. Cahoon; Winstead E. L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia Owner Garcia Farms Ed Hughs Research Leader in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile of a Prototype Mechanical Gap Sorter for Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 26: Good Agricultural Practices

Castillo, Steven P.

110

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President Rezolex, Ltd. Co. Ed Curry President Curry Seed and Chile Co. Robert Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 21 of a Prototype Mechanical Gap Sorter for Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 26: Good Agricultural Practices

Castillo, Steven P.

111

MAXIMUM ENERGY HARVESTING CONTROL FOROSCILLATING ENERGY HARVESTING SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents an optimal method of designing and controlling an oscillating energy harvesting system. Many new and emerging energy harvesting systems, such as the… (more)

Elmes, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Scheduling for machinery fleets in biomass multiple-field operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the light of the current development toward large, and consequently, complicated agricultural production systems, such as systems of biomass production as bioenergy resource, the demand for advanced management tools, such as fleet management tools ... Keywords: Biomass logistics, Biomass supply chain, Fleet management, Planning

A. Orfanou, P. Busato, D. D. Bochtis, G. Edwards, D. Pavlou, C. G. SøRensen, R. Berruto

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Application of CHL model for estimating biomass pyrolysis yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of wood biomass represents a valid technique for recovering "green" fuel from residues of forestry and other activities, in agriculture as in industry, where wood and other plant residues are available. Wood biomass is essentially a composite ... Keywords: CHL model, biogas yield, biomass, numerical analysis, pyrolysis, rate estimation

Francesco Marra

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource Christopher B. Field1 , J. Elliott Campbell1 Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550, USA Increased production of biomass for energy has the potential to offset resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass energy agriculture on climate could

115

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Washington State biomass data book  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Provider Mississippi Technology Alliance The Strategic Biomass Solutions (SBS) was formed by the Mississippi Technology Alliance in June 2009. The purpose of the SBS is to provide assistance to existing and potential companies, investors and economic developers in the renewable energy sector. It offers companies strategic guidance for making their technology investor ready and connects companies to early stage private capital and available tax incentives. SBS assists

118

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:25am Addthis Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops. Biomass energy takes many forms and can have a wide variety of applications

119

BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION  

SciTech Connect

Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

John McDaniel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

John McDaniel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Belowground and aboveground biomass in young postfire lodgepole pine forests of contrasting tree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belowground and aboveground biomass in young postfire lodgepole pine forests of contrasting tree as 40% of live biomass in coniferous forests is located belowground, yet the effect of tree density on biomass allocation is poorly understood. We developed allometric equations using traditional harvesting

Turner, Monica G.

122

California's program converts biomass residues to energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief introduction to the emerging biomass fuel industry in California and includes descriptions of California's biomass potential, California's biomass development program, and legislation that expands the state's developmental efforts in biomass commercialization. California's agriculture and forest industries residues were discussed. These residues can be converted to energy, and now, through California's aggressive development program, more residues will be converted. (DP)

Ward, P.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

124

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russell Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Russell Biomass Place Massachusetts Sector Biomass Product Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at...

125

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Biomass Place India Sector Biomass Product Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References Star Biomass1 LinkedIn...

126

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Speaker(s): William Morrow Date: September 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet Two areas of research will be presented: potential roles that domestically sourced biomass energy could play in achieving U.S. environmental and petroleum security goals, and possible pathways for achieving California's long-term greenhouse gas reduction goals. Biomass energy is viewed by many in the electricity and transportation fuel sectors as offering benefits such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions and petroleum fuel substitution. For this reason a large-scale biomass energy industry future is often anticipated although currently biomass energy provides only a small contribution to these sectors. Agriculture models, however,

127

An integrated approach for techno-economic and environmental analysis of energy from biomass and fossil fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass conversion into forms of energy is receiving current attention because of environmental, energy and agricultural concerns. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the environmental, energy, economic, and technological aspects of using a form of biomass, switchgrass (panicum virgatum), as a partial or complete replacement for coal in power generation and cogeneration systems. To examine the effects of such a substitution, an environmental biocomplexity approach is used, wherein the agricultural, technological, economic, and environmental factors are addressed. In particular, lifecycle analysis (LCA) and a three-dimensional integrated economic, energy and environmental analysis is employed. The effectiveness of alternate technologies for switchgrass preparation, harvest and use in terms of greenhouse gas impact, cost and environmental implications is examined. Also, different scenarios of cofiring and biomass preparation pathways are investigated. Optimization of the total biomass power generation cost with minimum greenhouse gas effect is undertaken using mathematical programming for various alternate competitive biomass processing pathways. As a byproduct of this work a generic tool to optimize the cost and greenhouse gas emissions for allocation of fuel sources to the power generating sinks is developed. Further, this work discusses the sensitivity of the findings to varied cofiring ratios, coal prices, hauling distances, per acre yields, etc. Besides electricity generation in power plants, another viable alternative for reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) is the utilization of biomass in conjunction with combined heat and power (CHP) in the process industries. This work addresses the utilization of biowaste or biomass source in a processing facility for CHP. A systematic algebraic procedure for targeting cogeneration potential ahead of detailed power generation network design is presented. The approach presented here effectively utilizes the biomass and biowaste sources as external fuel, and matches it with the use and dispatch of fuel sources within the process, heating and non-heating steam demands, and power generation. The concept of extractable energy coupled with flow balance via cascade diagram has been used as a basis to construct this approach. The work also discusses important economic factors and environmental policies required for the cost-effective utilization of biomass for electricity generation and CHP.

Mohan, Tanya

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

130

Coverage impacts biomass composition, conversion to ethanol yields and microbial communities during storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased mandates for the production of transportation fuels from renewable resources have thrust the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, e.g., energy crops and agricultural residues, to… (more)

Rigdon, Anne R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Sustainable liquid biofuels from biomass: The writingscandidates for refining into biofuels also possess qualitiesin the production of biofuels from agricultural feed- stocks

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Identifying factors and quantifying their impact on transportation costs of pre-processes biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research presents a rail transportation cost analysis of bulk agricultural commodities (such as grain and wood chips) with similar characteristics as pre-processed biomass.… (more)

Gonzales, Daniela Sofia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Macroalgae as a Biomass Feedstock: A Preliminary Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thorough of macroalgae analysis as a biofuels feedstock is warranted due to the size of this biomass resource and the need to consider all potential sources of feedstock to meet current biomass production goals. Understanding how to harness this untapped biomass resource will require additional research and development. A detailed assessment of environmental resources, cultivation and harvesting technology, conversion to fuels, connectivity with existing energy supply chains, and the associated economic and life cycle analyses will facilitate evaluation of this potentially important biomass resource.

Roesijadi, Guritno; Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Zhu, Yunhua

2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Harvesting Support for Sensor Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Energy Harvesting Support for SensorLifetime or Per formance Energy Harvesting System life andProposed Solution: Energy Harvesting Support for sensor

Jason Hsu; Aman Kansal; Mani Srivastava

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Biomass processing and solar process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which biomass can supply useful energy depends on the available integrated solar flux density over the year, the photosynthesis yield, the harvest factor, the energy gain, and the conversion efficiency of biomass into the desired energy carrier. Using these factors, an equation is presented to determine the area required for a given annual demand. In particular, the production of ethanol from biomass is considered, based on recent data from the national alcohol program Proalcool in Brazil. Finally, an estimate is given how solar process heat can improve the yield of alcohol or provide other base material for the chemical industry such as ethylene and synthesis gas from biomass. 9 references, 4 tables.

Sizmann, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Implementing Residue Chippers On Harvesting Operation for Biomass Recovery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three operations that implemented a small residue chipper on their conventional logging operations were studied in 2006. Two of the jobs were thinning operations, the… (more)

Aulakh, Jaspreet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

List of Biomass Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 757 Biomass Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-757) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

140

Development of the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics Model (IBSAL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Biomass Supply & Logistics (IBSAL) model is a dynamic (time dependent) model of operations that involve collection, harvest, storage, preprocessing, and transportation of feedstock for use at a biorefinery. The model uses mathematical equations to represent individual unit operations. These unit operations can be assembled by the user to represent the working rate of equipment and queues to represent storage at facilities. The model calculates itemized costs, energy input, and carbon emissions. It estimates resource requirements and operational characteristics of the entire supply infrastructure. Weather plays an important role in biomass management and thus in IBSAL, dictating the moisture content of biomass and whether or not it can be harvested on a given day. The model calculates net biomass yield based on a soil conservation allowance (for crop residue) and dry matter losses during harvest and storage. This publication outlines the development of the model and provides examples of corn stover harvest and logistics.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and

William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass resources meet about 99.5% of the Liberian population?s energy needs so they are vital to basic welfare and economic activity. Already, traditional biomass products like firewood and charcoal are the primary energy source used for domestic cooking and heating. However, other more efficient biomass technologies are available that could open opportunities for agriculture and rural development, and provide other socio-economic and environmental benefits.The main objective of this study is to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels. It intends to inform policy makers and industry developers of the biomass resource availability in Liberia, identify areas with high potential, and serve as a base for further, more detailed site-specific assessments.

Milbrandt, A.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermodynamic Data for Biomass Conversion and Waste Incineration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l b l l q,(net) 4202 cal g i qv(net) 17580 J g- 83 JENEBE 15 Agricultural Residues CORN STOVER; solid; Material is considered biomass fuel and has proximate analysis values...

147

Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schiller Biomass Con Biomass...

148

Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass...

149

Characterizing Microalgae (Nannochloris oculata) Harvesting by Aluminum Flocculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress in algae biotechnology indicates that microalgae have the potential of becoming a significant source for food, feed proteins, nutraceuticals, and lipids for biofuels. Typically low concentrations of microalgae cultures (less than 2 g/L) make harvesting of algae biomass one of the key economic bottlenecks for microalgae production of biofuels and bioproducts. Among the various biomass harvesting options currently under consideration, flocculation appears to be the least expensive and most flexible method for harvesting and initial concentration of dilute algal cultures. In addition to initial biomass concentration, processing factors that could also affect harvesting efficiency include culture pH, flocculant dosage, and media ionic strength (conductivity). This thesis reviews challenges of harvesting and concentration of green microalgae and examines the effect of pH, flocculant dosage, and culture conductivity on charge neutralization and flocculation of Nannochloris oculata by aluminum chloride. N. oculata flocculation was studied by manipulating the culture pH and ionic strength before the addition of aluminum chloride. The removal efficiency, concentration factor, settling rate, and zeta potential of the culture were measured to assess the effect of processing variables and understand mechanisms that govern N. oculata flocculation by aluminum chloride. Flocculation tests conducted with culture concentrations of 10^7 cells/ml revealed that AlCl3 concentration of 0.05 g/L and flocculation pH of 5.3 were optimal conditions for achieving 100% removal efficiency and a twentyfold algae concentration. At flocculant concentrations greater than 0.05 g/L, removal efficiencies were equally good but resulting concentration factors decreased with increasing AlCl3 dosage. Zeta potential measurements were correlated with flocculation dosage, initial cell concentration, medium pH, and aluminum solubility curves to conclude that densely charged multi-valent aluminum hydroxide species were responsible for the efficient flocculation at pH 5.3 with 0.05 g/L AlCl3.

Davis, Ryan T.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

151

Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. Photo of two men standing in front of large sugar cane plants. Sugar cane is used in Hawaii and other locations to produce energy and ethanol for alternative fuels. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops.

152

EA-1475: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa 75: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa EA-1475: Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Chillicothe, Iowa SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to provide partial funding for (1) the design and construction of a biomass storage, handling, and conveying system into the boiler at the Ottumwa Generating Station near Chillicothe, Iowa; (2) operational testing of switchgrass as a biomass co-fire feedstock at OGS; and (3) ancillary activities related to growing, harvesting, storing, and transporting switchgrass in areas of the Rathbun Lake watershed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 11, 2003 EA-1475: Final Environmental Assessment Chariton Valley Biomass Project

153

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick- stemmed species. Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering- economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or truck.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Butler, J. [Butler (James), Tifton, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

157

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

158

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. (Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation Poulomi Sannigrahi 1,2 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 10.1 Introduction With the rise in global energy demand and environmental concerns about the use of fossil fuels, the need for rapid development of alternative fuels from sustainable, non-food sources is now well acknowledged. The effective utilization of low-cost high-volume agricultural and forest biomass for the production of transporta- tion fuels and bio-based materials will play a vital role in addressing this concern [1]. The processing of lignocellulosic biomass, especially from mixed agricultural and forest sources with varying composition,

160

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

162

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to… (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy harvesting Wheel Speed Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a prototype energy harvesting autonomous sensor, called the Autonomous Wheel Speed Sensor (AWSS), that is targeted for operation in the Electronic Braking… (more)

Parthasarathy, Dhasarathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For instance, consider a solar energy harvesting network. Atare discussed below. Solar Energy Solar or other lightand could hence use solar energy, while a sensor network

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and &nergy Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 301-307, 1992 Printed in Great Britain 0961-9534/92 $5.00 + 0 saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process is a favored option for conversion of the lignocellulosic biomass biomass, ethanol, woody crops, herbaceous crops, agricultural residues. 1. INTRODUCIION Although ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

166

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood?to?energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities.

167

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 100,000 per fiscal year per taxpayer; 2.1 million per fiscal year for all taxpayers Program Info Start Date 5/29/2008 State South Carolina Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount 0.01 per kWh / 0.30 per therm Provider South Carolina Energy Office In 2007 South Carolina enacted the ''Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act'', which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for electricity generated or $0.30 per therm (100,000 Btu) for energy produced

168

NREL: Biomass Research - Richard L. Bain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard L. Bain Richard L. Bain Photo of Richard Bain Richard Bain is a Principal Engineer in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He has worked at NREL since 1990 and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He is a lead researcher in the area of production of transportation fuels and hydrogen via thermochemical conversion of biomass; technical advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on biofuels demonstrations; and Task Leader for the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Annex Biomass Gasification Task. Dr. Bain manages biomass gasification research activities for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program at NREL and coordinates support to the USDA for

169

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsoft Word - Biomass_Data_Book_EDITION_1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USEFUL WEB SITES USEFUL WEB SITES GOVERNMENT LINKS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE www.usda.gov Agricultural Research Service www.ars.usda.gov Forest Service www.fs.fed.us National Agricultural Library www.nal.usda.gov National Agricultural Statistics Service www.nass.usda.gov U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY www.energy.gov Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy www.eere.energy.gov Biomass Program www.eere.energy.gov/biomass Alternative Fuels Data Center www.afdc.nrel.gov Clean Cities www.ccities.doe.gov Fuel Economy www.fueleconomy.gov Biomass Energy Data Book cta.ornl.gov/bedb Buildings Energy Data Book www.btscoredatabook.net Power Technologies Data Book www.nrel.gov/analysis/power_databook Transportation Energy Data Book cta.ornl.gov/data

173

Biomass Energy Data Book: Edition2 - Full Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USEFUL WEB SITES USEFUL WEB SITES GOVERNMENT LINKS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE www.usda.gov Agricultural Research Service www.ars.usda.gov Forest Service www.fs.fed.us National Agricultural Library www.nal.usda.gov National Agricultural Statistics Service www.nass.usda.gov U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY www.energy.gov Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy www.eere.energy.gov Biomass Program www.eere.energy.gov/biomass Alternative Fuels Data Center www.eere.energy.gov/afdc Clean Cities www.eere.energy.gov/cleancities Fuel Economy www.fueleconomy.gov Biomass Energy Data Book cta.ornl.gov/bedb Buildings Energy Data Book www.btscoredatabook.net Power Technologies Data Book www.nrel.gov/analysis/power_databook

174

Biomass co-firing: A renewable alternative for utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Biomass Power...

177

Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fibrominn Biomass Power...

178

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Biomass Analytical Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the pertinent LAPs. Workbooks are available for: Wood (hardwood or softwood) Corn stover (corn stover feedstock) Biomass hydrolyzate (liquid fraction produced from...

179

Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy harvesting from a backpack instrumented with piezoelectricto harness mechanical energy. Piezoelectric materials haveEnergy harvesting through a back- pack employing a mechanically amplified piezoelectric

Brochu, Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the tenth reporting period (January 1-March 31, 2000), EER and NETL R and D group continued to work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 5. Information regarding these tasks will be included in the next Quarterly Report. This report includes (Appendix 1) a conceptual design study for the introduction of biomass reburning in a working coal-fired utility boiler. This study was conducted under the coordinated SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

Vladimir Zamansky; David Moyeda; Mark Sheldon

2000-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass utilization is one solution to our nation’s addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nation’s reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with, or even replace, petroleum and other fossil fuels in the near future. It is a primary domestic, sustainable, renewable energy resource that can supply liquid transportation fuels, chemicals, and energy that are currently produced from fossil sources, and it is a sustainable resource for a hydrogen-based economy in the future.

Zygarlicke, C.J.; Schmidt, D.D.; Olson, E.S.; Leroux, K.M.; Wocken, C.A.; Aulich, T.A.; WIlliams, K.D.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biofuels – Biomass Feedstock  

:  INL’s process enables an agricultural combine to separate multiple products , e.g. agricultural residue, grain, etc. in a single pass across a ...

185

Life Cycle Assessment: Using Wildland Biomass to Generate Electrical Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California faces significant threats from wildfire due to excessive accumulations of forest and wildland fuels. Much of this fuel loading is in the form of small-diameter woody material, or biomass. Fire suppression over the past century, combined with intensive forest management and a generally warmer and wetter climate, has led to increasingly dense vegetation. When wildfires occur, the heavy accumulation of biomass often makes those fires larger and more severe. The increase in forest biomass threatens public health and safety, watersheds, and wildlife habitat with unacceptable losses to wildfire. Public land management agencies and private landowners are focusing efforts on treating biomass to reduce wildfire hazards. These treatments typically create a significant volume of biomass wood waste. California law and policy, as well as several studies, assert a range of benefits associated with removing and using biomass from forests, as well as from agricultural

I. The Problem

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

New Harvest | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harvest Harvest Jump to: navigation, search Name New Harvest Facility New Harvest Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser ComEd and Ameren Illinois Location Schleswig IA Coordinates 42.16197194°, -95.44696569° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.16197194,"lon":-95.44696569,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

187

Piezoelectric MEMS for energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been proven to be an attractive technology for harvesting small magnitudes of energy from ambient vibrations. This technology promises to eliminate the need for ...

Kim, Sang-Gook

188

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Biomass Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on...

191

Small Modular Biomass Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet that provides an introduction to small modular biomass systems. These systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and people without power. They use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, and animal manures.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

TORREFACTION OF BIOMASS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical pre-treatment of biomass within a narrow temperature range from 200°C to 300°C, where mostly the hemicellulose components of a biomass depolymerise.… (more)

Dhungana, Alok

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Biomass Cofiring Update 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy source. When cofired with coal in a plant that would normally fire 100% coal as the fuel, biomass becomes a renewable source of electricity—for that fraction of electricity that is generated from the biomass fraction of the heat in the fuel mix to the power plant. For electric power generation organizations that have coal-fired generation, cofiring biomass with coal will often be the lowest-cost form of renewable power.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

leaves, that are not harvested or removed from fields in commercial use. Examples include corn stover (stalks, leaves, husks, and cobs), wheat straw, and rice straw. With...

195

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

196

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Recanati, Catherine

197

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

198

NREL: Biomass Research - Alexandre Chapeaux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biofuels with industrial partners. Alex's research areas of interest are: Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation...

199

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne stergrd, Ris National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne �stergård, Risø National Laboratory in the Agricultural Outlook from OECD-FAO, these predictions may be misleading and biomass may increase more rapidly Biomass and waste Hydro Nuclear Gas Oil Coal Fig 1 Total primary energy supply3 · The transport sector

200

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to which it can distinguish between different types of animals and infer biomass. Specificity usually comes

Stephens, Scott L.

202

Harvest Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Solar Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Harvest Solar Energy Name Harvest Solar Energy Address 1571 East 22 Place Place Tulsa, Oklahoma Zip 74114 Sector Solar Product Renewable energy systems Phone number 877-743-2299 Website http://www.harvest-energy.com/ Coordinates 36.1315533°, -95.9685254° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.1315533,"lon":-95.9685254,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Harvest II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harvest II Harvest II Facility Harvest II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Pigeon MI Coordinates 43.83861292°, -83.2171011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83861292,"lon":-83.2171011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Harvesting a renewable resource under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dividing by the unit price of biomass, p, and by K, bothdividing by the unit price of biomass, p, and by K) V ( zthe biomass evolves stochastically, the net resource price

Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electricity from biomass: An environmental review and strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an environmental assessment and strategy for the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program. The regulatory context and the environmental impact of biomass power technologies are described, and an environmental plan for the program is suggested. The plan suggest a proactive, synergistic approach, involving multiple parties with a stake in the successful commercialization of a biomass power industry. These parties include feedstock growers, state regulators. Forest Service and agricultural agents, utilities and independent power producers, rural electric cooperatives, and environmental activists.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Biomass Reburning - Modeling/Engineering Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The second reporting period (January 1- March 31) included kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing natural gas and biomass. Modeling was done with a kinetic mechanism that combined reactions relevant to reburning from GRI-Mech 2.11 with SNCR reactions. Experimental data obtained in a 1 MMBtu/h Boiler Simulator Facility (BSF) for reburning with natural gas and biomass were modeled using the ODF kinetic code. System was treated as a series of four one-dimensional reactors. Modeling of natural gas reburning qualitatively agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions. Modeling of furniture waste reburning does not qualitatively match experimental data due to a number of model simplifications. Future work will concentrate on improving the basic reburning model to give quantitative agreement with experiments and on search for better representation of biomass composition in kinetic modeling. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 3. These data were obtained during the reporting period in the scope of a coordinated program funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Peter M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ohio Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) Ohio Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info Funding Source Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program, Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Start Date 1983 State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Workforce development Provider Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio is one of seven states participating in the Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program which was established in 1983. The Regional Program is administered by the Council of Great Lakes Governors and receives funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The other six states under the

208

USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members January 15, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC, January 15, 2008 - U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Acting Secretary Chuck Conner and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced the appointment of six new members and the reappointment of seven members to serve on its Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee for a term of three years. The Committee was established by the Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000 to assist USDA and DOE in meeting important national goals for a healthier rural economy and improved national energy security.

209

USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members January 15, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC, January 15, 2008 - U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Acting Secretary Chuck Conner and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced the appointment of six new members and the reappointment of seven members to serve on its Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee for a term of three years. The Committee was established by the Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000 to assist USDA and DOE in meeting important national goals for a healthier rural economy and improved national energy security. The Committee provides expert advice on strategic planning; the technical

210

Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Funding for Biomass Research and New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative March 22, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the Administration's all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced up to $35 million over three years to support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) - a joint program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Energy Department (DOE) - will help develop economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

211

NREL: Computational Science - Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels Scientists in the Computational Science Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their partners use the latest terascale high-performance computers to probe the complex enzymatic cellulose depolymerization (i.e., breakdown) at the molecular level as biomass is converted to fuels. For a sustainable and economically viable liquid-fuel economy, America needs a carbon-neutral alternative to fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., agricultural residues, energy crops, and wood) could serve as the dominant feedstock for biofuels, if it can be efficiently and economically converted to its component sugars for microbial fermentation. One major obstacle to the use of biomass is the high resistance of crystalline

212

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

213

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

Biomass Cofiring Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared as a 147how tomanual for those interested in biomass cofiring in cyclone- or pulverized-coal-fired boilers. It contains information regarding all aspects of biomass cofiring, including biomass materials and procurement, handling, storage, pulverizing, feeding, gaseous emissions, ash handling, and general economics. It relies on actual utility experience over the past many years from plants mainly in the United States, but some experience also in Europe and Australia. Many ...

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Engine fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Methods discussed for the conversion of biomass to engine fuels include the production of producer gas, anaerobic fermentation to give biogas, fermentation of sugars and starches to give EtOH, and the production of synthesis gas for conversion to MeOH or hydrocarbons. Also discussed are the suitability of these fuels for particular engines, biomass availability, and the economics of biomass-derived engine fuels.

Parker, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Biomass Gasification Syngas Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1023994, Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification, prepared by CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. (CH2M HILL). It provided a global overview of commercially available biomass gasification technologies that can be used for power production in the 25- to 50-MWe range. The report provided detailed descriptions of biomass gasification technologies, typical operational parameters, emissions information, and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Biomass Cofiring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, primarily wood waste such as sawdust, has been cofired in over twenty utility coal-fired boilers in the United States at cofiring levels where the biomass provides from 1% to 10% of the heat input to the boiler. These guidelines present insights and conclusions from five years of EPRI assessment and testing of biomass cofiring and will enable utility engineers and power plant managers to evaluate their own options and plan their own tests.

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

Not Available

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Improving Biomass Yields: High Biomass, Low Input Dedicated Energy Crops to Enable a Full Scale Bioenergy Industry  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ceres is developing bigger and better grasses for use in biofuels. The bigger the grass yield, the more biomass, and more biomass means more biofuel per acre. Using biotechnology, Ceres is developing grasses that will grow bigger with less fertilizer than current grass varieties. Hardier, higher-yielding grass also requires less land to grow and can be planted in areas where other crops can’t grow instead of in prime agricultural land. Ceres is conducting multi-year trials in Arizona, Texas, Tennessee, and Georgia which have already resulted in grass yields with as much as 50% more biomass than yields from current grass varieties.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an… (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

223

Co-firing biomass  

SciTech Connect

Concern about global warming has altered the landscape for fossil-fuel combustion. The advantages and challenges of co-firing biomass and coal are discussed. 2 photos.

Hunt, T.; Tennant, D. [Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

225

A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device”,M, and Ferrari V. , “Thermal energy harvesting throughand G. P. Carman, “Thermal energy harvesting device using

He, Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Design Considerations for Solar Energy Harvesting Wireless Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the feasibility of energy harvesting in a mobile sensorCrossbow motes with energy harvesting capability. TheNODE N Fig. 2. Coordinated energy harvesting framework for a

Raghunathan, Vijay; Kansal, Aman; Hsu, Jason; Friedman, Jonathan K; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Distributed Energy Harvesting for Energy Neutral Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adja@cs.berkeley.edu Energy Harvesting Projects EDITOR’Sdevices that combine energy harvesting and data acquisition.kinetic and ther- mal energy harvesting from human users’

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Enabling Long-Lived Sensor Networks Through Solar Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networks through Solar Energy Harvesting Jason Hsu, SadafPer formance Energy Harvesting Technologies System life andProblem Description: Energy harvesting enabled sensor nodes

Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Jonathan Friedman; Aman Kansal; Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Distributed Energy Harvesting for Energy Neutral Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to exploit to develop piezoelectric energy harvesters. Manyenergy. Current piezoelectric energy harvest- ing researchwill improve piezoelectric energy harvesting technology’s

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

231

Evaluating a biomass resource: The TVA region-wide biomass resource assessment model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood is an alterative fuel for electric power generation at coal-fired plants in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region. Short rotation wood energy crops (SRWC) could provide a source of this woody biomass. However, the economic and supply structures of SRWC markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of SRWC biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas and coal. In this study we project the cost and supply of short-rotation woody biomass for the TVA region -- a 276 county area that includes all of Tennessee and portions of 10 contiguous states in the southeastern United States. Projected prices and quantities of SRWC are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region. expected SRWC yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curve of SRWC biomass that is projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of SRWC production. Finally, we show the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of SRWC biomass. In particular, we examine the separate impacts of varying SRWC production yields.

Downing, M.; Graham, R.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

233

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

234

Harvesting energy from non-ideal vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy harvesting has drawn significant interest for its potential to power autonomous low-power applications. Vibration energy harvesting is particularly well suited to industrial condition sensing, environmental monitoring ...

Chang, Samuel C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy GrossmanFulv.png Model of a molecule that reversibly changes it structure when it absorbs light....

236

Ultra wide-bandwidth micro energy harvester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultra wide-bandwidth resonating thin film PZT MEMS energy harvester has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. It harvests energy from parasitic ambient vibration at a wide range of amplitude and frequency via ...

Hajati, Arman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of rainwater harvesting in Northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the current state of rainwater harvesting in the Northern Region of Ghana and makes recommendations regarding if and how rainwater harvesting could be used to address Pure Home Water's goal of reaching ...

Barnes, David Allen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Florida Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Biomass Energy, LLC Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Florida-based biomass project developer. References Florida Biomass Energy, LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

239

Three-dimensional image-based modelling of linear features for plant biomass estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass estimation is important for biological research and agricultural management. Low-cost two-dimensional 2D computer vision has been applied to non-contact biomass estimation. However, the rapid increase of computing power has enabled the use of ...

RanNisim Lati, Alex Manevich, Sagi Filin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

MEMS BASED PYROELECTRIC THERMAL ENERGY HARVESTER - Energy ...  

A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov 301.975-5479. Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for Wearable Medical Sensors. RF-enabled ...

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nanocomposites for Energy Transport, Harvesting and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Nanocomposites: Nanocomposites for Energy Transport, Harvesting and Storage Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, ...

243

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

244

Program on Technology Innovation: Gasification Testing of Various Biomasses in Untreated and Pretreated (Leached) Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove/eliminate troublesome constituents, such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus, presents the opportunity to solve many of the problems found when firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomasses, grasses, and waste materials for energy or production of biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has fostered projects for the development and testing of this potential game-changing biomass pretreatment technology since 2010. As part ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA 7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA SUMMARY DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood-to-energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities

246

Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Utility optimal scheduling in energy harvesting networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we show how to achieve close-to-optimal utility performance in energy harvesting networks with only finite capacity energy storage devices. In these networks, nodes are capable of harvesting energy from the environment. The amount ... Keywords: Lyapunov analysis, energy harvesting, queueing, stochastic network

Longbo Huang; Michael J. Neely

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Energy Cooperation in Energy Harvesting Wireless Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Cooperation in Energy Harvesting Wireless Communications Berk Gurakan1 , Omur Ozel1 , Jing node, a relay node and a destination node where the source and the relay can harvest energy from the nature. Energy required for communication arrives (is harvested) at the transmitter and an unlimited

Ulukus, Sennur

249

Harvesting mechanical energy for ambient intelligent devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with mechanical energy harvesters, power management and energy storage devices as important building blocks for wireless autonomous sensor networks. The basic task of the harvester is to convert vibrational into electrical energy. As ... Keywords: Electromagnetic, Electrostatic, Energy harvester, Energy storage, Impedance matching, Piezoelectric, Power management

Bert Op Het Veld; Dennis Hohlfeld; Valer Pop

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biomass biomass Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

251

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

252

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biomass Commercialization Prospects the Next 2 to 5 Years; BIOMASS COLLOQUIES 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four colloquies held in the first quarter of 2000 examined the expected development of biomass commercialization in the next 2 to 5 years. Each colloquy included seven to ten representatives from key industries that can contribute to biomass commercialization and who are in positions to influence the future direction. They represented: Corn Growers, Biomass Suppliers, Plant Science Companies, Process Engineering Companies, Chemical Processors, Agri-pulp Suppliers, Current Ethanol Producers, Agricultural Machinery Manufacturers, and Enzyme Suppliers. Others attending included representatives from the National Renewable Energy Lab., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, environmental groups, grower organizations, and members of the financial and economic development community. The informal discussions resulted in improved awareness of the current state, future possibilit ies, and actions that can accelerate commercialization. Biomass commercialization on a large scale has four common issues: (1) Feedstock availability from growers; (2) Large-scale collection and storage; (3) An economic process; (4) Market demand for the product.

Hettenhaus, J. R.; Wooley, R.; Wiselogel, A.

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY) .......................................................................... 91 Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass) ......................................................................................................................... 111 Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members, and Project Advisors

255

Oil in biomass: a step-change for bioenergy production?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help meet the rapidly growing demand for biofuels, scientists and policy makers envision that a variety of agricultural, municipal, and forest-derived feedstocks will be used to produce “second-generation” biofuels. Oil in biomass: a step-change for bio

256

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multi-functional biomass systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass can play a role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions by substituting conventional materials and supplying biomass based fuels. Main reason for the low share… (more)

Dornburg, Veronika

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Through biomass research, NREL is developing technologies to convert biomass-plant matter such as...

260

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY Citation: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 2009. Biomass to Energy: Forest

262

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and continuously between the earth's biomass and atmosphere. From a greenhouse gas perspective, forest treatments

263

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

264

Corn Stover Availability for Biomass Conversion: Situation Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, this study of a large, square-bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional-bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting and collection and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Robert Perlack; Anthony Turhollow

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Corn stover availability for biomass conversion: situation analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, analysis of a conventional large square bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting, collection, and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Kenney, Kevin L. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Wright, Christopher [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow, Jr., Anthony [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Stump Harvesting: Interim Guidance on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to supply biomass for heat and power generation in the UK and attention is now turning to the potential there is an operational imperative to remove stumps for plant health reasons, such as in East Anglia for controlling), leading to lower soil fertility, and potential loss of tree growth in subsequent rotations. Removal

267

Hydropyrolysis of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass was investigated. Experimental runs using the biomass (Poplar wood sawdust) were performed using a tubular reactor of dimensions 1 inch inside diameter and 8 feet long heated at a temperature of 800 C and pressures between 450 and 750 psig. At low heat-up rate the reaction precedes in two steps. First pyrolysis takes place at temperatures of 300 to 400 c and subsequent hydropyrolysis takes place at 700 C and above. This is also confirmed by pressurized thermogravimetric analysis (PTGA). Under conditions of rapid heat-up at higher temperatures and higher hydrogen pressure gasification and hydrogasification of biomass is especially effective in producing carbon monoxide and methane. An overall conversion of 88 to 90 wt % of biomass was obtained. This value is in agreement with the previous work of flash pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass for rapid heat-up and short residence time. Initial rates of biomass conversion indicate that the rate increases significantly with increase in hydrogen pressure. At 800 C and 755 psig the initial rate of biomass conversion to gases is 0.92 1/min.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Review of the potential for biomass resources and conversion technology. Final report, Jan-Jul 83  

SciTech Connect

Biomass resources include dedicated energy crops, forestry/agricultural residues, and certain organic fractions of wastes. The magnitude of the resource base, the extent to which it can be devoted to methane production, the quantity of methane that can be produced, and the cost of the methane are issues that are addressed in this study. Research needs include improvement of agricultural production methods, especially regarding problems caused by the seasonal nature of biomass production. Reduction of capital investment per unit of methane could be achieved by development of membrane gas clean up systems or combination biomass storage/fermentation systems, are examples of advanced technologies.

Lipinsky, E.S.; Jenkins, D.M.; Young, B.A.; Sheppard, W.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Environmental issues related to biomass: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Now that public attention has grown increasingly focused on environmentalism and climate change, the commercial use of biomass could greatly accelerate. Renewable feedstocks like biomass can provide better environmentally balanced sources of energy and other nonfood products than fossil fuels. The future of biomass is uncertain, however, because public attention focuses on both its potential and its challenges. This paper is divided into five sections. Section 2 briefly addresses economic environmental issues. The extent to which externalities are accounted for in the market price of fuels plays a significant role in determining both the ultimate size of biofuel markets and the extent of the environmental benefits of feedstock cultivation and conversion processes. Sections 3 and 4 catalog the main hazards and benefits that are likely to arise in the large-scale commercialization of biomass fuel and note where the major uncertainties lay. Environmental issues arise with the cultivation of each feedstock and with each step in the process of its conversion to fuel. Feedstocks are discussed in Section 3 in terms of three main groups: wastes, energy crops, and traditional agricultural crops. In Section 4, conversion processes are also divided into three groups, on the basis of the end energy carrier: gas, liquid, and solid and electricity. Section 5 provides a conclusion and summary.

Hughes, M. [Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy; Ranney, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

BIOMASS-TO-ENERGY FEASIBILITY STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the economic and technical feasibility of producing electricity and thermal energy from biomass by gasification. For an economic model we chose a large barley malting facility operated by Rahr Malting Co. in Shakopee, Minnesota. This plant provides an excellent backdrop for this study because it has both large electrical loads and thermal loads that allowed us to consider a wide range of sizes and technical options. In the end, eleven scenarios were considered ranging from 3.1 megawatts (MWe) to 19.8 MWe. By locating the gasification and generation at an agricultural product processing plant with large electrical and thermal loads, the expectation was that some of the limitations of stand-alone biomass power plants would be overcome. In addition, since the process itself created significant volumes of low value biomass, the hope was that most of the biomass gathering and transport issues would be handled as well. The development of low-BTU gas turbines is expected to fill a niche between the upper limit of multiple spark ignited engine set systems around 5 MWe and the minimum reasonable scale for steam turbine systems around 10 MWe.

Cecil T. Massie

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

OpenEI - biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/827 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License: 

272

Evaluation of different agricultural biomass for bioethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In our study, five different bioenergy crops: wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), forage sorghum stover (sorghum bicolor), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) and sweet sorghum… (more)

Bansal, Sunil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

275

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/agricultural-technologies-for-climate-chan Language: English Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Screenshot

276

1981 Winter Meeting - American Society of Agricultural Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 13 volumes contain 372 papers presented at the meeting. Subjects covered include agricultural machinery developments and applications, irrigation, drainage, water supply, water pollution control, farm buildings, energy conservation, agricultural wastes management, biogas and other biomass fuels production, food products and good products plants, grain drying, solar energy applications, engineering economics, crop yield studies, agronomy, agrometeorology, livestock production and management, computer applications, field and laboratory studies, engineering education, and others. 108 papers are abstracted separately.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics was conducted using ArcGIS with the Network Analyst extension and model builder. A square grid methodology was used to determine biomass availability of corn stover and bioenergy sorghum in Texas. The SWAT model was used to quantify soil erosion losses in surface runoff caused by sorghum residue removal for bioenergy production in the Oso Creek Watershed in Nueces County. The model simulated the removal of 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent residue removal. The WEPS model was used to quantify wind erosion soil loss caused by corn stover removal in Dallam County. Nine simulations were run estimating soil loss for corn stover removal rates of 0 percent to 50 percent. The results of the SWAT and WEPS analyses were compared to the NRCS tolerable soil loss limit of 5 tons/acre/year for both study areas. The GIS analysis determined the optimum route distances between mobile unit sites were 2.07 to 58.02 km for corn and 1.95 to 60.36 km for sorghum. The optimum routes from the mobile pyrolysis sites and the closest refineries were 49.50 to 187.18 km for corn and 7.00 to 220.11 km for sorghum. These results were used as input to a separate bioenergy economic model. The SWAT analysis found that maximum soil loss (1.24 tons/acre) occurred during the final year of the simulation where 100 percent of the sorghum residue was removed. The WEPS analysis determined that at 30 percent removal the amount of soil loss starts to increase exponentially with increasing residue removal and exceeds the tolerable soil loss limit. Limited harvesting of biomass for bioenergy production will be required to protect crop and soil productivity ensuring a sustainable biomass source.

Bumguardner, Marisa

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biomass production by fescue and switchgrass alone and in mixed swards with legumes. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the role of biomass in alleviating potential global warming, the absence of information on the sustainability of biomass production on soils of limited agricultural potential is cited as a major constraint to the assessment of the role of biomass. Research on the sustainability of yields, recycling of nutrients, and emphasis on reduced inputs of agricultural chemicals in the production of biomass are among the critical research needs to clarify optimum cropping practice in biomass production. Two field experiments were conducted between 1989 and 1993. One study evaluated biomass production and composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown alone and with bigflower vetch (Vicia grandiflora L.) and the other assessed biomass productivity and composition of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown alone and with perennial legumes. Switchgrass received 0, 75 or 150 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} or was interseeded with vetch. Tall fescue received 0, 75, 150 or 225 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually or was interseeded with alfalfa (Medicago L.) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). It is hoped that production systems can be designed to produce high yields of biomass with minimal inputs of fertilizer N. Achievement of this goal would reduce the potential for movement of NO{sub 3} and other undesirable N forms outside the biomass production system into the environment. In addition, management systems involving legumes could reduce the cost of biomass production.

Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Univ. of Agronomy

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Biomass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy » Energy » Biomass Biomass Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel. Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Highlighting how a rural Oregon hospital was able to cut its heating bills while stimulating the local economy. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better A Ceres researcher evaluates the performance of biofuel crops. | Photo courtesy of Ceres, Inc.

280

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions Control Science & Technology Hangzhou, China May 28-30, 2008 Overview  Introduction  Technical approach  Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass  Conclusions Climate change is a result of burning too much coal, oil and gas.... We need to capture CO 2 in any way ! Introduction CCS is the world's best chance to have a major & immediate impact on CO 2 emission reduction Introduction Introduction  Biomass is renewable energy with zero CO 2 emission  A way to capture CO 2 from biomass ?  If so, a quick way to reduce CO 2 content in the atmosphere Normal combustion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions...

282

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Prince Edward Island Program Type Environmental Regulations PEI Biomass Guidelines identify two major pathways that biomass projects may follow: No Public Investment, and Public Investment. Projects with Public Investment include any project that has: * Grants or loans for start-up, capital, or operating costs; * Silvicultural or other land management incentives provided through Departmental programs (e.g. Forest Enhancement Program, ALUS); or * Green credits or certification from Government. Guidelines for No Public Investment projects must only comply with existing

283

USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development June 11, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a combined total of up to $18 million will be available for research and development of biomass-based products, biofuels, bioenergy and related processes. USDA and DOE are issuing these grant solicitations for several types of projects aimed at increasing the availability of alternative and renewable fuels, which will help further President Bush's bold energy initiatives, including Twenty in Ten. The Twenty in Ten Initiative promotes greater energy security through increased efficiency and diversification of energy sources. USDA

284

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate Feasibility Studies: $2,500 Biogas to Energy Systems: $225,000 Biomass to Energy Systems: $500,000 Program Info Start Date 12/16/1997 State Illinois Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to 50% of project cost Provider University of Illinois at Chicago '''The most recent application period closed April 30, 2012. Check the program web site for updates on future solicitations. ''' The Renewable Energy Resources Program (RERP) promotes the development of

285

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a 20 month study to explore the technical and economic feasibility of fuelwood utilization to operate a 50 megawatt energy conversion facility are described. The availability of biomass as a fuel source, the methods of harvesting and collecting the fuelstock, the costs of providing adequate fuel to the plant, and other requirements for fueling the proposed conversion facility are investigated. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

288

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system; and Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data will be collected, analyzed, and reported to elucidate ash-related problems during biomass-coal cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system. (4) Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data were used to elucidate ash-related problems during coal-biomass cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

Skelton, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the current status of externalities considerations--nonmarket costs and benefits--in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and determines how externalities considerations might help or hinder the development of biomass power plants. It provides an overview of biomass resources and technologies, including their market status and environmental impacts; reviews the current treatment of externalities in the states; and documents the perspectives of key utility, regulatory, and industry representatives concerning externalities considerations. The authors make the following recommendations to the biomass industry: (1) the wood and agricultural waste industries should work toward having states and utilities recognize that wood and agricultural waste are greenhouse gas neutral resources because of carbon sequestration during growth; (2) the biomass industry should emphasize nonenvironmental benefits such as economic development and job creation; and (3) the biomass industry should pursue and support efforts to establish renewable energy set-asides or ``green`` requests for proposals.

Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

294

Energy Harvesting Support for Sensor Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no harvesting energy Environment Aware DC Step-Up Converterand solar energy info with host sensor node DC Step-Up

Jason Hsu; Aman Kansal; Mani Srivastava

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Environmental Energy Harvesting - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary. Energy harvesting is a developing technology that seeks to exploit naturally-occurring energy to power systems, rather ...

296

Antennas and Metamaterials for Electromagnetic Energy Harvesting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emergence of microwave energy harvesting systems, commonly referred to as rectenna or Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) systems, has enabled numerous applications in many areas… (more)

Almoneef, Thamer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Switching converter techniques for energy harvesting applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xii, 95 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis ECED 2007 Sze Energy harvesting could provide a micro-sensor application with… (more)

Sze, Ngok Man

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Harvesting Applications of Ionic Polymers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy Harvesting Applications of Ionic Polymers Benjamin R. Martin Abstract The purpose of this thesis is the development and analysis of applications for ionic polymers… (more)

Martin, Benjamin Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solutions for Indoor Light Energy Harvesting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy harvesting (EH) was born few decades ago and evolved during the years, however only recently has found more applications thanks to the advent… (more)

Vignati, Stefano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Energy Harvesting Support for Sensor Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery status and solar energy info with host sensor nodelevel Yellow bar represent solar energy received locally •AHeliomoteR A integrated solar energy harvesting and storage

Jason Hsu; Aman Kansal; Mani Srivastava

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Apparatus and method for harvesting woody plantations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tree harvester for harvesting felled trees includes a wheel mounted wood chipper which moves toward the butt ends of the tree stems to be processed. The harvester includes a plurality of rotating alignment discs in front of the chipper. These discs align the tree stems to be processed with the mouth of the chipper. A chipper infeed cylinder is rotatably mounted between the discs and the front end of the chipper, and lifts the tree stem butts up from the ground into alignment with the chipper inlet port. The chips discharge from the chipper and go into a chip hopper which moves with the tree harvester. 8 figs.

Eggen, D.L.

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Apparatus and method for harvesting woody plantations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tree harvester for harvesting felled trees includes a wheel mounted wood chipper which moves toward the butt ends of the tree stems to be processed. The harvester includes a plurality of rotating alignment discs in front of the chipper. These discs align the tree stems to be processed with the mouth of the chipper. A chipper infeed cylinder is rotatably mounted between the discs and the front end of the chipper, and lifts the tree stem butts up from the ground into alignment with the chipper inlet port. The chips discharge from the chipper and go into a chip hopper which moves with the tree harvester.

Eggen, David L. (Rte. 1, Box 257, Moose Lake, MN 55767)

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy harvesting using a thermoelectric material - Energy ...  

A novel energy harvesting system and method utilizing a thermoelectric having a material exhibiting a large thermally induced strain (TIS) due to a phase ...

304

Toward an energy harvester for leadless pacemakers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work consists in the development and design of an energy harvesting device to supply power to the new generation pacemakers, miniaturized leadless implants without… (more)

Deterre, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Vibration energy harvesting using piezoelectric materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Harvesting environmental energy around a system provides a promising solution to implement self-powered electronic devices, which currently rely on batteries as power supply. Vibration energy… (more)

Tang, Lihua.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy Harvesting Utilized Resonance Phenomena of Piezoelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Piezoelectric buzzer for energy harvesting was investigated. While external force was applied to a buzzer, PZT unimorph in the buzzer, the ...

307

CNT Based Thermoelectric Devices for Energy Harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, CNT Based Thermoelectric Devices for Energy Harvesting. Author(s), David S. Lashmore, Tom VanVechten, Jennifer Mann, Cory Timoney, ...

308

Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprise Development (AREED) Enterprise Development (AREED) Jump to: navigation, search Name Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Finance Website http://www.areed.org/ Country Ghana, Mali, Tanzania, Senegal, Zambia Western Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References AREED[1] Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Screenshot "The United Nations Environment Programme's Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED) initiative operates in Africa as AREED to develop new

309

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

310

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

311

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compliance with the RPS. Keywords: Biodiesel, biogas, biomass, certificates, certification, conduit, retail sales, small hydroelectric, Self- Generation Incentive Program, solar thermal, supplemental energy .........................................................12 1. Biodiesel

313

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

316

Energy and task management in energy harvesting wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Energy Harvesting . . . . . . . . .2. Task Scheduling in Energy Harvesting WSNs 3. DataSensor Networks . . 2. Energy Harvesting . . . . . . . . 3.

Steck, Jamie Bradley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: from fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extraction circuits for piezoelectric energy harvesters infor cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters. Journal ofbeam shapes for piezoelectric energy harvesting. Journal of

Miller, Lindsay Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel Preliminary Food & Fuel Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

To promote economic growth and energy security, and to protect the environment, the U.S. is pursuing a national strategy of energy independence and climatic protection in which domestic renewable carbon-neutral biofuels displace 30 percent of U.S. oil consumption by the mid-21st century. Such fuels, including ethanol and biodiesel, will be produced from biological feed stocks (biomass). The availability of this billion-ton biomass will hinge on the application of modern scientific and engineering tools to create a highly-integrated biofuel production system. Efforts are underway to identify and develop energy crops, ranging from agricultural residues to genetically engineered perennials; to develop biology-based processing methods; and, to develop large-scale biorefineries to economically convert biomass into fuels. In addition to advancing the biomass-to-biofuel research and development agenda, policy makers are concurrently defining the correct mix of governmental supports and regulations. Given the volumes of biomass and fuels that must flow to successfully enact a national biomass strategy, policies must encourage large-scale markets to form and expand around a tightly integrated system of farmers, fuel producers and transporters, and markets over the course of decades. In formulating such policies, policy makers must address the complex interactions of social, technical, economic, and environmental factors that bound energy production and use. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The INL Bioenergy Program supports the DOE and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Key multidisciplinary INL capabilities are being leveraged to address major science and technology needs associated with the cost-effective utilization of biomass. INL’s whole crop utilization (WCU) vision is focused on the use of the entire crop, including both the grain and traditionally discarded plant biomass to produce food, feed, fiber, energy, and value-added products.

Ray Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jake Jacobson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Minimally refined biomass fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

322

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in Estonia Biomass Utilisation of Local in Estonia in 1995 - 2002 Regional Energy Centres in Estonia http://www.managenergy.net/conference/biomass

323

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Florida Biomass Energy Consortium Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Association of biomass energy companies. References Florida...

324

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Haryana Biomass Power Ltd. Place Mumbai, Haryana, India Zip 400025 Sector Biomass Product This is a JV consortium between...

325

Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit September 30, 2013 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2013 12:00PM EDT Algae Biomass Summit...

326

PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC-61 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.10093 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.hydrolytic pretreatment to biomass feedstocks, higher acid

Schaleger, Larry L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Category:Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass category. Pages in category "Biomass" This category contains only the following page. B Biomass Scenario Model Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCatego...

328

Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on biomass renewable...

329

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power  Economic Feasibility Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power rates..……………………. ……31  UCSD Biomass to Power ? Feasibility 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiantou Biomass Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power Place Jinzhou, Hebei Province, China Zip 50000 Sector Biomass Product A company engages in...

331

Chowchilla Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chowchilla Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chowchilla Biomass Facility Facility Chowchilla Sector Biomass Owner London Economics Location Chowchilla, California...

332

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Saugus Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid...

333

On-farm use of biomass fuels: market penetration potential during normal and fuel-emergency conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biomass fuels produced in decentralized facilities to replace the centrally produced fuels currently used in agriculture is examined. Two issues are examined. Will biomass fuels become cost-competitive relative to central fuels. And, what is the potential for biomass fuels to replace central fuels during emergency conditions when central fuels are unavailable. To answer these questions, descriptions of a range of currently available biomass technologies have been prepared and estimates made of current and projected agricultural fuel needs and biomass-feedstock availabilities. A variety of assumptions about future conditions have been adopted, the most important of which is that central fuel prices escalate at 7.5% annually relative to the commodities and inputs used to produce biomass fuel products. Under these assumptions, a number of biomass fuels will become cost-competitive during the 1980s, but most will do so late in the decade. Moreover, once these fuels become cost-competitive, penetration will occur gradually. Market forces thus will not markedly reduce the vulnerability of agriculture to energy-supply interruptions during this period. Biomass fuels could, however, play an important role during a fuel emergency. Estimates indicate they could replace up to about 60% of annual agricultural-sector fuel consumption by 1990, during the course of a fuel emergency of one year's duration.

Bjornstad, D.J.; Hillsman, E.L.; Tepel, R.C.; Mills, J.B.; CHester, C.V.; Klepper, O.H.; Borkowski, R.J.; Nichols, J.; Rainey, J.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Facility APS Biomass I Sector Biomass Location Arizona Coordinates 34.0489281°, -111.0937311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0489281,"lon":-111.0937311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

Research on Common Biomass Pyrolysis Production of Biomass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Textural parameters analysis revealed the caloric value of biomass carbons between 32 MJ/kg and 34 MJ/kg. It also indicated that the surface of biomass carbon ...

336

A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy harvesting by utilization of nanohelices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy harvesting device based on nanohelices is presented. The energy harvesting scheme based on nanohelices involves the same rectification circuitry found in many household electronic goods, which converts alternating current (AC) from a wall outlet into a direct current (DC) supply. The presented device, however, involves the rectification of ambient electromagnetic waves rather than the AC source from a household wall outlet.

Cho, Sung Nae

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated solar energy harvesting and storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To explore integrated solar energy harvesting as a power source for low power systems, an array of energy scavenging photodiodes based on a passive-pixel architecture for CMOS imagers has been fabricated together with storage capacitors implemented using ... Keywords: energy harvesting, low-power design, photodiodes

Nathaniel J. Guilar; Travis J. Kleeburg; Albert Chen; Diego R. Yankelevich; Rajeevan Amirtharajah

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy Cooperation in Energy Harvesting Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy Cooperation in Energy Harvesting Communications Berk Gurakan, Omur Ozel, Jing Yang and Sennur Ulukus Abstract In energy harvesting communications, users transmit messages using energy of the system depends only on the energy arrival profiles. In this paper, we introduce the concept of energy

Ulukus, Sennur

340

Electrostatic Conversion for Vibration Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter focuses on vibration energy harvesting using electrostatic converters. It synthesizes the various works carried out on electrostatic devices, from concepts, models and up to prototypes, and covers both standard (electret-free) and electret-based electrostatic vibration energy harvesters (VEH).

Boisseau, S; Seddik, B Ahmed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Communicating with Energy Harvesting Transmitters and Receivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources. · Develop an optimized system of harvesting, transporting, and storing high- tonnage energy crops than 2009 modules. · Evaluated four commercial mower-conditioners for energy use, harvest efficiencyLife Extension Service; Ceres, Inc. Federal Funding U.S. Department of Energy Jobs Generated 13.5 FTEs Nonfederal

Yener, Aylin

342

Solar Energy Harvesting for Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commercially available sensor nodes are battery-driven devices. A number of nodes together constitute a network. As days proceed, the batteries used in the nodes lose their charge and subsequently get isolated from the network. Many energy harvesting ... Keywords: Energy Harvest, Recharging Circuitry, Batteries, Low Power Design, MICAz sensor nodes

P. T. V. Bhuvaneswari; R. Balakumar; V. Vaidehi; P. Balamuralidhar

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching/Washing Laboratory-Scale Pilot Plant Equipment Selection and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus is an opportunity to solve the many problems facing the ability of firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials for the production of energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is interested in fostering the development of this potential game-changing biomass preteatment technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI sponsored through ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Initial Market Assessment for Small-Scale Biomass-Based CHP  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to reexamine the energy generation market opportunities for biomass CHP applications smaller than 20 MW. This paper provides an overview of the benefits of and challenges for biomass CHP in terms of policy, including a discussion of the drivers behind, and constraints on, the biomass CHP market. The report provides a summary discussion of the available biomass supply types and technologies that could be used to feed the market. Two primary markets are outlined--rural/agricultural and urban--for small-scale biomass CHP, and illustrate the primary intersections of supply and demand for those markets. The paper concludes by summarizing the potential markets and suggests next steps for identifying and utilizing small-scale biomass.

Brown, E.; Mann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

346

Power management in energy harvesting sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power management is an important concern in sensor networks, because a tethered energy infrastructure is not available and an obvious concern is to use the available battery energy efficiently. However, in some of the sensor networking applications, an additional facility is available to ameliorate the energy problem: harvesting energy from the environment. Certain considerations in using an energy harvesting source are fundamentally different from that in using a battery because, rather than a limit on the maximum energy, it has a limit on the maximum rate at which the energy can be used. Further, the harvested energy availability typically varies with time in a nondeterministic manner. While a deterministic metric such as residual battery suffices to characterize the energy availability in the case of batteries, a more sophisticated characterization may be required for a harvesting source. Another issue that becomes important in networked systems with multiple harvesting nodes is that different nodes may have different harvesting opportunity. In a distributed application, the same end-user performance may be achieved using different workload allocations, and resultant energy consumptions, at multiple nodes. In this case it is important to align the workload allocation with the energy availability at the harvesting nodes. We consider the above issues in power management for energy harvesting sensor networks. We develop abstractions to characterize the complex time varying nature of such sources with analytically tractable models and use them to address key design issues. We also develop distributed methods to efficiently use harvested energy and test these both in simulation and experimentally on an energy harvesting sensor network, prototyped for this work.

Aman Kansal; Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Mani B Srivastava

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.E. Brown. 2000. Localisation of antioxidant enzymes in the cnidarians Anemonia viridis and Goniopora. A comparison of the modelled biomasses of key species before and after the change in 2000 indicated the trophic biomass (Beamish et al. 2002). Sig- nificantly increased early marine survival was evident for juvenile

348

ENERGY FROM BIOMASS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated- gasifier steam-injected gasturbine (BIGISTIG) cogenerationsystemsis carried out here. A detailed!l!ledin a companionpaperprepared for this conference. 781 #12;BIOMASS-GASIFIER ~.INJECTED GAS TURBINE COGENERA110N FOR THE CANE). Biomassintegrated-gasifier/steam-injectedgas-turbine (BIG/STIG) cogenerationtechnologyand prospectsfor its use

349

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and dead vegetative material that have been removed from the landscape (either sent as biomass to the power

350

Transmission Policies for Asymmetric Interference Channels with Energy Harvesting Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Policies for Asymmetric Interference Channels with Energy Harvesting Nodes Kaya power policies to maximize sum capacity in an energy harvesting setting. It is shown derive optimal power allocation policies for interference channels comprised of energy harvesting

Yener, Aylin

351

Predicted effects of prescribed burning and harvesting on forest recovery and sustainability in southwest Georgia, USA  

SciTech Connect

A model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clear-cutting on stand recovery and sustainability was conducted at Fort Benning, GA, in the southeastern USA. Two experiments were performed with the model. In the first experiment, forest recovery from degraded soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning. In the second experiment simulations began with 100 years of predicted stand growth, then forest sustainability was predicted for an additional 100 years under different combinations of prescribed burning and forest harvesting. Three levels of fire intensity (low, medium, and high), that corresponded to 17%, 33%, and 50% consumption of the forest floor C stock by fire, were evaluated at 1-, 2-, and 3-year fire return intervals. Relative to the control (no fire), prescribed burning with a 2- or 3-year return interval caused only a small reduction in predicted steady state soil C stocks ({le} 25%) and had no effect on steady state tree wood biomass, regardless of fire intensity. Annual high intensity burns did adversely impact forest recovery and sustainability (after harvesting) on less sandy soils, but not on more sandy soils that had greater N availability. Higher intensity and frequency of ground fires increased the chance that tree biomass would not return to pre-harvest levels. Soil N limitation was indicated as the cause of unsustainable forests when prescribed burns were too frequent or too intense to permit stand recovery.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

3, 503539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions for biomass assimilation G. Crispi, M. Pacciaroni, and D. Viezzoli Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Correspondence to: G. Crispi (gcrispi@ogs.trieste.it) 503 #12;OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

5, 21032130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction dynamics in aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil J. Sch of the European Geosciences Union. 2103 #12;BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY not substantively affect the findings or recommendations of the study. 2. Introduction The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is developing a comprehensive forest biomass-to- electricity model to identify and analyze

356

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

357

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY as a result of emerging biomass opportunities on private industrial and public multiple-use lands (tracked in the vegetation domain) and the quantity of biomass consumed by the wildfire (tracked

358

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

359

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

360

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY or recommendations of the study. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Domain Description The study area for the Biomass to Energy (B2 and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electrical power while changing fire

362

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

364

6, 60816124, 2006 Modeling biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke injection into the LS (part II) G. Luderer et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Modeling of biomass smoke injection into the lower stratosphere by a large Correspondence to: G. Luderer (gunnar@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 6081 #12;ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Abundance,Biomass, and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance,Biomass, and Production Daniel B.Hayes,James R.Bence,Thomas J.Kwak, and Bradley E, the proportion of fish present that are #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 329 detected (i.e., sightability; available at http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance/). #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 331 Box 8

Kwak, Thomas J.

366

GMP - Biomass Electricity Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » GMP - Biomass Electricity Production Incentive GMP - Biomass Electricity Production Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate None Program Info Funding Source Cow Power tariff Start Date 10/2004 State Vermont Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.04 per kWh Provider Green Mountain Power Corporation Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP), Vermont's largest electric utility, offers a production incentive to farmers who own systems utilizing anaerobic digestion of agricultural products, byproducts or wastes to generate electricity. GMP purchases the renewable energy credits for up to $0.04 per kWh with full subscription of the GMP voluntary Cow Power tariff. Attributes associated with production in excess of voluntary customer

367

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Enabling Long-Lived Sensor Networks Through Solar Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor Networks through Solar Energy Harvesting Jason Hsu,Heliomote A integrated solar energy harvesting and storageYellow bar represent solar energy received locally Solar

Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Jonathan Friedman; Aman Kansal; Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design Considerations for Solar Energy Harvesting Wireless Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensor node using our solar energy harvesting module. VI. CDesign Considerations for Solar Energy Harvesting Wirelessfactors. For example, solar energy supply is highly time

Raghunathan, Vijay; Kansal, Aman; Hsu, Jason; Friedman, Jonathan K; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels...

371

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biofuels produced from biomass provide a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biomass is an inexpensive, readily available and renewable resource.

372

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/1991 State New York Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption for 15 years (unless local jurisdiction has opted out) Provider Office of Real Property Tax Services Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy

373

DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) today jointly announced up to $33 million in funding for research and development of technologies and processes to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products, subject to annual appropriations. These projects will support the Obama Administration's comprehensive energy strategy of increasing the nation's energy, economic and national security by reducing our reliance on foreign oil and reducing greenhouse gases. "These projects will help advance the production of biofuels and related

374

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Data Biomass Data These datasets represent the biomass resource availability in the United States by county. The estimates are based on county-level statistics and/or point-source data gathered from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service, EPA and other organizations. Geographic Coordinate System Name: GCS_North_American_1983 Coverage File Size Last Updated Metadata Urban Wood and Secondary Mill Residues (Zip 6.8 MB) 5/23/2012 Urban Wood and Secondary Mill Residues.xml Geographic Coordinate System Name: WGS 1984 Coverage File Size Last Updated Metadata Crop Residues (Zip 6.81 MB) 10/28/2008 Crop Residues.xml Forest and Primary Mill Residues (Zip 69.75 MB) 10/28/2008 Forest and Primary Mill Residues.xml Note - These datasets are designed to be used in GIS software applications.

375

Information Capacity of Energy Harvesting Sensor Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor nodes with energy harvesting sources are gaining popularity due to their ability to improve the network life time and are becoming a preferred choice supporting 'green communication'. We study such a sensor node with an energy harvesting source and compare various architectures by which the harvested energy is used. We find its Shannon capacity when it is transmitting its observations over an AWGN channel and show that the capacity achieving energy management policy is the same as the throughput optimal policy. We also obtain the capacity for the system with energy inefficiencies in storage and an achievable rate when energy conserving sleep-wake modes are supported.

Rajesh, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

378

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

379

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

380

Catalyzed gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalyzed biomass gasification studies are being conducted by Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Investigations are being carried out concurrently at the bench and process development unit scales. These studies are designed to test the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from biomass by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of specific catalysts. The program is directed at controlling the gasification reaction through the use of specific catalytic agents to produce desired products including synthetic natural gas, ammonia synthesis gas (H/sub 2//N/sub 2/), hydrogen, or syn gas (H/sub 2//CO). Such gaseous products are currently produced in tonnage quantities from non-renewable carbonaceous resources, e.g., natural gas and petroleum. The production of high yields of these specified gases from biomass is accomplished through optimization of gasification conditions and proper choice of catalytic agents. For instance, high yields of synthetic natural gas can be attained through gasification with steam in the presence of gasification catalyst such as trona (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ . NaHCO/sub 3/ . 2H/sub 2/O) and a nickel methanation catalyst. The gasification catalyst enhances the steam-biomass reaction while the methanation catalyst converts gaseous intermediates from this reaction to methane, the most thermodynamically stable hydrocarbon product. This direct conversion to synthetic natural gas represents a significant advancement in the classical approach of producing synthetic natural gas from carbonaceous substrates through several unit operations. A status report, which includes experimental data and results of the program is presented.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.; Mudge, L.K.; Mitchell, D.H.; Cox, J.L.

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching Pre-Treatment Technology Bench Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of biomass to remove or eliminate troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus presents an opportunity to solve many problems associated with firing and cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials to produce energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has taken interest in fostering the development of this potentially game-changing technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI, through the Technology Innovati...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

383

Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

Dail, David Bryan [University of Maine

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

Electrostatic power harvesting for material computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a novel wearable energy-harvesting system based on the phenomenon of contact electrification: when two materials are brought into contact and then separated, they are often found to be charged. By patterning circuits out of textiles with ...

E. Rehmi Post; Kit Waal

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hay harvesting services respond to market trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services respond to market trends by Steven Blank, Karenyears, there has been a trend in California from harvesting1,300 pounds or more. This trend is influencing how hay-

Blank, Steven; Klonsky, Karen; Fuller, Kate

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Two-hop Communication with Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication nodes with the ability to harvest energy from the environment have the potential to operate beyond the timeframe limited by the finite capacity of their batteries; and accordingly, to extend the overall network lifetime. However, the optimization of the communication system in the presence of energy harvesting devices requires a new paradigm in terms of power allocation since the energy becomes available over time. In this paper, we consider the problem of two-hop relaying in the presence of energy harvesting nodes. We identify the optimal offline transmission scheme for energy harvesting source and relay when the relay operates in the full-duplex mode. In the case of a half-duplex relay, we provide the optimal transmission scheme when the source has a single energy packet.

Gunduz, Deniz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote...

388

Thermal energy harvesting from temperature fluctuations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of portable equipments, wireless sensors networks and self-powered devices in a general manner generates a strong demand for micro-energy harvesting devices. One of… (more)

Zhu, Hongying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ultra-wide bandwidth piezoelectric energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, we present an ultra wide-bandwidth energy harvester by exploiting the nonlinear stiffness of a doubly clamped microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs) resonator. The stretching strain in a doubly clamped beam shows a ...

Hajati, Arman

390

Energy harvesting sensor nodes: Survey and implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor networks with battery-powered nodes can seldom simultaneously meet the design goals of lifetime, cost, sensing reliability and sensing and transmission coverage. Energy-harvesting, converting ambient energy to electrical energy, has emerged as an alternative to power sensor nodes. By exploiting recharge opportunities and tuning performance parameters based on current and expected energy levels, energy harvesting sensor nodes have the potential to address the conflicting design goals of lifetime and performance. This paper surveys various aspects of energy harvesting sensor systems — architecture, energy sources and storage technologies and examples of harvesting-based nodes and applications. The study also discusses the implications of recharge opportunities on sensor node operation and design of sensor network solutions. 1

Sujesha Sudevalayam; Purushottam Kulkarni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Downhole vibration sensing by vibration energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis outlines the design of a prototype electromagnetic induction vibration energy harvesting device for use in a downhole environment. First order models of the necessary components for a generic vibration energy ...

Trimble, A. Zachary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Harvesting | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Announcement Notices » Automated Protocols Announcement Notices » Automated Protocols Harvesting Print page Print page Email page Email page Harvesting (OSTI-to-Site) is OSTI's automated option for electronically submitting 241.1 metadata. Harvesting does not require sites to log into E-Link and is a fully automated process. To participate in this method for submitting metadata, sites should have a bibliographic database supporting their STI document review/approval/release process and must agree to post full text documents, multimedia, or datasets on their own web server. All STI reported via Harvesting must be unclassified with unlimited access and should be fully accessible on the Web to the public and to public search engines. Upfront programming is required on both a site's end and at OSTI to

393

Introduction and Selection of Photoperiod Sensitive Sorghum Genotypes for Agronomic Fitness and Biomass Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2007, U.S. Congress created the "Energy Independence and Security Act" with primary goals focused on increasing the knowledge in production of renewable fuels, increasing the percentages of renewable fuels in the transportation sector and decreasing the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel sources. To achieve these goals, many species have been pointed as sources of feedstock for the biofuel industry. Photoperiod sensitive (PS) biomass sorghum for the lignocellusosic based conversion is one. In this study, three main objectives were addressed regarding the relative performance for biomass yield and biomass composition of PS biomass sorghum. First, genetic and environmental variation effects on the biomass yield and biomass composition, and usefulness of pre-classification of genotypes by biomass lignin content were evaluated. On the set of genotypes and locations tested, the environmental effect had the largest influence on the biomass composition, yield and its components. Although smaller, the genetic variation effect was significant for most of the traits, some traits had significant genotype by environment GXE interaction. The pre-classification of genotypes according to lignin content proved to be an efficient system of separating genotypes as groups, but failed to be efficient in separating on the entries bases. Assessment of growth patterns for biomass yield and composition, characterized photoperiod sensitive sorghum as capable of producing a harvestable crop as soon as 4 months, but variations in the concentration of constituents and moisture percentage, pointed to a harvest window that can be extended up to the 7th month after planting. Genetic variation was observed in this trail for most agronomic and composition traits, but a strong environmental effect was also observed. Lastly, the influence of three diverse cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) systems in biomass sorghum hybrids was assessed. The presence of A1, A2 or A3 CMS in the hybrids tested in this study had no influence on the biomass yield performance or in the biomass composition. Therefore, any of the CMS systems can be used in the production of biomass sorghum hybrid seed. Also, in this trial the environmental effects were significant and strong for most traits evaluated.

Hoffmann, Leo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Enhancing the soil organic matter pool through biomass incorporation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was installed in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA, that sought to examine the impact of incorporating downed slash materials into subsoil layers on soil chemical and physical properties as compared with the effect of slash materials left on the soil surface. Baseline levels of slash were estimated by establishing transects within harvested stands and estimating the quantity of down wood and stumps. An equivalent quantity of biomass and two times the baseline levels were incorporated into subsurface soil layers by a CMI RS 500B reclaimer/stabilizer. Two sites were examined which differed in soil textural composition: sandy vs. clay. Site differences had no impact on machine productivity and machine costs were estimated at $US 521 ha-1 and $US 633 ha-1 on the ''sandy'' and ''clay'' sites, respectively. The feasibility of the CM1 for biomass incorporation is low due to high unit area costs but increased machine productivity would reduce costs and improve its potential. Biomass incorporation improved carbon and nutrient content of each site, especially on the sandy site. Slash levels had an impact on nutrient content but the differences were not statistically significant. For the sandy site, improvements in soil physical properties were evident in response to incorporation and machine planting operations. Bulk density and soil strength were reduced in response to biomass incorporation and tillage to levels that would not limit root production. The differences in soil physical response between incorporated treatments were minimal and not statistically significant.

Sanchez, Felipe, G.; Carter, Emily, A.; Klepac, John, F.

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated in the Northern and Eastern areas of the state. The areas of South and West Texas have little to no biomass available to use for cellulosic ethanol. The North East, South East, and Upper Coast districts include forestry waste that increase the amount of available biomass. With 100 percent certainty the North East and South East districts can support four 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plants each. The research found that there is more than enough biomass to support numerous cellulosic ethanol plants in Texas, and decision makers can use the results of this study to identify regions of low and high risk for available biomass from agricultural and forestry waste.

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility Facility Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Sector Biomass Location Lewis County, New York Coordinates 43.840112°, -75.4344727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.840112,"lon":-75.4344727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Biomass Facility LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535°, -122.7646577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.334535,"lon":-122.7646577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence May 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - TOMORROW, May 5, 2011, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a media conference call to highlight Obama Administration efforts to move the nation towards a clean energy future and reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Secretaries Vilsack and Chu will be announcing biomass research and development grants to the following states: Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, and South Carolina.

399

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development.

400

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Agriculture Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development. chinamou.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence May 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - TOMORROW, May 5, 2011, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a media conference call to highlight Obama Administration efforts to move the nation towards a clean energy future and reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Secretaries Vilsack and Chu will be announcing biomass research and development grants to the following states: Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, and South Carolina.

402

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy Harvesting Broadcast Channel with Inefficient Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Harvesting Broadcast Channel with Inefficient Energy Storage Kaya Tutuncuoglu Aylin Yener with an energy harvesting transmitter equipped with an inefficient energy storage device. For this setting by the energy harvesting process. The convexity of the capacity region for the energy harvesting broadcast

Yener, Aylin

404

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

406

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

407

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or… (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Sustainable Biomass Industry for the North American Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Great Plains (hereafter NAGP) region is economically distressed and prone to severe ecological disruptions such as soil erosion. Its water resources are over-used and subject to pollution from agricultural fertilizers and chemicals, issues common to agricultural lands globally. On the other hand, the region is well suited to the production of herbaceous biomass that can be combusted directly for power or converted to liquid transportation fuels. This paper reviews the geography, history and current condition of the NAGP and offers suggestions about how the agriculture, economy and environment of this and similar regions around the world can be made more sustainable and able to contribute to a reduction in CO2 emissions and consequent global warming.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Smith, Steven J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Agriculture Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.fao.org/bestpractices/index_en.htm Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Screenshot References: FAO Best Practices[1] Logo: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Summary "FAO's new model is based on a determination to learn from the Organization's experience and will require new mechanisms that allow and

410

Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

USDA, DOE to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, Development and Demonstration Projects USDA, DOE to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, Development and Demonstration Projects March 4, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Ed Schafer and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that combined, USDA and DOE will invest up to $18.4 million, over three years, for 21 biomass research and development (R&D), and demonstration projects. These projects specifically aim to address critical barriers to making production of biomass more efficient and cost-effective, in an effort to advance the Bush Administration's strategy of bringing online more clean, bio-based products and biofuels to help reduce our dependence

412

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several states are pursuing policies to foster renewable energy as part of efforts to restructure state electric power markets. The primary policies that states are pursuing for renewables are system benefits charges (SBCs) and renewable portfolio standards (RPSs). However, the eligibility of biomass under state RPS and SBC policies is in question in some states. Eligibility restrictions may make it difficult for biomass power companies to access these policies. Moreover, legislative language governing the eligibility of biomass power is sometimes vague and difficult to interpret. This paper provides an overview of state RPS and SBC policies and focuses on the eligibility of biomass power. For this paper, the authors define biomass power as using wood and agricultural residues and landfill methane, but not waste-to-energy, to produce energy.

Porter, K.; Wiser, R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

College of Agriculture Departments and Degree Programs Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Education Animal & Range Sciences Land Resources & Environmental Sciences Immunology & Infectious Diseases Multi Disciplinary Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Natural Resources & Rangeland Ecology Environmental Sciences Pre-Vet Program (non-degree) Biotechnology Sustainable Foods

Lawrence, Rick L.

414

Catalysis in biomass gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these studies is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products by catalytic gasification of biomass. Catalyst performance is a key factor in the feasibility of catalytic gasification processes. The results of studies designed to gain a fundamental understanding of catalytic mechanisms and causes of deactivation, and discussion of the state-of-the-art of related catalytic processes are presented. Experiments with primary and secondary catalysts were conducted in a 5-cm-diameter, continuous-wood-feed, fixed-catalyst-bed reactor. The primary catalysts used in the experiments were alkali carbonates mixed with the biomass feed; the secondary catalysts included nickel or other transition metals on supports such as alumina, silica, or silica-alumina. The primary catalysts were found to influence wood pyrolysis as well as the char/steam reaction. Secondary catalysts were used in a fixed-bed configuration to direct gas phase reactions. Results of the performance of these catalysts are presented. Secondary catalysts were found to be highly effective for conversion of biomass to specific gas products: synthesis gases and methane-rich gas. With an active catalyst, equilibrium gas composition are obtained, and all liquid pyrolysis products are converted to gases. The major cause of catalyst deactivation was carbon deposition, or coking. Loss of surface area by sintering was also inportant. Catalyst deactivation by sulfur poisoning was observed when bagasse was used as the feedstock for catalytic gasification. Mechanisms of catalyst activity and deactivation are discussed. Model compounds (methane, ethylene, and phenol) were used to determine coking behavior of catalysts. Carbon deposition is more prevalent with ethylene and phenol than with methane. Catalyst formulations that are resistant to carbon deposition are presented. 60 references, 10 figures, 21 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Microalgae harvesting and processing: a literature review  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present a discussion of the literature review performed on methods of harvesting microalgae. There is no single best method of harvesting microalgae. The choice of preferable harvesting technology depends on algae species, growth medium, algae production, end product, and production cost benefit. Algae size is an important factor since low-cost filtration procedures are presently applicable only for harvesting fairly large microalgae. Small microalgae should be flocculated into larger bodies that can be harvested by one of the methods mentioned above. However, the cells' mobility affects the flocculation process, and addition of nonresidual oxidants to stop the mobility should be considered to aid flocculation. The decision between sedimentation or flotation methods depends on the density difference between the algae cell and the growth medium. For oil-laden algae with low cell density, flotation technologies should be considered. Moreover, oxygen release from algae cells and oxygen supersaturation conditions in growth medium support the use of flotation methods. If high-quality algae are to be produced for human consumption, continuous harvesting by solid ejecting or nozzle-type disc centrifuges is recommended. These centrifuges can easily be cleaned and sterilized. They are suitable for all types of microalgae, but their high operating costs should be compared with the benefits from their use. Another basic criterion for selecting the suitable harvesting procedure is the final algae paste concentration required for the next process. Solids requirements up to 30% can be attained by established dewatering processes. For more concentrated solids, drying methods are required. The various systems for algae drying differ both in the extent of capital investment and the energy requirements. Selection of the drying method depends on the scale of operation and the use for which the dried product is intended.

Shelef, G.; Sukenik, A.; Green, M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Microalgae harvesting and processing: a literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to present a discussion of the literature review performed on methods of harvesting microalgae. There is no single best method of harvesting microalgae. The choice of preferable harvesting technology depends on algae species, growth medium, algae production, end product, and production cost benefit. Algae size is an important factor since low-cost filtration procedures are presently applicable only for harvesting fairly large microalgae. Small microalgae should be flocculated into larger bodies that can be harvested by one of the methods mentioned above. However, the cells' mobility affects the flocculation process, and addition of nonresidual oxidants to stop the mobility should be considered to aid flocculation. The decision between sedimentation or flotation methods depends on the density difference between the algae cell and the growth medium. For oil-laden algae with low cell density, flotation technologies should be considered. Moreover, oxygen release from algae cells and oxygen supersaturation conditions in growth medium support the use of flotation methods. If high-quality algae are to be produced for human consumption, continuous harvesting by solid ejecting or nozzle-type disc centrifuges is recommended. These centrifuges can easily be cleaned and sterilized. They are suitable for all types of microalgae, but their high operating costs should be compared with the benefits from their use. Another basic criterion for selecting the suitable harvesting procedure is the final algae paste concentration required for the next process. Solids requirements up to 30% can be attained by established dewatering processes. For more concentrated solids, drying methods are required. The various systems for algae drying differ both in the extent of capital investment and the energy requirements. Selection of the drying method depends on the scale of operation and the use for which the dried product is intended.

Shelef, G.; Sukenik, A.; Green, M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Intra-annual changes in biomass, carbon, and nitrogen dynamics at 4-year old switchgrass field trials in West Tennessee, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Switchgrass is a potential bioenergy crop that could promote soil C sequestration in some environments. We compared four cultivars on a well-drained Alfisol to test for differences in biomass, C, and N dynamics during the fourth growing season. There was no difference (P > 0.05) among cultivars and no significant cultivar x time interaction in analyses of dry mass, C stocks, or N stocks in aboveground biomass and surface litter. At the end of the growing season, mean (±SE) aboveground biomass was 2.1±0.13 kg m-2, and surface litter dry mass was approximately 50% of aboveground biomass. Prior to harvest, the live root:shoot biomass ratio was 0.76. There was no difference (P > 0.05) among cultivars for total biomass, C, and N stocks belowground. Total belowground biomass (90-cm soil depth) as well as coarse (greater than or equal to 1 mm diameter) and fine (< 1 mm diameter) live root biomass increased from April to October. Dead roots were less than 7% of live root biomass to a depth of 90 cm. Net production of total belowground biomass (505 ±132 g m-2) occurred in the last half of the growing season. The increase in total live belowground biomass (426 ±139 g m-2) was more or less evenly divided among rhizomes, coarse, and fine roots. The N budget for annual switchgrass production was closely balanced with 6.3 g N m-2 removed by harvest of aboveground biomass and 6.7 g N m-2 supplied by fertilization. At the location of our study in west Tennessee, intra-annual changes in biomass, C, and N stocks belowground were of greater importance to crop management for C sequestration than were differences among cultivars.

Garten, Jr, C. T.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Tyler, Donald D.; Amonette, James E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Brice, D. J.; Castro, H. F.; Graham, Robin L.; Gunderson, C. A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Jastrow, J. D.; Kerley, M. K.; Matamala, R.; Mayes, M. A.; Metting, F. B.; Miller, R. M.; Moran, K. K.; Post, W. M.; Sands, Ronald D.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Phillips, J. R.; Thomson, Allison M.; Vugteveen, T.; West, T. O.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking. Author(s), Shiju Thomas, Paul Cha, Steven J McKnight, Vincent A Bouma, Andrew L Petrik,

422

Biomass Databook ed4.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Data Book Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Stacy Davis (865) 946-1256...

423

Biomass Engineering Prize Competition Announced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 7/30/2010 12:00:00 AM... The DownEast 2010 Biomass Engineering Prize Competition is seeking innovative solutions focused on revitalizing an ...

424

NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel Inman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

us to examine the feasibility of alternative process configurations. Learn more about Biomass Technology Analysis at NREL. System Dynamics I am also interested in dynamic modeling...

425

Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Agriculture, technology, and conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized. Agriculture and its related technologies are often affected by conflict, but rarely acknowledged as a cause or solution to conflict. Literature reviews in six topic areas illustrate various facets of the relationship between agriculture and conflict. Research conducted in Santa Cruz del Quiché, Guatemala illustrates the ways farmers were impacted by the country’s civil war. It also examines farmer survival strategies during the war, and reveals the presence of minor localized conflict over water resources. Conflict over land is not a major concern at present. Market access for inputs and outputs are shown to have been a problem for a number of farmers during the civil war. The poverty of Santa Cruz farmers indicates that much could be gained by rural development. Research is unable to support the hypotheses that agricultural technologies have prevented or caused conflict in Santa Cruz del Quiché, or that they have played a large role in recovery from the country’s civil war. The author recommends that future research be undertaken in regions with a diverse set of agricultural technologies, and/or a recent history of significant technological change in agriculture. Policy recommendations include providing secure access to markets during war time, increasing capacity for home-based rural production, and continuing research into resilient crops. Finally, the author suggests that the responsible decision to develop, adopt, or introduce an agricultural technology must take into account the social consequences of that decision, including how the new technology may alleviate or contribute to conflict.

Zilverberg, Cody John

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

System and process for biomass treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cantilever-based electret energy harvesters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of structures and functions allowed reducing electric consumptions of sensors, actuators and electronic devices. Therefore, it is now possible to imagine low-consumption devices able to harvest their energy in their surrounding environment. One way to proceed is to develop converters able to turn mechanical energy, such as vibrations, into electricity: this paper focuses on electrostatic converters using electrets. We develop an accurate analytical model of a simple but efficient cantilever-based electret energy harvester. Therefore, we prove that with vibrations of 0.1g (~1m/s^{2}), it is theoretically possible to harvest up to 30\\muW per gram of mobile mass. This power corresponds to the maximum output power of a resonant energy harvester according to the model of William and Yates. Simulations results are validated by experimental measurements but the issues of parasitic capacitances get a large impact. Therefore, we 'only' managed to harvest 10\\muW per gram of mobile mass, but according to our...

Boisseau, S; Ricart, T; Defay, E; Sylvestre, A; 10.1088/0964-1726/20/10/105013

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biomass power for rural development. Quarterly report, September 23, 1996--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goals for the biomass power for rural development include: expanded feedstock research and demonstration activities to provide soil-specific production costs and yield data, as well as better methods for harvest and transport; four thousand acres of feedstock available for fueling a commercial venture; comparison of the feasibility of gasification and cocombustion; designs for on-site switchgrass handling and feeding system; a detailed assessment of utilizing switchgrass for gasification and cocombustion to generate electricity using turbines and fuel cells.

Cooper, J.T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies - in a global perspective Erik Steen Jensen Bioenergy and biomass Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory Denmark #12;Biomass - a local resource, slaughterhouse waste. #12;Biomass characteristics · Biomass is a storable energy carrier, unlike electricity

432

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

433

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce biomass energy resource through estimations of future biomass use for liquid fuels and electricity. Title Biomass...

434

The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive analyses are conducted of the holistic farm production-harvesting-transporting-pre-refinery storage supply chain paradigm which represents the totality of important issues affecting the conversion facility front-gate costs of delivered biomass feedstocks. Targeting the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area, mathematical programming in the form of a cost-minimization linear programming model(Sorghasaurus) is used to assess the financial and economic logistics costs for supplying a hypothetical 30-million gallon conversion facility with high-energy sorghum (HES) and switchgrass (SG) cellulosic biomass feedstock for a 12-month period on a sustainable basis. A corporate biomass feedstock farming entity business organization structure is assumed. Because SG acreage was constrained in the analysis, both HES and SG are in the optimal baseline solution, with the logistics supply chain costs (to the front gate of the conversion facility) totaling $53.60 million on 36,845 acres of HES and 37,225 acres of SG (total farm acreage is 187,760 acres, including HES rotation acres), i.e., $723.67 per harvested acre, $1.7867 per gallon of biofuel produced not including any conversion costs, and $134.01 per dry ton of the requisite 400,000 tons of biomass feedstock. Several sensitivity scenario analyses were conducted, revealing a potential range in these estimates of $84.75-$261.52 per dry ton of biomass feedstock and $1.1300-$3.4870 per gallon of biofuel. These results are predicated on simultaneous consideration of capital and operating costs, trafficable days, timing of operations, machinery and labor constraints, and seasonal harvested biomass feedstock yield relationships. The enhanced accuracy of a comprehensive, detailed analysis as opposed to simplistic approach of extrapolating from crop enterprise budgets are demonstrated. It appears, with the current state of technology, it is uneconomical to produce cellulosic biomass feedstocks in the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area. That is, the costs estimated in this research for delivering biomass feedstocks to the frontgate of a cellulosic facility are much higher than the $35 per ton the Department of Energy suggests is needed. The several sensitivity scenarios evaluated in this thesis research provides insights in regards to needed degrees of advancements required to enhance the potential economic competitiveness of biomass feedstock logistics in this area.

McLaughlin, Will

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203

436

Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Agricultural Meteorology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nearly five weeks in China (May–June 1981), the author visited scientific institutions and experiment stations engaged in agricultural meterology and climatology research and teaching. The facilities, studies, and research programs at each ...

Norman J. Rosenberg

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

OUT Success Stories: Biomass Gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world's first demonstration of an efficient, low-pressure biomass gasifier capable of producing a high-quality fuel is now operating in Vermont. The gasifier converts 200 tons of solid biomass per day into a clean-burning gas with a high energy content for electricity generation.

Jones, J.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Biomass Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Below are news stories related to NREL biomass research. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. August 21, 2013 Can "Drop-In" Biofuels Solve Integration Issues? Lab works to create biofuels indistinguishable from conventional

442

Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

Thomas Mason

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

NREL: Biomass Research - Amie Sluiter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter (aka Amie D. Sluiter, Amie Havercamp) is a scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Bioenergy Center in Golden, Colorado. Research Interests Amie Sluiter began research in the biomass-to-ethanol field in 1996. She joined the Biomass Analysis Technologies team to provide compositional analysis data on biomass feedstocks and process intermediates for use in pretreatment models and techno-economic analyses. The results of wet chemical analysis provide guidance on feedstock handling, pretreatment conditions, economic viability, and life cycle analyses. Amie Sluiter has investigated a number of biomass analysis methods and is an author on 11 Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAPs), which are being used industry-wide. She has taught full biomass compositional analysis

444

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

Collection, transportation, and storage of biomass residues in the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to identify potential methods for the collection, transportation and storage of agricultural and forest residues in the Pacific Northwest. Information was gathered from available literature and through contacts with researchers, equipment manufacturers, and other individuals involved in forest and agricultural activities. This information was evaluated, combined, and adapted for situations existing in the Pacific Northwest. A number of methods for collection, transportation, and storage of biomass residues using currently available technology are described. Many of these methods can be applied to residue fuel materials along with their current uses in the forest and agricultural industries.

Inaba, L.K.; Eakin, D.E.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

447

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS APRIL BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES FORWASHINGTON corrpletsformalreview,editorialamtrd,ordetailedediting. APRIL 1990 BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES rockfish (S.jordani). A biomass-based delay- difference model with knife-edge recruitment appeared

448

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus Energy and Resources Group University would also like to thank Bryan Jenkins and other members of the California Biomass Collaborative............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Biomass Electricity in California Today

Kammen, Daniel M.

450

Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, Melvin (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Biomass Webinar Text Version | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Webinar Text Version Biomass Webinar Text Version Dowload the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on biomass. DOE Office of Indian Energy...

452

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with  greater  supply  of  biomass,  such  as  northern areas of  higher supply will enable biomass to be secured supply of feedstock is  key component in developing a viable biomass 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Biomass production by desert halophytes: alleviating the pressure on food production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desert plants, i.e., plants that are adapted to grow under extreme desert conditions were studied with the aim of identifying new sources for energy crops. Such crops should not compete with conventional agriculture for valuable resources of fertile ... Keywords: Euphorbia tirucalii, biofuel, biomass, desert halophytes, saline water, tamarix

Amram Eshel; Aviah Zilberstein; Chingiz Alekparov; Tamar Eilam; Israel Oren; Yoel Sasson; Riccardo Valentini; Yoav Waisel

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

455

Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Chinese Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Chinese Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chinese Station Biomass Facility Facility...

457

SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

458

Montgomery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Montgomery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery Biomass Facility Facility...

459

Deblois Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Deblois Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Deblois Biomass Facility Facility Deblois...

460

West Enfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon West Enfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Enfield Biomass Facility Facility West...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

MM Nashville Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon MM Nashville Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MM Nashville Biomass Facility Facility MM...

462

Olokele Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Olokele Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olokele Biomass Facility Facility Olokele...

463

Pennsbury Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pennsbury Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pennsbury Biomass Facility Facility...

464

Celanese Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Celanese Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Celanese Biomass Facility Facility Celanese...

465

Central LF Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Central LF Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Central LF Biomass Facility Facility...

466

US Sugar Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon US Sugar Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name US Sugar Biomass Facility Facility US Sugar...

467

Rocklin Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rocklin Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rocklin Biomass Facility Facility Rocklin...

468

Glendale Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Glendale Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glendale Biomass Facility Facility Glendale...

469

SPI Quincy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Quincy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Quincy Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

470

Kettle Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Facility...

471

DG Whitefield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon DG Whitefield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DG Whitefield Biomass Facility Facility DG...

472

Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility...

473

Livermore Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Livermore Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Livermore Biomass Facility Facility...

474

Mecca Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mecca Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Biomass Facility Facility Mecca...

475

Oxnard Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oxnard Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oxnard Biomass Facility Facility Oxnard...

476

Westwood Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Westwood Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westwood Biomass Facility Facility Westwood...

477

Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility Facility...

478

Wilmarth Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wilmarth Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilmarth Biomass Facility Facility Wilmarth...

479

El Nido Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon El Nido Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name El Nido Biomass Facility Facility El Nido...

480

Dinuba Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Dinuba Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dinuba Biomass Facility Facility Dinuba...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass agricultural harvested" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Stratton Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Stratton Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stratton Biomass Facility Facility Stratton...

482

Jonesboro Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Jonesboro Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jonesboro Biomass Facility Facility...

483

Broome County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Broome County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broome County Biomass Facility Facility...

484

Salinas Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Salinas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salinas Biomass Facility Facility Salinas...

485

Coventry LFG Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Coventry LFG Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coventry LFG Biomass Facility Facility...

486

Lanchester Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lanchester Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lanchester Biomass Facility Facility...

487

Troy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Troy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Troy Biomass Facility Facility Troy Sector...

488

SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

489

Sherman Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sherman Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sherman Biomass Facility Facility Sherman...

490

Craven County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Craven County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Craven County Biomass Facility Facility...

491

Warren Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Warren Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warren Biomass Facility Facility Warren...

492

Collins Pine Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Collins Pine Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Collins Pine Biomass Facility Facility...

493

Davis County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Davis County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis County Biomass Facility Facility...

494

Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility...

495

Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publications. 25 5 Bioenergy Overview Biopower, or biomass power, is the use of biomass to generate electricity. Biopower system technologies include direct-firing,...

496

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here ... The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

497

BSCL Use Plan: Solving Biomass Recalcitrance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical report describing NREL's new Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL). The BSCL was constructed to provide the most modern commercial surface characterization equipment for studying biomass surfaces.

Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Utility Promoters for Biomass Feedstock Biotechnology ...  

Technology Marketing Summary. Genetic optimization of biomass is necessary to improve the rates and final yields of sugar release from woody biomass.

499

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of biomass and biofuels technologies available for licensing ...

500

Biomass Energy Services Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy Services Inc Place Tifton, Georgia Zip 31794 Product Biodiesel plant developer in Cordele, Georgia. References Biomass Energy Services Inc1 LinkedIn Connections...