National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for biological systems engineering

  1. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  2. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production Microorganisms have been rich sources for natural products, some of which have found use as fuels, commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, polymers, and drugs, to name a few. The recent interest in production of transportation fuels from renewable

  3. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The use of systems-level studies makes it possible to comprehensively understand the impact of pathway engineering within the context of the entire host metabolism, to diagnose ...

  4. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

  5. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  6. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: to create an interactive, physics based, systems analysis tool for geothermal energy development that will: Identify Źpoints of attackź to maximize efforts and investment dollars; Identify the parameter space where geothermal energy production is physically and economically viable; Provide a platform for public education and interaction.

  7. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically modified the organisms to harvest light more efficiently for maximum production. Overview of Research and Highlights Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using their renowned expertise in genomics, computation, and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. Systems

  8. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We

  9. Engine intake system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesaka, H.

    1989-02-07

    An intake system is described for an internal combustion engine, the system comprising: an intake passage having an intake port and an inertial supercharging intake pipe leading to the intake port; an intake valve mounted in the intake port and operatively connected to the engine for alternately opening and closing the intake port; a rotary valve operatively connected to the engine and disposed in the intake passage intermediate the inertial supercharging intake pipe and the intake port. The rotary valve is rotatable for opening and closing the intake passage, and timing adjusting means operatively connected to the engine and to the rotary valve for retarding the opening of the rotary valve relative to the opening of the intake valve at low engine speeds, and for advancing the opening of the rotary valve at high engine speeds, whereby the retarding and advancing of the opening of the rotary valve enables inertial supercharging in the intake pipe at both low and high engine speeds.

  10. Integrated and Engineered Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrated and Engineered Systems Integrated and Engineered Systems National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Contact thumbnail of Business Development Executive Miranda Intrator Business Development Executive Richard P. Feynmnan Center for Innovation (505) 665-8315 Email Engineers at Los Alamos create, design, and build the

  11. Information Systems Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The OCIO is dedicated to supporting the development and maintenance of DOE Department wide and site-specific software and IT systems engineering initiatives.  This webpage contains resources,...

  12. Synthetic Biology: Engineering, Evolution and Design (SEED) Conference 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    SEED2014 focused on advances in the science and technology emerging from the field of synthetic biology. We broadly define this as technologies that accelerate the process of genetic engineering. It highlighted new tool development, as well as the application of these tools to diverse problems in biotechnology, including therapeutics, industrial chemicals and fuels, natural products, and agriculture. Systems spanned from in vitro experiments and viruses, through diverse bacteria, to eukaryotes (yeast, mammalian cells, plants).

  13. DOE Systems Engineering Methodology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM) Computer System Retirement Guidelines Version 3 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Chief Information Officer Computer System Retirement Guidelines Date: September 2002 Page 1 Rev Date: Table of Contents Section Page Purpose ............................................................................................................................................ 2 Initiation and Distribution

  14. Rotary engine cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1988-07-26

    A rotary internal combustion engine is described comprising: a rotor housing forming a trochoidal cavity therein; an insert of refractory material received in the recess, an element of a fuel injection and ignition system extending through the housing and insert bores, and the housing having cooling passages extending therethrough. The cooling passages are comprised of drilled holes.

  15. Synthetic biology and crop engineering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthetic biology and crop engineering Synthetic biology and crop engineering Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA-E PDF icon b13_burbaum_2-a.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0481: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic

  16. Systems Engineer | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    disruptions in oil supplies. Organizational Structure: This position is located in the Office of the Assistant Project Manager for Systems & Projects, Systems Engineering and...

  17. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems: * Understanding the dynamics and treatments of viral diseases, such as HIV, influenza, and hepatitis. * Explore the complex soil community of bacteria and fungi using...

  18. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management...

  19. Stirling engine heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, L.N.; Houtman, W.H.; Percival, W.H.

    1988-06-28

    A hot gas engine is described wherein a working gas flows back and forth in a closed path between a relatively cooler compression cylinder side of the engine and a relatively hotter expansion cylinder side of the engine and the path contains means including a heat source and a heat sink acting upon the gas in cooperation with the compression and expansion cylinders to cause the gas to execute a thermodynamic cycle wherein useful mechanical output power is developed by the engine, the improvement in the heat source which comprises a plurality of individual tubes each forming a portion of the closed path for the working gas.

  20. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Power Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Systems Engineering Power systems engineering at NREL means working with the electricity industry to optimize strategies for effectively interconnecting renewable resources and emerging energy efficiency technologies with the electric power system. Power systems engineering focuses on resolving grid integration barriers to sustainable, economic, secure, and reliable electricity based on a paradigm of high penetration of renewable energy, coordinated and intelligent cyber-control, and

  1. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  2. Power Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems; steam, water, fuel, and environmental monitoring systems; alternative energy systems; reliability, availability, and maintainability assessments; and associated...

  3. Engine systems and methods of operating an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scotto, Mark Vincent

    2015-08-25

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique method for operating an engine. Another embodiment is a unique engine system. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for engines and engine systems. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  4. Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_sisken.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Engine Technologies Session Introduction Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for

  5. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  6. Corporate Systems Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Corporate Systems Engineering Place: Indianapolis, Indiana Product: Indiana-based energy management company. Coordinates:...

  7. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana on July 26‚Äď29, 2015, and will examine industry trends and innovations, with a focus on the focus on the economic, political and social factors influencing the industry. Bioenergy Technologies Office Director Jonathan Male, Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, and Technology Managers Sam Tagore, Mark Elless, and Steve Thomas will be in attendance.

  8. Adaptive Systems Engineering: A Medical Paradigm for Practicing Systems Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Douglas Hamelin; Ron D. Klingler; Christopher Dieckmann

    2011-06-01

    From its inception in the defense and aerospace industries, SE has applied holistic, interdisciplinary tools and work-process to improve the design and management of 'large, complex engineering projects.' The traditional scope of engineering in general embraces the design, development, production, and operation of physical systems, and SE, as originally conceived, falls within that scope. While this 'traditional' view has expanded over the years to embrace wider, more holistic applications, much of the literature and training currently available is still directed almost entirely at addressing the large, complex, NASA and defense-sized systems wherein the 'ideal' practice of SE provides the cradle-to-grave foundation for system development and deployment. Under such scenarios, systems engineers are viewed as an integral part of the system and project life-cycle from conception to decommissioning. In far less 'ideal' applications, SE principles are equally applicable to a growing number of complex systems and projects that need to be 'rescued' from overwhelming challenges that threaten imminent failure. The medical profession provides a unique analogy for this latter concept and offers a useful paradigm for tailoring our 'practice' of SE to address the unexpected dynamics of applying SE in the real world. In short, we can be much more effective as systems engineers as we change some of the paradigms under which we teach and 'practice' SE.

  9. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes. ASPEN can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations. It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computationmore¬†¬Ľ of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The ASPEN Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.¬ę¬†less

  10. Building America Systems Engineering Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-15

    The Building America Research Teams use a systems engineering approach to achieve higher quality and energy savings in homes. Using these techniques, the energy consumption of new houses can be reduced by 40% or more with little or no impact on the cost of ownership.

  11. Engineering Design Information System (EDIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.S.; Short, R.D.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1990-11-01

    This manual is a guide to the use of the Engineering Design Information System (EDIS) Phase I. The system runs on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., IBM 3081 unclassified computer. This is the first phase in the implementation of EDIS, which is an index, storage, and retrieval system for engineering documents produced at various plants and laboratories operated by Energy Systems for the Department of Energy. This manual presents on overview of EDIS, describing the system's purpose; the functions it performs; hardware, software, and security requirements; and help and error functions. This manual describes how to access EDIS and how to operate system functions using Database 2 (DB2), Time Sharing Option (TSO), Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF), and Soft Master viewing features employed by this system. Appendix A contains a description of the Soft Master viewing capabilities provided through the EDIS View function. Appendix B provides examples of the system error screens and help screens for valid codes used for screen entry. Appendix C contains a dictionary of data elements and descriptions.

  12. Supervisory Electrical Engineer- Supervisory Power System Real Time Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Power System Operations Operations Engineering, (J4200) 5555...

  13. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  14. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  15. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-09-14

    PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes and has been ported to run on a PC. PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations.more¬†¬Ľ It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computation of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.¬ę¬†less

  16. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  17. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  18. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; et al

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterialmore¬†¬Ľ effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.¬ę¬†less

  19. Knock-free engine control system for turbocharged automotive engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirabayashi, Y.

    1985-04-09

    In a turbocharged internal combustion engine, in order to optimize engine torque output spark timing control and boost pressure control are coordinated in such a manner that spark advance angle is adjusted only when the measured boost pressure equals a predetermined value and is allowed to vary only within a specified range advanced from a reference value derived from an empirical memory table on the basis of engine speed and boost pressure. When engine operating conditions are such that spark advance angle would fall outside of the specified range, spark advance angle is then held at the empirical value and boost pressure is adjusted in order to optimize engine torque. The coordinated control system can also be designed to respond to exhaust gas temperature on a first-priority basis, i.e., when exhaust temperature is sensed to be dangerously high, boost pressure is reduced regardless of other engine conditions.

  20. Systems Biology Knowledgebase for a New Era in Biology A Genomics:GTL Report from the May 2008 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregurick, S.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Stevens, R.

    2009-03-01

    Biology has entered a systems-science era with the goal to establish a predictive understanding of the mechanisms of cellular function and the interactions of biological systems with their environment and with each other. Vast amounts of data on the composition, physiology, and function of complex biological systems and their natural environments are emerging from new analytical technologies. Effectively exploiting these data requires developing a new generation of capabilities for analyzing and managing the information. By revealing the core principles and processes conserved in collective genomes across all biology and by enabling insights into the interplay between an organism's genotype and its environment, systems biology will allow scientific breakthroughs in our ability to project behaviors of natural systems and to manipulate and engineer managed systems. These breakthroughs will benefit Department of Energy (DOE) missions in energy security, climate protection, and environmental remediation.

  1. Data System Sciences & Engineering Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSS Directorate ORNL Data System Sciences & Engineering Group Computational Sciences & Engineering Division Home Organization The Advanced Computing Solutions Team The Data Systems Research Integration Team Research Areas Data Systems Architectures for National Security Risk Analysis Streaming Realtime Sensor Networks Visual Analytics Opportunities Contact Us Data System Sciences & Engineering Group DSSE goes past traditional approaches to develop new methods for meeting user needs

  2. NREL: Wind Research - Systems Engineering Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Engineering Wind Research The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. The initiative's goal is to

  3. Systems Engineering and Integration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Engineering and Integration Systems Engineering and Integration Systems Engineering and Integration The fuel cycle in use today in the United States faces challenges in achieving the goals of sustainability. While used fuel is safely stored at reactor sites, the development of a system to manage all of the waste now and in the future has proven to be a persistently difficult task. Uncertainties about long-term resource availability make it difficult to properly value reusable material in

  4. SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; ENGINES; NOISE POLLUTION ABATEMENT; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRIC GENERATORS No abstract prepared....

  5. Power Systems Engineer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Knowledge of AC Power, power conversion, DC circuits, motors, power technology, and industrial control systems. * Uses independent judgment in applying standard engineering...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    verified. Key areas for systems engineers at Sandia Conceptual design Requirements definition and analysis Architectural design Proposal development Modeling and prototyping...

  7. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  8. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  9. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  10. Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) The ARES program is designed to promote separate, but parallel engine development among the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the United States. PDF icon Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) Brochure More Documents & Publications Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) -

  11. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experimental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Modeling Investigations | Department of Energy Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experimental and Modeling Investigations International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experimental and Modeling Investigations International research collaborations on deep geological disposition of nuclear waste are a key aspect of the nation's strategy to investigate disposal design concepts in geologic settings considered by other countries. This report centers on results

  12. Career Map: Power Systems/Transmission Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems/Transmission Engineer Career Map: Power Systems/Transmission Engineer A stretch of wind turbines and power lines at dusk. Power Systems/Transmission Engineer Position Title Power Systems/Transmission Engineer Alternate Title(s) Electric Power Engineer, Electrical Interconnection Engineer, Electrical Design Engineer Education & Training Level Advanced, Bachelors required, prefer graduate degree Education & Training Level Description Power Systems Engineers typically have a

  13. Control system for supercharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.

    1988-05-24

    A control system for controlling an internal combustion engine is described having a supercharge including a rotatable shaft and an exhaust turbine driven by exhaust gas. The control system comprising: a rotary electric machine mounted on the rotatable shaft of the supercharger for imposing a load on the exhaust turbine of the supercharger; setting means for setting an engine brake mode of the internal combustion engine; and operating means for operating the rotary electric machine when the engine brake mode is set by the setting means.

  14. Turbocharged engine exhaust gas recirculation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stachowicz, R.W.

    1984-01-24

    Improved exhaust gas recirculation systems for turbocharged gas engines that include an exhaust pipe, a turbocharger connected thereto, and a carburetor connected with a source of gas for the engine. The recirculation system includes an air conduit extending from the turbocharger compressor discharge to a venturi, an exhaust gas conduit that extends from a connection with the exhaust pipe between the engine and the turbocharger to the venturi, a second air conduit that extends from the exhaust pipe to a connection with the first air conduit, and control valves located in the exhaust gas conduit and in the second air conduit. The valves are closed when the engine is being started or idling at no load and open when a load is imposed or when engine rpm's are increased. No pumps, blowers, etc. are needed because the system operates on a differential in pressure created within the system to cause the exhaust gas recirculation.

  15. Congeneration system with a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijer, R.J.; Meijer, E.J.; Godett, T.M.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a cogeneration system for producing process heat for useful purposes and electric energy. It comprises an electric generator; a Stirling cycle engine having an output shaft operatively coupled to the generator for driving the generator, the engine including at least one internal fuel combustor; means for circulating a cooling liquid about the generator and engine to extract heat therefrom; an exhaust system coupled with the engine for exhausting combustion gases from the engine, the exhaust system including a condensing heat exchanger for cooling the combustion gases below the condensing, temperature of the water vapor in the exhaust gases; means for directing the cooling liquid around the condensing heat exchanger to extract heat therefrom and heat the liquid; and means for directing the cooling liquid for useful purposes.

  16. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  17. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  18. Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced HD Engine Systems ... Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations ...

  19. Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the...

  20. 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is partnering with the Technical University of Denmarkís Department of Wind Energy to co-host the third biennial Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop...

  1. KPFM and PFM of Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Brian [University College, Dublin; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Surface potentials and electrostatic interactions in biological systems are a key element of cellular regulation and interaction. Examples include cardiac and muscular activity, voltage-gated ion channels, protein folding and assembly, and electroactive cells and electrotransduction. The coupling between electrical, mechanical, and chemical signals and responses in cellular systems necessitates the development of tools capable of measuring the distribution of charged species, surface potentials, and mechanical responses to applied electrical stimuli and vice versa, ultimately under physiological conditions. In this chapter, applications of voltage-modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods including Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) to biological systems are discussed. KPFM is a force-sensitive non-contact or intermittent-contact mode AFM technique that allows electrostatic interactions and surface potentials to be addressed. Beyond long-range electrostatic interactions, the application of bias can lead to a mechanical response, e.g., due to linear piezoelectric coupling in polar biopolymers or via more complex electrotransduction and redox pathways in other biosystems. The use and development of PFM, based on direct electromechanical detection, to biological systems will also be addressed. The similarities and limitations of measuring surface potentials and electromechanical coupling in solution will be outlined.

  2. Engineering the DEEPSEP subsea boosting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyre, G.P.; Day, A.; Galletti, R.; Ray, J.

    1995-12-01

    DEEPSEP is a subsea processing system that utilizes separation and conventional pumps to achieve production boosting. Following completion of a feasibility study, that showed that the system could be successfully deployed and operated in 1,000 m water depth, work has begun on the engineering of a commercial prototype for deployment at a specific subsea test site. The test site conditions are described along with some of the engineering solutions developed for some of the key aspects of the system including: Sand Handling; Production Separation; Well Testing; Instrumentation and Control; Installation and Intervention; Reliability. A pragmatic engineered approach is being adopted during the development of DEEPSEP which minimizes the use of novel solutions and equipment configurations. The ``commercial prototype`` will be engineered such that following proving tests it may be redeployed into full commercial operation.

  3. Thermoelectric system for an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mcgilvray, Andrew N.; Vachon, John T.; Moser, William E.

    2010-06-22

    An internal combustion engine that includes a block, a cylinder head having an intake valve port and exhaust valve port formed therein, a piston, and a combustion chamber defined by the block, the piston, and the head. At least one thermoelectric device is positioned within either or both the intake valve port and the exhaust valve port. Each of the valves is configured to move within a respective intake and exhaust valve port thereby causing said valves to engage the thermoelectric devices resulting in heat transfer from the valves to the thermoelectric devices. The intake valve port and exhaust valve port are configured to fluidly direct intake air and exhaust gas, respectively, into the combustion chamber and the thermoelectric device is positioned within the intake valve port, and exhaust valve port, such that the thermoelectric device is in contact with the intake air and exhaust gas.

  4. Innovative Systems Engineering Solar LLC ISE Solar LLC | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Engineering Solar LLC ISE Solar LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Innovative Systems Engineering Solar LLC (ISE Solar LLC) Place: Warminster, Pennsylvania Zip:...

  5. Patent: Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEpatents Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems Citation Details Title: Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

  6. Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,...

  7. Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Results of an...

  8. Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006, ...

  9. Energy Control Systems Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Control Systems Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Control Systems Engineering Inc Place: Monrovia, California Zip: 91016 Sector: Services Product: The...

  10. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard A. (Irvine, CA); Doiron, Daniel R. (Santa Ynez, CA); Crean, David H. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  11. Engineered containment and control systems : nurturing nature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M.; Clarke, J.; Smith, E.; Dunn, J.; Waugh, J.; Environmental Assessment; Vanderbilt Univ.; ORNL; Kleinfelder; U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office

    2004-06-01

    The development of engineered containment and control systems for contaminated sites must consider the environmental setting of each site. The behaviors of both contaminated materials and engineered systems are affected by environmental conditions that will continue to evolve over time as a result of such natural processes as climate change, ecological succession, pedogenesis, and landform changes. Understanding these processes is crucial to designing, implementing, and maintaining effective systems for sustained health and environmental protection. Traditional engineered systems such as landfill liners and caps are designed to resist natural processes rather than working with them. These systems cannot be expected to provide long-term isolation without continued maintenance. In some cases, full-scale replacement and remediation may be required within 50 years, at an effort and cost much higher than for the original cleanup. Approaches are being developed to define smarter containment and control systems for stewardship sites, considering lessons learned from implementing prescriptive waste disposal regulations enacted since the 1970s. These approaches more effectively involve integrating natural and engineered systems; enhancing sensors and predictive tools for evaluating performance; and incorporating information on failure events, including precursors and consequences, into system design and maintenance. An important feature is using natural analogs to predict environmental conditions and system responses over the long term, to accommodate environmental change in the design process, and, as possible, to engineer containment systems that mimic favorable natural systems. The key emphasis is harmony with the environment, so systems will work with and rely on natural processes rather than resisting them. Implementing these new integrated systems will reduce current requirements for active management, which are resource-intensive and expensive.

  12. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - NREL Power Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Publish 33 Articles in Last Year Power Systems Engineering Researchers Publish 33 Articles in Last Year February 18, 2016 NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center published 33 journal and magazine articles in the past year highlighting recent research in integrating renewable energy into power systems. NREL would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy for the funding support that made this research possible. Integrated Devices and Systems Research Lab Tests: Verifying

  13. Engineered plant biomass particles coated with biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2014-06-24

    Plant biomass particles coated with a biological agent such as a bacterium or seed, characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to a grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces.

  14. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  15. A Vision for Systems Engineering Applied to Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, F.; Dykes, K.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation was given at the Third Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop on January 14, 2015. Topics covered include the importance of systems engineering, a vision for systems engineering as applied to wind energy, and application of systems engineering approaches to wind energy research and development.

  16. Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Jon G.; Manwell, James F.; Lackner, Matthew A.

    2012-12-31

    Utility-scale electricity produced from offshore wind farms has the potential to contribute significantly to the energy production of the United States. In order for the U.S. to rapidly develop these abundant resources, knowledgeable scientists and engineers with sound understanding of offshore wind energy systems are critical. This report summarizes the development of an upper-level engineering course in "Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering." This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of both the technical challenges of offshore wind energy and the practical regulatory, permitting, and planning aspects of developing offshore wind farms in the U.S. This course was offered on a pilot basis in 2011 at the University of Massachusetts and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), TU Delft, and GL Garrad Hassan have reviewed its content. As summarized in this report, the course consists of 17 separate topic areas emphasizing appropriate engineering fundamentals as well as development, planning, and regulatory issues. In addition to the course summary, the report gives the details of a public Internet site where references and related course material can be obtained. This course will fill a pressing need for the education and training of the U.S. workforce in this critically important area. Fundamentally, this course will be unique due to two attributes: an emphasis on the engineering and technical aspects of offshore wind energy systems, and a focus on offshore wind energy issues specific to the United States.

  17. Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) for mechanical engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1996-11-18

    The ongoing advances in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) are providing man-kind the freedom to travel to dimensional spaces never before conceivable. Advances include new fabrication processes, new materials, tailored modeling tools, new fabrication machines, systems integration, and more detailed studies of physics and surface chemistry as applied to the micro scale. In the ten years since its inauguration, MEMS technology is penetrating industries of automobile, healthcare, biotechnology, sports/entertainment, measurement systems, data storage, photonics/optics, computer, aerospace, precision instruments/robotics, and environment monitoring. It is projected that by the turn of the century, MEMS will impact every individual in the industrial world, totaling sales up to $14 billion (source: System Planning Corp.). MEMS programs in major universities have spawned up all over the United States, preparing the brain-power and expertise for the next wave of MEMS breakthroughs. It should be pointed out that although MEMS has been initiated by electrical engineering researchers through the involvement of IC fabrication techniques, today it has evolved such that it requires a totally multi-disciplinary team to develop useful devices. Mechanical engineers are especially crucial to the success of MEMS development, since 90% of the physical realm involved is mechanical. Mechanical engineers are needed for the design of MEMS, the analysis of the mechanical system, the design of testing apparatus, the implementation of analytical tools, and the packaging process. Every single aspect of mechanical engineering is being utilized in the MEMS field today, however, the impact could be more substantial if more mechanical engineers are involved in the systems level designing. In this paper, an attempt is made to create the pathways for a mechanical engineer to enter in the MEMS field. Examples of application in optics and medical devices will be used to illustrate how mechanical engineers made impact. Through a basic understanding of the history of MEMS, the background physics and scaling in micromechanical systems, and an introduction to baseline MEMS processes, a mechanical engineer should be well on his way to Alice's wonderland in the ever-exciting playground of MEMS.

  18. AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

    2010-02-11

    In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

  19. High efficiency stoichiometric internal combustion engine system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winsor, Richard Edward (Waterloo, IA); Chase, Scott Allen (Cedar Falls, IA)

    2009-06-02

    A power system including a stoichiometric compression ignition engine in which a roots blower is positioned in the air intake for the engine to control air flow. Air flow is decreased during part power conditions to maintain the air-fuel ratio in the combustion chamber of the engine at stoichiometric, thus enabling the use of inexpensive three-way catalyst to reduce oxides of nitrogen. The roots blower is connected to a motor generator so that when air flow is reduced, electrical energy is stored which is made available either to the roots blower to temporarily increase air flow or to the system electrical load and thus recapture energy that would otherwise be lost in reducing air flow.

  20. Managing Design and Construction Using Systems Engineering for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, Managing Design and Construction Using Systems Engineering for Use with DOE O 413.3A by Roland Frenck Functional areas: Construction and Engineering, Program Management This...

  1. Reaction Systems Engineering of Kent | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering of Kent Jump to: navigation, search Name: Reaction Systems Engineering of Kent Place: Kent, United Kingdom Product: An organisation located in Kent involved in the...

  2. Method and system for controlled combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, A. K. (Berkeley, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A system for controlling combustion in internal combustion engines of both the Diesel or Otto type, which relies on establishing fluid dynamic conditions and structures wherein fuel and air are entrained, mixed and caused to be ignited in the interior of a multiplicity of eddies, and where these structures are caused to sequentially fill the headspace of the cylinders.

  3. Engine throttle valve position detecting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamai, K.; Kikuchi, T.

    1987-03-31

    This patent describes an engine throttle valve position detecting system including: a throttle switch including a rotary detector member adapted to be rotated in accordance with the rotation of an engine throttle valve and having a guide portion including a section offset radially relative to the direction of rotation of the rotary detector member. A movable contact is movable by the rotation of the rotary detector member and a stationary contact disposed in opposed relationship to the movable contact. The stationary and movable contacts have opened and closed positions which are changed over at two different predetermined rotational positions of the rotary detector member; means for producing a signal related to the operation of the engine; means for comparing a temperature representative of the engine operating condition with a predetermined reference level; and judgment means operative, when the engine operating condition temperature is judged by the comparing means as being higher than predetermined reference level, to judge the position of the throttle valve based on one of the positions of the movable and stationary contacts and on the signal.

  4. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

  5. Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

    2002-01-01

    A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  6. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INLís Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INLís Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customerís needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  7. Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss041_daw_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications PHEV Engine and Aftertreatment Model Development PHEV Engine and Aftertreatment Model Development Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling

  8. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  9. Low emission turbo compound engine system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vuk; Carl T. (Denver, IA)

    2011-05-31

    A diesel or HHCI engine has an air intake and an exhaust for products of combustion. A pair of turbochargers receive the products of combustion in a series relationship and an exhaust aftertreatment device receive the products of combustion from the downstream turbine. A power turbine receives the output from the exhaust aftertreatment device and an EGR system of the power turbine passes a selected portion of the output to a point upstream of the upstream turbocharger compressor. A device adds fuel to the aftertreatment device to regenerate the particulate filter and the power turbine recoups the additional energy. The power turbine may be used to drive accessories or the prime output of the engine.

  10. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis

  11. Energy Returned On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Determine the Energy Returned on Investment (EROI) for electric power production of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS).

  12. Boosting Small Engines to High Performance - Boosting Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Combustion Development Methodology Boosting Small Engines to High Performance - Boosting Systems and Combustion Development Methodology Overview on combustion approaches ...

  13. Engine System Approach to Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Approach to Exhaust Energy Recovery Engine System Approach to Exhaust Energy Recovery Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_kruiswyk.pdf More Documents & Publications An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery The Path to a 50% Thermal Efficient Engine

  14. Genomics and Systems Biology of Tuberculosis (2009 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Galagan, James

    2011-04-25

    James Galagan from the Broad Institute spoke about the "Genomics and Systems Biology of TB" on March 26, 2009 during the 4th Annual User Meeting

  15. Engine control system having speed-based timing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willi, Martin L. (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott B. (Metamora, IL); Montgomery, David T. (Edelstein, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2012-02-14

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator. The controller is configured to receive a signal indicative of engine speed and compare the engine speed signal with a desired engine speed. The controller is also configured to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve to control an amount of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinder based on the comparison.

  16. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  17. Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    System (EBS) Evaluation | Department of Energy Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the evaluation of EBS design concepts, assessment of clay phase stability at

  18. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy from Biological Systems Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Presentation by Matthew Posewitz, Colorado School of Mines, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. PDF icon bio_h2_workshop_posewitz.pdf More Documents & Publications The Hydrogen Program at NREL: A Brief Overview Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report

  19. Systems engineering implementation plan for the liquid effluents services program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    A graded approach is being taken by the Liquid Effluents Services Program in implementing systems engineering because of the advanced state of the program. The approach is cost-effective and takes credit for related work already completed, yet retains the benefits of systems engineering. This plan describes how the Liquid Effluents Services Program will implement systems engineering so there is a common understanding. Systems engineering work to be performed and the products of that work are identified. The relation to the current planning process and integration with the sitewide systems engineering effort is described.

  20. Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Sarah R.; Rodemeyer, Michael; Garfinkel, Michele S.; Friedman, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as ďsynthetic biologyĒ has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDAís authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPAís resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology indus¨try, and non-governmental organiza¨tions. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

  1. Boosting Small Engines to High Performance - Boosting Systems and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Development Methodology | Department of Energy Boosting Small Engines to High Performance - Boosting Systems and Combustion Development Methodology Boosting Small Engines to High Performance - Boosting Systems and Combustion Development Methodology Overview on combustion approaches and challenges for smaller boosted engines to improve vehicle fuel economy, particularly downsizing gasoline engines PDF icon deer12_kleeberg.pdf More Documents & Publications Two-Stage Variable

  2. OE Power Systems Engineering Research & Development Program Partnerships |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mission ¬Ľ Power Systems Engineering Research and Development ¬Ľ OE Power Systems Engineering Research & Development Program Partnerships OE Power Systems Engineering Research & Development Program Partnerships The OE Power Systems Research and Development Program engages a broad group of stakeholders in program planning, identification of high-priority technology gap areas, and joint participation in research, development, demonstration, and deployment

  3. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Checklist | Department of Energy SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, configuration managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and planning software configuration management (SCM)

  4. System Engineering Management and Implementation Plan for Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN BEEK, J.E.

    2000-05-05

    This systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) describes the Project W-211 implementation of the Tank Farm Contractor Systems Engineering Management Plan (TFC SEMP). The SEMIP defines the systems engineering products and processes used by the project to comply with the TFC SEMP, and provides the basis for tailoring systems engineering processes by applying a graded approach to identify appropriate systems engineering requirements for W-211.

  5. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems Major Classification: Biological Sciences

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems Major Classification: Biological Sciences Minor Classification: Biophysics Authors: Troy Cellmer 1 , Dusan Bratko 1,2 , John M. Prausnitz 1,3 , and Harvey Blanch 1,* 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 3 Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 * corresponding author Tel:

  6. Fuel Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Control | Department of Energy Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine Emissions Control Fuel Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine Emissions Control 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Catalytica Energy Systems PDF icon 2004_deer_catalytica.pdf More Documents & Publications Transient Dynamometer Testing of a Single-Leg NOX Adsorber Combined with a Fuel Processor for Enhanced NOx

  7. Sustainable Energy Economy: The Next Challenge for Systems Engineers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, N.

    2008-06-01

    This paper discusses large, past projects that may provide insights into how systems engineers can help in the transition to a sustainable energy economy.

  8. An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes progress in design, analysis, and testing of individual component building blocks of waste heat recovery system for a 10% improvement in heavy-duty diesel engine.

  9. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Gaseous Fueled Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D, given by Sreenath Gupta of Argonne National Laboratory, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy...

  10. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in ...

  11. Senior Systems Engineer | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    doctorate in computer engineering from New Mexico State University, a master's degree in computer science from the University of Colorado, a master's in electrical and computer...

  12. Engineering report standard hydrogen monitoring system problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golberg, R.L.

    1996-09-25

    Engineering Report to document moisture problems found during the sampling of the vapors in the dome space for hydrogen in the storage tanks and a recommended solution.

  13. A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production √ó You are accessing a document from the Department of

  14. Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shewanella genus (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus To what extent genotypic differences translate to phenotypic variation remains a poorly understood issue of paramount importance for several cornerstone concepts of microbiology such as the species definition. Here, we take

  15. A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production Authors: Collins, James J [1] + Show Author Affiliations

  16. A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic Pathways that Influence and Control Microbial Hydrogen Production Authors: Collins, James J [1] + Show Author Affiliations Boston University

  17. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  18. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines Increase Efficiency and Reduce Emissions for Distributed Power Generation Applications Distributed energy (DE) technologies for on-site power generation are assuming a role of increasing importance for our nation's energy, environmental, and economic future. The use of DE technologies can lead to lower emissions and, particularly in combined heat and power (CHP)

  19. Future Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines Future Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_czarnowski.pdf More Documents & Publications Can Future Emissions Limits be Met with a Hybrid EGR

  20. Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component Systems in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pursuit of Enhanced Efficiency under Environmental Constraints | Department of Energy Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component Systems in Pursuit of Enhanced Efficiency under Environmental Constraints Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component Systems in Pursuit of Enhanced Efficiency under Environmental Constraints Four lubricant technical themes are presented that aim to work synergistically with advanced engine technologies to meet a goal of improving

  1. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  2. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  3. Configuration management program plan for Hanford site systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellie, C.L.

    1996-03-28

    This plan establishes the integrated management program for the evolving technical baseline developed through the systems engineering process. This configuration management program aligns with the criteria identified in the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-1073-93. Included are specific requirements for control of the systems engineering RDD-100 database, and electronic data incorporated in the database that establishes the Hanford Site Technical Baseline.

  4. Engine control system having pressure-based timing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willi, Martin L. (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott B. (Metamora, IL); Montgomery, David T. (Edelstein, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2011-10-04

    A control system for an engine having a first cylinder and a second cylinder is disclosed having a first engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the first cylinder and a first actuator associated with the first engine valve. The control system also has a second engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the second cylinder and a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a pressure within the first cylinder. The control system also has a controller that is in communication with the first actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to compare the pressure within the first cylinder with a desired pressure and selectively regulate the first actuator to adjust a timing of the first engine valve independently of the timing of the second engine valve based on the comparison.

  5. The OME Framework for genome-scale systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palsson, Bernhard O.; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Steve

    2014-12-19

    The life sciences are undergoing continuous and accelerating integration with computational and engineering sciences. The biology that many in the field have been trained on may be hardly recognizable in ten to twenty years. One of the major drivers for this transformation is the blistering pace of advancements in DNA sequencing and synthesis. These advances have resulted in unprecedented amounts of new data, information, and knowledge. Many software tools have been developed to deal with aspects of this transformation and each is sorely needed [1-3]. However, few of these tools have been forced to deal with the full complexity of genome-scale models along with high throughput genome- scale data. This particular situation represents a unique challenge, as it is simultaneously necessary to deal with the vast breadth of genome-scale models and the dizzying depth of high-throughput datasets. It has been observed time and again that as the pace of data generation continues to accelerate, the pace of analysis significantly lags behind [4]. It is also evident that, given the plethora of databases and software efforts [5-12], it is still a significant challenge to work with genome-scale metabolic models, let alone next-generation whole cell models [13-15]. We work at the forefront of model creation and systems scale data generation [16-18]. The OME Framework was borne out of a practical need to enable genome-scale modeling and data analysis under a unified framework to drive the next generation of genome-scale biological models. Here we present the OME Framework. It exists as a set of Python classes. However, we want to emphasize the importance of the underlying design as an addition to the discussions on specifications of a digital cell. A great deal of work and valuable progress has been made by a number of communities [13, 19-24] towards interchange formats and implementations designed to achieve similar goals. While many software tools exist for handling genome-scale metabolic models or for genome-scale data analysis, no implementations exist that explicitly handle data and models concurrently. The OME Framework structures data in a connected loop with models and the components those models are composed of. This results in the first full, practical implementation of a framework that can enable genome-scale design-build-test. Over the coming years many more software packages will be developed and tools will necessarily change. However, we hope that the underlying designs shared here can help to inform the design of future software.

  6. Radioisotope power system based on derivative of existing Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.; Kumar, V.

    1995-12-31

    In a recent paper, the authors presented the results of a system design study of a 75-watt(c) RSG (Radioisotope Stirling Generator) for possible application to the Pluto Fast Flyby mission. That study was based on a Stirling engine design generated by MTI (Mechanical Technology, Inc.). The MTI design was a derivative of a much larger (13 kwe) engine that they had developed and tested for NASA`s LERC. Clearly, such a derivative would be a major extrapolation (downsizing) from what has actually been built and tested. To avoid that, the present paper describes a design for a 75-watt RSG system based on derivatives of a small (11-watt) engine and linear alternator system that has been under development by STC (Stirling Technology Company) for over three years and that has operated successfully for over 15,000 hours as of March 1995. Thus, the STC engines would require much less extrapolation from proven designs. The design employs a heat source consisting of two standard General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules, coupled to four Stirling engines with linear alternators, any three of which could deliver the desired 75-watt(e) output if the fourth should fail. The four engines are coupled to four common radiators with redundant heatpipes for rejecting the engines` waste heat to space. The above engine and radiator redundancies promote system reliability. The paper describes detailed analyses to determine the effect of radiator geometry on system mass and performance, before and after an engine or heatpipe failure.

  7. Engine control system having fuel-based timing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willi, Martin L. (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott B. (Metamora, IL); Montgomery, David T. (Edelstein, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2012-04-03

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of an amount of an air/fuel mixture remaining within the cylinder after completion of a first combustion event and a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller may be configured to compare the amount with a desired amount, and to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve associated with a subsequent combustion event based on the comparison.

  8. Engine control system having fuel-based adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willi, Martin L. (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott B. (Metamora, IL); Montgomery, David T. (Edelstein, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2011-03-15

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve configured to affect a fluid flow of the cylinder, an actuator configured to move the engine valve, and an in-cylinder sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a characteristic of fuel entering the cylinder. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to determine the characteristic of the fuel based on the signal and selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve based on the characteristic of the fuel.

  9. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - NREL Power Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Publish 33 Articles in Last Year Power Systems Engineering Researchers Publish 33 Articles in Last Year February 18, 2016 NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center published 33 journal and magazine articles in the past year highlighting recent research in integrating renewable energy into power systems. NREL would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy for the funding support that made this research possible. Integrated Devices and Systems Research Lab Tests: Verifying

  10. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN)

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  11. Behavior of REE in geological and biological systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.

    1981-05-01

    The REE abundances when normalized to primordial (chondritic) abundances behave as a smooth function of the REE ionic radii in both the geological and biological systems. The REE are hardly fractionated chemically through various stages of their transformation from soil-soil extract-plant-geological systems.

  12. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

  13. Rotary engine cooling system with flow balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes a rotary internal combustion engine having a trochoid rotor housing section and having a group of cooling passages extending through a top-dead-center (TDC) region. The engine is characterized by: at least one passage of the group following a curved path which extends through a first hotter portion of the TDC region, by at least one further passage of the group following a substantially uncurved path through a second cooler portion of the TDC region, and by a fluid restriction for restricting fluid flow through the at least one further passage to balance coolant flow between the passages.

  14. Systems engineering approach towards performance monitoring of emergency diesel generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramli, Nurhayati Yong-kwan, Lee

    2014-02-12

    Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary approach and means to enable the realization of successful systems. In this study, systems engineering approach towards the performance monitoring of Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) is presented. Performance monitoring is part and parcel of predictive maintenance where the systems and components conditions can be detected before they result into failures. In an effort to identify the proposal for addressing performance monitoring, the EDG boundary has been defined. Based on the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) results and industry operating experiences, the most critical component is identified. This paper proposed a systems engineering concept development framework towards EDG performance monitoring. The expected output of this study is that the EDG reliability can be improved by the performance monitoring alternatives through the systems engineering concept development effort.

  15. NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Power Systems Engineering Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Systems Engineering Center The Power Systems Engineering Center supports the science and technology goals of the U.S. Department of Energy and NREL toward a sustainable energy future. The center works with the electricity industry to optimize strategies for effectively interconnecting renewable resources and emerging energy efficiency technologies in the existing electric power system. The center focuses on resolving grid integration barriers and providing improved control and management

  16. Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_parche.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation SCR Technologies for

  17. Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss089_daw_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impacts of Advanced

  18. Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stimulation | Department of Energy Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation Project objectives: To create an Enhanced Geothermal System on the margin of the Cosofield through the hydraulic, thermal, and/or chemical stimulation of one or more tight injection wells; To increase the productivity of the Cosofield by 10 MWe; To develop and calibrate geomechanical,

  19. Intake system for rotary piston engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadokoro, T.; Okimoto, H.; Shiraishi, H.; Akagi, T.

    1986-01-07

    This patent describes a two rotor type rotary piston engine consisting of a casing composed of: a pair of rotor housings each having an inner wall of trochoidal configuration; an intermediate housing located between the rotor housings; and a pair of side housings secured to the outer sides of the respective rotor housings to define rotor cavities in the respective rotor housings.

  20. High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and Evaluation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace017_briggs_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones Identification and Evaluation of Near-term Opportunities for Efficiency Improvement High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and Evaluation

  1. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  2. Organic rankine cycle system for use with a reciprocating engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; McCormick, Duane; Brasz, Joost J.

    2006-01-17

    In a waste heat recovery system wherein an organic rankine cycle system uses waste heat from the fluids of a reciprocating engine, provision is made to continue operation of the engine even during periods when the organic rankine cycle system is inoperative, by providing an auxiliary pump and a bypass for the refrigerant flow around the turbine. Provision is also made to divert the engine exhaust gases from the evaporator during such periods of operation. In one embodiment, the auxiliary pump is made to operate simultaneously with the primary pump during normal operations, thereby allowing the primary pump to operate at lower speeds with less likelihood of cavitation.

  3. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  4. Engine exhaust control system and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billington, W.G.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an exhaust gas control apparatus for an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a rotary fan blade assembly having a hollow hub and plurality of hollow blades, each having a plurality of apertures in a trailing edge; drive means for driving the rotary fan blade assembly; feed means feeding exhaust gases from the engine into the hollow hub and hollow blades; air intake means for feeding intake air to the rotary fan blade assembly from a direction opposite to the direction of flow of the exhaust gases into the hollow hub of the rotary fan blade assembly; exhaust means for exhausting a mixture of air and the exhaust gases; whereby the flow of exhaust gases through the rotary fan blade assembly and out through the exhaust means reduces back-pressure, exhaust noise, exhaust temperature and exhaust pollutants.

  5. Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2014-03-22

    The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

  6. Annex II Technical Specifications Operational Systems Diagnostics Engineering Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operational Systems Diagnostics Engineering Services ITER_D_ SD8PNK v.1.3 ITER_D_SD8PNK Page 1 of 9 Table of Contents 1 PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................2 2 SCOPE .................................................................................................................................2 3 DEFINITIONS

  7. Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss041_daw_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for

  8. Configuration management program plan for Hanford site systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, A.G.

    1994-11-14

    This plan establishes the integrated configuration management program for the evolving technical baseline developed through the systems engineering process. This configuration management program aligns with the criteria identified in the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-1073-93. Included are specific requirements for control of the systems engineering RDD-100 database, and electronic data incorporated in the database that establishes the Hanford site technical baseline.

  9. 2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 14 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems 2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems September 26, 2014 - 12:04pm Addthis JASON study members stand on a basaltic dike exposure below the La Jolla cliffs while professor Yuri Fialko of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (back left) describes how its orientation is controlled by the stress field at the time of emplacement. Credit: Benjamin Phillips JASON study members

  10. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Ryan W; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C; Rolim de Mattos, Erico

    2014-02-25

    The present disclosure relates to biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use.

  11. Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

    1987-01-01

    A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

  12. Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_hu.pdf More Documents & Publications LNT + SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications: A Systems Approach Improved System Performance and

  13. Engine having a variable valve actuation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hefler, Gregory W. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2005-10-12

    An engine has a cylinder head having a first surface and a second surface spaced from the first surface. A valve is moveably connected to the cylinder head. A rocker arm is connected to the valve, and a rocker shaft having a first location spaced a maximum distance from the cylinder head is connected to the rocker arm. A support member has and an actuator fluid passage network. The actuator fluid passage network defines a volume. The support member is connected to the cylinder head and is positioned such that a majority of the volume of the actuator fluid passage network is between the first location of the rocker shaft and the second surface of the cylinder head.

  14. Engine having a variable valve actuation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hefler, Gregory W. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2004-10-12

    An engine has a cylinder head having a first surface and a second surface spaced from the first surface. A valve is moveably connected to the cylinder head. A rocker arm is connected to the valve, and a rocker shaft having a first location spaced a maximum distance from the cylinder head is connected to the rocker arm. A support member has and an actuator fluid passage network. The actuator fluid passage network defines a volume. The support member is connected to the cylinder head and is positioned such that a majority of the volume of the actuator fluid passage network is between the first location of the rocker shaft and the second surface of the cylinder head.

  15. EnergyCS Inc Energy Control Systems Engineering Inc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EnergyCS Inc Energy Control Systems Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: EnergyCS Inc (Energy Control Systems Engineering, Inc) Sector: Services Product: String...

  16. ENGINEERING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENGINEERING the Future of ENERGY Regional University Alliance National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development The Future of Energy The time to redraw America's energy blueprint is now. The challenges we face today are the most critical in decades-from the impact of energy use on global ecosystems to the difficulties of efficiently harnessing our natural resources. Because energy is fundamental to human welfare, we must develop sustainable systems that make clean,

  17. Linear hydraulic drive system for a Stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Michael M. (Schenectady, NY)

    1984-02-21

    A hydraulic drive system operating from the periodic pressure wave produced by a Stirling engine along a first axis thereof and effecting transfer of power from the Stirling engine to a load apparatus therefor and wherein the movable, or working member of the load apparatus is reciprocatingly driven along an axis substantially at right angles to the first axis to achieve an arrangement of a Stirling engine and load apparatus assembly which is much shorter and the components of the load apparatus more readily accessible.

  18. Linear hydraulic drive system for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.M.

    1984-02-21

    A hydraulic drive system operating from the periodic pressure wave produced by a Stirling engine along a first axis thereof and effecting transfer of power from the Stirling engine to a load apparatus therefor and wherein the movable, or working member of the load apparatus is reciprocatingly driven along an axis substantially at right angles to the first axis to achieve an arrangement of a Stirling engine and load apparatus assembly which is much shorter and the components of the load apparatus more readily accessible. 2 figs.

  19. Site Data System Engineering Roles and Responsibilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history and comments in sections 5, 6, and 7 regarding rebooting of instrument computers: Instrument computers should not be rebooted unless the system is frozen...

  20. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    North, William Edward (Winter Springs, FL)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  1. Systems Biology in Prokaryote - Eukaryote Symbiosis | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Systems Biology in Prokaryote - Eukaryote Symbiosis Monday, June 25, 2012 - 12:00pm SLAC, SSRL Main Conference Room, 137-322 Allen M. Orville, Brookhaven National Laboratory Frontier challenges for macromolecular crystallography (MX) now include determining structures of trapped reactive intermediates, large macromolecules and viruses, membrane proteins, protein-protein complexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. Although structure and function are intimately linked,

  2. Power control system for a hot gas engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berntell, John O. (Staffanstorp, SE)

    1986-01-01

    A power control system for a hot gas engine of the type in which the power output is controlled by varying the mean pressure of the working gas charge in the engine has according to the present invention been provided with two working gas reservoirs at substantially different pressure levels. At working gas pressures below the lower of said levels the high pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the control system, and at higher pressures the low pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the system, thereby enabling a single one-stage compressor to handle gas within a wide pressure range at a low compression ratio.

  3. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  4. Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Bioimaging Technology DOE Joint Genome Institute Structural Biology Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER

  5. Hybrid vehicle system studies and optimized hydrogen engine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.

    1995-04-26

    We have done system studies of series hydrogen hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. We have evaluated the impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy. Experiments in an available engine at the Sandia CRF demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppM at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppM to meet the 0.2 g/mile ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. LLNL has designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing Onan engine. This head features 15:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses. Initial testing shows promise of achieving an indicated efficiency of nearly 50% and emissions of less than 100 ppM NO{sub x}. Hydrocarbons and CO are to be measured, but are expected to be very low since their only source is engine lubricating oil. A successful friction reduction program on the Onan engine should result in a brake thermal efficiency of about 42% compared to today`s gasoline engines of 32%. Based on system studies requirements, the next generation engine will be about 2 liter displacement and is projected to achieve 46% brake thermal efficiency with outputs of 15 kW for cruise and 40 kW for hill climb.

  6. Development of a locomotive engine condition monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broughton, C.; Holloway, R.; Webster, G.

    1997-12-31

    Outlines test procedures and results of a study of the application of the instantaneous crankshaft angular velocity (ICAV) engine condition monitoring system applied to three freight locomotives. The study involved the assessment of a prototype repair-shop diagnostic tool, based on prior experimental programs and the ICAV technology. Engine testing was carried out at four-month intervals for three separate trials on the locomotives. Experimental data obtained included power output, fuel consumption, cylinder firing pressure waveforms, and the ICAV waveforms. The performance of the ICAV system was judged on its ability to accurately predict the change in indicated mean effective pressure of each cylinder from one test to the next.

  7. Analysis of Aurora's Performance Simulation Engine for Three Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Janine; Simon, Joseph

    2015-07-07

    Aurora Solar Inc. is building a cloud-based optimization platform to automate the design, engineering, and permit generation process of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. They requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validate the performance of the PV system performance simulation engine of Aurora Solar’s solar design platform, Aurora. In previous work, NREL performed a validation of multiple other PV modeling tools 1, so this study builds upon that work by examining all of the same fixed-tilt systems with available module datasheets that NREL selected and used in the aforementioned study. Aurora Solar set up these three operating PV systems in their modeling platform using NREL-provided system specifications and concurrent weather data. NREL then verified the setup of these systems, ran the simulations, and compared the Aurora-predicted performance data to measured performance data for those three systems, as well as to performance data predicted by other PV modeling tools.

  8. Handbook of biomass downdraft gasifier engine systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, T B; Das, A

    1988-03-01

    This handbook has been prepared by the Solar Energy Research Institute under the US Department of Energy /bold Solar Technical Information Program/. It is intended as a guide to the design, testing, operation, and manufacture of small-scale (less than 200 kW (270 hp)) gasifiers. A great deal of the information will be useful for all levels of biomass gasification. The handbook is meant to be a practical guide to gasifier systems, and a minimum amount of space is devoted to questions of more theoretical interest.

  9. Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Cynthia Chaffin; Weber, Phillip Anthony; Khair, Magdi K.

    2004-06-01

    Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions, including, for example, oxides of nitrogen emissions, particulate matter emissions, and the like. The emission control system according to this invention is provided in the exhaust passageway of a diesel engine and includes a catalyst-based particulate filter; and first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems coupled to the catalyst-based particulate filter. The first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems are arranged in a parallel flow configuration with each other. Each of the first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems include a carbon monoxide generating catalyst device, a sulfur trap device, a lean NO.sub.x device, a supplemental fuel injector device, and a plurality of flow diverter devices.

  10. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES): Raising the Bar on Engine Technology with Increased Efficiency and Reduced Emissions, at Attractive Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This is a fact sheet on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems program (ARES), which is designed to promote separate, but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the United States.

  11. Combining Wind Plant Control With Systems Engineering (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Ning, A.; Gebraad, P.; Dykes, K.

    2015-02-01

    This presentation was given at the third Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, and focused on wind plant controls research, combined optimization, a case study on the Princess Amalia Wind Park, results from the case study, and future work.

  12. Product Lifecycle Management Architecture: A Model Based Systems Engineering Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonan, Nicholas James

    2015-07-01

    This report is an analysis of the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) program. The analysis is centered on a need statement generated by a Nuclear Weapons (NW) customer. The need statement captured in this report creates an opportunity for the PLM to provide a robust service as a solution. Lifecycles for both the NW and PLM are analyzed using Model Based System Engineering (MBSE).

  13. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology @WIPP Life Begins at 250,000,000 Years WIPP's underground isn't just suited for physics experiments aiming to unlock the mysteries of the Universe, it is also a perfect "dig site" for biologists wanting to chronicle the history of life. 250 million years ago, the area around WIPP was all part of the Permian Sea. Today, the salt beds that make up the WIPP underground provide a time capsule, of sorts, to this ancient era. Researchers have uncovered ancient bacteria, cellulose and

  14. Nanofluid Development for Engine Cooling Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Systems Nanofluid Development for Engine Cooling Systems 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_21_timofeeva.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Thermal Management Erosion of Radiator Materials by Nanofluids Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Nanofluids for Cooling Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

  15. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  16. Systems-Level Synthetic Biology for Advanced Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffing, Anne; Jensen, Travis J.; Strickland, Lucas Marshall; Meserole, Stephen; Tallant, David

    2015-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to be capable of producing a variety of advanced biofuels; however, product yields remain well below those necessary for large scale production. New genetic tools and high throughput metabolic engineering techniques are needed to optimize cyanobacterial metabolisms for enhanced biofuel production. Towards this goal, this project advances the development of a multiple promoter replacement technique for systems-level optimization of gene expression in a model cyanobacterial host: Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. To realize this multiple-target approach, key capabilities were developed, including a high throughput detection method for advanced biofuels, enhanced transformation efficiency, and genetic tools for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Moreover, several additional obstacles were identified for realization of this multiple promoter replacement technique. The techniques and tools developed in this project will help to enable future efforts in the advancement of cyanobacterial biofuels.

  17. Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration effectively PDF icon deer12_suresh.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Identification and Evaluation of Near-term Opportunities for Efficiency Improvement

  18. Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Silver, Pam [Harvard University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Pam Silver of Harvard University gives a presentation on "Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  19. Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, Pam [Harvard University] [Harvard University

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Pam Silver of Harvard University gives a presentation on "Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  20. Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihl, J.; West, B.; Toops, T.; Adelman, B.; Derybowski, E.

    2011-09-30

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT, also known as NOx adsorber catalyst) regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

  1. Systems and method for delivering liquified gas to an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Siahpush, Ali S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brown, Kevin B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  2. Systems for delivering liquified gas to an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2006-05-16

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  3. Multi-purpose canister system evaluation: A systems engineering approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to investigate various container systems for handling, transporting, storing, and disposing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The primary goal of DOE`s investigations was to select a container technology that could handle the vast majority of commercial SNF at a reasonable cost, while ensuring the safety of the public and protecting the environment. Several alternative cask and canister concepts were evaluated for SNF assembly packaging to determine the most suitable concept. Of these alternatives, the multi-purpose canister (MPC) system was determined to be the most suitable. Based on the results of these evaluations, the decision was made to proceed with design and certification of the MPC system. A decision to fabricate and deploy MPCs will be made after further studies and preparation of an environmental impact statement.

  4. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Engineering Standards Manual, Master Specifications Index, Drafting Manual, Design Guides, and more. IHS Standards Expert login information Collections include ANSI,...

  5. Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based ...

  6. Method and apparatus for controlling hybrid powertrain system in response to engine temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martini, Ryan D; Spohn, Brian L; Lehmen, Allen J; Cerbolles, Teresa L

    2014-10-07

    A method for controlling a hybrid powertrain system including an internal combustion engine includes controlling operation of the hybrid powertrain system in response to a preferred minimum coolant temperature trajectory for the internal combustion engine.

  7. Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel Additives Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel Additives A bench-top ...

  8. Systems for delivering liquified natural gas to an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Siahpush, Ali S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brown, Kevin B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A fuel delivery system includes a fuel tank configured to receive liquid natural gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the fuel tank to an economizer valve. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the fuel tank to the economizer valve. Fluid coupled to the economizer valve is a vaporizer which is heated by coolant from the engine and is positioned below the fuel tank. The economizer valve selectively withdraws either liquid natural gas or vaporized natural gas from the fuel tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank. A delivery conduit extends from the vaporizer to the engine. A return conduit having a check valve formed therein extends from the delivery conduit to the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank for pressurizing the fuel tank.

  9. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B. D.; Baum, G. N.; Perez, J.; Baum, K. N.

    2009-09-01

    Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation.

  10. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Patent: On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated

  11. Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Endurance | Department of Energy Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Results of an investigation into effects of biofuels on engine- and system-out emissions, specifically US 2010 EPA exhaust after-treatment system from Mack Trucks PDF icon deer11_barnum.pdf More Documents & Publications High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine A European Perspective of EURO

  12. Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D) Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D) Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D) Power Systems Engineering Research and Development activities accelerate discovery and innovation in electric transmission and distribution technologies and create "next generation" devices, software, tools, and techniques to help modernize the electric grid. Projects are planned

  13. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

  14. Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Engineering National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Engineering New type of laser to help defeat threats to U.S. Navy. LANL successfully tested a new high-current electron injector, a device that can be scaled up to produce the electrons needed to build a

  16. A surety engineering framework to reduce cognitive systems risks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P.; Peercy, David Eugene; Caldera, Eva O.; Shaneyfelt, Wendy L.

    2008-12-01

    Cognitive science research investigates the advancement of human cognition and neuroscience capabilities. Addressing risks associated with these advancements can counter potential program failures, legal and ethical issues, constraints to scientific research, and product vulnerabilities. Survey results, focus group discussions, cognitive science experts, and surety researchers concur technical risks exist that could impact cognitive science research in areas such as medicine, privacy, human enhancement, law and policy, military applications, and national security (SAND2006-6895). This SAND report documents a surety engineering framework and a process for identifying cognitive system technical, ethical, legal and societal risks and applying appropriate surety methods to reduce such risks. The framework consists of several models: Specification, Design, Evaluation, Risk, and Maturity. Two detailed case studies are included to illustrate the use of the process and framework. Several Appendices provide detailed information on existing cognitive system architectures; ethical, legal, and societal risk research; surety methods and technologies; and educing information research with a case study vignette. The process and framework provide a model for how cognitive systems research and full-scale product development can apply surety engineering to reduce perceived and actual risks.

  17. Radionuclide transport through engineered barrier system alteration products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viani, B.E.; Torretto, P.C.; Matzen, S.L.

    1997-12-01

    The primary rationale for studying the transport behavior of radionuclides through the Engineered Barrier system / Near Field Environment (EBS/NFE) is to ascertain whether the material properties of the introduced and altered host rock can significantly affect the transport of radionuclides from the waste container to the far field. The intent of this report is to present data and modeling results that can be used to assess the importance of canister corrosion products and cementitious materials to transport of radionuclides to the far field.

  18. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  19. Biologically-based signal processing system applied to noise removal for signal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    2004-07-13

    The method and system described herein use a biologically-based signal processing system for noise removal for signal extraction. A wavelet transform may be used in conjunction with a neural network to imitate a biological system. The neural network may be trained using ideal data derived from physical principles or noiseless signals to determine to remove noise from the signal.

  20. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a light-duty diesel engine, which require utilization of the waste energy found in the coolant, EGR, and exhaust streams, may be increased through the development of a Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system PDF icon deer09_briggs.pdf More Documents & Publications Performance of an Organic

  1. engineering

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.

    Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran wasn't necessarily...

  2. Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-12

    Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

  3. Enabling a Systems Biology Knowledgebase with Gaggle and Firegoose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-12-12

    The overall goal of this project was to extend the existing Gaggle and Firegoose systems to develop an open-source technology that runs over the web and links desktop applications with many databases and software applications. This technology would enable researchers to incorporate workflows for data analysis that can be executed from this interface to other online applications. The four specific aims were to (1) provide one-click mapping of genes, proteins, and complexes across databases and species; (2) enable multiple simultaneous workflows; (3) expand sophisticated data analysis for online resources; and enhance open-source development of the Gaggle-Firegoose infrastructure. Gaggle is an open-source Java software system that integrates existing bioinformatics programs and data sources into a user-friendly, extensible environment to allow interactive exploration, visualization, and analysis of systems biology data. Firegoose is an extension to the Mozilla Firefox web browser that enables data transfer between websites and desktop tools including Gaggle. In the last phase of this funding period, we have made substantial progress on development and application of the Gaggle integration framework. We implemented the workspace to the Network Portal. Users can capture data from Firegoose and save them to the workspace. Users can create workflows to start multiple software components programmatically and pass data between them. Results of analysis can be saved to the cloud so that they can be easily restored on any machine. We also developed the Gaggle Chrome Goose, a plugin for the Google Chrome browser in tandem with an opencpu server in the Amazon EC2 cloud. This allows users to interactively perform data analysis on a single web page using the R packages deployed on the opencpu server. The cloud-based framework facilitates collaboration between researchers from multiple organizations. We have made a number of enhancements to the cmonkey2 application to enable and improve the integration within different environments, and we have created a new tools pipeline for generating EGRIN2 models in a largely automated way.

  4. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  5. A power system includes an engine, a motor/generator operatively connected to the engine, and a starter operatively connected to at least one of the engine and the motor/generator.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL); Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL)

    2008-12-09

    A power system includes an engine, a motor/generator operatively connected to the engine, and a starter operatively connected to at least one of the engine and the motor/generator.

  6. A flexible system for the simulation of turbocharged diesel engines and turbocharging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaty, T.; Codan, E.; Skopil, M.

    1996-12-31

    A fully flexible simulation system enables substitution of the conventional tests performed on turbocharged diesel engines. The supercharging systems can be calculated either by filling and emptying or by the differential method for 1-D unsteady flow during steady-state or transient operation. During sophisticated simulations, some conservation problems were observed. Their theoretical explanation and a practical solution are presented.

  7. Exhaust gas purification system for lean burn engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haines, Leland Milburn (Northville, MI)

    2002-02-19

    An exhaust gas purification system for a lean burn engine includes a thermal mass unit and a NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit downstream of the thermal mass unit. The NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit includes at least one catalyst section. Each catalyst section includes a catalytic layer for converting NO.sub.x coupled to a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger portion of the catalyst section acts to maintain the catalytic layer substantially at a desired temperature and cools the exhaust gas flowing from the catalytic layer into the next catalytic section in the series. In a further aspect of the invention, the exhaust gas purification system includes a dual length exhaust pipe upstream of the NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit. The dual length exhaust pipe includes a second heat exchanger which functions to maintain the temperature of the exhaust gas flowing into the thermal mass downstream near a desired average temperature.

  8. Concentrating Solar Power Dish/Engine System Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Concentrating Solar Power Dish/Engine System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Dish/Engine System Basics August 20, 2013 - 5:02pm Addthis The dish/engine system is a concentrating solar power (CSP) technology that produces relatively small amounts of electricity compared to other CSP technologies-typically in the range of 3 to 25 kilowatts. Dish/engine systems use a parabolic dish of mirrors to direct and concentrate sunlight onto a central engine that produces electricity. The two major parts of

  9. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

  10. System integration and performance of the EUV engineering test stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Replogle, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Rockett, Paul D.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Jefferson, Karen L.; Leung, Alvin H.; Wronosky, John B.; Hale, Layton C.; Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard; Blaedel, Kenneth; Sommargren, Gary E.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Batson, Phillip J.; Attwood, David T.; Jackson, Keith H.; Hector, Scott D.; Gwyn, Charles W.; Yan, Pei-Yang; Yan, P.

    2001-03-01

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is a developmental lithography tool designed to demonstrate full-field EUV imaging and provide data for commercial-tool development. In the first phase of integration, currently in progress, the ETS is configured using a developmental projection system, while fabrication of an improved projection system proceeds in parallel. The optics in the second projection system have been fabricated to tighter specifications for improved resolution and reduced flare. The projection system is a 4-mirror, 4x-reduction, ring-field design having a numeral aperture of 0.1, which supports 70 nm resolution at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The illuminator produces 13.4 nm radiation from a laser-produced plasma, directs the radiation onto an arc-shaped field of view, and provides an effective fill factor at the pupil plane of 0.7. The ETS is designed for full-field images in step-and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, magnetically levitated, scanning stages. This paper describes system performance observed during the first phase of integration, including static resist images of 100 nm isolated and dense features.

  11. Engine having hydraulic and fan drive systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2000-01-01

    An engine comprises a hydraulic system attached to an engine housing that includes a high pressure pump and a hydraulic fluid flowing through at least one passageway. A fan drive system is also attached to the engine housing and includes a hydraulic motor and a fan which can move air over the engine. The hydraulic motor includes an inlet fluidly connected to the at least one passageway.

  12. Systems Engineering Provides Successful High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two Systems Engineering Studies completed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the High Temperature Stream Electrolysis (HTSE) process. HTSE produces hydrogen from water using nuclear power and was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for integration with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The first study was a reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) analysis to identify critical areas for technology development based on available information regarding expected component performance. An HTSE process baseline flowsheet at commercial scale was used as a basis. The NGNP project also established a process and capability to perform future RAM analyses. The analysis identified which components had the greatest impact on HTSE process availability and indicated that the HTSE process could achieve over 90% availability. The second study developed a series of life-cycle cost estimates for the various scale-ups required to demonstrate the HTSE process. Both studies were useful in identifying near- and long-term efforts necessary for successful HTSE process deployment. The size of demonstrations to support scale-up was refined, which is essential to estimate near- and long-term cost and schedule. The life-cycle funding profile, with high-level allocations, was identified as the program transitions from experiment scale R&D to engineering scale demonstration.

  13. Emission control system and method for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, L.

    1980-06-03

    Fresh air is introduced into the exhaust pipe leading to the muffler for an internal combustion engine, while the air and exhaust gas mixture is cooled, not only in the muffler but also in a circuitous tube which extends from the muffler to the normal discharge or tail pipe and in which a special cooler may be installed. From the outlet of the special cooling tube, which faces forwardly, a portion of the air and exhaust gas mixture, now cooled, is led from a Y-connection to the intake tube of the air filter, so that the air and exhaust gas mixture will be introduced into the intake system prior to the carburetor. A rearwardly slanting arm of the Y-connection connects the front end of the special cooling pipe with the normal tail pipe. The carburetor has one or more air bleed tubes leading into the mixture passage at or below the butterfly valves, so that at idling speeds, a small amount of fresh air is introduced, irrespective of the position of the butterfly valves, to overcome any tendency for the engine, when idling, to cough or sputter due to the introduction of an air and exhaust gas mixture to the air filter intake.

  14. Integration of Control System Components for Optimum Engine Response...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications NAFTA Heavy Duty Engine and Aftertreatment Technology: Status and Outlook Technical Demonstration of 2010 Emissions Regulations over Transient Operation...

  15. Water spray ejector system for steam injected engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, W.R.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a method of increasing the power output of a steam injected gas turbine engine. It comprises: a compressor, a combustor having a dome which receives fuel and steam from a dual flow nozzle, and a turbine in series combination with a gas flow path passing therethrough, and a system for injection of superheated steam into the gas flow path, the method comprising spraying water into the steam injection system where the water is evaporated by the superheated steam, mixing the evaporated water with the existing steam in the steam injection system so that the resultant steam is at a temperature of at least 28 degrees celsius (50 degrees fahrenheit) superheat and additional steam is added to the dome from the fuel nozzle to obtain a resultant increased mass flow of superheated steam mixture for injection into the gas flow path, and controlling the amount of water sprayed into the steam injection system to maximize the mass flow of superheated steam without quenching the flame.

  16. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bland, Robert J. (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  17. Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A J

    2012-12-10

    Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Too often comparisons of energy systems use √ʬĬúefficiency√Ę¬Ä¬Ě when EROI would be more appropriate. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. Embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished system. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy √ʬĬď heat is not as valuable as electrical energy. The EROI of an EGS depends upon a number of factors that are currently unknown, for example what will be typical EGS well productivity, as well as, reservoir depth, temperature, and temperature decline rate. Thus the approach developed is to consider these factors as parameters determining EROI as a function of number of wells needed. Since the energy needed to construct a geothermal well is a function of depth, results are provided as a function of well depth. Parametric determination of EGS EROI is calculated using existing information on EGS and US Department of Energy (DOE) targets and is compared to the √ʬĬúminimum√Ę¬Ä¬Ě EROI an energy production system should have to be an asset rather than a liability.

  18. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  19. Heat transfer analysis in Stirling engine heat input system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, W.; Kim, S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major factor in commercialization of Stirling engine is mass productivity, and the heat input system including tubular heater is one of the obstacles to mass production because of its complexity in shape and difficulty in manufacturing, which resulted from using oxidation-resistant, low-creep alloys which are not easy to machine and weld. Therefore a heater heat exchanger which is very simple in shape and easy to make has been devised, and a burner system appropriate to this heater also has been developed. In this paper specially devised heat input system which includes a heater shell shaped like U-cup and a flame tube located in the heater shell is analyzed in point of heat transfer processes to find optimum heat transfer. To enhance the heat transfer from the flame tube to the heater shell wall, it is required that the flame tube diameter be enlarged as close to the heater shell diameter as possible, and the flame tube temperature be raised as high as possible. But the enlargement of the flame tube diameter should be restricted by the state of combustion affected by hydraulic resistance of combustion gas, and the boost of the flame tube temperature should be considered carefully in the aspects of the flame tube`s service life.

  20. Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) Engineering Applications. Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linebarger, John Michael; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2011-10-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex eco-socio-economic-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to highly-saturated interdependencies and allied vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. The Phoenix initiative approaches this high-impact problem space as engineers, devising interventions (problem solutions) that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. CASoS embody the world's biggest problems and greatest opportunities: applications to real world problems are the driving force of our effort. We are developing engineering theory and practice together to create a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave, and allows us to better control those behaviors. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving CASoS Engineering principles while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it.

  1. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) engineering and foundations for global design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Nancy S.; Finley, Patrick D.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-01-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which must be recognized and reckoned with to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Design within CASoS requires the fostering of a new discipline, CASoS Engineering, and the building of capability to support it. Towards this primary objective, we created the Phoenix Pilot as a crucible from which systemization of the new discipline could emerge. Using a wide range of applications, Phoenix has begun building both theoretical foundations and capability for: the integration of Applications to continuously build common understanding and capability; a Framework for defining problems, designing and testing solutions, and actualizing these solutions within the CASoS of interest; and an engineering Environment required for 'the doing' of CASoS Engineering. In a secondary objective, we applied CASoS Engineering principles to begin to build a foundation for design in context of Global CASoS

  2. Proceedings of the 1996 spring technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Volume 2: Engine design and engine systems; ICE-Volume 26-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzkan, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although the cost of the petroleum crude has not increased much within the last decade, the drive to develop internal combustion engines is still continuing. The basic motivation of this drive is to reduce both emissions and costs. Recent developments in computer chip production and information management technology have opened up new applications in engine controls and monitoring. The development of new information is continuing at a rapid pace. Some of these research and development results were presented at the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division in Youngstown, Ohio, April 21--24, 1996. The papers presented covered various aspects of the design, development, and application of compression ignition and spark ignition engines. The conference was held at the Holiday Inn Metroplex Complex and hosted by Altronic Incorporated of Girard, Ohio. The written papers submitted to the conference have been published in three conference volumes. Volume 2 includes the papers on the topics of engine design, engine systems, and engine user experience.

  3. Overview of Sonex Combustion Systems (SCS) for DI Engines | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sonex Combustion Systems (SCS) for DI Engines Overview of Sonex Combustion Systems (SCS) for DI Engines The SCS system has undergone computational and experimental verification and allows for controlled auto-ignition of low-cetane fuels. PDF icon deer08_pouring.pdf More Documents & Publications Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Clean Technology for Diesel Expansion High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Eng

  4. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D - Presentation by Argonne

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory, June 2011 | Department of Energy Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D - Presentation by Argonne National Laboratory, June 2011 Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D - Presentation by Argonne National Laboratory, June 2011 Presentation on Technologies for Gaseous Fueled Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D, given by Sreenath Gupta of Argonne National Laboratory, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in

  5. A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines | Department of Energy A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_regner.pdf More Documents &

  6. System for lubrication of a brake air compressor associated with a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, J.C.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a system for use with a vehicle which includes a turbocharged internal combustion engine having a lubricating system wherein lubricating oil from an engine oil reservoir is circulated within the engine and also to and from an associated brake system air compressor which supplies compressed air for operation of the vehicle air braking system. This patent describes improvement in passing supercharged air to an oil crankcase of the air compressor to cause lubricating oil to drain therefrom and return to the engine oil reservoir.

  7. Effects of Biodiesel Operation on Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Emission Control Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Nanjundaswamy, H.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.

    2008-08-01

    This paper documents the impact of biodiesel blends on engine-out emissions as well as overall system performance in terms of emissions control system calibration and overall system efficiency.

  8. An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  9. OE Power Systems Engineering Research & Development Program Partnershi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standards Coordination Committee (SCC) 21. Development of the 1547 series of standards for interconnecting distributed ...

  10. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

  11. High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and Evaluation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace017_edwards_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Defining engine efficiency limits Identification and Evaluation of Near-term Opportunities for Efficiency Improvement Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones

  12. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, Antoni K. (Kensington, CA); Maxson, James A. (Berkeley, CA); Hensinger, David M. (Albany, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  13. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1993-12-21

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

  14. Systems engineering identification and control of mixed waste technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. Waste treatment includes all necessary steps from generation through disposal. Systems engineering was employed to reduce programmatic risk, that is, risk of failure to meet technical commitments within cost and schedule. Customer needs (technology deficiencies) are identified from Site Treatment Plans, Consent Orders, ten year plans, Site Technical Coordinating Groups, Stakeholders, and Site Visits. The Technical Baseline, a prioritized list of technology deficiencies, forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. Technology Development Requirements Documents are prepared for each technology selected for development. After technologies have been successfully developed and demonstrated, they are documented in a Technology Performance Report. The Technology Performance Reports are available to any of the customers or potential users of the technology, thus closing the loop between problem identification and product development. This systematic approach to technology development and its effectiveness after 3 years is discussed in this paper.

  15. Energy Return On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mansure, Chip

    EROI is a ratio of the energy delivered to the consumer to the energy consumed to build, operate, and decommission the facility. EROI is important in assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Currently EROI analyses of geothermal energy are either out-of-date, of uncertain methodology, or presented online with little supporting documentation. This data set is a collection of files documenting data used to calculate the Energy Return On Investment (EROI) of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) and erratum to publications prior to the final report. Final report is available from the OSTI web site (http://www.osti.gov/geothermal/). Data in this collections includes the well designs used, input parameters for GETEM, a discussion of the energy needed to haul materials to the drill site, the baseline mud program, and a summary of the energy needed to drill each of the well designs. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered to the customer to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Whereas efficiency is the ratio of the energy delivered to the customer to the energy extracted from the reservoir.

  16. Adapting classical Systems Engineering to Department of Energy (DOE) needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    Rather than discuss Systems Engineering (SE) as applied by aerospace contractors to military programs, this document provides an adapted model well suited for use by DOE and represents 18 months of applying SE principles to the challenges faced by INEL. The real-life examples are drawn from INEL`s ongoing effort to integrate activities across the entire spectrum of within its Environmental Management program. Since the traditional SE process, with its initial focus on requirements identification and analysis, must be modified to provide tangible results in the short term, the adapted SE model starts with the external driver of ``reducing costs without increasing risks`` and performs an initial integration effort to identify high-potential, cost-saving opportunities. Elements from traditional alternatives development and analysis stages are used; then the adapted model cycles back to include more traditional requirements analysis activities. These cycles continue in an iterative manner, adding rigor and detail at each successive iteration, throughout the life-cycle of a program or project. Detailed lessons learned are included.

  17. Energy Return On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mansure, Chip

    2012-01-01

    EROI is a ratio of the energy delivered to the consumer to the energy consumed to build, operate, and decommission the facility. EROI is important in assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Currently EROI analyses of geothermal energy are either out-of-date, of uncertain methodology, or presented online with little supporting documentation. This data set is a collection of files documenting data used to calculate the Energy Return On Investment (EROI) of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) and erratum to publications prior to the final report. Final report is available from the OSTI web site (http://www.osti.gov/geothermal/). Data in this collections includes the well designs used, input parameters for GETEM, a discussion of the energy needed to haul materials to the drill site, the baseline mud program, and a summary of the energy needed to drill each of the well designs. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered to the customer to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Whereas efficiency is the ratio of the energy delivered to the customer to the energy extracted from the reservoir.

  18. DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBASE) (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Arkin, Adam [LBNL

    2013-01-15

    Adam Arkin from Berkeley Lab on the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBASE) at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  19. Building the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brettin, Tom [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2013-03-22

    Tom Brettin on "Building the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase)" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  20. DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBASE) (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkin, Adam [LBNL] [LBNL

    2012-03-21

    Adam Arkin from Berkeley Lab on the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBASE) at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  1. System and method for conditioning intake air to an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sellnau, Mark C.

    2015-08-04

    A system for conditioning the intake air to an internal combustion engine includes a means to boost the pressure of the intake air to the engine and a liquid cooled charge air cooler disposed between the output of the boost means and the charge air intake of the engine. Valves in the coolant system can be actuated so as to define a first configuration in which engine cooling is performed by coolant circulating in a first coolant loop at one temperature, and charge air cooling is performed by coolant flowing in a second coolant loop at a lower temperature. The valves can be actuated so as to define a second configuration in which coolant that has flowed through the engine can be routed through the charge air cooler. The temperature of intake air to the engine can be controlled over a wide range of engine operation.

  2. New Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems New Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential of emissions-based process control to meet future heavy-duty emissions legislation by identifying suitable actuated variables and developing hardware and related controllers. PDF icon deer08_traver.pdf More Documents & Publications Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to

  3. Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-16

    The original plan for the project involved design modifications to an existing system to enhance its performance and increase the limit of power that was achieved by the original design and to apply the higher performance product to the full sized engine and test its performance. The new system would also be applied to a different engine model. The specific work would include the redesign of gas injectors, piston configurations and two types of igniters, engine instrumentation, monitoring and testing.

  4. Phoenix : Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) engineering version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Quach, Tu-Thach; Detry, Richard Joseph; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Starks, Shirley J.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Sunderland, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy; Maffitt, S. Louise; Finley, Patrick D.; Russell, Eric Dean; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reedy, Geoffrey E.; Mitchell, Roger A.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Linebarger, John Michael

    2011-08-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to pervasive interdependencies and attendant vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. Phoenix was initiated to address this high-impact problem space as engineers. Our overarching goals are maximizing security, maximizing health, and minimizing risk. We design interventions, or problem solutions, that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving the principles and discipline of CASoS Engineering while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it. Both grounded in reality and working to extend our understanding and control of that reality, Phoenix is at the same time a solution within a CASoS and a CASoS itself.

  5. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol

  6. Efficiency Improvement in an Over the Road Diesel Powered Engine System by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration | Department of Energy in an Over the Road Diesel Powered Engine System by the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration Efficiency Improvement in an Over the Road Diesel Powered Engine System by the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration Hybridization of heavy-duty truck propulsion with thermoelectric generator and

  7. Engineer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Security to Allow Digitally Signed Content from Dekker LTD for Microsoft Excel 2007 or Microsoft Excel 2003. * Configuring Workstations for use with the PARS II System, 627...

  8. An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the pastóincluding the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biologyóhave not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  10. Tuned intake air system for a rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, W.D.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a rotary internal combustion engine for an outboard board motor. It comprises a plenum chamber attached to the rear of the engine; and the plenum chamber including an inner wall attached to the exhaust manifold; an inlet conduit connecting the cooling air exit passage and the inlet air opening; an outlet conduit connecting the outlet air opening and the combustion air inlet; and the outlet conduit terminating in a combustion air outlet in the inner wall of the plenum chamber.

  11. IECEC '91; Proceedings of the 26th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Boston, MA, Aug. 4-9, 1991. Vol. 5 - Renewable resource systems, Stirling engines and applications, systems and cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on energy conversion engineering are presented. The general topics considered are: developments in nuclear power, energy from waste and biomass, system performance and materials in photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, wind energy systems, Stirling cycle analysis, Stirling cycle power, Stirling component technology, Stirling cooler/heat pump developments, Stirling engine concepts, Stirling engine design and optimization, Stirling engine dynamics and response, Stirling engine solar terrestrial, advanced cogeneration, AMTC, fossil fuel systems and technologies, marine energy.

  12. Engineering task plan for the 241-AZ-101 waste tank color video camera system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, R.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) is to be distributed to communicate the design basis of the 241-AZ-101 camera system and to define system requirements and associated responsibilities.

  13. Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_nickolas.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Particulate Filter: A Success for Faurecia Exhaust Systems Development of an Active Regeneration Diesel Particulate Filter System Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions

  14. Modular Automated Processing System (MAPS) for analysis of biological samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Chirica, Gabriela S.; Fruetel, Julia A.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Branda, Steven S.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Brennan, James S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a novel modular automated processing system (MAPS) that enables reliable, high-throughput analysis as well as sample-customized processing. This system is comprised of a set of independent modules that carry out individual sample processing functions: cell lysis, protein concentration (based on hydrophobic, ion-exchange and affinity interactions), interferent depletion, buffer exchange, and enzymatic digestion of proteins of interest. Taking advantage of its unique capacity for enclosed processing of intact bioparticulates (viruses, spores) and complex serum samples, we have used MAPS for analysis of BSL1 and BSL2 samples to identify specific protein markers through integration with the portable microChemLab{trademark} and MALDI.

  15. System for monitoring an industrial or biological process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Vilim, R.B.; White, A.M.

    1998-06-30

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring and responding to conditions of an industrial process. Industrial process signals, such as repetitive manufacturing, testing and operational machine signals, are generated by a system. Sensor signals characteristic of the process are generated over a time length and compared to reference signals over the time length. The industrial signals are adjusted over the time length relative to the reference signals, the phase shift of the industrial signals is optimized to the reference signals and the resulting signals output for analysis by systems such as SPRT. 49 figs.

  16. System for monitoring an industrial or biological process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Argonne, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Argonne, IL); Vilim, Rick B. (Argonne, IL); White, Andrew M. (Skokie, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring and responding to conditions of an industrial process. Industrial process signals, such as repetitive manufacturing, testing and operational machine signals, are generated by a system. Sensor signals characteristic of the process are generated over a time length and compared to reference signals over the time length. The industrial signals are adjusted over the time length relative to the reference signals, the phase shift of the industrial signals is optimized to the reference signals and the resulting signals output for analysis by systems such as SPRT.

  17. A study of the reliability of Stirling engines for distributed receiver systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the reliability of existing and improved Stirling engine concepts for dispersed solar dish/electric applications in the 25--50 kW/sub e/ range. Five current kinematic Stirling engine designs have the capability to meet or exceed the 32% system efficiency goal of the DOE Solar Thermal Program. Experience with the Vanguard Solar-Dish/Stirling Engine module demonstrated that the 32% efficiency goal is realistic, but that improved Stirling engine reliability is necessary for successful implementation of dispersed solar power systems. A review of historical Stirling engine data illustrated that the three major reliability issues with kinematic Stirling engines are the piston-rod seals, engine hot parts and power control/drive systems. A specific kinematic engine concept that appears to have the potential for meeting the 50,000-hour operating lifetime requirement of solar power systems has a pressurized crankcase to reduce piston-rod seal problems, an indirectly heated hot-end section using heat pipes to smooth out temperature gradients in the heater tubes, and a variable-angle swashplate for power control. Further development efforts are required to establish reliability and validate performance goals of these engine concepts. 30 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.V. Gerasimov

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

  19. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  20. Study of fuel consumption and cooling system in low heat rejection turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taymaz, I.; Gur, M.; Cally, I.; Mimaroglu, A.

    1998-07-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. At the same time, the cooling water, antifreeze, thermostat, radiator, water pump, cooling fan, and associated hoses and clamps could be eliminated. A new trend in the field of internal combustion engines is to insulate the heat transfer surfaces such as the combustion chamber, cylinder wall, cylinder head, piston and valves by ceramic insulating materials for the improvement of engine performance and elimination of cooling system. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on direct injected and turbocharged diesel engine fuel consumption and cooling system were investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and loads conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces was coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic coated engine.

  1. Chapter 8: Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and Technologies | Internal Combustion Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Internal Combustion Engines Chapter 8: Technology Assessments Introduction to the Technology/System Overview of Internal Combustion Engines and Potential Role Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs) already offer outstanding drivability and reliability to over 240 million on-road passenger vehicles in the U.S. Over 16 million ICE-powered new passenger and commercial vehicles are sold annually, some replacing older vehicles and the remainder adding to the vehicle population. Currently, on-road

  2. Engineer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) Presented by: Cathe Mohar and Karen Urschel Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM) MA-60 U. S. Department of Energy January 2013 Achieving Management and Operational Excellence This page intentionally left blank Page 3 Agenda - Day 1 8:00 - 8:15 Welcome / Intro 8:15 - 9:15 PARS II Overview 9:15 - 9:30 Break 9:30 - 10:30 Project Lifecycle in PARS II 10:30 - 11:00 Dashboards 11:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 -

  3. Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additives | Department of Energy Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel Additives Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel Additives A bench-top engine testing system was used to fast screen the efficiency of fuel additives or fuel blends on NOx reduction PDF icon deer09_an.pdf More Documents & Publications Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and

  4. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs

  5. Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papoutsakis, Elefterios

    2015-04-30

    This is the final project report for project "Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production" for the funding period of 9/1/12 to 2/28/2015 (three years with a 6-month no-cost extension) OVERVIEW AND PROJECT GOALS The bottleneck of achieving higher rates and titers of toxic metabolites (such as solvents and carboxylic acids that can used as biofuels or biofuel precursors) can be overcome by engineering the stress response system. Thus, understanding and modeling the response of cells to toxic metabolites is a problem of great fundamental and practical significance. In this project, our goal is to dissect at the molecular systems level and build models (conceptual and quantitative) for the stress response of C. acetobutylicum (Cac) to its two toxic metabolites: butanol (BuOH) and butyrate (BA). Transcriptional (RNAseq and microarray based), proteomic and fluxomic data and their analysis are key requirements for this goal. Transcriptional data from mid-exponential cultures of Cac under 4 different levels of BuOH and BA stress was obtained using both microarrays (Papoutsakis group) and deep sequencing (RNAseq; Meyers and Papoutsakis groups). These two sets of data do not only serve to validate each other, but are also used for identification of stress-induced changes in transcript levels, small regulatory RNAs, & in transcriptional start sites. Quantitative proteomic data (Lee group), collected using the iTRAQ technology, are essential for understanding of protein levels and turnover under stress and the various protein-protein interactions that orchestrate the stress response. Metabolic flux changes (Antoniewicz group) of core pathways, which provide important information on the re-allocation of energy and carbon resources under metabolite stress, were examined using 13C-labelled chemicals. Omics data are integrated at different levels and scales. At the metabolic-pathway level, omics data are integrated into a 2nd generation genome-scale model (GSM) (Maranas group). Omics data are also integrated using bioinformatics (Wu and Huang group), whereby regulatory details of gene and protein expression, protein-protein interactions and metabolic flux regulation are incorporated. The PI (Papoutsakis) facilitated project integration through monthly meeting and reports, conference calls, and collaborative manuscript preparation. The five groups collaborated extensively and made a large number of presentations in national and international meetings. It has also published several papers, with several more in the preparation stage. Several PhD, MS and postdoctoral students were trained as part of this collaborative and interdisciplinary project.

  6. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas addressed by LBNL. Section 3 documents the current modeling tools, available at LBNL, for the EBS study. This may be important for identifying future modeling activities within the EBS group with these current capabilities and needs for future EBS modeling development. Section 4 presents the results of geomechanical modeling using the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) constitutive relationship for thermo-elasto-plastic media such as bentonite and an update on reactive-diffusive transport modeling approaches through bentonite in the EBS. Section 5 discusses identified knowledge gaps and technical issues as well as short- and long-term R&D plans.

  7. EA-0907: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Sewer System Upgrade Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the Sewer System at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho.  The...

  8. Development of Urea Dosing System for 10 Liter Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powered Vehicle | Department of Energy Urea Dosing System for 10 Liter Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Powered Vehicle Development of Urea Dosing System for 10 Liter Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Powered Vehicle Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-09_lee.pdf More Documents & Publications Evaluation of SCR and DOC/CPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission Control to Meet U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5 An

  9. An applied study using systems engineering methods to prioritize green systems options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sonya M; Macdonald, John M

    2009-01-01

    For many years, there have been questions about the effectiveness of applying different green solutions. If you're building a home and wish to use green technologies, where do you start? While all technologies sound promising, which will perform the best over time? All this has to be considered within the cost and schedule of the project. The amount of information available on the topic can be overwhelming. We seek to examine if Systems Engineering methods can be used to help people choose and prioritize technologies that fit within their project and budget. Several methods are used to gain perspective into how to select the green technologies, such as the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Kepner-Tregoe. In our study, subjects applied these methods to analyze cost, schedule, and trade-offs. Results will document whether the experimental approach is applicable to defining system priorities for green technologies.

  10. Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System Evaluation (Work Package LL1015080425)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J A; Buscheck, T A; Halsey, W G; Wolery, T

    2010-03-19

    The Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) will use a logical process for developing one or more disposal system concepts (also referred to as repository system in this report) for any given waste form and geologic setting combination. In the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) group of work packages, there are seven categories of waste forms and eight categories of geologic setting being studied. The DSEF will also establish a Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) knowledge management system to organize high-level information, data, and assumptions, thereby facilitating consistency in high-level system simulation and economic analyses. This system likely will be housed with the INL-based documentation system. Attention is given to lessons oearned from the systems used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Where reference material from other programs (e.g., international) is used or cited, the knowledge-management system imports the reference material directly or refer to it in bibliography form. Alternative data sets (e.g., from other programs) will also be utilized to evaluate their influence on DSEF analyses for given waste form and disposal-system combinations. The knowledge-management system can also be used to maintain the results of DSEF realizations, enabling the comparison and ranking of various waste-form/disposal-system-environment/disposal-system-design options. Finally, the UFDC knowledge-management system will be able to provide a compendium of 'templates' that can be utilized, in a labor-efficient fashion, to build parallel DSEF analyses (e.g., 'one offs'). The DSEF will not be a stand-alone, push-the-button and wait for the results, item of software. it will use osftware (probably EXCEL, initially), to guide the team members through a logical process of evaluating combinations of waste-form, disposal-syste-environment, and disposal-system design. In later stages, it will utilize software developed in the field of knowledge engineering and knowledge-management systems (Umeki et al. 2009). At certain points in the logical process, the DSEF software will point the evaluate to other software tools to do analyses needed to move the process forward. In the development of the DSEF, they will be mindful to make it no more complex than necessary to evaluate the system being considered. The DSEF will organize and document the work such that multiple realizations for different combinations can be compared and contrasted.

  11. Feedback air-fuel control system for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes improvement in combination with a Stirling engine having an air-fuel ratio control and an exhaust gas emission outlet. The improvement comprises an oxygen sensor in communication with the exhaust gas emission outlet for generating an output signal representative of the oxygen content in the outlet; a sensor signal conditioning unit for adapting the output signal to a conditioned input signal for a microprocessor; and a microprocessor controlled pilot for adjusting the air-fuel control in response to the control input signal.

  12. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Keefe, Andrew C; Alexander, Paul W; Sarosi, Peter Maxwell; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan

    2013-12-17

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulled spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes first spring coil and a first fiber core within the first spring coil. A timing cable is disposed about disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  13. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  14. Modeling the thermal and structural response of engineered systems to abnormal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.; Moya, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is engaged actively in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to thermal and structural abnormal environments. Abnormal environments that will be addressed in this paper include: fire, impact, and puncture by probes and fragments, as well as a combination of all of the above. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the survivability of engineered systems to abnormal environments using a balanced approach between numerical simulation and testing. It is necessary to determine the response of engineered systems in two cases: (1) to satisfy regulatory specifications, and (2) to enable quantification of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In a regulatory case, numerical simulation of system response is generally used to guide the system design such that the system will respond satisfactorily to the specified regulatory abnormal environment. Testing is conducted at the regulatory abnormal environment to ensure compliance.

  15. Final report for Conference Support Grant "From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology - CBSB12"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-07-02

    This report summarizes the outcome of the international workshop √ʬ?¬?From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology (CBSB12)√ʬ?¬Ě which was held June 3-5, 2012, at the University of Tennessee Conference Center in Knoxville, TN, and supported by DOE through the Conference Support Grant 120174. The purpose of CBSB12 was to provide a forum for the interaction between a data-mining interested systems biology community and a simulation and first-principle oriented computational biophysics/biochemistry community. CBSB12 was the sixth in a series of workshops of the same name organized in recent years, and the second that has been held in the USA. As in previous years, it gave researchers from physics, biology, and computer science an opportunity to acquaint each other with current trends in computational biophysics and systems biology, to explore venues of cooperation, and to establish together a detailed understanding of cells at a molecular level. The conference grant of $10,000 was used to cover registration fees and provide travel fellowships to selected students and postdoctoral scientists. By educating graduate students and providing a forum for young scientists to perform research into the working of cells at a molecular level, the workshop adds to DOE's mission of paving the way to exploit the abilities of living systems to capture, store and utilize energy.

  16. Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Presentation given at the 16th Directions...

  17. TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 2, PF systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, H.A.

    1995-07-28

    This system development specification covers the Poloidal Field (PF) Magnet System, WBS 14 in the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory TPX Program to build a tokamak fusion reactor. This specification establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements of the PF Magnet System.

  18. Application of systems engineering techniques (reliability, availability, maintainability, and dollars) to the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, J.G.; DeLozier, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    The systems engineering function for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) covers system requirements definition, analyses, verification, technical reviews, and other system efforts necessary to assure good balance of performance, safety, cost, and scheduling. The systems engineering function will support the design, installation, start-up, and operational phases of GCEP. The principal objectives of the systems engineering function are to: assure that the system requirements of the GCEP process are adequately specified and documented and that due consideration and emphasis are given to all aspects of the project; provide system analyses of the designs as they progress to assure that system requirements are met and that GCEP interfaces are compatible; assist in the definition of programs for the necessary and sufficient verification of GCEP systems; and integrate reliability, maintainability, logistics, safety, producibility, and other related specialties into a total system effort. This paper addresses the GCEP reliability, availability, maintainability, and dollars (RAM dollars) analyses which are the primary systems engineering tools for the development and implementation of trade-off studies. These studies are basic to reaching cost-effective project decisions. The steps necessary to achieve optimum cost-effective design are shown.

  19. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  20. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Shaw, John Andrew; Churchill, Christopher Burton; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P; Alexander, Paul W; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan; Brown, Jeffrey W

    2014-09-30

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulley spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes a first wire, a second wire, and a matrix joining the first wire and the second wire. The first wire and the second wire are in contact with the pulleys, but the matrix is not in contact with the pulleys. A timing cable is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  1. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  2. Differential pressure sensing system for airfoils usable in turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Stampahar, Maria E.

    2005-09-13

    A detection system for identifying airfoils having a cooling systems with orifices that are plugged with contaminants or with showerheads having a portion burned off. The detection system measures pressures at different locations and calculates or measures a differential pressure. The differential pressure may be compared with a known benchmark value to determine whether the differential pressure has changed. Changes in the differential pressure may indicate that one or more of the orifices in a cooling system of an airfoil are plugged or that portions of, or all of, a showerhead has burned off.

  3. NREL Names Santiago Grijalva Director for Power Systems Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing electric power system and to provide improved management strategies for demand response and transportation electrification. "Santiago is a pioneer in distributed power ...

  4. System and method for controlling engine knock using electro-hydraulic valve actuation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2013-12-10

    A control system for an engine includes a knock control module and a valve control module. The knock control module adjusts a period that one or more of an intake valve and an exhaust valve of a cylinder are open based on engine knock corresponding to the cylinder. The valve control module, based on the adjusted period, controls the one or more of the intake valve and the exhaust valve using one or more hydraulic actuators.

  5. Engineering Basis Document Review Supporting the Double Shell Tank (DST) System Specification Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEONARD, M.W.

    2000-03-14

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System is required to transition from its current storage mission to a storage and retrieval mission supporting the River Protection Project Phase 1 privatization, defined in HNF-SD-WM-MAR-008, Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report. Requirements for the DST subsystems are being developed using the top-down systems engineering process outlined in HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. This top-down process considers existing designs to the extent that these designs impose unavoidable constraints on the Phase 1 mission. Existing engineering-basis documents were screened, and the unavoidable constraints were identified. The constraints identified herein will be added to the DST System specification (HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System). While the letter revisions of the DST System specification were constructed with a less rigorous review of the existing engineering-basis documents, the Revision 0 release of the specification must incorporate the results of the review documented herein. The purpose of this document is to describe the screening process and criteria used to determine which constraints are unavoidable and to document the screening results.

  6. Multi-bottle, no compressor, mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (Melrose, NY)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus for mean pressure control of a Stirling engine without the need for a compressor. The invention includes a multi-tank system in which there is at least one high pressure level tank and one low pressure level tank wherein gas flows through a maximum pressure and supply line from the engine to the high pressure tank when a first valve is opened until the maximum pressure of the engine drops below that of the high pressure tank opening an inlet regulator to permit gas flow from the engine to the low pressure tank. When gas flows toward the engine it flows through the minimum pressure supply line 2 when a second valve is opened from the low pressure tank until the tank reaches the engine's minimum pressure level at which time the outlet regulator opens permitting gas to be supplied from the high pressure tank to the engine. Check valves between the two tanks prevent any backflow of gas from occurring.

  7. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation. PDF icon Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production More Documents & Publications Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis

  8. Systems Engineering Applications to Wind Energy Research, Design, and Development (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Ning, A.; Scott, G.; Sirnivas, S.; Veers, P.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few decades, wind energy has evolved into a large international industry involving major players in the manufacturing, construction, and utility sectors. Coinciding with the industry's growth, significant innovation in the technology has resulted in larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and more complex designs in all subsystems. However, as the deployment of the technology grows, and its role within the electricity sector becomes more prominent, so has the expectations of the technology in terms of performance, reliability, and cost. The industry currently partitions its efforts into separate paths for turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated to meet a diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs between them. To address these challenges, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has embarked on the Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) initiative to use methods of systems engineering in the research, design, and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field that has a long history of application to complex technical systems. The work completed to date represents a first step in understanding this potential. It reviews systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems and illustrates how these methods can be combined in a WESE framework to meet the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry.

  9. Multi-bottle, no compressor, mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey, J.A.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine. It comprises: at least one high pressure tank; at least one low pressure tank; the high pressure tank and the low pressure tank each including a check valve to prevent backflow of gas from one tank to the other during operation; at least one inlet regulator for each the low pressure tank adapted to open when the engine has a maximum pressure level lower than that of the next higher pressure tank; at least one outlet regulator for each the high pressure tank adapted to open when next lower pressure tank has a minimum pressure level higher than that of the engine; a maximum pressure supply line including a first valve connecting the engine to the high pressure tank and to the inlet regulator; and a minimum pressure supply line.

  10. Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minorsky, Peter V.

    2003-06-01

    The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on the following themes: Cell-Cell Communication; Protein Trafficking; Cell Surface, Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall; Signal Transduction; Signal Transduction and Proteosome; and Systems-Based Approaches to Plant Cell Biology. Workshops on Chemical Genetics and Visual Microscopy were also presented. Abstracts from each of the speaker presentations, as well as the posters presented at the meeting were published in a program booklet given to the 239 faculty members, researchers, postdoctoral scientists and graduate students in attendance. The booklet thus serves as a reference for symposium attendees to locate additional information about a topic of their particular interest and to contact other investigators. In addition, an article reviewing the symposium by science writer Peter V. Minorsky appeared in the June 2003 issue of Plant Physiology, a special issue devoted to systems-based approaches in the study of the model plant Arabidopsis (article submitted as part of this Final Technical Report).

  11. Development and utilization of new and renewable energy with Stirling engine system for electricity in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, W.; Abenavoli, R.I.; Carlini, M.

    1996-12-31

    China is the largest developing country in the world. Self-supporting and self-sustaining energy supply is the only solution for development. Recently, fast economic development exposed gradually increasing pressure of energy demand and environment concern. In order to increase the production of electricity of China, the Stirling engine system should be developed. This paper provides an investigation of energy production and consumption in China. The main features of the energy consumption and the development objectives of China`s electric power industry are also described. The necessity and possibility of development of Stirling engine system is discussed.

  12. Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. Abstract not provided. Authors: Lloyd, Jimmy ; John Lawler Publication Date: 2007-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1148030 Report Number(s): SAND2007-6644C 522685 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Energy Sustainability 2007 held June 27-30, 2007 in Long Beach, CA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at

  13. Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D CRADA with Navistar, Inc. |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D CRADA with Navistar, Inc. Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D CRADA with Navistar, Inc. 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace034_pihl_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D

  14. An application of a combined charging system on a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.I.; Her, K.; Chang, N.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the low-speed torque characteristics and the fuel economy and to reduce the exhaust gaseous emissions from a 10-liter, turbocharged diesel engines, charge air cooling with a resonant intake system has been introduced. The use of an air-to-air inter-cooler mounted in front of the radiator results in increasing the charge air density and the resonant intake system offers a high volumetric charging efficiencies at low-speed region. Actual engine data show an increase in power of 14 percent, the improvement of specific fuel consumption by 3-7 percent and a decrease in NOx emissions by 33 percent.

  15. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  16. Disposal systems evaluations and tool development : Engineered Barrier System (EBS) evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Liu, Hui-Hai; Steefel, Carl I.; Serrano de Caro, M. A.; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Blink, James A.; Sutton, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Buscheck, Thomas A.; Levy, Schon S.; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Halsey, William G.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wolery, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Key components of the nuclear fuel cycle are short-term storage and long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The latter encompasses the immobilization of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and radioactive waste streams generated by various phases of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the safe and permanent disposition of these waste forms in geological repository environments. The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a very important role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. EBS concepts and their interactions with the natural barrier are inherently important to the long-term performance assessment of the safety case where nuclear waste disposition needs to be evaluated for time periods of up to one million years. Making the safety case needed in the decision-making process for the recommendation and the eventual embracement of a disposal system concept requires a multi-faceted integration of knowledge and evidence-gathering to demonstrate the required confidence level in a deep geological disposal site and to evaluate long-term repository performance. The focus of this report is the following: (1) Evaluation of EBS in long-term disposal systems in deep geologic environments with emphasis on the multi-barrier concept; (2) Evaluation of key parameters in the characterization of EBS performance; (3) Identification of key knowledge gaps and uncertainties; and (4) Evaluation of tools and modeling approaches for EBS processes and performance. The above topics will be evaluated through the analysis of the following: (1) Overview of EBS concepts for various NW disposal systems; (2) Natural and man-made analogs, room chemistry, hydrochemistry of deep subsurface environments, and EBS material stability in near-field environments; (3) Reactive Transport and Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes in EBS; and (4) Thermal analysis toolkit, metallic barrier degradation mode survey, and development of a Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF). This report will focus on the multi-barrier concept of EBS and variants of this type which in essence is the most adopted concept by various repository programs. Empasis is given mainly to the evaluation of EBS materials and processes through the analysis of published studies in the scientific literature of past and existing repository research programs. Tool evaluations are also emphasized, particularly on THCM processes and chemical equilibria. Although being an increasingly important aspect of NW disposition, short-term or interim storage of NW will be briefly discussed but not to the extent of the EBS issues relevant to disposal systems in deep geologic environments. Interim storage will be discussed in the report Evaluation of Storage Concepts FY10 Final Report (Weiner et al. 2010).

  17. Engineering an Adsorbent-Based Hydrogen Storage System: What Have We Learned?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Don Siegel, 1 Bruce Hardy, 2 and the HSECoE Team 1 System Architect-Adsorbent System, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan 2 Savanah River National Laboratory Hydrogen)Storage)Summit,)) Golden,)CO)-)January)27928,)2015) Overview' * For)the)past)5)years)the)HSECoE)has)been)developing) hydrogen)storage)systems)based)on)adsorbent,)metal) hydride,)and)chemical)hydride)media) * As)we)near)the)Center's)conclusion,)we)seek)to)translate)

  18. Science and Engineering of an Operational Tsunami Forecasting System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Frank

    2010-01-08

    After a review of tsunami statistics and the destruction caused by tsunamis, a means of forecasting tsunamis is discussed as part of an overall program of reducing fatalities through hazard assessment, education, training, mitigation, and a tsunami warning system. The forecast is accomplished via a concept called Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART). Small changes of pressure at the sea floor are measured and relayed to warning centers. Under development is an international modeling network to transfer, maintain, and improve tsunami forecast models.

  19. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.; de Mattos, Erico Rolim

    2012-11-06

    Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use. Specifically, methods for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency including applying pulsed light to a photosynthetic organism, using a chlorophyll fluorescence feedback control system to determine one or more photosynthetic efficiency parameters, and adjusting one or more of the photosynthetic efficiency parameters to drive the photosynthesis by the delivery of an amount of light to optimize light absorption of the photosynthetic organism while providing enough dark time between light pulses to prevent oversaturation of the chlorophyll reaction centers are disclosed.

  20. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  1. Integration of Wind Energy Systems into Power Engineering Education Program at UW-Madison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataramanan, Giri; Lesieutre, Bernard; Jahns, Thomas; Desai, Ankur R

    2012-09-01

    This project has developed an integrated curriculum focused on the power engineering aspects of wind energy systems that builds upon a well-established graduate educational program at UW- Madison. Five new courses have been developed and delivered to students. Some of the courses have been offered on multiple occasions. The courses include: Control of electric drives for Wind Power applications, Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power), Practicum in Small Wind Turbines, Utility Integration of Wind Power, and Wind and Weather for Scientists and Engineers. Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power) has been provided for distance education as well as on-campus education. Several industrial internships for students have been organized. Numerous campus seminars that provide discussion on emerging issues related to wind power development have been delivered in conjunction with other campus events. Annual student conferences have been initiated, that extend beyond wind power to include sustainable energy topics to draw a large group of stakeholders. Energy policy electives for engineering students have been identified for students to participate through a certificate program. Wind turbines build by students have been installed at a UW-Madison facility, as a test-bed. A Master of Engineering program in Sustainable Systems Engineering has been initiated that incorporates specializations that include in wind energy curricula. The project has enabled UW-Madison to establish leadership at graduate level higher education in the field of wind power integration with the electric grid.

  2. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 ‚Äď 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: ‚ÄĘ Phase 1 ‚Äď market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. ‚ÄĘ Phase 2 ‚Äď Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  3. Systems Engineering Plan and project record Configuration Management Plan for the Mixed Waste Disposal Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W.E.; Oakley, L.B.

    1993-04-01

    This document summarizes the systems engineering assessment that was performed for the Mixed Waste Disposal Initiative (MWDI) Project to determine what types of documentation are required for the success of the project. The report also identifies the documents that will make up the MWDI Project Record and describes the Configuration Management Plan describes the responsibilities and process for making changes to project documentation.

  4. Managing Design and Construction Using Systems Engineering for Use with DO EO 413.3A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-23

    The goal of this Guide is to provide the Department of Energy's federal project directors (FPDs) with the knowledge, methodologies, and tools needed to meet Order 413.3A's requirement that they plan, implement and complete their assigned project(s) using a System Engineering approach.

  5. Managing Design and Construction Using Systems Engineering for Use with DOE O 413.3A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-23

    This Guide provides the Department of Energy's federal project directors with the methodologies and tools needed to plan, implement and complete assigned projects using a Systems Engineering approach in accordance with the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. No cancellations.

  6. Managing Design and Construction Using Systems Engineering for Use with DOE O 413.3A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-23

    The goal of this Guide is to provide the Department of Energy's federal project directors (FPDs) with the knowledge, methodologies, and tools needed to meet Order 413.3A's requirement that they plan, implement and complete their assigned project(s) using a System Engineering approach.

  7. A Study of a Diesel Engine Based Micro-CHP System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.; Andrews, J.; Tutu, N.; Butcher, T.

    2010-08-31

    This project, funded by New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA), investigated the potential for an oil-fired combined heat and power system (micro-CHP system) for potential use in residences that use oil to heat their homes. Obviously, this requires the power source to be one that uses heating oil (diesel). The work consisted of an experimental study using a diesel engine and an analytical study that examined potential energy savings and benefits of micro-CHP systems for 'typical' locations in New York State. A search for a small diesel engine disclosed that no such engines were manufactured in the U.S. A single cylinder engine manufactured in Germany driving an electric generator was purchased for the experimental work. The engine was tested using on-road diesel fuel (15 ppm sulfur), and biodiesel blends. One of the main objectives was to demonstrate the possibility of operation in the so-called HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) mode. The HCCI mode of operation of engines is being explored as a way to reduce the emission of smoke, and NOx significantly without exhaust treatment. This is being done primarily in the context of engines used in transportation applications. However, it is felt that in a micro-CHP application using a single cylinder engine, such an approach would confer those emission benefits and would be much easier to implement. This was demonstrated successfully by injecting the fuel into the engine air intake using a heated atomizer made by Econox Technologies LLC to promote significant vaporization before entering the cylinder. Efficiency and emission measurements were made under different electrical loads provided by two space heaters connected to the generator in normal and HCCI modes of operation. The goals of the analytical work were to characterize, from the published literature, the prime-movers for micro-CHP applications, quantify parametrically the expected energy savings of using micro-CHP systems instead of the conventional heating system, and analyze system approaches for interaction with the local electric utility. The primary energy savings between the space heating provided by a conventional space heating system with all the required electrical energy supplied by the grid and the micro-CHP system supplemented when needed by a conventional space heating and the grid supplied electricity. were calculated for two locations namely Long Island and Albany. The key results from the experimental work are summarized first and the results from the analytical work next. Experimental results: (1) The engine could be operated successfully in the normal and HCCI modes using both diesel and biodiesel blends. (2) The smoke levels are lower with biodiesel than with diesel in both modes of operation. (3) The NOx levels are lower with the HCCI mode of operation than with the normal mode for both fuels. (4) The engine efficiency in these tests is lower in the HCCI mode of operation. However, the system parameters were not optimized for such operation within the scope of this project. However, for an engine designed with such operation in mind, the efficiency would possibly be not lower. Analytical results: (1) The internal combustion engine (diesel engine in this case) is the only proven technology as a prime mover at present. However, as noted above, no U.S. engine is available at present. (2) For both locations, the use of a micro-CHP system results in primary energy savings. This is true whether the CHP system is used only to supply domestic hot water or to supply both hot water and space heat and even for a low efficiency system especially for the latter case. The size of the thermal storage (as long as it above a certain minimum) did not affect this. (3) For example, for a 2 kW CHP electrical efficiency of 25%, a typical house on Long Island will save about 30MBtu of energy per year for a combined space heat and domestic hot water system. This corresponds to annual energy savings of about 210 gallons oil equivalent per (4) The savings increased initially with the power capacity of the prime-mover, but flattened out at around 2 kW power output suggesting that a low power engine like the one tested is a good choice. (5) Reverse metering, that is, power returned to the electric grid when produced in excess of the local load, increased the primary energy savings significantly when using a 3kW to 5kW system with high fuel-to-electric efficiency. (6) In view of the current interest in plug-in electric or hybrid vehicles, the impact of night-time recharging on the micro-CHP operation was considered. Obviously, it will reduce the amount reverse metered and without reverse-metering, the primary energy savings were increased significantly. (7) The micro-CHP systems can contribute to the decrease of the carbon emissions of the local utility even with the use of diesel fuel and much more so with biodiesel use.

  8. Compression ignition engine having fuel system for non-sooting combustion and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazyn, Timothy; Gehrke, Christopher

    2014-10-28

    A direct injection compression ignition internal combustion engine includes a fuel system having a nozzle extending into a cylinder of the engine and a plurality of spray orifices formed in the nozzle. Each of the spray orifices has an inner diameter dimension of about 0.09 mm or less, and define inter-orifice angles between adjacent spray orifice center axes of about 36.degree. or greater such that spray plumes of injected fuel from each of the spray orifices combust within the cylinder according to a non-sooting lifted flame and gas entrainment combustion pattern. Related methodology is also disclosed.

  9. Integrated Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Increased Utilization of Gaseous Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratapas, John; Zelepouga, Serguei; Gnatenko, Vitaliy; Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas; Li, Hailin; Getz, Timothy; Mather, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The project is addressing barriers to or opportunities for increasing distributed generation (DG)/combined heat and power (CHP) use in industrial applications using renewable/opportunity fuels. This project brings together novel gas quality sensor (GQS) technology with engine management for opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester gas and coal bed methane. By providing the capability for near real-time monitoring of the composition of these opportunity fuels, the GQS output can be used to improve the performance, increase efficiency, raise system reliability, and provide improved project economics and reduced emissions for engines used in distributed generation and combined heat and power.

  10. Selection of Light Duty Truck Engine Air Systems Using Virtual Lab Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Houshun

    2000-08-20

    An integrated development approach using seasoned engine technology methodologies, virtual lab parametric investigations, and selected hardware verification tests reflects today's state-of-the-art R&D trends. This presentation will outline such a strategy. The use of this ''Wired'' approach results in substantial reduction in the development cycle time and hardware iterations. An example showing the virtual lab application for a viable design of the air-exhaust-turbocharger system of a light duty truck engine for personal transportation will be presented.

  11. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

    2011-07-18

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  12. Internal combustion engine system having a power turbine with a broad efficiency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whiting, Todd Mathew; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-04-13

    An engine system incorporating an air breathing, reciprocating internal combustion engine having an inlet for air and an exhaust for products of combustion. A centripetal turbine receives products of the combustion and has a housing in which a turbine wheel is rotatable. The housing has first and second passages leading from the inlet to discrete, approximately 180.degree., portions of the circumference of the turbine wheel. The passages have fixed vanes adjacent the periphery of the turbine wheel and the angle of the vanes in one of the passages is different than those in the other so as to accommodate different power levels providing optimum approach angles between the gases passing the vanes and the blades of the turbine wheel. Flow through the passages is controlled by a flapper valve to direct it to one or the other or both passages depending upon the load factor for the engine.

  13. Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smed, Jan P.; Lemieux, Dennis H.; Williams, James P.

    2007-06-19

    An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

  14. Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

    2014-03-11

    A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

  15. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells ...

  16. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  17. Anomaly Detection for Resilient Control Systems Using Fuzzy-Neural Data Fusion Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-08-01

    Resilient control systems in critical infrastructures require increased cyber-security and state-awareness. One of the necessary conditions for achieving the desired high level of resiliency is timely reporting and understanding of the status and behavioral trends of the control system. This paper describes the design and development of a neural-network based data-fusion system for increased state-awareness of resilient control systems. The proposed system consists of a dedicated data-fusion engine for each component of the control system. Each data-fusion engine implements three-layered alarm system consisting of: (1) conventional threshold-based alarms, (2) anomalous behavior detector using self-organizing maps, and (3) prediction error based alarms using neural network based signal forecasting. The proposed system was integrated with a model of the Idaho National Laboratory Hytest facility, which is a testing facility for hybrid energy systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the implemented data fusion system provides timely plant performance monitoring and cyber-state reporting.

  18. Free-piston Stirling engine system considerations for various space power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dochat, G.R.; Dhar, M. )

    1991-01-05

    The U.S. Government is evaluating power requirements for future space applications. As power requirements increase solar or nuclear dynamic systems become increasingly attractive. Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE) have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation. Therefore, they are excellent candidates for the dynamic power conversion module of a space-based, power-generating system. FPSE can be coupled with many potential heat sources (radioisotope, solar, or nuclear reactor), various heat input systems (pumped loop, heat pipe), heat rejection (pumped loop or heat pipe), and various power management and distribution systems (AC, DC, high or low voltage, and fixed or variable load). This paper will review potential space missions that can be met using free-piston Stirling engines and discusses options of various system integration approaches. Currently free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power applications is being developed under contract with NASA-Lewis Research Center. This paper will also briefly outline the program and recent progress.

  19. Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Wooley, R.; Sandor, D.

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes how the Systems Integration Office is assisting the Department of Energy's Biomass Program by using systems engineering processes, practices and tools to guide decisions and achieve goals.

  20. IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Bestor

    2004-06-01

    This report documents the second year's effort towards a 3-year program to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. In essence, all Phase II goals and objectives were met. We intend to proceed with the Phase III research plan, as set forth by the applicable Research Management Plan. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase II were to evaluate the results for the 4-cylinder system prototype developed for Phase I, then optimize this system to demonstrate the technology's readiness for the field demonstration phase. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support objectives in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. Research activities for Micropilot Phase II were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are expected to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. Modifications to existing engine components were kept to a minimum. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The optimized four-cylinder system data demonstrated significant progress compared to Phase I results, as well as traditional spark ignition systems. An extensive testing program at the EECL using the GMV-4 test engine demonstrated that: (1) In general, the engine operated more stable fewer misfires and partial combustion events when using the 3-hole injectors compared to the 5-hole injectors used in Phase I. (2) The engine had, in general, a wider range of operation with the 3-hole injectors. Minimum operational boost levels were approximately 5''Hg lower and the minimum pilot quantity that the engine would operate on was roughly cut in half. (3) A successful concept demonstration of engine lube oil pilot injection was performed where the minimum operational boost was reduced by another 5''Hg to a boost level of 3''Hg; this is, depending on altitude, in the range of boost levels of many blower and piston scavenged low BMEP engines. (4) Micropilot ignition compares very favorably to other ignitions systems. The performance of micropilot ignition with mechanical gas admission valves is very similar to the performance of precombustion chamber ignition with high pressure fuel injection. Compared to spark ignition with mechanical gas admission valves the lean limit of operation is extended by about 5''Hg. These laboratory results will be enhanced, demonstrated and commercialized by others, with management and support from CSU, during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program.

  1. Towards Composing Data Aware Systems Biology Workflows on Cloud Platforms: A MeDICi-based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Wynne, Adam S.

    2011-09-08

    Cloud computing is being increasingly adopted for deploying systems biology scientific workflows. Scientists developing these workflows use a wide variety of fragmented and competing data sets and computational tools of all scales to support their research. To this end, the synergy of client side workflow tools with cloud platforms is a promising approach to share and reuse data and workflows. In such systems, the location of data and computation is essential consideration in terms of quality of service for composing a scientific workflow across remote cloud platforms. In this paper, we describe a cloud-based workflow for genome annotation processing that is underpinned by MeDICi - a middleware designed for data intensive scientific applications. The workflow implementation incorporates an execution layer for exploiting data locality that routes the workflow requests to the processing steps that are colocated with the data. We demonstrate our approach by composing two workflowswith the MeDICi pipelines.

  2. Final Report - Phylogenomic tools and web resources for the Systems Biology Knowledgebase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjolander, Kimmen

    2014-11-07

    The major advance during this last reporting period (8/15/12 to present) is our release of data on the PhyloFacts website: phylogenetic trees, multiple sequence alignments and other data for protein families are now available for download from http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu/data/. This project as a whole aimed to develop high-throughput functional annotation systems that exploit information from protein 3D structure and evolution to provide highly precise inferences of various aspects of gene function, including molecular function, biological process, pathway association, Pfam domains, cellular localization and so on. We accomplished these aims by developing and testing different systems on a database of protein family trees: the PhyloFacts Phylogenomic Encyclopedia (at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu/phylofacts/ ).

  3. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  4. Influence of the exhaust system on performance of a 4-cylinder supercharged engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trenc, F.; Bizjan, F.; Hribernik, A.

    1998-10-01

    Twin entry radial turbines are mostly used to drive compressors of small and medium size 6-cylinder diesel engines where the available energy of the undisturbed exhaust pulses can be efficiently used to drive the turbine of a turbocharger. Three selected cylinders feed two separated manifold branches and two turbine inlets and prevent negative interaction of pressure waves and its influence on the scavenging process of the individual cylinders. In the case of a four-stroke, 4-cylinder engine, two selected cylinders, directed by the firing order, can be connected to one (of the two) separated manifold branches that feeds one turbine entry. Good utilization of the pressure pulse energy, together with typically longer periods of reduced exhaust flow can lead to good overall efficiency of the two-pulse system. Sometimes this system can be superior to the single manifold system with four cylinders connected to one single-entry turbine. The paper describes advantages and disadvantages of the above described exhaust systems applied to a turbocharged and aftercooled 4-cylinder Diesel engine. Comparisons supported by the analyses of the numerical and experimental results are also given in the presented paper.

  5. IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM -- PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

    2005-03-01

    This report documents the third year's effort towards a 3-year program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. Two earlier phases of development precede this report. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) systems for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system for an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Installation efforts at Window Rock were completed towards the end of the budget period, which did not leave sufficient time to complete the durability testing. These efforts are ongoing, with funding provided by El Paso Pipeline Group, and the results will be documented in a report. Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the RMI system.

  6. Device to lower NOx in a gas turbine engine combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laster, Walter R; Schilp, Reinhard; Wiebe, David J

    2015-02-24

    An emissions control system for a gas turbine engine including a flow-directing structure (24) that delivers combustion gases (22) from a burner (32) to a turbine. The emissions control system includes: a conduit (48) configured to establish fluid communication between compressed air (22) and the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24). The compressed air (22) is disposed at a location upstream of a combustor head-end and exhibits an intermediate static pressure less than a static pressure of the combustion gases within the combustor (14). During operation of the gas turbine engine a pressure difference between the intermediate static pressure and a static pressure of the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24) is effective to generate a fluid flow through the conduit (48).

  7. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF OPERATIONAL CONCEPTS FOR ADVANCED SMRs: THE ROLE OF COGNITIVE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; David Gertman

    2014-04-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) will use advanced digital instrumentation and control systems, and make greater use of automation. These advances not only pose technical and operational challenges, but will inevitably have an effect on the operating and maintenance (O&M) cost of new plants. However, there is much uncertainty about the impact of AdvSMR designs on operational and human factors considerations, such as workload, situation awareness, human reliability, staffing levels, and the appropriate allocation of functions between the crew and various automated plant systems. Existing human factors and systems engineering design standards and methodologies are not current in terms of human interaction requirements for dynamic automated systems and are no longer suitable for the analysis of evolving operational concepts. New models and guidance for operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems need to adopt a state-of-the-art approach such as Cognitive Systems Engineering (CSE) that gives due consideration to the role of personnel. This approach we report on helps to identify and evaluate human challenges related to non-traditional concepts of operations. A framework - defining operational strategies was developed based on the operational analysis of Argonne National Laboratory’s Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), a small (20MWe) sodium-cooled reactor that was successfully operated for thirty years. Insights from the application of the systematic application of the methodology and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of CSE as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  9. McrEngine: A Scalable Checkpointing System Using Data-Aware Aggregation and Compression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Islam, Tanzima Zerin; Mohror, Kathryn; Bagchi, Saurabh; Moody, Adam; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Eigenmann, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) systems use checkpoint-restart to tolerate failures. Typically, applications store their states in checkpoints on a parallel file system (PFS). As applications scale up, checkpoint-restart incurs high overheads due to contention for PFS resources. The high overheads force large-scale applications to reduce checkpoint frequency, which means more compute time is lost in the event of failure. We alleviate this problem through a scalable checkpoint-restart system, mcrEngine. McrEngine aggregates checkpoints from multiple application processes with knowledge of the data semantics available through widely-used I/O libraries, e.g., HDF5 and netCDF, and compresses them. Our novel scheme improves compressibility ofmore¬†¬Ľ checkpoints up to 115% over simple concatenation and compression. Our evaluation with large-scale application checkpoints show that mcrEngine reduces checkpointing overhead by up to 87% and restart overhead by up to 62% over a baseline with no aggregation or compression.¬ę¬†less

  10. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Cole, Roger L. (Elmhurst, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  11. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1998-02-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

  12. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

  13. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Power System Operation Operations Engineering, (J4200) 5555...

  14. Proceedings of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.

    2014-12-01

    The second National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop was held in Broomfield, Colorado, from January 29 to February 1, 2013. The event included a day-and-a-half workshop exploring a wide variety of topics related to system modeling and design of wind turbines and plants. Following the workshop, 2 days of tutorials were held at NREL, showcasing software developed at Sandia National Laboratories, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Laboratories, and NREL. This document provides a brief summary of the various workshop activities and includes a review of the content and evaluation results from attendees.

  15. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry; Choate, William T.

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  16. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shihui; Pan, Chongle; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Engle, Nancy L; Zhou, Wen; Dam, Phuongan; Xu, Ying; Dice, Lezlee T; Davison, Brian H; Brown, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

  17. Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    Gas Technology Institute will collaborate with Integrated CHP Systems Corporation, West Virginia University, Vronay Engineering Services, KAR Engineering Associates, Pioneer Air Systems, and Energy Concepts Company to recover waste heat from reciprocating engines. The project will integrate waste heat recovery along with gas clean-up technology system improvements. This will address fuel quality issues that have hampered expanded use of opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester biogas, and coal mine methane. This will enable increased application of CHP using renewable and domestically derived opportunity fuels.

  18. Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior or Evolutionary Genomic Analyses of Insect Society: Eat, Drink, and Be Scary (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gene

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois on "Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior" at the 6th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  19. Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior or Evolutionary Genomic Analyses of Insect Society: Eat, Drink, and Be Scary (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gene

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois on "Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior" at the 6th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  20. Biostirling({trademark}): A small biomass power conversion system using an advanced stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, L.; Ziph, B.; McKeough, W.; Houtman, W.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past decade the need for small power conversion systems to serve rural and/or remote needs has increased dramatically. The requirements for systems <100 kW are very similar, whether the need is defined as {open_quotes}rural electrification{close_quotes} in developed countries, or as {open_quotes}village power{close_quotes} in developing countries. The availability of biomass fuel resources to serve such systems is not in doubt, be they agricultural, forestry, animal or urban wastes. The main inhibiting factor has been the absence of a biomass power conversion system characterized by: reliability, cost effectiveness, low pollution, and ease of maintenance. Stirling Thermal Motors of Ann Arbor, Michigan, is recognized as the leader worldwide in the development and application of Stirling engine technology. It is currently demonstrating a {open_quotes}BioStirling({trademark}){close_quotes} Power Conversion System which combines its unique STM4-120 engine rated at 25 kW with a proven commercial gasifier. The BioStirling({trademark}) proof-of-concept demonstration is funded by DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory and is to be completed in late 1996, with field demonstrations in 1997 and commercial availability 1998.

  1. Heat-pipe gas-combustion system endurance test for Stirling engine. Final report, May 1990-September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahrle, P.

    1990-12-01

    Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., (STM) has been developing a general purpose Heat Pipe Gas Combustion System (HPGC) suitable for use with the STM4-120 Stirling engine. The HPGC consists of a parallel plate recuperative preheater, a finned heat pipe evaporator and a film cooled gas combustor. A principal component of the HPGC is the heat pipe evaporator which collects and distributes the liquid sodium over the heat transfer surfaces. The liquid sodium evaporates and flows to the condensers where it delivers its latent heat. The report presents test results of endurance tests run on a Gas-Fired Stirling Engine (GFSE). Tests on a dynamometer test stand yielded 67 hours of engine operation at power levels over 10 kW (13.5 hp) with 26 hours at power levels above 15 kW (20 hp). Total testing of the engine, including both motoring tests and engine operation, yielded 245 hours of engine run time.

  2. Reliability of unstable periodic orbit based control strategies in biological systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Nagender; Singh, Harinder P.; Hasse, Maria; Biswal, B.

    2015-04-15

    Presence of recurrent and statistically significant unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) in time series obtained from biological systems is now routinely used as evidence for low dimensional chaos. Extracting accurate dynamical information from the detected UPO trajectories is vital for successful control strategies that either aim to stabilize the system near the fixed point or steer the system away from the periodic orbits. A hybrid UPO detection method from return maps that combines topological recurrence criterion, matrix fit algorithm, and stringent criterion for fixed point location gives accurate and statistically significant UPOs even in the presence of significant noise. Geometry of the return map, frequency of UPOs visiting the same trajectory, length of the data set, strength of the noise, and degree of nonstationarity affect the efficacy of the proposed method. Results suggest that establishing determinism from unambiguous UPO detection is often possible in short data sets with significant noise, but derived dynamical properties are rarely accurate and adequate for controlling the dynamics around these UPOs. A repeat chaos control experiment on epileptic hippocampal slices through more stringent control strategy and adaptive UPO tracking is reinterpreted in this context through simulation of similar control experiments on an analogous but stochastic computer model of epileptic brain slices. Reproduction of equivalent results suggests that far more stringent criteria are needed for linking apparent success of control in such experiments with possible determinism in the underlying dynamics.

  3. Engineering Technician

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Civil Engineering Technician; Electrical Engineering Technician; Mechanical Engineering Technician; Environmental Engineering Technician

  4. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  5. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archivedmore¬†¬Ľ at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.¬ę¬†less

  6. Value engineering: An alternative liner system at the La Paz County Regional Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, A.L.; Purdy, S.; Tempelis, D.

    1997-11-01

    The La Paz County Regional Landfill is a 65 hectare (160 acre) municipal waste site located near the western border of Arizona between the cities of Parker and Quartzsite. The site is operated under a public/private partnership between the County of La Paz and Browning-Ferris Industries, Inc. (BFI). The County owns the landfill and infrastructure and BFI is responsible for facility improvements, environmental compliance, and daily operations. Following the initial permitting and construction of the first landfill cell, a value engineering review was conducted on the site design and permit requirements. Based on this review, substantial cost saving opportunities were identified. In order to implement the value engineering ideas, the site permit was modified and a new Solid Waste Facilities Plan was Submitted to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. This paper discusses the value engineering modifications that were conducted, the revisions to the permits, and the relative cost savings that were realized. The areas addressed include the liner system design, closure design, disposal capacity, and operations plan. Through the use of alternative liners a cost savings of well over 50 percent (as compared to the original permit) will be realized over the life of the landfill.

  7. A MultiAir¬ģ/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Ronald

    2015-05-20

    FCA US LLC (formally known as Chrysler Group LLC, and hereinafter ‚ÄúChrysler‚ÄĚ) was awarded an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded project by the Department of Energy (DOE) titled ‚ÄúA MultiAir¬ģ/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency‚ÄĚ (hereinafter ‚Äúproject‚ÄĚ). This award was issued after Chrysler submitted a proposal for Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA- 0000079, ‚ÄúSystems Level Technology Development, Integration, and Demonstration for Efficient Class 8 Trucks (SuperTruck) and Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD).‚ÄĚ Chrysler started work on this project on June 01, 2010 and completed testing activities on August 30, 2014. Overall objectives of this project were; Demonstrate a 25% improvement in combined Federal Test Procedure (FTP) City and Highway fuel economy over a 2009 Chrysler minivan; Accelerate the development of highly efficient engine and powertrain systems for light-duty vehicles, while meeting future emissions standards; and Create and retain jobs in accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  8. Energy Returned On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Annual Report FY2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A.J.

    2011-12-31

    Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. The embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished plant. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy - heat is not as valuable as electrical energy.

  9. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leas, A. M.; Leas, L. E.

    1985-02-12

    Disclosed are an engine system suitable for use with methyl alcohol and hydrogen and a rotary engine particularly suited for use in the engine system. The rotary engine comprises a stator housing having a plurality of radially directed chamber dividers, a principal rotor, a plurality of subordinate rotors each having an involute gear in its periphery mounted on the principal rotor, and means for rotating the subordinate rotors so that their involute gears accept the radially directed dividers as the subordinate rotors move past them.

  10. Operational feasibility of underwater Stirling engine systems using oxygen-seawater extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The exploration of the oceans whether for societal, commercial, scientific or military reasons requires efficient and cost effective underwater vehicles. In turn, these vessels require efficient means of producing on board power for the propulsion and hotel load requirements of long endurance missions. The Stirling engine, because of its inherent closed-cycle operation, has long been an attractive candidate for underwater use and now has proved its reliability and maintainability in the arduous environment of a naval submarine application. More recently the Stirling has been considered for use in small long endurance unmanned underwater vessels (UUVs). However, with these type of vehicles the need to carry an on board oxygen supply in a very confined space has presented a number of design problems. The concept of using multi-stage vehicles with disposable energy pods has been explored and appears attractive although a major change in submarine design philosophy will be required if such vehicles are to launched from submarines. Another approach is to use a more space efficient source of oxygen. As seawater contains dissolved oxygen then if this source could be utilized to meet all or at least part of the engine`s need than a major design problem could be overcome. In this paper the findings of an initial study into the use of membranes or artificial gill techniques to provide oxygen for a Stirling powered DARPA type vehicle are presented. It has been found that only in certain sea areas is the concept of oxygen extraction feasible for use with power systems. Even in situations where there are sufficient levels of dissolved oxygen the gill system approach appears to have limited utility for UUV applications and a number of practical problems still need to be addressed.

  11. System and method for preconcentrating, identifying, and quantifying chemical and biological substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method for preconcentrating, identifying, and quantifying chemical and biological substances is disclosed. An input valve directs a first volume of a sample gas to a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The SAW device preconcentrates and detects a mass of a substance within the sample gas. An output valve receives a second volume of the sample gas containing the preconcentrated substance from the SAW device and directs the second volume to a gas chromatograph (GC). The GC identifies the preconcentrated substance within the sample gas. A shunt valve exhausts a volume of the sample gas equal to the first volume minus the second volume away from the SAW device and the GC. The method of the present invention includes the steps of opening an input valve for passing a first volume of a sample gas to a SAW device; preconcentrating and detecting a mass of a substance within the sample gas using the SAW device; opening an output valve for passing a second volume of the sample gas containing the preconcentrated substance to a gas chromatograph (GC); and then identifying the preconcentrated substance within the sample gas using the GC.

  12. Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research Strategic Data Roadmap for Earth System Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Palanisamy, Giri; Shipman, Galen; Boden, Thomas A.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

    2014-04-25

    Rapid advances in experimental, sensor, and computational technologies and techniques are driving exponential growth in the volume, acquisition rate, variety, and complexity of scientific data. This wealth of scientifically meaningful data has tremendous potential to lead to scientific discovery. However, to achieve scientific breakthroughs, these data must be exploitable‚ÄĒthey must be analyzed effectively and efficiently and the results shared and communicated easily within the wider Department of Energy‚Äôs (DOE‚Äôs) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) community. The explosion in data complexity and scale makes these tasks exceedingly difficult to achieve, particularly given that an increasing number of disciplines are working across techniques, integrating simulation and experimental or observational results (see Table 5 in Appendix 2). Consequently, we need new approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization that provide research teams with easy-to-use and scalable end-to-end solutions. These solutions must facilitate (and where feasible, automate and capture) every stage in the data lifecycle (shown in Figure 1), from collection to management, annotation, sharing, discovery, analysis, and visualization. In addition, the core functionalities are the same across climate science communities, but they require customization to adapt to specific needs and fit into research and analysis workflows. To this end, the mission of CESD‚Äôs Data and Informatics Program is to integrate all existing and future distributed CESD data holdings into a seamless and unified environment for the acceleration of Earth system science.

  13. E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants (reciprocation and rotating combustion engines). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    Design, performance, and testing of reciprocating and rotating engines of various configurations for all types of propulsion. Includes internal and external combustion engines; engine exhaust systems; engine air systems components; engine structures; stirling and diesel engines.

  14. INTEGRATED DRILLING SYSTEM USING MUD ACTUATED DOWN HOLE HAMMER AS PRIMARY ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John V. Fernandez; David S. Pixton

    2005-12-01

    A history and project summary of the development of an integrated drilling system using a mud-actuated down-hole hammer as its primary engine are given. The summary includes laboratory test results, including atmospheric tests of component parts and simulated borehole tests of the hammer system. Several remaining technical hurdles are enumerated. A brief explanation of commercialization potential is included. The primary conclusion for this work is that a mud actuated hammer can yield substantial improvements to drilling rate in overbalanced, hard rock formations. A secondary conclusion is that the down-hole mud actuated hammer can serve to provide other useful down-hole functions including generation of high pressure mud jets, generation of seismic and sonic signals, and generation of diagnostic information based on hammer velocity profiles.

  15. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous operation under DPF regeneration events. During the second stage of HD testing, the ULSD lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.5% to 0.8%, while for B20, lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.6% to 1.0%, but the fuel in the oil was 36% biodiesel. For the LD vehicle tests, the frequency of DPF regeneration events was observed to be the same for both ULSD and B20. No significant difference between the two fuels' estimated soot loading was detected by the engine control unit (ECU), although a 23% slower rate of increase in differential pressure across DPF was observed with B20. It appears that the ECU estimated soot loading is based on the engine map, not taking advantage of the lower engine-out particulate matter from the use of biodiesel. After 4,000 miles of LD vehicle operation with ULSD, fuel dilution in the lube-oil samples showed total dilution levels of 4.1% diesel. After 4,000 miles of operation with B20, total fuel in oil dilution levels were 6.7% consisting of 3.6% diesel fuel and 3.1% biodiesel. Extrapolation to the 10,000-mile oil drain interval with B20 suggests that the total fuel content in the oil could reach 12%, compared to 5% for operation on ULSD. Analysis of the oil samples also included measurement of total acid number, total base number, viscosity, soot, metals and wear scar; however, little difference in these parameters was noted.

  16. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new developments in information technology. May 14, 2013 Los Alamos Research Park Los Alamos Research Park, the home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505)

  17. Engineering systems analysis of pressurized fluidized-bed-combustion power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, R.L.; Griffin, F.P.; Lackey, M.E.

    1982-04-01

    This effort was conducted to provde supporting data for the research and development program on pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) systems being continued under the auspices of the Office of Coal Utilization of DOE. This report deals with the first phase of the effort, designated Task 1, which was scoped to be a somewhat broad review of PFBC technology and an analysis to determine its potential and sensitivity to key development needs. Background information pertaining to the application of PFBC to the market for coal-fired technology is included. The status of development is reviewed and the deficiencies in data are identified. Responses to a survey of PFBC developers are reviewed with emphasis on the high risk areas of the PFBC concept. Some of these problems are: uncertainty of life of gas turbine components; lack of demonstration of load following; and hot solids handling. Some high risk areas, such as the gas cleanup or gas turbine systems, can be relieved by reducing the severity of design conditions such as the turbine inlet temperature. Alternate turbine designs or plant configurations are also possible solutions. Analyses were performed to determine whether the advantages held by PFBC systems in cost, efficiency, and emissions would be nullified by measures taken to reduce risk. In general, the results showed that the attractive features of the PFBC could be preserved.

  18. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  19. Integration of air separation membrane and coalescing filter for use on an inlet air system of an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moncelle, Michael E. (Bloomington, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system suitable for combustion air of an internal combustion engine. An air separation device of the system includes a plurality of fibers, each fiber having a tube with a permeation barrier layer on the outer surface thereof and a coalescing layer on the inner surface thereof, to restrict fluid droplets from contacting the permeation barrier layer.

  20. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2013-05-15

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  1. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  2. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  3. IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM-PHASE I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Bestor

    2003-03-04

    This report documents the first year's effort towards a 3-year program to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. In essence, all Phase I goals and objectives were met. We intend to proceed with the Phase II research plan, as set forth by the applicable Research Management Plan. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of micropilot ignition for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase I were to develop a single-cylinder test chamber to study the injection of pilot fuel into a combustion cylinder and to develop, install and test a multi-cylinder micropilot ignition system for a 4-cylinder, natural gas test engine. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support these two (2) primarily elements in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. Research activities for Micropilot Phase I were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are expected to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. An extensive state-of-art review was conducted to leverage the existing body of knowledge of micropilot ignition with respect to retrofit applications. Additionally, commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The four-cylinder prototype data was encouraging for the micro-pilot ignition technology when compared to spark ignition. Initial testing results showed: (1) Brake specific fuel consumption of natural gas was improved from standard spark ignition across the map, 1% at full load and 5% at 70% load. (2) 0% misfires for all points on micropilot ignition. Fuel savings were most likely due to this percent misfire improvement. (3) THC (Total Hydrocarbon) emissions were improved significantly at light load, 38% at 70% load. (4) VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) emissions were improved above 80% load. (5) Coefficient of Variance for the IMEP (Indicated Mean Effective Pressure) was significantly less at lower loads, 76% less at 70%. These preliminary results will be substantiated and enhanced during Phase II of the Micropilot Ignition program.

  4. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  5. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

    2013-11-13

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations are executed.

  6. Reliability Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LA-UR 15-27450 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Reliability Engineering Reliability Engineering Current practice in reliability is often fragmented, does not cover the full system lifecycle * Reliability needs to be addressed in design, development, and operational life * Reliability analysis should integrate information from components and systems Integrate proven reliability methods with world-class statistical science * Use methods and tools

  7. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission: First issue. Addendum 3, Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B.; Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M.

    1994-05-01

    This addendum provides additional information, in the form of Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD), concerning the system engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The results of the functional analysis as depicted in Integrated Definition language notation (IDEFO) diagrams are provided in Addendum 2 to the parent document. The FFBDs provided herein cover the total Hanford cleanup mission and depict the decomposition of functions to a reasonable level for understanding (generally level 3 or 4). Functional definitions are contained in Section 3.0 of Addendum 2 to the parent document. Specific programs such as the Tank Waste Remediation System and Environmental Restoration, whose IDEFO diagrams were presented as part of their specific baseline documentation and not included in Addendum 2, have their FFBDs included in this addendum. The information contained in this addendum will remain tied to the overall Hanford cleanup mission through the top-level (``Capstone``) functional analysis so that a complete, top-to-bottom functional documentation set always exists for all mission activities. This linkage is accomplished through the use of the Requirements Driven Design (RDD-100{reg_sign}) design tool. Through the use of RDD-100{reg_sign}, this addendum supports and is traceable to the information presented in Addendum 2 to the parent document.

  9. Method and systems for power control of internal combustion engines using individual cycle cut-off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorenko, Y.; Korzhov, M.; Filippov, A.; Atamanenko, N.

    1996-09-01

    A new method of controlling power has been developed for improving efficiency and emissions performance of internal combustion engines at partial load. The method involves cutting-off some of the work cycles, as the load decreases, to obtain required power. Theoretical and experimental material is presented to illustrate the underlying principle, the implementation means and the results for the 4- and 8-cylinder piston engine and a twin rotor Wankel engine applications.

  10. Career Map: Electrical Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Engineer Career Map: Electrical Engineer Two electrical engineers inspect the electrical components to a turbine. Electrical Engineer Position Title Electrical Engineer Alternate Title(s) Electronics Engineer, Project Engineer, Power Systems, Transmission Engineer Education & Training Level Advanced, bachelor's required, prefer graduate degree Education & Training Level Description Electrical engineers must have a bachelor's degree. Employers also value practical experience,

  11. Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal Systempresentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  12. An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled Engine and Aftertreatment System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  13. Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

    2000-03-02

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

  14. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  15. System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Bryan

    2009-06-01

    This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

  16. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented.

  17. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  18. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hassel, Bart A.

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review in favor of studying the slurry-form of AB as it appeared to be difficult to transport a solid form of AB through the thermolysis reactor. UTRC demonstrated the operation of a compact GLS in the laboratory at a scale that would be required for the actual automotive application. The GLS met the targets for weight and volume. UTRC also reported about the unresolved issue associated with the high vapor pressure of fluids that could be used for making a slurry-form of AB. Work on the GLS was halted after the Phase 2 to Phase 3 review as the off-board regeneration efficiency of the spent AB was below the DOE target of 60%. UTRC contributed to the design of an adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system through measurements of the thermal conductivity of a compacted form of Metal Organic Framework (MOF) number 5 and through the development and sizing of a particulate filter. Thermal conductivity is important for the design of the modular adsorbent tank insert (MATI), as developed by Oregon State University (OSU), in order to enable a rapid refueling process. Stringent hydrogen quality requirements can only be met with an efficient particulate filtration system. UTRC developed a method to size the particulate filter by taking into account the effect of the pressure drop on the hydrogen adsorption process in the tank. UTRC raised awareness about the potential use of materials-based H2 storage systems in applications outside the traditional light-duty vehicle market segment by presenting at several conferences about niche application opportunities in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), portable power and others.

  19. Project W-340 long reach arm retrieval system balance of plant instrumentation workshop engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    This engineering study documents the results of a workshop held to resolve Issue No. 26 generated at a Arm Based Retrieval Functional Analysis Value Engineering Session. The issue deals with the scope of the Balance of Plant Instrumentation needs for the LRARS.

  20. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  1. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Brief Overview of SKB-EBS Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-10-01

    Research collaborations with international partners on the behavior and performance of engineered barrier systems (EBS) are an important aspect of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign strategy in the evaluation of disposal design concepts. These international partnerships are a cost-effective way of engaging in key R&D activities with common goals resulting in effective scientific knowledge exchanges thus enhancing existing and future research programs in the USA. This report provides a brief description of the activities covered by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) EBS Task Force (TF) (referred hereafter as SKB EBS TF) and potential future directions for engagement of the DOE-NE UFDC program in relevant R&D activities. Emphasis is given to SKB EBS TF activities that are still ongoing and aligned to the UFDC R&D program. This include utilization of data collected in the bentonite rock interaction experiment (BRIE) and data sets from benchmark experiments produced by the chemistry or ďCĒ part of the SKB EBS TF. Potential applications of information generated by this program include comparisons/tests between model and data (e.g., reactive diffusion), development and implementation of coupled-process models (e.g., HM), and code/model benchmarking.

  2. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  3. Stratified charge combustion system and method for gaseous fuel internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoades, W.A. Jr.

    1986-03-11

    This patent describes a stratified charge combustion system for use in a gaseous fuel internal combustion engine. This system consists of: (a) a combustion chamber; (b) an ignition; (c) a gaseous fuel injection valve assembly in communication with the combustion chamber and in spaced relationship from the ignition source with a portion of the inside surfaces extending between the fuel injection valve assembly and the ignition source. The fuel valve assembly defines an entry port for the entrance of gaseous fuel, the entry port is recessed outside of a fixed inside surface. (d) means for pressuring the gaseous fuel prior to injection; and (e) a curved transitional surface extending from the entry port toward the portion of the inside surfaces extending between the fuel injection valve assembly and the ignition source. The curved transitional surface curves away from the direction of the entry port. The curved transitional surface has a curvature for the particular direction and configuration of the entry port. The particular configuration of the portion of the inside surfaces extends between the injection valve assembly and the ignition source. The particular arrangment of the fuel injection valve assembly in the combustion chamber, and for the particular pressure of the gaseous fuel is to produce the Coanda Effect in the injected gaseous fuel flow after it passes through the entry port and follows the curved transitional surface under the Coanda Effect. As the curved transitional surface curves away from the direction of the entry port, a flow is produced of the gaseous fuel that clings to and follows the particular configuration of the inside surfaces to the ignition source.

  4. Jefferson Lab Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation search JLab Engineering Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? Engineering Division Engineering Pressure Systems Seminars/Training print version Mechanical Systems Mechanical Engineering - Document Control Survey Alignment Machine Shop Installation/Vacuum Cryogenics Cryogenics - Cryogenics Department

  5. Application of charge stratification, lean burn combustion systems and anti-knock control devices in small two-stroke cycle gasoline engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuentscher, V.

    1986-01-01

    For essentially reducing the specific fuel consumption in two-stroke cycle engines and the concentration of hydrocarbons (HC) in the exhaust gas, the normal engine was equipped with a new ram tuned fuel injection system. By the application of charge stratification, lean burn combustion, different ignition systems and a special anti-knock device, considerable fuel consumption and HC emission reductions were obtained.

  6. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a cooling system for the transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weibe, David J.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-12-08

    A cooling system is provided for a transition (420) of a gas turbine engine (410). The cooling system includes a cowling (460) configured to receive an air flow (111) from an outlet of a compressor section of the gas turbine engine (410). The cowling (460) is positioned adjacent to a region of the transition (420) to cool the transition region upon circulation of the air flow within the cowling (460). The cooling system further includes a manifold (121) to directly couple the air flow (111) from the compressor section outlet to an inlet (462) of the cowling (460). The cowling (460) is configured to circulate the air flow (111) within an interior space (426) of the cowling (460) that extends radially outward from an inner diameter (423) of the cowling to an outer diameter (424) of the cowling at an outer surface.

  7. Mechanical Engineering Department technical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, R.B.; Abrahamson, L.; Denney, R.M.; Dubois, B.E

    1982-01-01

    Technical achievements and publication abstracts related to research in the following Divisions of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reported in this biannual review: Nuclear Fuel Engineering; Nuclear Explosives Engineering; Weapons Engineering; Energy Systems Engineering; Engineering Sciences; Magnetic Fusion Engineering; and Material Fabrication. (LCL)

  8. Enabling X-ray free electron laser crystallography for challenging biological systems from a limited number of crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Weis, William I.

    2015-03-17

    There is considerable potential for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to enable determination of macromolecular crystal structures that are difficult to solve using current synchrotron sources. Prior XFEL studies often involved the collection of thousands to millions of diffraction images, in part due to limitations of data processing methods. We implemented a data processing system based on classical post-refinement techniques, adapted to specific properties of XFEL diffraction data. When applied to XFEL data from three different proteins collected using various sample delivery systems and XFEL beam parameters, our method improved the quality of the diffraction data as well as themore¬†¬Ľ resulting refined atomic models and electron density maps. Moreover, the number of observations for a reflection necessary to assemble an accurate data set could be reduced to a few observations. These developments will help expand the applicability of XFEL crystallography to challenging biological systems, including cases where sample is limited.¬ę¬†less

  9. Enabling X-ray free electron laser crystallography for challenging biological systems from a limited number of crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Weis, William I.

    2015-03-17

    There is considerable potential for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to enable determination of macromolecular crystal structures that are difficult to solve using current synchrotron sources. Prior XFEL studies often involved the collection of thousands to millions of diffraction images, in part due to limitations of data processing methods. We implemented a data processing system based on classical post-refinement techniques, adapted to specific properties of XFEL diffraction data. When applied to XFEL data from three different proteins collected using various sample delivery systems and XFEL beam parameters, our method improved the quality of the diffraction data as well as the resulting refined atomic models and electron density maps. Moreover, the number of observations for a reflection necessary to assemble an accurate data set could be reduced to a few observations. These developments will help expand the applicability of XFEL crystallography to challenging biological systems, including cases where sample is limited.

  10. Fuel injection system and method of operating the same for an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Topinka, Jennifer Ann (Niskayuna, NY); DeLancey, James Peter (Corinth, NY); Primus, Roy James (Niskayuna, NY); Pintgen, Florian Peter (Niskayuna, NY)

    2011-02-15

    A fuel injector is coupled to an engine. The fuel injector includes an injection opening configured to vary in cross-section between a open state and a fully closed state. The fuel injector is configured to provide a plurality of discrete commanded fuel injections into an engine cylinder by modulating the size of the injection opening without completely closing the opening to the fully closed state.

  11. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); O'Brien, Kevin C. (San Ramon, CA)

    2006-05-09

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  12. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); O'Brien, Kevin C. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-11-01

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  13. Development and Applications Of Photosensitive Device Systems To Studies Of Biological And Organic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruner, Sol

    2012-01-20

    The primary focus of the grant is the development of new x-ray detectors for biological and materials work at synchrotron sources, especially Pixel Array Detectors (PADs), and the training of students via research applications to problems in biophysics and materials science using novel x-ray methods. This Final Progress Report provides a high-level overview of the most important accomplishments. These major areas of accomplishment include: (1) Development and application of x-ray Pixel Array Detectors; (2) Development and application of methods of high pressure x-ray crystallography as applied to proteins; (3) Studies on the synthesis and structure of novel mesophase materials derived from block co-polymers.

  14. DYNA3D, INGRID, and TAURUS: an integrated, interactive software system for crashworthiness engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Stillman, D.W.

    1985-04-01

    Crashworthiness engineering has always been a high priority at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory because of its role in the safe transport of radioactive material for the nuclear power industry and military. As a result, the authors have developed an integrated, interactive set of finite element programs for crashworthiness analysis. The heart of the system is DYNA3D, an explicit, fully vectorized, large deformation structural dynamics code. DYNA3D has the following four capabilities that are critical for the efficient and accurate analysis of crashes: (1) fully nonlinear solid, shell, and beam elements for representing a structure, (2) a broad range of constitutive models for representing the materials, (3) sophisticated contact algorithms for the impact interactions, and (4) a rigid body capability to represent the bodies away from the impact zones at a greatly reduced cost without sacrificing any accuracy in the momentum calculations. To generate the large and complex data files for DYNA3D, INGRID, a general purpose mesh generator, is used. It runs on everything from IBM PCs to CRAYS, and can generate 1000 nodes/minute on a PC. With its efficient hidden line algorithms and many options for specifying geometry, INGRID also doubles as a geometric modeller. TAURUS, an interactive post processor, is used to display DYNA3D output. In addition to the standard monochrome hidden line display, time history plotting, and contouring, TAURUS generates interactive color displays on 8 color video screens by plotting color bands superimposed on the mesh which indicate the value of the state variables. For higher quality color output, graphic output files may be sent to the DICOMED film recorders. We have found that color is every bit as important as hidden line removal in aiding the analyst in understanding his results. In this paper the basic methodologies of the programs are presented along with several crashworthiness calculations.

  15. Final report of the systems engineering technical advisory board for the Tank Waste Remediation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranowski, F.P.; Goodlett, C.B.; Beard, S.J.; Duckworth, J.P.; Schneider, A.; Zahn, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is one segment of the environmental restoration program at the Hanford site. The scope is to retrieve the contents of both the single shell and double shell tanks and process the wastes into forms acceptable for long term storage and/or permanent disposal. The quantity of radioactive waste in tanks is significantly larger and substantially more complex in composition than the radioactive waste stored in tanks at other DOE sites. The waste is stored in 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks. The waste was produced over a period from the mid 1940s to the present. The single shell tanks have exceeded their design life and are experiencing failures. The oldest of the double shell tanks are approaching their design life. Spar double shell tank waste volume is limited. The priorities in the Board`s view are to manage safely the waste tank farms, accelerate emptying of waste tanks, provide spare tank capacity and assure a high degree of confidence in performance of the TWRS integrated program. At its present design capacity, the glass vitrification plant (HWVP) will require a period of about 15 years to empty the double shell tanks; the addition of the waste in single shell tanks adds another 100 years. There is an urgent need to initiate now a well focused and centralized development and engineering program on both larger glass melters and advanced separations processes that reduce radioactive constituents in the low-level waste (LLW). The Board presents its conclusions and has other suggestions for the management plan. The Board reviews planning schedules for accelerating the TWRS program.

  16. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the research findings of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) are presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators. Projections are made for future space-power requirements over the next few decades. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  17. A Fish-eye View of Riverine Hydropower Systems: Understanding the Biological Response to Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pracheil, Brenda M; DeRolph, Christopher R; Schramm, Michael P; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Fish populations that have been traditionally thought of as completely fragmented by dams still maintain limited, one-way connectivity from upstream to downstream reaches via downstream turbine passage. This one-way connectivity may be important to population dynamics, but can also introduce a new and significant source of mortality due to turbine-induced fish injury and mortality. Mechanistically, fish injury and mortality associated with downstream turbine passage can come from several sources including blade strike, shear forces, cavitation, or pressure decreases, and parsing the contributions of these individual forces is important for advancing and deploying turbines that minimize these impacts to fishes. The overarching goals of this project are two-fold: 1. To inform biological limitations of fish for use in creating and testing advanced turbine designs (e.g., research and development) and 2. To provide insight into locations that would be good initial locations for deploying advanced turbines (e.g., marketing). This report is an initial step in linking physical forces to injury and mortality rates to provide a better understanding turbine-associated injury and mortality rates for turbine designers and manufacturers and examine the spatial distribution of hydropower, turbines, and fishes across the U.S.A. to determine locations that may be good candidates for advanced turbine designs. We also use this report to present an initial approach for selecting species for further laboratory and field studies that examine the impacts of hydropower on fishes.

  18. Integrated Omics in Systems Biology: The New Frontier for Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-08-12

    Environmental biotechnology encompasses a wide range of characterization, monitoring and control for bioenergy and bioremediation technologies that are based on biological processes. Recent breakthroughs in our understanding of biogeochemical processes and genomics are leading to exciting new and cost effective ways to monitor and manipulate the environment and potentially produce bioenergy fuels as we also cleanup the environment. Indeed, our ability to sequence an entire microbial genome in just a few hours is leading to similar breakthroughs in characterizing proteomes, metabolomes, phenotypes, and fluxes for organisms, populations, and communities. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in subsurface environments has tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of biogeochemistry and the potential for making biofuel breakthroughs. Monitoring techniques that inventory and monitor terminal electron acceptors and electron donors, enzyme probes that measure functional activity in the environment, functional genomic microarrays, phylogenetic microarrays, metabolomics, proteomics, and quantitative PCR are also being rapidly adapted for studies in environmental biotechnology. Integration of all of these new high throughput techniques using the latest advances in bioinformatics and modeling will enable break-through science in environmental biotechnology. A review of these techniques with examples from field studies and lab simulations will be discussed.

  19. Engineering Task Plan for Development and Fabrication and Deployment of Nested Fixed Depth Fluidic Sampling and At Tank Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-10-30

    This engineering task plan identifies the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development and deployment of a mobile, variable depth sampling system and an at-tank analysis system. The mobile, variable depth sampling system concept was developed after a cost assessment indicated a high cost for multiple deployments of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system. The sampling will provide double-shell tank (DST) staging tank waste samples for assuring the readiness of the waste for shipment to the LAW/HLW plant for treatment and immobilization. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the samples' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B vitrification project.

  20. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) Research at Argonne National Laboratory. A Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sreenath; Biruduganti, Muni; Bihari, Bipin; Sekar, Raj

    2014-08-01

    The goals of these experiments were to determine the potential of employing spectral measurements to deduce combustion metrics such as HRR, combustion temperatures, and equivalence ratios in a natural gas-fired reciprocating engine. A laser-ignited, natural gas-fired single-cylinder research engine was operated at various equivalence ratios between 0.6 and 1.0, while varying the EGR levels between 0% and maximum to thereby ensure steady combustion. Crank angle-resolved spectral signatures were collected over 266-795 nm, encompassing chemiluminescence emissions from OH*, CH*, and predominantly by CO2* species. Further, laser-induced gas breakdown spectra were recorded under various engine operating conditions.

  1. BEW Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Product: BEW Engineering provides engineering consulting services, and performs research and development in electrical power systems for bulk power and distributed energy...

  2. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 2: Major mechanical equipment; FGD proposal evaluations; Use of FGDPRISM in FGD system modification, proposal, evaluation, and design; FGD system case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-04

    Part 2 of this manual provides the electric utility engineer with detailed technical information on some of the major mechanical equipment used in the FGD system. The objectives of Part 2 are the following: to provide the electric utility engineer with information on equipment that may be unfamiliar to him, including ball mills, vacuum filters, and mist eliminators; and to identify the unique technique considerations imposed by an FGD system on more familiar electric utility equipment such as fans, gas dampers, piping, valves, and pumps. Part 3 provides an overview of the recommended procedures for evaluating proposals received from FGD system vendors. The objectives are to provide procedures for evaluating the technical aspects of proposals, and to provide procedures for determining the total costs of proposals considering both initial capital costs and annual operating and maintenance costs. The primary objective of Part 4 of this manual is to provide the utility engineer who has a special interest in the capabilities of FGDPRISM [Flue Gas Desulfurization PRocess Integration and Simulation Model] with more detailed discussions of its uses, requirements, and limitations. Part 5 is a case study in using this manual in the preparation of a purchase specification and in the evaluation of proposals received from vendors. The objectives are to demonstrate how the information contained in Parts 1 and 2 can be used to improve the technical content of an FGD system purchase specification; to demonstrate how the techniques presented in Part 3 can be used to evaluate proposals received in response to the purchase specification; and to illustrate how the FGDPRISM computer program can be used to establish design parameters for the specification and evaluate vendor designs.

  3. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish-Tagging System : Annual Report 1998-1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.; Jonasson, Bruce F.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our work during 1998 and 1999 (FY99) on a project to expand and improve technology for passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted the work. Timely and accurate information derived from PIT-tag technology is increasingly critical to resource stakeholders in assessing the effectiveness of efforts to enhance survival of juvenile and adult salmonids. Continued development of PIT-tag technology will enable researchers and fisheries managers to address issues expressed in the NMFS biological opinions for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and the proposed Snake River Recovery Plan. The FY99 work was divided into individual projects that are covered separately in this report.

  4. An adaptive multi-level simulation algorithm for stochastic biological systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, C. Giles, M. B.; Baker, R. E.; Yates, C. A.

    2015-01-14

    Discrete-state, continuous-time Markov models are widely used in the modeling of biochemical reaction networks. Their complexity often precludes analytic solution, and we rely on stochastic simulation algorithms (SSA) to estimate system statistics. The Gillespie algorithm is exact, but computationally costly as it simulates every single reaction. As such, approximate stochastic simulation algorithms such as the tau-leap algorithm are often used. Potentially computationally more efficient, the system statistics generated suffer from significant bias unless tau is relatively small, in which case the computational time can be comparable to that of the Gillespie algorithm. The multi-level method [Anderson and Higham, ďMulti-level Monte Carlo for continuous time Markov chains, with applications in biochemical kinetics,Ē SIAM Multiscale Model. Simul. 10(1), 146Ė179 (2012)] tackles this problem. A base estimator is computed using many (cheap) sample paths at low accuracy. The bias inherent in this estimator is then reduced using a number of corrections. Each correction term is estimated using a collection of paired sample paths where one path of each pair is generated at a higher accuracy compared to the other (and so more expensive). By sharing random variables between these paired paths, the variance of each correction estimator can be reduced. This renders the multi-level method very efficient as only a relatively small number of paired paths are required to calculate each correction term. In the original multi-level method, each sample path is simulated using the tau-leap algorithm with a fixed value of ?. This approach can result in poor performance when the reaction activity of a system changes substantially over the timescale of interest. By introducing a novel adaptive time-stepping approach where ? is chosen according to the stochastic behaviour of each sample path, we extend the applicability of the multi-level method to such cases. We demonstrate the efficiency of our method using a number of examples.

  5. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  6. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasability of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report, 1986-1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Flagg, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    In 1983, a multi-year project to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids was established. The system is based upon a miniaturized passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed and is divided into laboratory studies, field studies, and systems development. All studies were conducted using a glass-encapsulated tag implanted into the body cavity of test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle. Laboratory studies with juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, showed that retention of glass-encapsulated PIT tags was 99-100% in fish weighing 3 g (mean weight) or larger. No adverse tissue response to the tag was noted. The survival of fish 5 g (mean weight) or larger was usually greater than 99%. However, fish ranging in weight from 2 to 4 g, or fish undergoing a physiological change such as smoltification may have a low mortality (usually less than 5.0%) after tagging. The mortality rate in the smaller fish was dependent upon tagging skill whereas mortality in smolting fish seemed dependent upon the level of stress. Growth comparisons between tagged and control fish indicated PIT-tagged fish had a slightly depressed growth rate at some measurement periods. The operational life of glass-encapsulated PIT tags implanted in fish was good, with 100% of the tags operating after 401 days. No tags were rejected from the fish during the observation period.

  7. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  8. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-15

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02?mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  9. Apparatus and filtering systems relating to combustors in combustion turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC)

    2012-07-24

    A combustor for a combustion turbine engine, the combustor that includes: a chamber defined by an outer wall and forming a channel between windows defined through the outer wall toward a forward end of the chamber and at least one fuel injector positioned toward an aft end of the chamber; a screen; and a standoff comprising a raised area on an outer surface of the outer wall near the periphery of the windows; wherein the screen extends over the windows and is supported by the standoff in a raised position in relation to the outer surface of the outer wall and the windows.

  10. Engine improvement and efficiency gained by teamwork

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects Engine improvement and efficiency gained by teamwork Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Improved medical implants comes from...

  11. Assessment and economic analysis of the MOD III Stirling-engine driven chiller system. Final report, October 1989-July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moryl, J.

    1990-07-01

    The Stirling engine is an inherently clean and efficient engine. With the requirements for environmentally benign emissions and high energy efficiency, the Stirling engine is an attractive alternative to both internal combustion (IC) engines and electric motors. The study evaluated a Stirling-engine-driven chiller package. Technically, the Stirling engine is a good selection as a compressor drive, with inherently low vibrations, quiet operation, long life, and low maintenance. Exhaust emissions are below the projected 1995 stringent California standards. Economically, the Stirling-engine-driven chiller is a viable alternative to both IV-engine and electric-driven chillers, trading off slightly higher installed cost against lower total operating expenses. The penetration of a small portion of the projected near-term stationary engine market opportunity will provide the volume production basis to achieve competitively priced engines.

  12. Career Map: Aerospace Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aerospace Engineer Career Map: Aerospace Engineer An aerospace engineer stands in front of a drivetrain testing machine. Aerospace Engineer Position Title Aerospace Engineer Alternate Title(s) Aeronautical Engineer Education & Training Level Advanced, Bachelor's required, prefer graduate degree Education & Training Level Description Aerospace engineers must have a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering or another field of engineering or science related to aerospace systems. Brief job

  13. Perturbing engine performance measurements to determine optimal engine control settings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-12-30

    Methods and systems for optimizing a performance of a vehicle engine are provided. The method includes determining an initial value for a first engine control parameter based on one or more detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine, determining a value of an engine performance variable, and artificially perturbing the determined value of the engine performance variable. The initial value for the first engine control parameter is then adjusted based on the perturbed engine performance variable causing the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. Operation of the vehicle engine is controlled based on the adjusted initial value for the first engine control parameter. These acts are repeated until the engine performance variable approaches the target engine performance variable.

  14. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 ‚Äď 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  15. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  16. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are collaborating with this center under the leadership of the University of New Mexico's Cancer Center and Department of Pathology and in collaboration with Sandia National...

  17. XML Engineering Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-07-27

    The XML Engineering Environment is a reconfigurable software system that allows users to translate, enhance and route data from sources to sinks.

  18. ARM - Engineering Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes Workflow Graphic Engineering Workflow Document Tools for Workflow ECR ECO BCR Ingests Value-Added Products Reprocessing Instruments Data System Elements Field...

  19. Engineering microbes to produce biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wackett, LP

    2011-06-01

    The current biofuels landscape is chaotic. It is controlled by the rules imposed by economic forces and driven by the necessity of finding new sources of energy, particularly motor fuels. The need is bringing forth great creativity in uncovering new candidate fuel molecules that can be made via metabolic engineering. These next generation fuels include long-chain alcohols, terpenoid hydrocarbons, and diesel-length alkanes. Renewable fuels contain carbon derived from carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is derived directly by a photosynthetic fuel-producing organism(s) or via intermediary biomass polymers that were previously derived from carbon dioxide. To use the latter economically, biomass depolymerization processes must improve and this is a very active area of research. There are competitive approaches with some groups using enzyme based methods and others using chemical catalysts. With the former, feedstock and end-product toxicity loom as major problems. Advances chiefly rest on the ability to manipulate biological systems. Computational and modular construction approaches are key. For example, novel metabolic networks have been constructed to make long-chain alcohols and hydrocarbons that have superior fuel properties over ethanol. A particularly exciting approach is to implement a direct utilization of solar energy to make a usable fuel. A number of approaches use the components of current biological systems, but re-engineer them for more direct, efficient production of fuels.

  20. System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of the current research is to assess differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuels, resulting from fundamental issues and system-response issues.

  1. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley

    2012-03-22

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  2. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley

    2013-01-25

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  3. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Morris, Macdonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1997-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks.

  4. Tailoring next-generation biofuels and their combustion in next-generation engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, John Michael; Wu, Weihua; Taatjes, Craig A.; Scheer, Adam Michael; Turner, Kevin M.; Yu, Eizadora T.; O'Bryan, Greg; Powell, Amy Jo; Gao, Connie W.

    2013-11-01

    Increasing energy costs, the dependence on foreign oil supplies, and environmental concerns have emphasized the need to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. The strategy for producing next-generation biofuels must include efficient processes for biomass conversion to liquid fuels and the fuels must be compatible with current and future engines. Unfortunately, biofuel development generally takes place without any consideration of combustion characteristics, and combustion scientists typically measure biofuels properties without any feedback to the production design. We seek to optimize the fuel/engine system by bringing combustion performance, specifically for advanced next-generation engines, into the development of novel biosynthetic fuel pathways. Here we report an innovative coupling of combustion chemistry, from fundamentals to engine measurements, to the optimization of fuel production using metabolic engineering. We have established the necessary connections among the fundamental chemistry, engine science, and synthetic biology for fuel production, building a powerful framework for co-development of engines and biofuels.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  6. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihl, Josh A; West, Brian H; Toops, Todd J; Adelman, Brad; Derybowski, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments confirmed the previous results regarding hydrocarbon reactivity: 1-pentene was the most efficient LNT reductant, followed by toluene. Injection location had minimal impact on the reactivity of these two compounds. Iso-octane was an ineffective LNT reductant, requiring high doses (resulting in high HC emissions) to achieve reasonable NOx conversions. Diesel fuel reactivity was sensitive to injection location, with the best performance achieved through fuel injection downstream of the DOC. This configuration generated large LNT temperature excursions, which probably improved the efficiency of the NOx storage/reduction process, but also resulted in very high HC emissions. The ORNL team demonstrated an LNT desulfation under 'road load' conditions using throttling, EGR, and in-pipe injection of diesel fuel. Flow reactor characterization of core samples cut from the front and rear of the engine-aged LNT revealed complex spatially dependent degradation mechanisms. The front of the catalyst contained residual sulfates, which impacted NOx storage and conversion efficiencies at high temperatures. The rear of the catalyst showed significant sintering of the washcoat and precious metal particles, resulting in lower NOx conversion efficiencies at low temperatures. Further flow reactor characterization of engine-aged LNT core samples established that low temperature performance was limited by slow release and reduction of stored NOx during regeneration. Carbon monoxide was only effective at regenerating the LNT at temperatures above 200 C; propene was unreactive even at 250 C. Low temperature operation also resulted in unselective NOx reduction, resulting in high emissions of both N{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}. During the latter years of the CRADA, the focus was shifted from LNTs to other aftertreatment devices. Two years of the CRADA were spent developing detailed ammonia SCR device models with sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency to be used in development of model-based ammonia injection control algorithms.ORNL, working closely with partners at Navistar and Mi

  7. Apparatus and filtering systems relating to combustors in combustion turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC)

    2012-03-27

    A combustor for a combustion turbine engine that includes: a chamber defined by an outer wall and forming a channel between windows defined through the outer wall toward a forward end of the chamber and at least one fuel injector positioned toward an aft end of the chamber; and a multilayer screen filter comprising at least two layers of screen over at least a portion of the windows and at least one layer of screen over the remaining portion of the windows. The windows include a forward end and a forward portion, and an aft end and an aft portion. The multilayer screen filter is positioned over the windows such that, in operation, a supply of compressed air entering the chamber through the windows passes through at least one layer of screen. The multilayer screen filter is configured such that the aft portion of the windows include at least two layers of screen, and the forward portion of the windows includes one less layer of screen than the aft portion of the windows.

  8. Managing steam: An engineering guide to industrial, commercial, and utility systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makansi, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a guide to steam production, utilization, handling, transport, system optimization, and condensation and recovery. This book incudes a description of how steam, condensate, and hot water are used in various industrial, commercial, institutional, and utility sectors and explains how steam is generated and distributed. Waste-heat recovery, fluidized-bed boilers, and cogeneration systems and boiler control theory are discussed. The book also describes different types of valves, valve components, regulators, steam traps, and metering devices available for managing steam and condensate and discusses maintaining steam systems for optimum service and longer life.

  9. Biological Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  10. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  11. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1996-11-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  12. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  13. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  14. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Lipshutz, R.J.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1997-01-14

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  15. Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-12

    This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage.

  16. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  17. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

  18. ionic liquids biological-ly derived from lignin and hemicellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological-ly derived from lignin and hemicellulose - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  19. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boiler systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Riley Stoker Corporation is leading an R&D program for the expedited development of a new generation of pulverized coal-fired boiler systems. The overall objective is to develop relatively near term technologies to produce Low-Emission coal-fired Boiler Systems (LEBS) ready for full scale commercial generating plants by the end of the decade. The specific goal is to develop a LEBS incorporating an advanced slagging system for improved ash management in addition to meeting the emission and performance goals. This Concept Selection Report documents an evaluation of subsystems and LEBS concepts. Priority was given to the evaluation of the boiler system, steam cycle, and advanced slagging combustor. Some findings are as follows: An ultra supercritical steam cycle is required to meet project efficiency goals. The cost of electricity (COE) for this cycle, at today`s fuel prices, and without externality costs, is slightly higher than a conventional subcritical cycle. The supercritical cycle includes a substantial contingency. Reduction of contingency, escalation of fuel cost, or inclusion of externalities all lead to a lower COE for the supercritical cycle compared to the subcritical cycle. The advanced cycle is selected for inclusion in the LEBS. The advanced slagging combustor (TVC), should it meet the projected performance goals, yields a lower COE than either a dry firing system or a more conventional slagger fitted with post combustion NO{sub x} controls. Verification and development of the advanced slagger performance is the primary focus of this project. A commercial slagging configuration know as U-firing is selected for parallel development and as a platform for adaptation to the TVC.

  20. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  1. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 System Requirements Document V1.3.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Burns, John F.; Satpathi, Meara Allena

    2015-12-01

    This System Requirements Document (SRD) defines waveform data processing requirements for the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The IDC applies, on a routine basis, automatic processing methods and interactive analysis to raw International Monitoring System (IMS) data in order to produce, archive, and distribute standard IDC products on behalf of all States Parties. The routine processing includes characterization of events with the objective of screening out events considered to be consistent with natural phenomena or non-nuclear, man-made phenomena. This document does not address requirements concerning acquisition, processing and analysis of radionuclide data but includes requirements for the dissemination of radionuclide data and products.

  2. Energy Returned On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Annual Report FY2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A.J.

    2010-12-31

    Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. EROI analyses of geothermal energy are either out of date or presented online with little supporting documentation. Often comparisons of energy systems inappropriately use 'efficiency' when EROI would be more appropriate. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electric energy delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to build, operate, and decommission the facility.

  3. Reliability Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LA-UR 15-27450 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Reliability Engineering Reliability Engineering Current practice in reliability is ...

  4. The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

  5. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  6. Development of an Implementation Plan Related to Biological Opinion on Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System ; Step 1: Review and Critique of Implementation Plans.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret

    2000-12-01

    The Draft Biological Opinion on Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System calls for the development of 1- and 5-year implementation plans. These plans will provide the roadmap for planning and subsequent implementation of actions intended to meet specific performance standards (i.e., biological objectives) in a timely manner. To develop implementation plans the key tasks and sequences of steps must be determined. Those responsible for specific tasks must be identified and they must understand what they need to do. There must be assurances that the resources (human, physical, and fiscal) to complete the tasks are available. Motivation and incentive systems should be set up. Systems to coordinate efforts and guide activity must be devised and installed. An information management system must be designed to manage and analyze data and ensure that appropriate data are collected. This will aid managers in assessing whether individual activities or actions are tracking with stated goals and objectives. Training programs to improve managerial and worker capability in making and implementing plans should be designed. Managerial leadership to guide the efforts of all individuals in achieving the goals of the anadromous and resident fish recovery must be developed. It is the entire process of managing fish recovery in relationship to the Biological Opinion that will guide, coordinate, motivate, and control work and determine the effectiveness and efficiency of plan implementation.

  7. System and method for improving performance of a fluid sensor for an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubinski, David (Canton, MI); Zawacki, Garry (Livonia, MI)

    2009-03-03

    A system and method for improving sensor performance of an on-board vehicle sensor, such as an exhaust gas sensor, while sensing a predetermined substance in a fluid flowing through a pipe include a structure for extending into the pipe and having at least one inlet for receiving fluid flowing through the pipe and at least one outlet generally opposite the at least one inlet, wherein the structure redirects substantially all fluid flowing from the at least one inlet to the sensor to provide a representative sample of the fluid to the sensor before returning the fluid through the at least one outlet.

  8. Technology Assessment Tool - An Application of Systems Engineering to USDOE Technology Proposals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel

    1999-06-01

    This paper discusses the system design for a Technology Assessment (TA) tool that can be used to quantitatively evaluate new and advanced technologies, products, or processes. Key features of the tool include organization of information in an indentured hierarchy; questions and categories derived from the decomposition of technology performance; segregation of life-cycle issues into six assessment categories; and scoring, relative impact, and sensitivity analysis capability. An advantage of the tool's use is its ability to provide decision analysis data, based on incomplete or complete data.

  9. START-3: Operational Evaluations of the ISUS Engine Ground Demonstration Thermionic Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luchau, D.W.; Luke, J.R.; Wyant, F.J.

    1998-10-08

    START-3 was a test program conducted in order to demonstrate and characterize the operational performance of the prototype Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) thermionic power system. The test device consisted of a graphite thermal storage uni~ multilayer foil insulation, and sixteen thermionic converters electrically connected in a series array. Several thermal input conditions were achieved during the test, which resulted in measuring converter performance at average converter hot shoe temperatures in the range of 1600 K to 2000 K. Results indicate that the ;hermionic converter; did not perform as weil as expected in the array individual sixteen converters is currently being performed.

  10. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH-HIGH EFFICIENCY ENGINES AND TURBINES (UTSR-HEET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz; William H. Day

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the U S Department of Energy established a cooperative agreement for a program now designated as the University Turbine Systems (UTSR) Program. As stated in the cooperative agreement, the objective of the program is to support and facilitate development of advanced energy systems incorporating turbines through a university research environment. This document is the first annual, technical progress report for the UTSR Program. The Executive Summary describes activities for the year of the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), which administers the UTSR Program. Included are descriptions of: Outline of program administrative activities; Award of the first 10 university research projects resulting from a year 2001 RFP; Year 2002 solicitation and proposal selection for awards in 2003; Three UTSR Workshops in Combustion, Aero/Heat Transfer, and Materials; SCIES participation in workshops and meetings to provide input on technical direction for the DOE HEET Program; Eight Industrial Internships awarded to higher level university students; Increased membership of Performing Member Universities to 105 institutions in 40 states; Summary of outreach activities; and a Summary table describing the ten newly awarded UTSR research projects. Attachment A gives more detail on SCIES activities by providing the monthly exceptions reports sent to the DOE during the year. Attachment B provides additional information on outreach activities for 2002. The remainder of this report describes in detail the technical approach, results, and conclusions to date for the UTSR university projects.

  11. Systems Level Engineering of Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis to Improve Biofuel Feedstock Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Samuel

    2013-09-27

    Our new regulatory model of cell wall biosynthesis proposes original network architecture with several newly incorporated components. The mapped set of protein-DNA interactions will serve as a foundation for 1) understanding the regulation of a complex and integral plant component and 2) the manipulation of crop species for biofuel and biotechnology purposes. This study revealed interesting and novel aspects of grass growth and development and further enforce the importance of a grass model system. By functionally characterizing a suite of genes, we have begun to improve the sparse model for transcription regulation of biomass accumulation in grasses. In the process, we have advanced methodology and brachy molecular genetic tools that will serve as valuable community resource.

  12. National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data: Community Requirements and Information Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Arlene; Blackwell, David; Chickering, Cathy; Boyd, Toni; Horne, Roland; MacKenzie, Matthew; Moore, Joseph; Nickull, Duane; Richard, Stephen; Shevenell, Lisa A.

    2013-10-01

    To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as a viable renewable energy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is investing in the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to supply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geothermal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by all geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS includes a work plan that addresses data assets and resources of interest to users, a survey of data providers, data content models, and how data will be exchanged and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.

  13. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  14. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  15. A two-dimensional model for the heat transfer on the external circuit of a Stirling engine for a dish/Stirling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper the {kappa}-{var{underscore}epsilon} turbulent model for the incompressible fluid flow has been used to describe the heat transfer and gas dynamical processes on the external circuit of a Stirling Engine as used on a Solar Dish/Stirling System. The problem considered, in this work for a cavity-type heat receiver of the Stirling Engine, is that of the heat transfer in the body of the shell of the heat exchangers of the engine due to the thermal conductivity, the convective heat transfer between the working fluid and the walls of the engine internal gas circuit and the heat transfer due to the forced convection of the air in the cavity and in the attached air domain. The boundary conditions employed on the engines internal circuit were obtained using the developed one-dimensional second level mathematical model of the engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation on the bottom and side walls of the heat receiver have been taken into account and the temperature fields for the heat receiver and the air velocity have been obtained for the case when the heat receiver is affected by wind. The numerical results show that it is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is the largest reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the convection of the air.

  16. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Opportunities ¬Ľ Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Engineering dynamics that include flight, vibration isolation for precision manufacturing, earthquake engineering, blast loading, signal processing, and experimental model analysis. Contact Leader, LANL Charles Farrar Email Leader, UCSD Michael Todd Email LANL Program Administrator Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email Collaboration for conducting mission-driven,

  17. Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-14

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engineís pistons to pump and powers the car. MSUís engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engineís rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSUís redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving partsóreducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

  18. UST corrective action technologies: Engineering design of free product recovery systems. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, J.C.; Waddill, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a technical assistance document for assessment of subsurface hydrocarbon spills and for evaluating effects of well placement and pumping rates on separate phase plume control and on free product recovery. Procedures developed for estimation of hydrocarbon spill volume include interpolation and spatial integration of measurements from soil cores, and fluid level data from monitoring wells. The first method involves vertical integration of soil concentration measurements to yield oil volume or species mass per unit area followed by kriging and areal integration to estimate the total mass or volume within the measurement zone. The second method involves kriging of well fluid levels, calculation of free oil volume per area using a physically based model for vertically hydrostatic three phase fluid distributions that converts well product thickness to soil product thickness, followed by areal integration to estimate the volume of free product floating on the water table. A procedure is presented to evaluate effects of steady-state water pumping from multiple point sources on the oil flow gradients to evaluate if hydraulic control of plume spreading will be obtained for a selected system of pumping wells and/or trenches. The applicability of trenches and vacuum-enhanced product recovery to hydrocarbon spills is also discussed.

  19. Real-time fracture monitoring in Engineered Geothermal Systems with seismic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose A. Rial; Jonathan Lees

    2009-03-31

    As proposed, the main effort in this project is the development of software capable of performing real-time monitoring of micro-seismic activity recorded by an array of sensors deployed around an EGS. The main milestones are defined by the development of software to perform the following tasks: ‚ÄĘ Real-time micro-earthquake detection and location ‚ÄĘ Real-time detection of shear-wave splitting ‚ÄĘ Delayed-time inversion of shear-wave splitting These algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this report, make possible the automatic and real-time monitoring of subsurface fracture systems in geothermal fields from data collected by an array of seismic sensors. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is parameterized in terms of the polarization of the fast shear wave and the time delay between the fast and slow shear waves, which are automatically measured and stored. The measured parameters are then combined with previously measured SWS parameters at the same station and used to invert for the orientation (strike and dip) and intensity of cracks under that station. In addition, this grant allowed the collection of seismic data from several geothermal regions in the US (Coso) and Iceland (Hengill) to use in the development and testing of the software.

  20. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  1. $18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations.

  2. Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiling, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  3. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritiuim Faciity Safety Significant Fire Suppression System, November 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Safety Significant Fire Suppression System November 2014 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Purpose

  4. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological and Environmental Research Biological and Environmental Research Understanding how genomic information is translated to functional capabilities, and the roles of Earth's biogeochemical systems so we can predict climate decades or centuries into the future. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske (505) 665-4800 Email James Bossert (505) 667-3644 Email Manvendra Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Kim Nitschke (505) 667-1186 Email Phil Jones (505) 667-6387 Email Cathy Wilson (505) 667-0202 Email Conducting

  5. Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Quarterly report number 5, November 1997--January 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-23

    This quarter has the authors starting out with the engine mapped out in its standard dual fuel configuration. This means that the engine is configured to be exactly what the have been selling in the past. They have worked to install the new style gas injectors, Hydraulic power unit, control lines, gas lines and associated hardware. This hardware has been tested and is operational. They have been able to start at installing the spark ignition system but have been held up because of other more pressing work.

  6. Engine having multiple pumps driven by a single shaft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL)

    2001-01-01

    An engine comprises an engine housing. A first engine fluid sub-system that includes a first pump and the engine housing defining a first fluid passage is also included in the engine. The engine also includes at least one additional engine fluid sub-system that includes a second pump and the engine housing defining a second fluid passage. A rotating shaft is at least partially positioned in the engine housing, the first pump and the second pump.

  7. Experimental Studies for CPF and SCR Model, Control System, and OBD Development for Engines Using Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, John; Naber, Jeffrey; Parker, Gordon; Yang, Song-Lin; Stevens, Andrews; Pihl, Josh

    2013-04-30

    The research carried out on this project developed experimentally validated Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) high?fidelity models that served as the basis for the reduced order models used for internal state estimation. The high?fidelity and reduced order/estimator codes were evaluated by the industrial partners with feedback to MTU that improved the codes. Ammonia, particulate matter (PM) mass retained, PM concentration, and NOX sensors were evaluated and used in conjunction with the estimator codes. The data collected from PM experiments were used to develop the PM kinetics using the high?fidelity DPF code for both NO2 assisted oxidation and thermal oxidation for Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (ULSF), and B10 and B20 biodiesel fuels. Nine SAE papers were presented and this technology transfer process should provide the basis for industry to improve the OBD and control of urea injection and fuel injection for active regeneration of the PM in the DPF using the computational techniques developed. This knowledge will provide industry the ability to reduce the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles in the field. Four MS and three PhD Mechanical Engineering students were supported on this project and their thesis research provided them with expertise in experimental, modeling, and controls in aftertreatment systems.

  8. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  9. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  10. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  11. Abacus Engineered Systems, Inc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southland Energy, A Division of Southland Industries Aniello (Nello) Tortora Director of Federal Programs 22340 Dresden Street Suite 177 Dulles, VA 20166 P:...

  12. Sandia Energy Ľ Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p-structural-strength-gains-attentionfeed 0 Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Funding Awarded for Feasibility Study http:energy.sandia.govhydrogen-fuel-cell-funding-awarded-for-feasibility-s...

  13. Carbon Cycling and Biosequestration Integrating Biology and Climate Through Systems Science Report from the March 2008 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graber, J.; Amthor, J.; Dahlman, R.; Drell, D.; Weatherwax, S.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most daunting challenges facing science in the 21st Century is to predict how Earth's ecosystems will respond to global climate change. The global carbon cycle plays a central role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and thus Earth's climate, but our basic understanding of the myriad of tightly interlinked biological processes that drive the global carbon cycle remains limited at best. Whether terrestrial and ocean ecosystems will capture, store, or release carbon is highly dependent on how changing climate conditions affect processes performed by the organisms that form Earth's biosphere. Advancing our knowledge of biological components of the global carbon cycle is thus crucial to predicting potential climate change impacts, assessing the viability of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and informing relevant policy decisions. Global carbon cycling is dominated by the paired biological processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthetic plants and microbes of Earth's land-masses and oceans use solar energy to transform atmospheric CO{sub 2} into organic carbon. The majority of this organic carbon is rapidly consumed by plants or microbial decomposers for respiration and returned to the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Coupling between the two processes results in a near equilibrium between photosynthesis and respiration at the global scale, but some fraction of organic carbon also remains in stabilized forms such as biomass, soil, and deep ocean sediments. This process, known as carbon biosequestration, temporarily removes carbon from active cycling and has thus far absorbed a substantial fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

  14. Free-piston Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, R.W.; Moynihan, T.M.

    1982-09-01

    A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator system (FPSE-010-3), developed under previous Department of Energy (DOE) funding, has been used as a test bed for evaluating selected Stirling engine loss mechanisms. The engine is particularly suited to test-bed operation because engine performance can be evaluated over a wide range of operating conditions; system instrumentation is capable of measuring the effects of system component changes; and modular engine design facilitates the evaluation of alternate component configurations. Extensive testing was performed to establish the operating characteristics of a base-line engine configuration and to characterize specific losses within a Stirling engine. Significant variations in engine performance were observed as the displacer seal clearance was varied. This paper presents selected results from the base-line and displacer seal clearance tests.

  15. Value Engineering

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-30

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that establishs and maintains cost-effective value procedures and processes.

  16. Impact of Extreme Injection Pressure and EGR on the Combustion System of a HD Single Cylinder Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  17. Engineered Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Engineered Materials Materials design, fabrication, assembly, and characterization for national security needs. Contact Us Group Leader Ross Muenchausen Email Deputy Group Leader Dominic Peterson Email Group Office (505)-667-6887 We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly, characterization, and field support. We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly,

  18. Biological Mass Spectrometry and Shotgun Proteomics of Microbial Systems: Methods for studying microbial physiology from isolates to environmental communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, Brian; Young, Jacque C; Carey, Patricia A; Verberkmoes, Nathan C

    2010-01-01

    Microbial ecology is currently experiencing a renaissance spurred by the rapid development of molecular techniques and omics technologies in particular. As never before, these tools have allowed researchers in the field to produce a massive amount of information through in situ measurements and analysis of natural microbial communities, both vital approaches to the goal of unraveling the interactions of microbes with their environment and with one another. While genomics can provide information regarding the genetic potential of microbes, proteomics characterizes the primary end-stage product, proteins, thus conveying functional information concerning microbial activity. Advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies, along with bioinformatic approaches, have brought this analytic chemistry technique to relevance in the biological realm due to its powerful applications in proteomics. Mass spectrometry-enabled proteomics, including bottom-up and top-down approaches, is capable of supplying a wealth of biologically-relevant information, from simple protein cataloging of the proteome of a microbial community to identifying post-translational modifications of individual proteins.

  19. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, L.A.

    1980-12-02

    The major components of this rotary engine are two equal sized rotary units, the housing containing them along with associated ignition and cooling systems. Each of the rotary units consists of a shaft, gear, two outer compressor wheels, and one center power wheel which has twice the axial thickness as the compressor wheel. All the wheels are cylindrical in shape with a lobe section comprising a 180/sup 0/ arc on the periphery of each wheel which forms an expanding and contracting volumetric chamber by means of leading and trailing lips. The lobes of the first rotary unit are situated 180/sup 0/ opposite the lobes of the second adjacent mating rotary unit, thus lobes can intermesh with its corresponding wheel.

  20. Rotary vee engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.W.; Holder, T.J.; Buchanan, M.F.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a rotary vee engine. It comprises: a housing; two cylinder blocks; angled support shaft means; an air/fuel system; angled pistons; and sealing means for sealing the combustion chamber.

  1. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Science Subject Feed Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A. Moe; Ryan Dorn (2002) 51 /> SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS. KRISHNA,C.R. (1999) 46 /> Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994 NONE (1995)

  2. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaji, V.; Boden, Tom; Cowley, Dave; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Desai, Narayan; Egan, Rob; Foster, Ian; Goldstone, Robin; Gregurick, Susan; Houghton, John; Izaurralde, Cesar; Johnston, Bill; Joseph, Renu; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin; Lipton, Mary; Monga, Inder; Pritchard, Matt; Rotman, Lauren; Strand, Gary; Stuart, Cory; Tatusova, Tatiana; Tierney, Brian; Thomas, Brian; Williams, Dean N.; Zurawski, Jason

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  3. Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Quarterly report number 4, July--September, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-23

    This quarter started out with fresh ability to perform sustained engine operation on gas because of the successful operation of the gas compressor last quarter. The authors have completed baseline tests recording emissions and efficiency numbers. This gives the authors data that they have never before been able to acquire in the facility. In addition to the baseline data they have recorded data with a host of additional engine variables. These variables include the adjustments of ignition timing, air fuel ratio, air inlet temperatures and some propane seeding of the injected gas. With the background data on record they will be able to properly measure the level of positive impact that the port gas injection system provides. The remaining time in this quarter has been focused on completing the application of the port style gas injection system. The next steps in this project all pivot on the application of this port injection system. They have also progressed in the evaluation of the cylinder/engine monitoring system.

  4. Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I design review report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This volume, No. 3, of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review Report contains a preliminary parts list and detailed drawings of equipment for the basic Stirling engine and for the following systems: vehicular Stirling Engine System; external heat system; hot and cold engine systems; engine drive; controls and auxiliaries; and vehicle integration. (LCL)

  5. SC e-journals, Biology/Genetics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biology/Genetics ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Chemical Biology ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neuropathologica Advances in Bioinformatics - OAJ Advances in Health Sciences Education Agriculture and Human Values Agroforestry Systems American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science - OAJ American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Analyst Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Anatomical Record, The Anatomy and Embryology

  6. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  7. Defining engine efficiency limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engine efficiency limits Defining engine efficiency limits Investigates the potential to reduce engine efficiency losses and how this impacts the entire system in terms of a direct increase in work output or a change in the loss mechanism. PDF icon deer11_edwards.pdf More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and Evaluation Identification and Evaluation of Near-term Opportunities for Efficiency Improvement High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and

  8. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nationís energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nationís future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillarís DIGN program under the ARES program. This work has consisted of both modeling and single cylinder engine experiments to quantify DIGN performance. The air handling systems of natural gas engines dissipate a percentage of available energy as a result of both flow losses and turbomachinery inefficiencies. An analytical study was initiated to increase compressor efficiency by employing a 2-stage inter-cooled compressor. Caterpillar also studied a turbo-compound system that employs a power turbine to recover energy from the exhaust gases for improved engine efficiency. Several other component and system investigations were undertaken during the final phase of the program to reach the ultimate ARES goals. An intake valve actuation system was developed and tested to improve engine efficiency, durability and load acceptance. Analytical modeling and materials testing were performed to evaluate the performance of steel pistons and compacted graphite iron cylinder head. Effort was made to improve the detonation sensing system by studying and comparing the performance of different pressure sensors. To reduce unburned hydrocarbon emissions, different camshafts were designed and built to investigate the effect of exhaust valve opening timing and value overlap. 1-D & 3-D coupled simulation was used to study intake and exhaust manifold dynamics with the goal of reducing load in-balance between cylinders. Selective catalytic reduction with on-board reductant generation to reduce NOx emissions was also engine tested. An effective mean to successfully deploy ARES technologies into the energy markets is to deploy demonstration projects in the field. In 2010, NETL and Caterpillar agreed to include a new ďopportunity fuelĒ deliverable and two field demonstrations in the ARES program. An Organic Rankine Cycle system was designed with production intent incorporating lessons learned from the Phase II demonstration. Unfortunately, business conditions caused Caterpillar to cancel this demonstration in 2011. Nonetheless, Caterpillar partnered with a local dealer to deploy an ARES class engine using syngas from a biomass gasifier as

  9. Maintaining low exhaust emissions with turbocharged gas engines using a feedback air-fuel ratio control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckard, D.W.; Serve, J.V.

    1987-10-01

    Maintaining low exhaust emissions on a turbocharged, natural gas engine through the speed and load range requires precise control of the air-fuel ratio. Changes in ambient conditions or fuel heating value will cause the air-fuel ratio to change substantially. By combining air-gas pressure with preturbine temperature control, the air-fuel ratio can be maintained regardless of changes in the ambient conditions or the fuel's heating value. Design conditions and operating results are presented for an air-fuel controller for a turbocharged engine.

  10. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1990-1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Maynard, D.J.; Downing, S.L. (and others)

    1994-01-01

    In 1983, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) began a multiyear cooperative research program with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to evaluate a new miniaturized identification system that could be used with salmonids. The system is referred to as the passive-integrated-transponder (PIT) tagging and interrogation system. The program has focused on determining the effects of PIT tags on juvenile and adult salmonids, as well as the development and evaluation of tagging and interrogation methods. Earlier results of the program have been reported in annual reports and journal articles cited in this report. This report covers the work per formed from 1990 through 1993. For convenience, the report is divided into three sections: (1) Interrogation and separation systems at Columbia River Basin dams; (2) Systems development and evaluation; and (3) Information and technology transfer.

  11. engineer | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer...

  12. Aztech Engineers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Zip: 6120 Product: Connecticut-based consulting engineers specializing in HVAC, Plumbing, Fire-Protection, Electrical, and Geo-Thermal Well Systems. Coordinates:...

  13. General Engineers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Engineers The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the General Engineer, whose work is associated with analytical studies and evaluation projects pertaining to the operations of the energy industry. Responsibilities: General Engineers perform or participate in one or

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A MultiAir / MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation given by Chrysler at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on its project to research a multi-air and multi-fuel approach to improving engine efficiency.

  15. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  16. D&D Engineering & Design Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requiring EngineeringDesign ......9 Activity 4 Process System Deactivation and ... the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and therefore must ...

  17. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Children's Hospital]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  18. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene; Sansone, Susanna

    2011-09-11

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  19. Environmental, safety, and health engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodside, G.; Kocurek, D.

    1997-12-31

    A complete guide to environmental, safety, and health engineering, including an overview of EPA and OSHA regulations; principles of environmental engineering, including pollution prevention, waste and wastewater treatment and disposal, environmental statistics, air emissions and abatement engineering, and hazardous waste storage and containment; principles of safety engineering, including safety management, equipment safety, fire and life safety, process and system safety, confined space safety, and construction safety; and principles of industrial hygiene/occupational health engineering including chemical hazard assessment, personal protective equipment, industrial ventilation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, noise, and ergonomics.

  20. Engine and method for operating an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauper, Jr., John Christian (East Peoria, IL); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Thirunavukarasu, Balamurugesh (Peoria, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2008-12-23

    A method of operating an engine is provided. The method may include supplying a combustible combination of reactants to a combustion chamber of the engine, which may include supplying a first hydrocarbon fuel, hydrogen fuel, and a second hydrocarbon fuel to the combustion chamber. Supplying the second hydrocarbon fuel to the combustion chamber may include at least one of supplying at least a portion of the second hydrocarbon fuel from an outlet port that discharges into an intake system of the engine and supplying at least a portion of the second hydrocarbon fuel from an outlet port that discharges into the combustion chamber. Additionally, the method may include combusting the combustible combination of reactants in the combustion chamber.