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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

2

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

4

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

Scheibe, Timothy D.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

6

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs" was organized collaboratively by the NSF-funded Tengchong PIRE

Ahmad, Sajjad

7

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

8

ORNL DAAC for Biogeochemical Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home Welcome about us image About Us Provides detailed information about the ORNL DAAC. projects image About Data Lists the data products available from the ORNL DAAC. access image Get Data Guides you through the steps needed to acquire the data. tools image Data Tools Some tools to help you work with the data. uso image Help Need assistance? Our staff is happy to help. ORNL DAAC The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information

9

A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Final Project Report: "Â?Â?Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"Â?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "��Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."� This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also benefits efforts to trace Hg contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers, into which EFPC flows, and to distinguish Hg from the Y-12 plant from that released from a nearby coal ash accident.

Johnson, Thomas M

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

» Atmospheric System Research (ASR) » Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

14

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research » Climate and Research » Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

15

Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving...

16

Why Sequence Biogeochemically Important Bacteria?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? DOE-JGI will be sequencing three biogeochemically important bacteria, Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002 and Azospira suillum strain PS. These organisms represent diverse genera capable of anaerobically oxidizing both iron(II) and humic acids by using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Two of these organisms, strain 2002 and strain TPSY, are also capable of the anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation of uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). Left to right, Azospira suillum PS, Ferrutens nitratireducens 2002, and Diaphorobacter TPSY. Nitrate-dependent microbial metal oxidation is of critical importance because of its potential effect on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminants. Nitrate-dependent Iron(II) oxidation by organisms such as

17

Biogeochemical Controls | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Biogeochemical Biogeochemical Controls Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Biogeochemical Controls Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Savannah River National Laboratory researches long-term economic in-situ remediation of sites with mixed contaminants

18

Terrestrial Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE present activity of the department of terrestrial magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the largeness of its future aims are alike ... a “progress report” which he contributes to the latest (March) number of Terrestrial Magnetism. The department, which has lately entered on its eleventh year, has under construetion ...

C. CHREE

1914-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

19

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

20

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 14, doi:10.1002/grl.50466, 2013 Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space N. Ã?stgaard,1,2 T. Gjesteland,1,2 B. E from space of a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) and the optical signal from lightning. By fortuitous, TGF, and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified. Citation: Ã?stgaard, N., T

Cummer, Steven A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

On Terrestrial Magnetism.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1843-1850 research-article On Terrestrial Magnetism. William A. Norton The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London. www.jstor.org

1843-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Terrestrial Magnetism*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A similar investigation of the effect of the moon's action on terrestrial magnetism requires a series of observations made at much less distant intervals than the monthly ones ... heat, from the central body of our system, or merely having its own inherent magnetism modified by solar action, then we must choose as our unit the lunation, or ...

1873-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Terrestrial Magnetism*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN bringing before you this evening, gentlemen, the subject of terrestrial magnetism, it is not my intention to attempt to present you with an exhaustive paper ... clearly as I am able, what is the actual condition of our knowledge respecting the magnetism of the globe, and what the nature of its complex variations, without, however, ...

1873-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

GlobalBiogeochemicalCycles RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Zhang (2014), Global dry deposition of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide inferred from space Accepted article online 3 SEP 2014 Global dry deposition of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide inferred contributes on average 9­36% and as much as 85% of total NOy dry deposition. 1. Introduction Nitrogen dioxide

Martin, Randall

25

DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT, AND COMMERCIALIZATION OF A BIOGEOCHEMICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT, AND COMMERCIALIZATION OF A BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROFILING FLOAT FOR CALIBRATION to maximize data quality within power, data, and cost constraints. · Field-test to examine robustness-Goddard). The technical work is being overseen and coordinated by the University of Maine. All the manufacturers

Boss, Emmanuel S.

26

Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total

Hubbard, Susan

27

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) North Dakota State University

28

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 93, NO. All, PAGES 12,817-12,825, NOVEMBER 1, 1988 The Polarization of EscapingTerrestrial Continuum Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Polarization of EscapingTerrestrial Continuum Radiation D. A. GURNETT, W. CALVERT,AND R. L. HUFF Departmentof, Japan PlasmawavemeasurementsfromtheDE 1(DynamicsExplorer1)spacecraftareusedto determinethe polarization of an escapingterrestrialcontinuum radiation event that occurredon March 2, 1982.The sourceof the radiationwasdeterminedby

Gurnett, Donald A.

29

In May/June 2012 we participated in a measurement campaign aboard the German research vessel METEOR. The aim was to quantify the contribution of terrestrial organic matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Baltic Sea along a transect of the entire salinity gradient (1-33 psu). During this study, the in situ 13 the complete salinity gradient The Outlook: WEGAS will be part of the upcoming SWERUS-C3 arctic campaign 2014 the terrestrial fraction (fterrestriall) against salinity. Applying a fit of the data points leads

30

Terrestrial Sequestration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program Capture and Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems Background Clean, affordable energy is essential for U.S. prosperity and security in the 21st century. More than half of the electricity currently generated in the United States comes from coal-fired boilers, and there is little indication that this percentage will diminish through 2020 and beyond. In addition, the use of coal for electricity generation is projected to more than double in developing nations by 2020. This ever growing demand for fossil-fuel-based power and the consequential rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations requires innovative methods to capture and store CO 2 . Terrestrial ecosystems, which include both soil and vegetation, are widely recognized

31

OptIC project: An intercomparison of optimization techniques for parameter estimation in terrestrial biogeochemical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and earth system models, especially for long-term (multian- nual and greater) simulations. Data assimilation

Richardson, Andrew D.

32

Fossil Fuel Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biogeochemistry in the Marine Environment: Research Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of biogeochemical cycles provides information about when, where, for how long, and in which physical-chemical or biological form organisms will be exposed to a pollutant. Biogeochemical research seek...

John W. Farrington

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

By simulating biogeochemical cycles, the Greenland ice sheet, and more--with reach to the lower thermosphere--this system gives the research community a flexible, state-of-the-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate variability and change. THE COMMUNITY EARTH SYSTEM MODEL A Framework for Collaborative Research in the CCSM4/CESM1 (version 1.0 of the Community Earth System Model) special collection of the Journal processes must be represented before a climate model becomes an Earth system model (ESM), but typically

34

Treatise on Terrestrial Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and from which the writer also attempts to deduce some of the other phenomena of magnetism. There seems to us to be some ambiguity in the writer's method of ... , to arrive at laws, that we may hope to form a theory of terrestrial magnetism, than from “making an hypothesis,”and then attempting to apply it to facts. ...

J. S.

1872-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES Donald H. Menzel HARVARD COLLEGE OBSERVATORY SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES* BY...OBSERVATORY Scientists have long recognized that solar activity is somehow responsible for, or...

Donald H. Menzel

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Field Validation Test Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Andrea McNemar, U.S. Department of Energy, andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center North Dakota State University Summary of Field Test Site and Operations:

37

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

38

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

39

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U. of New Mexico; B. Bjornstad, G. Last—PNNL This project isPI), M. Freshley, B. Bjornstad—PNNL; J. Christensen, M.A. Plymale, J. -H. Lee, B. Bjornstad, J. Fredrickson, A.

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanford’s 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Zavarin, LLNL/Glenn T. Seaborg Institute, B. Powell,R. Tinnacher, LLNL/Glenn T. Seaborg Institute; P. Huang,LLNL; R. Kips, LLNL/Glenn T. Seaborg Institute This new SFA

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Idaho National Laboratory Scientific Focus Area INLobjective of the Scientific Focus Area at Idaho National

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Bioturbators enhance ecosystem function through complex biogeochemical interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... benthos could have global consequences, the significance of species loss to bentho-pelagic rates and processes remains poorly understood. Benthic sediments are replete with complex biogeochemical interactions, and ecosystem performance ... the net effects of their activities are difficult to predict because of the number of interrelated ...

Andrew M. Lohrer; Simon F. Thrush; Max M. Gibbs

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Review Paper/ Biogeochemical Evolution of a Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Paper/ Biogeochemical Evolution of a Landfill Leachate Plume, Norman, Oklahoma by I Abstract Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade

46

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

48

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Jorge L. Sarmiento - Princeton PI, Anand Gnanadesikan - Princeton Co-I, Nicolas Gruber - UCLA PI, Xin Jin - UCLA PostDoc, Robert Armstrong - SUNY /Stony Brook Consultant

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104,NO. E4, PAGES 8489-8507, APRIL 25, 1999 A Mossbauer investigationof iron-rich terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham Jack D. Farmer 2 NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field as efficient in identification as X-ray diffraction. This observation is important from an exploration at the Department of Geology, Arizona State University, School of Fine Arts, Birmingham. Tempe. Copyright 1999by

Farmer, Jack D.

50

1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

Research recommendations to the EPA in support of earth system modeling activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theme which emerges from our simple considerations is that some well-planned early parametric and sensitivity studies, using current-generation coupled Earth system model components, along with simplistic proxy models of terrestrial biospheric and biogeochemical processes, could furnish valuable information to help guide the development of a longer-term plan for research supporting ESM development. This theme is rooted in the premise that the importance of various ESM component processes can be fully assessed only from the perspective of a complete coupling of that process into the ESM context. That is, the question, ``How well must a given process be modelled``? Cannot be answered in isolation, but rather requires a careful blend of process research and coupled model studies.

Ambrosiano, J.J.; Dannevik, W.P.; Kercher, J.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Rotman, D.

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reply to 'Influence of cosmic ray variability on the monsoon rainfall and temperature': a false-positive in the field of solar-terrestrial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A litany of research has been published claiming strong solar influences on the Earth's weather and climate. Much of this work includes documented errors and false-positives, yet is still frequently used to substantiate arguments of global warming denial. This manuscript reports on a recent study by Badruddin & Aslam (2014), hereafter BA14, which claimed a highly significant ($p=1.4\\times10^{-5}$) relationship between extremes in the intensity of the Indian monsoon and the cosmic ray flux. They further speculated that the relationship they observed may apply across the entire tropical and sub-tropical belt, and be of global importance. However, their statistical analysis---and consequently their conclusions---were wrong. Specifically, their error resulted from an assumption that their data's underlying distribution was Gaussian. But, as demonstrated in this work, their data closely follow an ergodic chaotic distribution biased towards extreme values. From a probability density function, calculated using a...

Laken, Benjamin A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

SWP.terrestrial.factsheet0919  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.odowd@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Sequestration Programs - Regional Terrestrial and Local Terrestrial Sequestration (Combined With Enhanced Coalbed Methane Sequestration) Test Location Entire Region (Regional Program); San Juan Basin (Local Pilot Test) Amount and Source of CO 2

54

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Santschi, Peter H.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Essential Terrestrial Variable data workflows for distributed water resources modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses a prototype infrastructure, HydroTerre, that provides researchers, educators and resource managers with seamless access to geospatial/geotemporal data for supporting physics-based numerical models. The prototype defines the supporting ... Keywords: Data workflow, Distributed hydrologic model, Essential Terrestrial Variables, Geographic information systems, HydroTerre, PIHM, Web services

Lorne Leonard; Christopher J. Duffy

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

60

2, 183201, 2005 Global terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1997). According to Watts (2000) and Kettle et al. (2002) total global sources and sinks are balancedBGD 2, 183­201, 2005 Global terrestrial COS sink strength L. Sandoval-Soto et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Global uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy On the morning of Monday, August 29, Hurri- cane Katrina dependence we all have on power and energy systems. Nine major oil re- fineries in Louisiana and Mississippi- trial energy community is the question of why alternative energy sources, such as coal, solar, wind

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

62

Fuel cells for extraterrestrial and terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel cell is a nineteenth century invention and a twentieth century technology development. Due to the high power and energy density, high efficiency, reliability, and production of pure water, hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems have no competition as auxiliary power sources for space vehicles. The alkaline fuel cell system is a well developed and proven technology for this application. The solid polymer electrolyte system may be its future competitor. The energy crisis of 1973 stimulated research, development and demonstration of the phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems using natural gas, petroleum or coal derived hydrogen (and carbon monoxide for the high temperature systems) for terrestrial applications. The direct methanol-air fuel cell is still an electrochemist's dream. Though considerable technological advances have been made, the present price of crude oil, and the high capital costs and limited lifetime of fuel cell systems impede their terrestrial applications in the developed countries. Conversely, the potential for lower capital costs of labor intensive manufacturing processes and the relatively higher fossil fuel prices make these systems more attractive for such applications in the developing countries. 11 refs.

Srinivasan, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Title: Managing collaborative research partnerships to ensure research quality, relevance and uptake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Board of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), a Visiting Fellow at the Fenner School

64

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Ecological and Biogeochemical Characterization of a Subterranean Estuary in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physicochemical boundaries characterize anchialine caves, a subset of subterranean estuaries. This study serves as a biogeochemical and ecological characterization of Sistema Crustacea, an anchialine cave in the Yucatan Peninsula with dense populations of cave...

Haukebo, Sepp Leif

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biogeochemical consequences of livestock grazing in a juniper-oak savanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the soil system. Despite its probable significance, little is known regarding the effects of livestock grazing on biogeochemical processes, I investigated the effects of grazing intensity (heavy, moderate, none) on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N...

Marshall, Samuel Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Southeast Asia, southern China to the Ryuku Islands south of Japan. It also extends into cooler areas in this process. If you encounter plants, please send us photos or #12;Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHIDPemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI 183 ALIEN TERRESTRIAL

Koptur, Suzanne

68

Summer Internship Opportunities at Lake Tahoe The UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC) is dedicated to research, education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and airsheds. Lake ecosystems include the physical, biogeochemical and human environments, and the interactions among them. The Center is committed to providing objective scientific information for restoration include: Aquatic Invasive Species o Assist researchers in discovering effective ways to mitigate

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

69

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

70

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

71

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecosystems: Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress Gary K. Jacobs (jacobsgk@ornl.gov, 865-576-0567) Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008, MS-6035 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Roger C. Dahlman (roger.dahlman@science.doe.gov, 301-903-4951) Office of Science/Biological and Environmental Research U. S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 F. Blaine Metting, Jr. (blaine.metting@pnl.gov, 509-375-2607) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 902 Battelle Blvd. PO Box 999, P7-54 Richland, WA 99352 Introduction Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of

73

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

74

Biogeochemical impacts of wildfires over four millennia in a Rocky Mountain subalpine watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemical impacts of wildfires over four millennia in a Rocky Mountain subalpine watershed of Geography, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO 80217-3364, USA Author for correspondence: Philip E forests. Summary Wildfires can significantly alter forest carbon (C) storage and nitrogen (N

75

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored Wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007­ 2009: Methods and Data for Plant, Sediment, and Water Parameters By Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Mark C. Marvin-DiPasquale, Jennifer L. Agee, Le

76

Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Southwest Biological Science Center, Canyonlands Research...terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information...estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58...Boyer, EW. 2004 Pre-industrial and contemporary fluxes...through rivers: a global assessment based on typology...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biogeochemical studies of long-lived radionuclides in marine environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research results from several studies relevant to seabed dispoal of radioactive wastes are briefly discussed. The studies include: (1) mobilization of plutonium from Enewetak and Bikini lagoon sediments to seawater; (2) concentrations of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239+240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 207/Bi and /sup 210/Pb-/sup 210/Bi-/sup 210/Po in fish from the Marshall Islands; and (3) plutonium in northeast Atlantic sediments. (ACR)

Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Jokela, T.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Current issues in terrestrial solar radiation instrumentation for energy, climate, and space applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements of a few watts per square metre (1 W/m2 to 2 W/m2) is needed to validate estimates of the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. The characterization of solar energy resources for renewable energy technologies requires similar accuracy for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. The characterization of field instrument geometric and thermal responses contributing to radiometric errors is described, together with correction schemes reducing the uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square metre to a few (±2 W/m2 to ±5 W/m2). Such improvements in accuracy reduce the time and labour required for detecting and quantifying trends in terrestrial solar radiation and possible changes in the Earth's radiation budget.

T L Stoffel; I Reda; D R Myers; D Renne; S Wilcox; J Treadwell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Origin of first cells at terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...terrestrial geothermal fields are conducive...solar light as an energy source and a...terrestrial geothermal fields are conducive...solar light as an energy source and selective...M.), EU COST CM0902 Action (A.Y...diverse kinds of energy, including...terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields. | All...

Armen Y. Mulkidjanian; Andrew Yu. Bychkov; Daria V. Dibrova; Michael Y. Galperin; Eugene V. Koonin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

Jonathan R. Lloyd

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

83

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

84

The terrestrial ecosystem program for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has implemented a program to monitor and mitigate impacts associated with site Characterization Activities at Yucca Mountain on the environment. This program has a sound experimental and statistical base. Monitoring data has been collected for parts of the program since 1989. There have been numerous changes in the Terrestrial Ecosystems Program since 1989 that reflect changes in the design and locations of Site Characterization Activities. There have also been changes made in the mitigation techniques implemented to protect important environmental resources based on results from the research efforts at Yucca Mountain. These changes have strengthened DOE efforts to ensure protection of the environmental during Site Characterization. DOE,has developed and implemented an integrated environmental program that protects the biotic environment and will restore environmental quality at Yucca Mountain.

Ostler, W.K.; O`Farrell, T.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School District on the integration of PIRE activities into the new US national science education presentation schedule, we also feature a poster session with more than 25 posters and unique meals organized, and Poster Session I (Posters 1-12) #12;10:00 - 11:15Oral Session I (25 minutes each) - José de la Torre

Ahmad, Sajjad

86

An Isopycnal Box Model with predictive deep-ocean structure for biogeochemical cycling applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To simulate global ocean biogeochemical tracer budgets a model must accurately determine both the volume and surface origins of each water-mass. Water-mass volumes are dynamically linked to the ocean circulation in General Circulation Models, but at the cost of high computational load. In computationally efficient Box Models the water-mass volumes are simply prescribed and do not vary when the circulation transport rates or water mass densities are perturbed. A new computationally efficient Isopycnal Box Model is presented in which the sub-surface box volumes are internally calculated from the prescribed circulation using a diffusive conceptual model of the thermocline, in which upwelling of cold dense water is balanced by a downward diffusion of heat. The volumes of the sub-surface boxes are set so that the density stratification satisfies an assumed link between diapycnal diffusivity, ?d, and buoyancy frequency, N: ?d = c/(N?), where c and ? are user prescribed parameters. In contrast to conventional Box Models, the volumes of the sub-surface ocean boxes in the Isopycnal Box Model are dynamically linked to circulation, and automatically respond to circulation perturbations. This dynamical link allows an important facet of ocean biogeochemical cycling to be simulated in a highly computationally efficient model framework.

Philip Goodwin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CARBONATE STABLE ISOTOPES | Terrestrial Teeth and Bones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Teeth and bones of fossil vertebrates can preserve a record of Quaternary terrestrial environments in the form of isotopic compositions of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15N/14N), and oxygen (18O/16O). These isotopic signatures in teeth and bones have yielded valuable information on the extent of savanna environments under tropical climates, on the ancient levels of aridity, on the spread of dense forests at the beginning of the Holocene, and on the paleodiet of hominids and their associated fauna.

H. Bocherens; D.G. Drucker

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CARBONATE STABLE ISOTOPES | Terrestrial Teeth and Bones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Teeth and bones of fossil vertebrates can preserve a record of Quaternary terrestrial environments in the form of the isotopic compositions of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15N/14N), and oxygen (18O/16O). These isotopic signatures in teeth and bones have yielded valuable information on the extent of savanna environments under tropical climates, on the ancient levels of aridity, on the spread of dense forests at the beginning of the Holocene, and on the paleodiet of Hominids and their associated fauna.

H. Bocherens; D.G. Drucker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

Terrestrial nitrogen–carbon cycle interactions at the global scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N. Depending on whether the radiative forcing in Earth system models is prescribed (RCP-type forcing) or calculated...accounted for interactively in the next generation of Earth system models designed for long-term studies of biogeochemical-climate...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NETL: Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration A "Hands-On" Workshop for the Appalachian Coal & Electric Utilities Industries Table of Contents Disclaimer General Conference Information Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

93

House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Howard Herzog Principal Research Engineer Massachusetts Institute to the Technical Group of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (see www.cslforum.org). Just two weeks ago, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss Carbon Dioxide (CO2) geological

94

GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global Dry Deposition of Nitrogen Dioxide and1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-DERIVED NO2 AND SO2 DRY DEPOSITION 1. Introduction Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) haveGLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global Dry Deposition of Nitrogen Dioxide and1 Sulfur Dioxide Inferred from Space-Based2 Measurements3 C. R. Nowlan, 1,2 R. V. Martin, 1,2 S

Martin, Randall

95

LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah This report focuses on locomotion and communication aspects of mobile robot networks for harsh polar

Kansas, University of

96

Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global priorities for biodiversity conservation are only as robust as the data used to identify them of freshwater biodiversity patterns. Given that many conservation priorities are currently driven by terrestrialLETTER Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1 , Michele Thieme1

Vermont, University of

97

Terrestrial gamma ray flash production by active lightning leader channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terrestrial gamma ray flash production by active lightning leader channels B. E. Carlson,1 N. G 28 October 2010. [1] The production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) requires a seed energetic electron source and a strong electric field. Lightning leaders naturally provide seed electrons by cold

Bergen, Universitetet i

98

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

99

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - alberta flare research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and solar interior could Source: New Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research Collection: Physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of skill and portability in regional marine biogeochemical models: Role of multiple planktonic groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Coastal Research, GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Geesthachtfor Coastal Research, GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Battelle, Paific Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Company, 2952 George Washington Way, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Spatial and temporal controls on biogeochemical indicators at the small-scale interface between a contaminated aquifer and wetland surface water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from three locations exhibiting upward, downward, and negligent hydrologic flow between aquifer and wetland. PCA was used to identify the principal biogeochemical processes and to obtain factor scores for evaluating significant seasonal and hydrological...

Baez-Cazull, Susan Enid

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

106

Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......444-448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental...TERRESTRIAL DOSE RATE IN NIGERIAN MINES N d Aerial ropeway Figure 2. Surface background...444 448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental......

C. E. Mokobia; F. A. Balogun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

X-ray emission from the terrestrial magnetosheath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] X-rays are generated throughout the terrestrial magnetosheath as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and geocoronal neutrals. The solar wind ions resulting from these collisions ...

Robertson, Ina Picket; Cravens, Thomas Edward

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Peatland geoengineering: an alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration Christopher Freeman Nathalie...studies suggest that peatland carbon sequestration is due to the inhibitory...peatland geoengineering|carbon sequestration|phenolic compounds|inhibition...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Global organization of terrestrial plant–nutrient interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...needed guidance for efforts underway to incorporate N and P dynamics within the terrestrial component of coupled earth system models (13). Inclusion of explicit mechanisms of plant–nutrient interactions will better enable these models to simulate...

Lars O. Hedin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BIO-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2009; 17:1133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2009; 17 Research History of Accelerated and Qualification Testing of Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules: A Literature-plate terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. An important facet of this subject is the standard module test

113

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PI), M. Freshley, B. Bjornstad—PNNL; J. Christensen, M.D. Kennedy, A. Konopka, B. Bjornstad, D. Moore, T. Resch, J.

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigating critical Hanford and basic subsurface scienceAbiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsliquid waste release to the Hanford vadose zone, where

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Scientific FocusThe Idaho National Laboratory SBR Scientific Focus Area INLpart of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Scientific Focus

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces. Results from neutron reflectometry studies suggeststructure using SAXS. Neutron reflectometry also revealed it

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are brief flashes of gamma-rays originating in the Earth's atmosphere) that extends from below 25 keV to above 20 MeV. When good lightning data exists, TGFs are closely associated

119

Lunar and terrestrial planet formation in the Grand Tack scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...c for each simulated Solar System in that suite...terrestrial planets in the Solar System. The sub-panels are arranged the same...simulations. The sub-panels are arranged the same...populations for each simulated Solar System. We only have...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal modelEstimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce

Mcdonough, William F.

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulating terrestrial plant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: accumulating terrestrial plant Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Primer on the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: What We Don't Know, But Should Summary: primary...

123

Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Midlatitude regions experienced frequent droughts during the twentieth century, but their impacts on terrestrial carbon balance are unclear. This paper presents a century-scale study of drought effects on the carbon balance of terrestrial ...

Jingfeng Xiao; Qianlai Zhuang; Eryuan Liang; Xuemei Shao; A. David McGuire; Aaron Moody; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes] To characterize lightning processes that produce terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), we have analyzed broadband (lightning magnetic fields for TGFs detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

Cummer, Steven A.

125

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

DeLucia, Evan H.

126

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment David J. Burdige being buried in marine sediments may be of terrestrial origin, with the majority of this terrestrial organic matter (TOM) burial occurring in muddy, deltaic sediments. These calculations further suggest

Burdige, David

127

Impact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the satellite- based estimates of PAR for modelling terrestrial primary productivity. 1. Introduction The global energy is referred to as net primary production (NPP). For terrestrial ecosystems GPP and NPP are givenImpact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity RACHEL T. PINKER

Montana, University of

128

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1 and Jeremy N. Thomas2 that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure

Thomas, Jeremy N.

129

Terrestrial Ecosystems extend from uplands to wetlands, which form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field of study provides students with an understanding of ecological restoration, particularly as it relates to restoring and managing the kinds of ecosystems found, restoration, consulting and education pertaining to a wide range of forest ecosystems in the governmental

Edwards, Paul N.

130

NATURE GEOSCIENCE | VOL 7 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 173 emperature regulates almost all biogeochemical processes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ecosystem functions and services such as carbon storage1 . For example, climate warming influences terrestrial primary pro- duction directly by changing the leaf process intensity , but also indirectly in most areas of the world, lead- ing to a reduction in the diurnal temperature range14 , although

Chen, Jiquan

131

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Developers: Dr. Jerry Olson, Dr. Sarah Kurtz, Dr. Daniel Friedman, Alan Kibbler, and Charlene Karmer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Richard King, Jim Ermer, Dmitri D. Krut, Hector Cotal, Peter Colter, Hojun Yoon, Nassar Karam, and Gregory S. Glenn, Spectrolab, Inc. The triple-junction solar cell - or TJ solar cell - generates a lot of energy from just a very little amount of material. How much energy? A 1-cm2 cell can generate as much as 35 W of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity to power the typical American household. This cell can do this, first, because it

132

Global Change and the Terrestrial Biosphere (449th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Industrial Revolution, the increased use of fossil fuels has resulted in a dramatic and unprecedented rise in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Most scientists agree that increasing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have raised Earth's temperature and, without a reduction in emissions, will continue to do so. Terrestrial ecosystems sustain life on Earth through the production of food, fuel, fiber, clean air, and naturally purified water. But how will agriculture and ecosystems be affected by global change? Rogers will describe the impact of projected climate change on the terrestrial biosphere and explain why plants are not just passive respondents to global change, but play an important role in determining the rate of change.

Rogers, Alistair (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

The influence of winter convection on primary production: a parameterisation using a hydrostatic three-dimensional biogeochemical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the recent past observational and modelling studies have shown that the vertical displacement of water parcels, and therefore, phytoplankton particles in regions of deep-reaching convection plays a key role in late winter/early spring primary production. The underlying mechanism describes how convection cells capture living phytoplankton cells and recurrently expose them to sunlight. This study presents a parameterisation called `phytoconvection' which focuses on the influence of convection on primary production. This parameterisation was implemented into a three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model and applied to the Northwestern European Continental Shelf and areas of the adjacent Northeast Atlantic. The simulation was compared to a `conventional' parameterisation with respect to its influence on phytoplankton concentrations during the annual cycle and its effect on the carbon cycle. The simulation using the new parameterisation showed good agreement with observation data recorded during winter, whe...

Große, Fabian; Pätsch, Johannes; Backhaus, Jan O

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the terrestrial ecology of semi-arid sites; (2) marine sciences; (3) radionuclide fate and effects; (4) waste mobilization, fate and effects; and (5) theoretical research on environmental sampling. (ACR)

Novich, C.M. (ed.)

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated robotic terrestrial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ornithopter Summary: are often unable to navigate, giving an advantage to a terrestrial robot. Flying also requires a large... amount of energy, and no robot can stay aloft...

137

Coupling Terrestrial and Atmospheric Water Dynamics to Improve Prediction in a Changing Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluxes across the land surface directly influence predictions of ecological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and terrestrial hydrology. However, many simplifications are made in numerical models when considering ...

Lyon, Steve W.; Dominguez, Francina; Gochis, David J.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Castro, Christopher; Chow, Fotini K.; Fan, Ying; Fuka, Daniel; Hong, Yang; Kucera, Paul A.; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Salzmann, Nadine; Schmidli, Juerg; Snyder, Peter K.; Teuling, Adriaam J.; Twine, Tracy E.; Levis, Samuel; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Sealy, Andrea M.; Walter, M. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Uncertainty of Concentration–Terrestrial Carbon Feedback in Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon uptake by land and ocean as a biogeochemical response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is called concentration–carbon feedback and is one of the carbon cycle feedbacks of the global climate. This feedback can have a major impact ...

Tomohiro Hajima; Kaoru Tachiiri; Akihiko Ito; Michio Kawamiya

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

Pasko, Victor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States, using the terrestrial water balance as the constraintData Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman. The water balance was applied at the domain scale, and estimates of the water balance components

Pan, Ming

142

Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean-Yves Rasplus,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean of animals and plants, no checklist of alien terrestrial inverte- brates was available in any of the European the existing lists were inherently difficult because they used different definitions of alien. Thus, estimat

Richner, Heinz

143

Lightning mapping observation of a terrestrial gammaray flash Gaopeng Lu,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Lightning mapping observation of a terrestrial gammaray flash Gaopeng Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) related to a terrestrial gammaray flash (TGF) detected by RHESSI of a compact intracloud (IC) lightning flash between a negative charge region centered at about 8.5 km above

Cummer, Steven A.

144

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed from

Pasko, Victor

145

Geolocation of terrestrial gamma-ray flash source lightning M. B. Cohen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geolocation of terrestrial gamma-ray flash source lightning M. B. Cohen,1 U. S. Inan,1,2 R. K. Said-ray flash source lightning, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02801, doi:10.1029/ 2009GL041753. 1. Introduction [2; published 22 January 2010. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are impulsive ($1 ms) but intense

Bergen, Universitetet i

146

Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space N detection from space of a terrestrial3 gamma-ray flash (TGF) and the optical signal from lightning, TGF and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified.11 #12;3 1. Introduction12

Ã?stgaard, Nikolai

147

Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation to terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation to terrestrial gamma breakdown stage of 10 intracloud lightning flashes that may have produced terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and S. Xiong (2013), Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation

Cummer, Steven A.

148

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS: INTERPLANETARY ASPECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS, with peak value of -16 nT. In this paper the interplanetary aspects of these two solar-terrestrial connection events are analyzed and compared. Plasma and magnetic field data obtained from sensors on board

149

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

Williamson, Mark

150

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

151

SECTION 48 Table of Contents 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment Terrestrial ............................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48-1 SECTION 48 ­ Table of Contents 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment ­ Terrestrial 48.2 Wildlife of the Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin.......................................................................................17 #12;48-2 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment ­ Terrestrial 48.1 Focal Habitats: Current

152

Assessing the influence of the solar orbit on terrestrial biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terrestrial fossil record shows a significant variation in the extinction and origination rates of species during the past half billion years. Numerous studies have claimed an association between this variation and the motion of the Sun around the Galaxy, invoking the modulation of cosmic rays, gamma rays and comet impact frequency as a cause of this biodiversity variation. However, some of these studies exhibit methodological problems, or were based on coarse assumptions (such as a strict periodicity of the solar orbit). Here we investigate this link in more detail, using a model of the Galaxy to reconstruct the solar orbit and thus a predictive model of the temporal variation of the extinction rate due to astronomical mechanisms. We compare these predictions as well as those of various reference models with paleontological data. Our approach involves Bayesian model comparison, which takes into account the uncertainties in the paleontological data as well as the distribution of solar orbits consistent wi...

Feng, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

Comparative Analysis of Acidobacterial Genomic Fragments from Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries, with Emphasis on Acidobacteria Subdivision 6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries...drivers of key ecosystem processes in terrestrial...5o45E), where an ecosystem restoration experiment was...Biodiversity and Ecosystem Development (6...recovered from aquatic environments...

Anna M. Kielak; Johannes A. van Veen; George A. Kowalchuk

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

157

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras we describe our experience of implementing a gateway between ad hoc and terrestrial routing protocols terrestrial network interface and MAODV on a wireless ad hoc network interface.Although we focus primarily

Baras, John S.

158

Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Model-Inspired Research. TES research uses modeling, prediction, and synthesis to identify  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Earth system models (ESMs). TES supports research to advance fundamental understanding of terrestrial-process models, ecosystem models, and the Community Earth System Model). This emphasis on the capture of advanced in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and to provide the scientific

160

Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiling floats now represent a mature technology. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has begun to benefit from the increase in observational capacities by developing profiling floats that allow the measurement of key biooptical variables and subsequent products of biogeochemical and ecosystem relevance like Chlorophyll a (Chla), optical backscattering or attenuation coefficients which are proxies of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). Thanks to recent algorithmic improvements, new bio-optical variables such as backscattering coefficient or absorption by CDOM, at present can also be extracted from space observations of ocean color. In the future, an intensification of in situ measurements by bio-optical profiling floats would permit the elaboration of unique 3D/4D bio-optical climatologies, linking surface (remotely detected) properties to their vertical distribution (measured by autonomous platforms), with which key questions in the role of the ocean in climate could be addressed. In this context, the objective of the IOCCG (International Ocean Color Coordinating Group) BIO-Argo working group is to elaborate recommendations in view of a future use of bio-optical profiling floats as part of a network that would include a global array that could be 'Argo-relevant', and specific arrays that would have more focused objectives or regional targets. The overall network, realizing true multi-scale sustained observations of global marine biogeochemistry and biooptics, should satisfy the requirements for validation of ocean color remote sensing as well as the needs of a wider community investigating the impact of global change on biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems. Regarding the global profiling float array, the recommendation is that Chla as well as POC should be the key variables to be systematically measured. A first target would be to implement 20% of the Argo floats with these measurements within a five-year term. The yearly additional cost is estimated to 1.5 M$, including additional management structure in each of the two Global Data Assembly Centers.

Claustre, H.; Bishop, J.; Boss, E.; Bernard, S.; Berthon, J.-F.; Coatanoan, C.; Johnson, K.; Lotiker, A.; Ulloa, O.; Perry, M.J.; D'Ortenzio, F.; D'andon, O.H.F.; Uitz, J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Larger Opportunities for Research on the Relations of Solar and Terrestrial Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the so-called "solar constant of radiation...an insuperable obstacle to the highest...distribution of energy along the diameter of the solar image. These measurements...quantitative in terms of energy. Something can...reflecting the solar beam by means of...

C. G. Abbot

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

Pigeon, Timothy David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Multi-temporal Terrestrial Lidar for Estimating Individual Tree Dimensions and Biomass Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate measures of forest structural parameters are essential to forest inventory and growth models, managing wildfires, and modeling of carbon cycle. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides accurate understory information rapidly through non...

Srinivasan, Shruthi

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Using terrestrial laser scanner for estimating leaf areas of individual trees in a conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method that applies the terrestrial laser scanning to estimate leaf areas of individual trees in a mature conifer forest is presented. It is based on the...Picea abies [L.] Karst.) stand located in southern Bav...

Peng Huang; Hans Pretzsch

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

167

Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Digital Outcrop Models: Applications of Terrestrial Scanning Lidar Technology in Stratigraphic Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...passive sensors. All but the most extreme atmospheric and lighting conditions will have little effect on terrestrial lidar...Changes, Cycles, and Reservoirs on Carbonate Platforms in Greenhouse and Ice-house Worlds: SEPM, Short Course no. 35, 147...

J.A. Bellian; C. Kerans; D.C. Jennette

169

THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. I. IN SITU SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially 'Earth like', containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); O'Brien, David P., E-mail: jbond@psi.ed [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largely in the Ukraine and Switzerland, this work has concentrated on the role of resuspension in the contamination of agricultural plants. Whereas other researchers have shown...

171

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Loik Abstract Loik Abstract Climate Change Impacts on Shrub-Forest Ecotones in the Western US Principle Investigator: Michael E. Loik, University of California, Santa Cruz Co-PI: Daniel F. Doak, University of California, Santa Cruz (after Aug. 2007: University of Wyoming) Unfunded collaborator: Ronald P. Neilson, Pacific Northwest Forest Service Research Laboratory Abstract:: This research is motivated by (i) the importance of snow as a dominant form of precipitation for a large portion of arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States, (ii) uncertainty in how changes in snow climate will affect ecotones between terrestrial ecosystems of the West, and (iii) the need to better understand how climate change impacts recruitment of dominant organisms of range and forest lands of the West, in order to better predict climate change effects on distributions of terrestrial ecosystems.

172

Assimilation of surface data in a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model of the surface ocean: 1. Method and preliminary results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method to estimate parameters of complex ocean carbon cycle models and to estimate carbon fluxes other than primary production from satellite data. A one-dimensional vertical model, which couples the physics of the ocean mixed layer and biogeochemical processes, was used to simulate the carbon cycle. Variational assimilation was applied to globally adjust the model solution. Consistent results were found for the grazing rate, the phytoplankton mortality rate, and the minimum concentration of zooplankton in winter. Some carbon fluxes appeared to be robustly constrained; however, primary production is apparently underestimated. The study results suggest that a simplified biological model would adequately the seasonal evolution of surface chlorophyll concentration, and would be more adapted to transform satellite data into carbon fluxes. Analysis of model behavior during assimilation experiments also provided information for other possible simplifications of the trophic model. 49 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Prunet, P.; Minster, J.F. [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France); Ruiz-Pino, D. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)] [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Summaries of FY 1995 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either direct or indirect to the Department of Energy`s long-range technological needs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William R. Wiley Environmental William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

175

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

176

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

177

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

178

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL HERITAGE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL was recorded using a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i) and a mini UAV-system (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle targets was used. As a product of the laser data a regular raster grid with point spacing of 5 cm

180

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

de Weck, Olivier L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dr J Michael Kuperberg | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Climate and Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » Dr J Michael Kuperberg Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities

182

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

183

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

184

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

185

Improvements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao, Steven W. Running  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towers. The global annual total ET over the vegetated land surface is 62.8Ã?103 km3 , agrees very wellImprovements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao Vegetation cover fraction MODIS MODIS global evapotranspiration (ET) products by Mu et al. [Mu, Q., Heinsch

Montana, University of

186

Aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate drift in southern Appalachian Mountain streams: implications for trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the southern Appalachians, ecotrophic coefficients and food conversion efficiencies. 3. Abundance and biomass invertebrate biomass was greater than aquatic larval biomass in the autumn. Drift rates of aquatic larval abundance and biomass were greatest at sunset. Inputs of terrestrial invertebrate biomass were greater than

Hutchens, John

187

Protecting terrestrial ecosystems and the climate through a global carbon market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a global carbon market Robert Bonnie Melissa...Washington, DC 20009, USA Protecting terrestrial...through a carbon market 1861 0 400 800 1200 1600 USA China Russia Japan...US Department of Energy (1999). ural...typically have market values for the...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evidence for the respiration of ancient terrestrial organic C in northern temperate lakes and streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...integral part of the landscape C storage/decomposition system...remainder of the water sample was pumped using a peristaltic pump through combusted...of biological substrates in seawater: Implications...current models of long-term C storage in terrestrial reservoirs...

S. Leigh McCallister; Paul A. del Giorgio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation Bruce Thomas1, Australia Salisbury, SA, Australia The Levels, SA, Australia Bruce.Thomas@UniSA.Edu.Au Abstract To date- stead of the computer being hand-held, it is attached to the user on a backpack or belt, as illustrated

Thomas, Bruce

190

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric-Milwaukee, will become director of the Great Lakes and Marine Waters Center at the University of Michigan on I July 1976, the University of Michigan reports. Before joining the UW faculty, Beeton was chiefof the En- vironmental

191

Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes Steven A. Cummer,1 Yuhu Zhai,1 Wenyi Hu,1 David M. Smith,2,3 Liliana I. Lopez,4,5 and Mark A. [1] We report observations and analysis of 30 kHz radio emissions (sferics) from lightning discharges

Cummer, Steven A.

192

AcceptedArticleSimultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AcceptedArticleSimultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from pulses, TGF and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified. 7 University of Alabama occur during the initial phase of a normal polarity intracloud (IC) lightning flash, bringing negative

Ã?stgaard, Nikolai

193

McCarl contribution to ED Document Terrestrial GHG Quantification and Accounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McCarl contribution to ED Document Terrestrial GHG Quantification and Accounting 1 Prices across.4.2.1 Current cost of a GHG offset................................................................ 13 1.4.2.2 Current offset equivalent of a GHG offset............................................ 14 1.4.2.3 Per unit

McCarl, Bruce A.

194

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 -413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 - 413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension 2001, Finlay 2002, Dolan 2006, McArthur 2006). In this paper we present data on protozoa isolated from) or the Green Turtles Chelonia mydas (e.g. Broderick et al. 2006). The invertebrates have been shown to include

Brown, Richard

195

Critical remarks on the use of terrestrial moss (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) for monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are widely used to monitor airborne heavy metal pollution, have been collected from eight catchments spread been used successfully to map and monitor airborne heavy metal pollution in northern European countries reserved. Keywords: Terrestrial moss; Environmental monitoring; Northern Europe; Airborne pollution; Heavy

Filzmoser, Peter

196

ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1- ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Course:00 J 127 -Simcoe Building (first lecture September 11, 2008) Office Hours: Prior to the start of class will deal with a rather wide array of topics in the environmental sciences, with particular emphasis

Fox, Michael

197

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

198

Can we measure terrestrial photosynthesis from space directly, using spectral reflectance and fluorescence?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can we measure terrestrial photosynthesis from space directly, using spectral reflectance the changes in the xanthophyll cycle, which is closely coupled to photosynthesis. Several studies have shown of fluorescence, which is a directly related to the efficiency of photosynthesis. We discuss the state of the art

Jones, Peter JS

199

Summaries of FY 1993 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the DOE`s many missions. The Geosciences Research Program is supported by the Office of Energy Research. The participants in this program include DOE laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the DOE and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar-atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ed O'Loughlin | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ed O'Loughlin Environmental chemist - Biosciences Ed O'Loughlin is an environmental chemist/environmental microbiologist specializing in the biogeochemical processes controlling the cycling of major/minor elements and the fate and transport of contaminants in natural systems. Ed's research intersects several major disciplines, including environmental microbiology, environmental chemistry, and geology. He has been studying biogeochemical processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems for nearly 25 years, the last 12 of which have been with the Molecular Environmental Science Group in the Biosciences Division at Argonne. Ed's current research focuses on the effects of microbial transformations of carbon, iron, and sulfur on the fate and transport of uranium and

202

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

203

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The goal of the Interagency Agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory is to conduct research to enhance understanding of the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Performer Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling its contribution to the atmospheric carbon cycle. Active methane fluxes (from deep sediment hydrates and seeps) contribute to shallow sediment biogeochemical carbon cycles, which in turn

205

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Comment on Tectonics and the Future of Life on Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is argued that the tight interconnection between biological, climatological, and geophysical factors in the history of the terrestrial biosphere can teach us something of wider importance regarding the general astrobiological evolution of planets in the Galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way. Motivated by a recent debate on the future of Earth's biosphere, we suggest an additional reason why the impact of plate tectonics on the biological evolution is significant on the global Galactic level.

Milan M. Cirkovic

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planetary systems, ours included, are formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. While the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-IR interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-IR emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-IR interferometric observations that probe gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to dust, within one astronomical unit of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapor and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapor is likely produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

J. A. Eisner

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of Biases in JRA-25/JCDAS Precipitation and Their Impact on the Global Terrestrial Carbon Balance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluates a modeled precipitation field and examines how its bias affects the modeling of the regional and global terrestrial carbon cycle. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation produced by the Japanese 25-yr reanalysis (JRA-...

Makoto Saito; Akihiko Ito; Shamil Maksyutov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Consequences of Considering Carbon–Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of carbon–nitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

212

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research areas are highlighted: terrestrial and riverine ecology; marine sciences; radionuclide fate and effects; ecological effects of coal conversion; solid waste: mobilization fate and effects; and statistical and theoretical research. A listing of interagency services agreements provided at the end of this report. (PSB)

Vaughan, B.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

C.14 PLANETARY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY THROUGH ANALOG RESEARCH 1. Scope of Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Science Operations: PSTAR seeks systems-level terrestrial field campaigns which are conducted exploration requires the development of relevant, miniaturized instrumentation capable of extensive operations environments on Earth in order to develop a sound technical and scientific basis to conduct planetary research

Rathbun, Julie A.

215

US fuel cell research and applications, 1960--1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the major fuel cell research and development (R and D) programs funded by the US government and the private sector, with a particular focus on terrestrial applications. Included in this overview is information on funding levels, project descriptions and goals, and selected accomplishments. Brief assessments as to the proximity of commercialization for each of the primary types of fuel cells are also furnished. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Kinzey, B.R.; Sen, R.K.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Research - Programs - Climate &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Research Areas The Carbon Cycle Better Models for Robust Climate Projection Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Projects Contacts Facilities & Centers Publications Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Climate & Carbon Sciences Program The global carbon cycle strongly regulates earth's climate, while anthropogenic disturbance of the carbon cycle is the main cause of current and predicted climate change. At the same time, humans depend on the terrestrial carbon cycle for food, fiber, energy, and pharmaceuticals. The Climate and Carbon Sciences Program of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory encompasses both atmospheric and

217

Workshop on environmental research for actinide elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discussions in this fifth workshop were directed to the advances which have been made in the environmental chemistry of plutonium and to the feasibility and worth of developing environmental transport models which might serve as predictive tools for long term behavior and as guides for future research needs. Two plutonium models of the soil/plant pathway were presented for critique and as examples of possible approaches. Reports of the following four panels are presented in this proceedings: model development; marine; terrestrial and freshwater/groundwater.

Watters, R.L. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The role of quality assurance in the monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quality assurance in ecosystem monitoring helps reduce the variability associated with human factors, and increase the probability that if the work is duplicated by other scientists, the results will be comparable. This paper addresses quality assurance issues related to program design, field work, and subjective measurements in terrestrial monitoring. The purpose of this paper is to provide topics for discussion for participants at the Ecological Quality Assurance Workshop, and is not intended to be an exhaustive study of these topics. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Breckenridge, R.P.; Olson, G.L.; Wiersma, G.B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Jones, K.B. (Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Population doses from terrestrial exposure in the vicinity of abandoned uranium mines in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A uranium mineralized area of Stara Planina Mt., Serbia, where uranium ore was exploited for seven years was characterized radiologically. Results were compared with those for an area of background radiation in the northern part of the mountain. The terrestrial gamma dose rate due to 238U, 232Th and 40K in the area affected by mining activities was twofold higher than that of background area. The radiological situation of the affected area is not of immediate concern, except one location with elevated external hazard index where remediative measures taking into account site-specific ecological characteristics should be planned and implemented.

M. Mom?ilovi?; J. Kova?evi?; S. Dragovi?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Terrestrial Remotely Sensed Imagery in Support of Public Health: New Avenues of Research Using Object-Based Image Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

context of the 1994–1996 Ebola outbreaks. Photogramm. Eng.Vector-borne disease modeling (Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever) LST,series data to examine Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in

Kelly, Maggi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Terrestrial Remotely Sensed Imagery in Support of Public Health: New Avenues of Research Using Object-Based Image Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage assessment (Earthquake) Natural hazard damageaid assessment (Population characteristics) Natural hazardDarfur, Sudan Natural hazard damage assessment (Earthquake)

Kelly, Maggi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Terrestrial Remotely Sensed Imagery in Support of Public Health: New Avenues of Research Using Object-Based Image Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat events in urban environments by integrating sociodemographic risk factors with estimates of land surface temperature derived from thermal remote

Kelly, Maggi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma-ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ? 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV to 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar planetary O3 absorption somewhat better than before.

B. C. Thomas; A. L. Melott; L. D. Martin; C. H. Jackman

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar pla...

Thomas, B C; Martin, L D; Jackman, C H

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Research Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

230

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

researchers published research in 2007 that addressed assumptions in the ability of diesel exhaust organic aerosols to mix with organic aerosols from tree evaporate. This new...

231

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

232

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

233

Research | JCESR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research banner researcher908 Today's electrical energy storage approaches suffer from limited energy and power capacities, lower-than-desired rates of charge and discharge,...

234

Assimilation of surface data in a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model of the surface ocean: 2. Adjusting a simple trophic model to chlorophyll, temperature, nitrate, and pCO{sub 2} data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper builds on a previous work which produced a constrained physical-biogeochemical model of the carbon cycle in the surface ocean. Three issues are addressed: (1) the results of chlorophyll assimilation using a simpler trophic model, (2) adjustment of parameters using the simpler model and data other than surface chlorophyll concentrations, and (3) consistency of the main carbon fluxes derived by the simplified model with values from the more complex model. A one-dimensional vertical model coupling the physics of the ocean mixed layer and a description of biogeochemical processes with a simple trophic model was used to address these issues. Chlorophyll concentration, nitrate concentration, and temperature were used to constrain the model. The surface chlorophyll information was shown to be sufficient to constrain primary production within the photic layer. The simultaneous assimilation of chlorophyll, nitrate, and temperature resulted in a significant improvement of model simulation for the data used. Of the nine biological and physical parameters which resulted in significant variations of the simulated chlorophyll concentration, seven linear combinations of the mode parameters were constrained. The model fit was an improvement on independent surface chlorophyll and nitrate data. This work indicates that a relatively simple biological model is sufficient to describe carbon fluxes. Assimilation of satellite or climatological data coulc be used to adjust the parameters of the model for three-dimensional models. It also suggests that the main carbon fluxes driving the carbon cycle within surface waters could be derived regionally from surface information. 38 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Prunet, P.; Minster, J.F.; Echevin, V. [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France)] [and others] [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France); and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Research Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opportunities collaborationassetsimagesicon-collaboration.jpg Research Opportunities Partnering with respected universities, LANL Centers provide exceptional educational...

236

Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

237

Transport of terrestrial organic matter in the Ogooué deep sea turbidite system (Gabon)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to define the nature and distribution of the organic matter (OM) preserved in the modern Ogooué deep sea turbidite system (Gabon), bulk geochemical techniques (Rock-Eval pyrolysis, elemental and isotopic analyses) and palynofacies were applied to three piston cores collected in the Cape Lopez Canyon and lobe and on the continental slope, north of the canyon. The hemipelagic sedimentation in the study area is characterized by high accumulations of well-preserved OM (?2–3 wt. TOC %). Bulk geochemical and palynofacies analysis indicate both a marine and terrestrial origin of the OM. Contribution of the marine source is higher on the slope than in the canyon and lobe. OM accumulation in turbidites is strongly controlled by the combined influence of the Cape Lopez Canyon and littoral drift. In the canyon and lobe, turbidites show generally low TOC content (0.5 wt. %) and OM is oxidized. The origin of the OM is interpreted as both marine and terrestrial, with a higher contribution of continental source versus marine source. The low TOC contents are due to the large siliciclastic fraction transported by the littoral drift and diverted in the Cape Lopez Canyon during high energy processes (e.g. storms) which tend to dilute the OM in the turbidites. Transport by long-shore currents and/or turbiditic flows leads to oxidation of the OM. On the continental slope located north of the Cape Lopez Canyon, large amounts of OM are deposited in turbidites (up to 14 wt. %). The OM is predominantly derived from terrestrial land plants and has not been subjected to intense oxidation. These deposits are characterized by high hydrocarbon potential (up to 27 kg HC/t rock), indicating a good potential as gas-prone source rock. Because Cape Lopez Canyon captures a significant part of the sediment transported by the littoral drift, the siliciclastic sedimentary flux is reduced north of the canyon; OM is thus concentrated in the turbidites. Variation in TOC content within turbidite laminae can be explained by the burst and sweep deposition process affecting the boundary layer of the turbulent flow. This study confirms that gravity flows play a preponderant role in the accumulation and preservation of OM in deep water and that deep sea turbidite systems could be regarded as an environment where organic sedimentation occurs.

Laurie Biscara; Thierry Mulder; Philippe Martinez; François Baudin; Henri Etcheber; Jean-Marie Jouanneau; Thierry Garlan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

239

Summary outline of DOE geoscience and geoscience - related research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) supports long-range, basic research in those areas of the geosciences which are relevant to the nation's energy needs. The objective of the Geoscience program is to develop a quantitative and predictive understanding of geological, geophysical and geochemical structures and processes in the solid earth and in solar-terrestrial relationships. This understanding is to assure an effective knowledge base for energy resource recognition, evaluation and utilization in an environmentally acceptable manner. The work is carried out primarily in DOE laboratories and in universities, although some is conducted by other federal agencies and by the National Academy of Sciences. Principal areas of interest include: Geology, Geophysics, and Earth Dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy Resource Recognition, Evaluation and Utilization; Hydrologic and Marine Sciences; and Solar-Terrestrial/Atmospheric Interactions.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

RESEARCH FRONT CSIRO PUBLISHING Foreword  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the biogeochemical cycling of Sb, its sources, transport through environmental compartments, and risk assessment and nutrients in aquatic ecosystems, development of water-quality and sampling guidelines and development Australian Chemical Institute (RACI) Analytical Divisions medal in 2002 and the RACI Environmental Chemistry

Short, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

242

Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

244

Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

Rayno, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparative genomic analysis of the thermophilic biomass-degrading fungi Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermostable enzymes and thermophilic cell factories may afford economic advantages in the production of many chemicals and biomass-based fuels. Here we describe and compare the genomes of two thermophilic fungi, Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris. To our knowledge, these genomes are the first described for thermophilic eukaryotes and the first complete telomere-to-telomere genomes for filamentous fungi. Genome analyses and experimental data suggest that both thermophiles are capable of hydrolyzing all major polysaccharides found in biomass. Examination of transcriptome data and secreted proteins suggests that the two fungi use shared approaches in the hydrolysis of cellulose and xylan but distinct mechanisms in pectin degradation. Characterization of the biomass-hydrolyzing activity of recombinant enzymes suggests that these organisms are highly efficient in biomass decomposition at both moderate and high temperatures. Furthermore, we present evidence suggesting that aside from representing a potential reservoir of thermostable enzymes, thermophilic fungi are amenable to manipulation using classical and molecular genetics.

Berka, Randy M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Grimwood, Jane; Reid, Ian; Ishmael, Nadeeza; John, Tricia; Darmond, Corinne; Moisan, Marie-Claude; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Lombard, Vincent; Natvig, Donald O.; Lindquist, Erika; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lucas, Susan; Harris, Paul; Powlowski, Justin; Bellemare, Annie; Taylor, David; Butler, Gregory; de Vries, Ronald P.; Allijn, Iris E.; van den Brink, Joost; Ushinsky, Sophia; Storms, Reginald; Powell, Amy J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Baker, Scott. E.; Magnuson, Jon; LaBoissiere, Sylvie; Clutterbuck, A. John; Martinez, Diego; Wogulis, Mark; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael W.; Tsang, Adrian

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways Version 3. 0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways is a computer program for calculation of numeric criteria for land application and distribution and marketing of sludges under the sewage-sludge regulations at 40 CFR Part 503. The risk-assessment models covered assume that municipal sludge with specified characteristics is spread across a defined area of ground at a known rate once each year for a given number of years. Risks associated with direct land application of sludge applied after distribution and marketing are both calculated. The computer program calculates the maximum annual loading of contaminants that can be land applied and still meet the risk criteria specified as input. Software Description: The program is written in the Turbo/Basic programming language for implementation on IBM PC/AT or compatible machines using DOS 3.0 or higher operating system. Minimum core storage is 512K.

Niebla, E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

LOW Mg/Si PLANETARY HOST STARS AND THEIR Mg-DEPLETED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations have shown that a diverse range of extrasolar terrestrial planet bulk compositions are likely to exist based on the observed variations in host star elemental abundances. Based on recent studies, it is expected that a significant proportion of host stars may have Mg/Si ratios below 1. Here we examine this previously neglected group of systems. Planets simulated as forming within these systems are found to be Mg-depleted (compared to Earth), consisting of silicate species such as pyroxene and various feldspars. Planetary carbon abundances also vary in accordance with the host star C/O ratio. The predicted abundances are in keeping with observations of polluted white dwarfs, lending validity to this approach. Further studies are required to determine the full planetary impacts of the bulk compositions predicted here.

Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Delgado Mena, Elisa; Israelian, Garik; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Santos, Nuno C., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Most terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water. In amniotes, drinking is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the efficiency of water transport, such as volume per kinematic cycle) may be randomly variable with littleMost terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water, not drinking, because water, unlike food, is physically uniform (at least between 1 and 99 °C). Modifications

Behe, Michael J.

250

Early (4.5 Ga) formation of terrestrial crust: LuHf, 18 thermometry results for Hadean zircons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the characterization of 176 Hf/177 Hf initial ratios (Hf ) in Hadean zircons by acquiring a further 116 laser ablationEarly (4.5 Ga) formation of terrestrial crust: Lu­Hf, 18 O, and Ti thermometry results for Hadean Editor: R.W. Carlson Available online 19 February 2008 Abstract Large deviations in Hf(T) from bulk

Harrison, Mark

251

A Ka/EHF band geostationary satellite system to provide multimedia services to terrestrial and aeronautical users  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on a satellite mobile-multimedia system using both Ka-band and EHF, both for the fixed and the mobile user, which has been defined in Europe to support the UMTS satellite component. The system includes a terrestrial broadband communications ...

Giacinto Losquadro; Michele Luglio; Francesco Vatalaro

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

TERRESTRIAL 3D-LASER SCANNER ZLS07 DEVELOPED AT ETH ZURICH: AN OVERVIEW OF ITS CONFIGURATION,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility Cavern ABSTRACT This paper introduces the terrestrial 3D-laser scanner ZLS07 which has been and the application of underground utility cavern acquisition for water and sewage engineering are presented. For utility cavern acquisitions, the ZLS07 is guided headfirst through a manhole into the utility cavern

253

A magnetic compass sense has been demonstrated in a large and taxonomically diverse group of organisms. In terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A magnetic compass sense has been demonstrated in a large and taxonomically diverse group of organisms. In terrestrial organisms, magnetic orientation appears to be mediated by more than one type; Marhold et al., 1997). In contrast, magnetic compass orientation has been shown to be sensitive

Phillips, John B.

254

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 15151525 www.elsevier.nl/locate/jastp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 1515­1525 wwwDepartment of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA bDepartment ofAerospace Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA cDepartment of Electrical Engineering

Stout, Quentin F.

255

Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation average dose rate in three mountainous locations in the western region of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......produced an almost energy-independent response of the detectors within the energy range of terrestrial...TL signal vs. storage time. As can be...Figure 1. TL response of CaSO4:Dy as...3 -5 show the frequency distributions of......

Fayez H. H. A1-Ghorabie

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Astrometric Detection of Terrestrial Planets in the Habitable Zones of Nearby Stars with SIM PlanetQuest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIM PlanetQuest (Space Interferometry Mission) is a space-borne Michelson interferometer for precision stellar astrometry, with a nine meter baseline, currently slated for launch in 2015. One of the principal science goals is the astrometric detection and orbit characterization of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. Differential astrometry of the target star against a set of reference stars lying within a degree will allow measurement of the target star's reflex motion with astrometric accuracy of 1 micro-arcsecond in a single measurement. We assess SIM's capability for detection (as opposed to characterization by orbit determination) of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of nearby solar-type stars. We compare SIM's performance on target lists optimized for the SIM and Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronograph (TPF-C) missions. Performance is quantified by three metrics: minimum detectable planet mass, number and mass distribution of detected planets, and completeness of detections in each mass range. Finally, we discuss the issue of confidence in detections and non-detections, and show how information from SIM's planet survey can enable TPF to increase its yield of terrestrial planets.

Joseph Catanzarite; Michael Shao; Angelle Tanner; Stephen Unwin; Jeffrey Yu

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 12331240 www.elsevier.com/locate/jastp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and of the transfer of solar energy to the troposphere and biosphere. Perhaps the least understood element of this comJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 1233­1240 www thunderstorm currents over one of the three main thunderstorm active regions: Africa, Asia/Oceania, and America

Michigan, University of

258

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd Edition. #12;HO #20 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Larcher (1995) #12;HO #21 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 Osmond et al. (1982) IN Encyclopedia of Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

259

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

university-research The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total...

260

Research Highlights  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE partners with leading researchers from industry, academia, and national laboratories to accelerate advances in solid-state lighting (SSL). These researchers have made dramatic progress in just a few years, achieving several world records as well as national recognition.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Thermodynamics Affect Radiative Impact of Deep Convective Cloud Systems Submitter: Jensen, M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric...

262

Microbiological Research ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or to expand on previous research addressing the fate of nitrogen from agrochemicals (Bichat et al., 1999

Sims, Gerald K.

263

Summaries of FY 91 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. Theses activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the Department of Energy and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs. 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News News November 5, 2007. The NICCR National office will release the 2008/2009 RFP on March 1st, 2008. Other important dates will be announced in the near future. July 17, 2006. The selection of the new NICCR Coastal Center has been completed. Seven competitive applications were submitted in April, and reviewed by a panel of technical experts shortly thereafter. As a result of the competitive review, the application from Tulane University was selected by DOE. It is expected that a cooperative agreement between Tulane University and the DOE will be in place to manage the new Coastal Center by September 1, 2006. The next NICCR request for proposals is expected to include a research focus on potential effects of climatic change and/or sea level rise on the structure and functioning of coastal terrestrial ecosystems. All coastal ecosystem research to be supported by NICCR will be in the United States.

265

Neuroimaging Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

266

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cotton-Ball Clouds Contained Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

268

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection with CuP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

269

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the First Aerosol Indirect Effect in Shallow Cumuli Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

270

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research:...

271

Research Help  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology Nuclear Science & Technology Plutonium Science Physics Renewable Energy Space Sciences Research Help Looking for Library resources? How to Find can assist you in...

272

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y Qian, and JE Penner. 2012. "Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L15709, doi: 10.1029...

273

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change Download a printable PDF Submitter: Maseyk, K. S., Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6 Area of Research: Surface...

274

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Curve Captures Cloud System Variability Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud...

275

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference:...

276

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Kelly, JT, CC Chuang, and AS Wexler. 2007. "Influence of dust composition on cloud droplet...

277

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tests of Single-Column Models with ARM Data Submitter: Randall, D. A., Colorado State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column ModelsParameterizations...

278

Research Proposals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards are intended to be an avenue for significant energy efficiency and renewable energy innovation. To enable the participant's creativity as they conduct their...

279

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

algorithms from the research domain to operational applications. But while the standardization of algorithms is an important concern of the radar community, an awareness of the...

280

Research Topics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Postdoctoral Research Awards are intended to be an avenue for significant energy efficiency and renewable energy innovation. The EERE Postdoctoral...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weather Prediction and Climate Simulation: a Meeting of the Models Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single...

282

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Plains site to evaluate three major Numerical-Weather-Prediction reanalyses (ERA-Interim, NCEPNCAR Reanalysis I, and NCEPDOE...

283

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MBL Cloud Properties Derived from the Azores-AMF Observations Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

284

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Glaciation Temperature of Deep Convective Clouds with Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud...

285

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

286

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schween, J. H., Inst. of Geophysics and Meteorology Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference:...

287

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S,...

288

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

289

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Maryland Sawyer, V. R., University of Maryland Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

290

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Khain, A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Area of Research:...

291

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie...

292

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Insight on the Atmosphere's Tiniest Particles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Smith, J., NCAR McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

293

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Properties of the 1997 TWP Smoke Event Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal...

294

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Radiation...

295

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Estimates of Cloud Optical Thickness, Simple Equation Is Good Enough Submitter: Barnard, J. C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

296

Research | NREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy grid integration. Learn More National Bioenergy Center National Center for Photovoltaics National Wind Technology Center Publications Data & Resources Research Highlights...

297

Member Name Title Research Interests Joseph Bump Assistant Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hotspots Aquatic-terrestrial links Stable isotopes in wildlife ecology Wind energy-wildlife issues Kim

298

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

299

Terrestrial and Solar Limits on Long-Lived Particles in a Dark Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter charged under a new gauge sector, as motivated by recent data, suggests a rich GeV-scale 'dark sector' weakly coupled to the Standard Model by gauge kinetic mixing. The new gauge bosons can decay to Standard Model leptons, but this mode is suppressed if decays into lighter 'dark sector' particles are kinematically allowed. These particles in turn typically have macroscopic decay lifetimes that are constrained by two classes of experiments, which we discuss. Lifetimes of 10 cm {approx}< c{tau} {approx}< 10{sup 8} cm are constrained by existing terrestrial beam-dump experiments. If, in addition, dark matter captured in the Sun (or Earth) annihilates into these particles, lifetimes up to {approx} 10{sup 15} cm are constrained by solar observations. These bounds span fourteen orders of magnitude in lifetime, but they are not exhaustive. Accordingly, we identify promising new directions for experiments including searches for displaced di-muons in B-factories, studies at high-energy and -intensity proton beam dumps, precision gamma-ray and electronic measurements of the Sun, and milli-charge searches re-analyzed in this new context.

Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yavin, Itay; /CCPP, New York U.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Identifying biological monitoring tools to evaluate the chronic effects of chemical exposures in terrestrial plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When contamination of any habitat, such as a wetland impacted by heavy metals or a high desert disposal area impacted by chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides, is considered within an ecological risk assessment context, long-term land use goals should be included as part of the decision-making process, especially when remediation options are being considered for the site. If imminent threats to human health and the environment are highly unlikely, and environmental management and projected land use allow, remediation options and monitoring programs for a site should be developed that assure long-term habitat use, while continuing surveillance for evaluating potential chronic ecological effects. For example, at Milltown Reservoir wetlands on the Clark Fork River in western Montana the baseline ecological risk assessment suggested that no current adverse biological or ecological effects warranted extensive remediation at the site. But, given the land use goals currently anticipated for the wetland habitat and the hydroelectric facility located on the Clark Fork River, a program,should be developed that, in part, continues assessing plant communities and sublethal biological effects as cost-effective monitoring tools for evaluating long-term effects associated with metal-contaminated soils. Similarly, high desert sites that have been impacted by past disposal activities like that at Alkali Lake, Oregon, should be monitored using cost-effective methods that continue to monitor terrestrial plants as a field screening tool for evaluating soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides.

Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Desalination Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... for the United States for discussions with the Office of Saline Water. The Committee on Desalination Research had considered a research programme in conjunction with industry, and the Atomic Energy ... the Atomic Energy Authority had undertaken work on the use of nuclear energy for a desalination plant. The Committee and the Authority had watched closely work in the United States ...

1965-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Research projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

303

Basic Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

304

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

305

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

306

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 METHODS DERIVATION MODULE 3: METHODS DERIVATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M3-1 1 Introduction and Basis for the Approach The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has in place a radiation dose limit of 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for the protection of aquatic organisms (DOE Order 5400.5), and has proposed dose limits for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These limits are: 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for aquatic animals; 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for terrestrial plants; and 0.1 rad/d (1 mGy/d) for terrestrial animals. Because the biota protection limits are dose-based, a calculational method is needed to demonstrate compliance. In theory, derived radionuclide concentration limits for environmental media (e.g., Biota Concentration Guides, BCGs, for water, sediment, or soil) provide a relatively straightforward and simple means to do so. However, because of the

307

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Recent Climate-Driven Increases in Vegetation Productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence of an Acceleration of the Northern Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain much of the global reservoir of terrestrial carbon that is potentially reactive in the context of near-term climate change. Annual variability and recent trends in vegetation productivity across Alaska and northwest ...

J. S. Kimball; M. Zhao; A. D. McGuire; F. A. Heinsch; J. Clein; M. Calef; W. M. Jolly; S. Kang; S. E. Euskirchen; K. C. McDonald; S. W. Running

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

310

Conclusion -The VGI ratio provides a simple and effective molecular parameter useful in determining the relative contributions of terrestrial and aquatic organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Connecticut and Thames River mouths have a greater terrestrial OM component (VGI of 0.15 to 0.23). The results barrier island and with marsh islands and mul- tiple urbanized tidal creeks, displays a very wide VGI

Columbia University

311

Relative role of changes in CO? and climate to equilibrium responses of net primary production and carbon storage of the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a partial factorial model experiment, we used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) to assess the relative roles of changes in CO2, temperature, precipitation and cloudiness in equilibrium responses of ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

312

Aquatic feeding in a terrestrial turtle: a functional-morphological study of the feeding apparatus in the Indochinese box turtle Cuora galbinifrons (Testudines, Geoemydidae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indochinese box turtle Cuora galbinifrons...is regarded as a purely terrestrial species, but our results demonstrate that it can feed both on land and in water. The inverse relationship between the relative d...

Nikolay Natchev; Patrick Lemell; Egon Heiss; Christian Beisser…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the FRC to characterize the site and in support of NABIR-funded investigations at the FRC. NABIR investigators who collect their own samples or measurements at the FRC will be responsible for developing their own data quality assurance protocol. Notably, this QAP will be of direct benefit to NABIR investigators who will be provided with and use the documented quality data about the FRC to support their investigations.

Brandt, C.C.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con-parameter experiments in RERAF. Systems Analysis Department The objective of the research is to de- velop and apply are systems reliability, organisation, toxi- cology, informatics, simulation methods, work studies, economics

315

Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

317

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2001). Little data are available on the use of native terrestrial ecosystems for waste- water treatmentNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem: Impact on soil physical

Johnson, Eric E.

318

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

319

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

320

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schumacher, C., Texas A&M University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

322

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fielding, M. D., University of Reading Area of Research:...

323

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional terrestrial threat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ative importance of ... Source: Florida, University of - Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 WHAT...

325

Structural characterization of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides from Pinal Creek, AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial catalysis of Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be a dominant source of abundant sorption- and redox-active Mn oxides in marine, freshwater, and subsurface aquatic environments. In spite of their importance, environmental oxides of known biogenic origin have generally not been characterized in detail from a structural perspective. Hyporheic zone Mn oxide grain coatings at Pinal Creek, Arizona, a metals-contaminated stream, have been identified as being dominantly microbial in origin and are well studied from bulk chemistry and contaminant hydrology perspectives. This site thus presents an excellent opportunity to study the structures of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides in detail. XRD and EXAFS measurements performed in this study indicate that the hydrated Pinal Creek Mn oxide grain coatings are layer-type Mn oxides with dominantly hexagonal or pseudo-hexagonal layer symmetry. XRD and TEM measurements suggest the oxides to be nanoparticulate plates with average dimensions on the order of 11 nm thick x 35 nm diameter, but with individual particles exhibiting thickness as small as a single layer and sheets as wide as 500 nm. The hydrated oxides exhibit a 10-A basal-plane spacing and turbostratic disorder. EXAFS analyses suggest the oxides contain layer Mn(IV) site vacancy defects, and layer Mn(III) is inferred to be present, as deduced from Jahn-Teller distortion of the local structure. The physical geometry and structural details of the coatings suggest formation within microbial biofilms. The biogenic Mnoxides are stable with respect to transformation into thermodynamically more stable phases over a time scale of at least 5 months. The nanoparticulate layered structural motif, also observed in pure culture laboratory studies, appears to be characteristic of biogenic Mn oxides and may explain the common occurrence of this mineral habit in soils and sediments.

Bargar, John; Fuller, Christopher; Marcus, Matthew A.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Perez De la Rosa, M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Caldwell, Wendel A.

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

328

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

329

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the tropics. By improving an existing, sophisticated, global climate model, scientists can now simulate cloud and rainfall more accurately. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research program, a research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and

330

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

331

For Researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Export Control Export Control Berkeley Lab policy is to comply with all applicable state and federal laws, including those relating to Export Control. Berkeley Lab's Export Control Program is designed to support Berkeley Lab's and the University of California's international activities by ensuring compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations in the context of our fundamental research mission. Much of the Lab's compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations is based on our remaining within the "fundamental research" exception, i.e. performing basic or applied research for which the resulting information is ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community. Do not sign non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements. Contact Parul Jain at 495-2306 or the Tech Transfer Department if you need or are

332

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown here is the SGP Central Facility, where the most comprehensive instrument suite is hosted. Moisture trapped in soil provides water necessary for vegetation and crops, but how much of that moisture makes its way into the atmosphere and influences regional meteorology? The poor understanding of the role of soil

333

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

334

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

335

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., NOAA - Coop. Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate models: Results from Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T03, doi:10.1029/2010JD015433. Relationship between De and Vm for all tropical cirrus cloud types (solid

336

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol humidification factor f(RH) from Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol extinction and relative humidity. Upgrades to the Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF)

337

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

338

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with SCAM, CAPT Forecasts and M-PACE Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Liu, X, S Xie, and SJ Ghan. 2007. "Evaluation of a new mixed-Phase cloud microphysics parameterization with the NCAR single column climate model (SCAM) and ARM M-PACE observations." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L23712, doi:10.1029/2007GL031446. Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

339

Research Focus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

340

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Classifying Cloud Phase Classifying Cloud Phase Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD. 2007. "A ground-based multisensory cloud phase classifier." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L22809, doi:10.1029/2007GL031008. Observations of (a) lidar backscatter, (b) lidar depolarization ratio, (c) radar reflectivity, (d) radar mean Doppler velocity, (e) radar Doppler spectrum width, (f) microwave radiometer-derived liquid water path, and (g) the resulting multisensor cloud-phase classification mask. Cloud phase identification is a necessary prerequisite to performing cloud property retrievals from remote sensor measurements. Most retrieval

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RESEARCH STATEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My research is in the area of commutative algebra, the branch of abstract algebra that concerns commutative rings and modules over these rings, with the underlying motivation to better understand systems of polynomial equations in several variables (henceforth referred to as ideals), or equivalently, to understand the geometry of the

Bahman Engheta

342

Fuel Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FUEL research was discussed by Sir Harry McGowan, who succeeds Sir William Larke as president of the Institute of Fuel, in ... has a ragged front, and new knowledge is continually changing relative national positions. Sir Harry McGowan referred to the domestic use of raw coal, which is still preferred to ...

1934-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Our silicon group members have backgrounds in physics, chemistry, mathematics, materials science, and electrical engineering. Russell Bauer Howard Branz Sachit Grover Vincenzo LaSalvia Benjamin Lee William Nemeth Matt Page Lorenzo Roybal Pauls Stradins, (Acting Group Manager) Charles Teplin Qi Wang David Young Hao-Chih Yuan Photo of 21 people standing in front of a building with a silver, cylinder-shaped structure on one side. Photo of Pauls Stradins Pauls Stradins Senior Scientist II Group Manager Primary Research Interests High-efficiency silicon photovoltaics: advanced passivation techniques and industrially-relevant processes Interfacing Si cell with other materials for high-efficiency tandem Nanostructured semiconductor materials for photovoltaics: Si quantum

346

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioscience Bioscience researcher The Bioscience Research Foundation integrates and analyzes research data from the biological sciences to create reliable analytical and predictive...

347

Research Affiliate Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Affiliate Program Research Affiliate Program Research Affiliates are collaborators who are not current PARC principal investigators andor who are from academic or...

348

Research Teams - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Teams Research Teams Associates Greg Smith, Senior Research Chemist, SRI International Jeffrey A. Sutton, Assistant Professor, Ohio State Univeristy Combustion Energy...

349

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Research Briefs  

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Research Briefs The annually published Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center Research Briefs highlights recent accomplishments supporting our missions. Our research focuses...

350

Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate, and effects of army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of hexachloroethane obscurant smokes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of hexachloroethane (HC) smoke were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on exposure scenarios, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of HC smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and two soil types. HC aerosols were generated in a controlled atmosphere wind tunnel by combustion of hexachloroethane mixtures prepared to simulate normal pot burn rates and conditions. The aerosol was characterized and used to expose plant, soil, and other test systems. Particle sizes of airborne HC ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), and particle size was affected by relative humidity over a range of 20% to 85%. Air concentrations employed ranged from 130 to 680 mg/m{sup 3}, depending on exposure scenario. Chlorocarbon concentrations within smokes, deposition rates for plant and soil surfaces, and persistence were determined. The fate of principal inorganic species (Zn, Al, and Cl) in a range of soils was assessed.

Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Research Highlight  

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Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Dependence on Dry Air Sources Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Lateral entrainment rate in shallow cumuli: Dependence on dry air sources and probability density functions." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20812, doi:10.1029/2012GL053646. Probability density functions (PDFs) of entrainment rate (λ) for different dry air sources in eight cumulus flights. The rate at which cloud engulfs dry air (entrainment rate) has proven to be one of the strongest controls on the climate sensitivity of climate models;

352

Research Highlight  

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Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

353

Research Highlight  

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The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life in the Midlatitude Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, X Dong, B Xi, S McFarlane, A Kennedy, B Lin, and P Minnis. 2012. "Life cycle of midlatitude deep convective systems in a Lagrangian framework." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117(D23), D23201, doi:10.1029/2012JD018362. The life cycle of a convective system tracked by the automated tracking algorithm in the study domain. Time increases from the top left to the bottom right, and each image represents an hour. The colors represent regions given by the hybrid classification.

354

Research Highlight  

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ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

355

Research Highlight  

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Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, and M Zhang. 2000. "Impact of the convective triggering function on single-column model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research 105: 14983-14996. Six-hour accumulated precipitation valid at 12 UTC 18 July 2005. (a) Radar Observation, (b) DCAPE, (c) GSM without the DCAPE trigger, and (d) GSM with the DCAPE trigger. Considerable improvement of precipitation forecast is obtained by the GSM with the new trigger compared to the radar observation.

356

Research Highlight  

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Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications for Aerosol Indirect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Observed impacts of vertical velocity on cloud microphysics and implications for aerosol indirect effects." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L21808, doi:10.1029/2012GL053599. Joint probability density functions (PDF) of relative dispersion (ε) versus vertical velocity (w) along horizontal aircraft legs for each cumulus flight (date given in legend). The red lines denote weighted least

357

Research Highlight  

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Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Rotstayn, L., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Rotstayn, L., and Y. Liu, Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase in Cloud Droplet Spectral Dispersion with Droplet Number Concentration, Journal of Climate: Vol. 16, No. 21, pp.3476-3481, May 2003. Figure 1. Measurements of the relation between the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum and the cloud droplet number concentration (N). The lower, middle, and upper curves show the parameterizations used in the LOWER, MIDDLE, and UPPER simulations, respectively. A recent study by DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

358

Research Highlight  

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Giants in the Sky Giants in the Sky For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A few large particles in a crowd of tiny ones have often been ignored when calculating the amount of sunlight bounced back into space in clean-sky conditions. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that these "giant" particles have a larger-than-expected impact on the amount of sunlight reflected away from Earth, by as much as 45 percent. They also showed that particles larger than one micron (0.000039 inch) occur much more frequently than expected, up to 85 percent of the time. "Many routine measurements are unable to sample large particles, thus they may overlook the residence of many 'Gullivers in the country of Lilliput,' said Dr. Evgueni

359

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Figs. 1a and 1b contain rms differences from 72 radiosondes for AERI retrievals (blue), GOES retrievals (black), and AERI+GOES retrievals (red) for temperature and mixing ratio respectively during the 1997 Water Vapor IOP. A measure of meteorological the variability of the temperature and water vapor is indicated by the green line. Figs. 1c and 1d show the TPW for the same cases from GOES, AERI+GOES, radiosonde, and the ARM SGP CART microwave radiometer and relative percent differences in TPW amounts. Figure 2. Four consecutive radiosonde, GOES, and AERI+GOES comparisons from

360

Research Highlight  

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Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Emissions (CARES) Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fast JD, WI Gustafson, LK Berg, WJ Shaw, M Pekour, M Shrivastava, JC Barnard, RA Ferrare, CA Hostetler, JA Hair, M Erickson, BT Jobson, B Flowers, MK Dubey, S Springston, RB Pierce, L Dolislager, J Pederson, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Transport and mixing patterns over central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, 1759-1783. Aircraft sampling flight patterns are shown over central California in this aerial overlay. Researchers collected and analyzed measurements from

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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361

Research Highlight  

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Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kafle, D. N., University of California, Riverside Coulter, R. L., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kafle DN and RL Coulter. 2013. "Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(13), 10.1002/jgrd.50536. Vertical profiles of multi-year annually averaged AOD (z) at different ARM sites: SGP, NSA, TWP, GRW, and FKB. Inset plots are the profiles of corresponding relative standard deviation, Srel (z). The corresponding 1-sigma measurement errors are given in horizontal bars.

362

Research Highlight  

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Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively delicate but has the power to tip the balance between ice and water in Arctic clouds. This image of an ice crystal was obtained from a Cloud Particle Imager during ISDAC. The imager was mounted on aircraft flying through clouds at a speed of 100 m/s.

363

Research Highlight  

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New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

364

Research Highlight  

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Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

365

Research Highlight  

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The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

366

Research Highlight  

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Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

367

Research Highlight  

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Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

368

Research Highlight  

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Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

369

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

370

Research Highlight  

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Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Submitter: Jakob, C., Monash University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Jakob, C., R. Pincus, C. Hannay, and K.M. Xu (2004). Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D03202, doi:10.1029/2003JD003473. In evaluating climate models, time and space represent key challenges when extrapolating observations into simulations. Researchers supported by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have explored an alternative method based on "point series data" to arrive at model cloud predictions. Point series data are obtained over time through measurements

371

Research Highlight  

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The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern California Measured During CARES and CalNex Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cahill JF, K Suski, JH Seinfeld, RA Zaveri, and KA Prather. 2012. "The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-10989-2012. The CARES campaign took place in Sacramento in order to sample the city's urban plume. Photo courtesy of Jason Tomlinson. Researchers, including DOE scientists working at Pacific Northwest National

372

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kollias, P. and M. A. Miller, 2007: Cloud and Precipitation Observations at Niamey During the 2006 ARM Mobile Facility Deployment. Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters. Daily observed cloud fraction in Niamey during the AMF deployment. The cloud fraction is derived using measurements from the 94-GHz radar, the MPL, and the ceilometer. The vertical resolution is 260 m, and a 5-day temporal filter is applied to the daily cloud fraction profiles. (a) Monthly-averaged cloud and precipitation fraction. The monthly mean and standard deviation of cirrus cloud top (white line), middle cloud tops

373

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kay, JE, T L'Ecuyer, A Gettelman, G Stephens, and C O'Dell. "The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum." To appear in Geophysical Research Letters. Clouds and downwelling radiation 2007-2006 differences (June 15-Sept 15). a. Total cloud fraction differences based on radar and lidar data. b. Downwelling SW radiative flux difference. c. Downwelling LW radiative flux difference. The Western Arctic Ocean is outlined in brown. ARM ground-based radiation observations at Barrow, Alaska.

374

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

375

Research Highlight  

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Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

376

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hanlon, C., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hanlon CJ, JB Stefik, AA Small, J Verlinde, and GS Young. 2013. "Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , . ACCEPTED. In many atmospheric science field campaigns, investigators are budgeted some number of flight hours to collect data under specific, imperfectly forecastable atmospheric conditions. In such field campaigns, investigators must assess atmospheric conditions each day and make a resource-allocation decision: are conditions good enough to use some of our scarce flight hours

377

Research Highlight  

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Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the brightness of sky in nearby clear areas. In cloud-free areas light is scattered mainly by air molecules, but aerosols also contribute. Figure 2. Top: Average increase in MODIS clear-sky reflectivity (R) near clouds. The difference between areas near illuminated and shadowy cloud

378

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Model Development Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Smith-Mrowiec, A. A., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mrowiec AA, C Rio, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, AD Del Genio, OM Pauluis, AC Varble, and J Fan. 2012. "Analysis of cloud-resolving simulations of a tropical mesoscale convective system observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical fluxes and draft properties in convective and stratiform regions." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D19201, doi:10.1029/2012JD017759.

379

Research Highlight  

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A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

380

Research Highlight  

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"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

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A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

382

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The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud Fraction and Reflectance Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Feingold, G., NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory Koren, I., Weizmann Institute of Science Remer, L., NASA - GSFC, Laboratory for Atmospheres Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Koren, I, L Oreopoulos, G Feingold, LA Remer, and O Altaratz. 2008. "How small is a small cloud?" Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Journal, in press Cloud mask for a sparse cumulus cloud field as inferred by using the same threshold at four different spatial resolutions. The upper-left panel is for the original Landsat resolution and the lower-right panel is for a

383

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Burning on the Prairies Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the beginning of the experiment at the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory in March 2005. What does it mean for the carbon cycle? The deep drought in the United States that fueled wildfires and damaged crops in 2012 has now continued well into 2013. However, long before the droughts and fires wreaked havoc, a team of

384

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Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: China S, C Mazzoleni, K Gorkowski, AC Aiken, and MK Dubey. 2013. "Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles." Nature Communications, 4, 2122, doi:10.1038/ncomms3122. La Conchas fire, New Mexico Analyzing fresh, carbon-rich aerosols in smoke from the largest wildfire in New Mexico (2011), scientists report large impacts of wildfires on climate. A research study, published last week in Nature Communications, has revealed that smoke from wildfires, or biomass-burning events, contains

385

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Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds on Earth's Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Qian, Y., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qian Y, CN Long, H Wang, JM Comstock, SA McFarlane, and S Xie. 2012. "Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(4), doi:10.5194/acp-12-1785-2012. Clouds get in the way of the dawn light, perfectly framing the Raman lidar instrument at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. This ground-based laser is a remote sensing instrument used for measuring

386

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Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

387

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Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

388

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Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

389

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The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

390

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Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, L18805, doi:10.1029/2012GL052831. An example of dusty MSSC: (a) CALIOP TAB profiles at 532nm; (b) CALIOP depolarization profiles at 532nm; (c) CloudSat CPR radar reflectivity profiles; (d) Identified dust layers and MSSC; (e) Global distribution of

391

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Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Probing of Dense Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis, AB. 2008. "Multiple-scattering lidar from both sides of the clouds: Addressing internal structure." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S10, doi:10.1029/2007JD009666. Figure 1. Lidar observations of a dense cloud. Left: standard (single-scattering/on-beam) lidar. Right: multiple-scattering/off-beam lidar. Note the extreme narrowness of the FOV in the standard case, as is required to restrict as much as possible the signal to a single backscatter. Also note the weak penetration, O(1) MFP, of the two-way

392

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Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

393

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Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Chen, R., University of Maryland Wood, R., University of Washington Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Ferraro, R., NOAA/NESDIS, WWBG Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chen, R, R Wood, Z Li, R Ferraro, and F Chang. 2008. "Studying the vertical variation of cloud droplet effective radius using ship and space-borne remote sensing data." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, doi:10.1029/2007JD009596. Figure 1. Coincident images of C-band radar reflectivity and MODIS cloud profile at UTC 15:55, Oct. 18, 2001. a) RHB C-band radar reflectivity

394

Research Highlight  

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Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

395

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Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

396

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ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D04211, doi:10.1029/2007JD009225. Time-height cross sections of active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) cloud frequency (a) and modeled cloud fraction (b) CAM3, (c) AM2, and (d) CAM3LIU at Barrow during M-PACE. The unit is %. Liquid fraction as a function of cloud height. (a) UND citation data, (b)

397

Research Highlight  

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How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

398

Research Highlight  

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CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ACCEPTED. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation (Seff) against CCN concentration at 1% S (N1%) for horizontal cloud penetrations, 50 for MASE and 34 for POST. Seff is the S for which nearby below cloud CCN spectra, NCCN(S), equals mean droplet concentration (Nc). Figure 2. One second droplet concentration, Nc, and vertical velocity

399

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

400

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Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

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401

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Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, C Flynn, and M Cribb. 2012. "Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D00K38, doi:10.1029/2011JD016490. A team of scientists found that aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Aerosols were identified from as far away as Mongolia and Siberia. These findings have considerable implications for atmospheric

402

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Invisible Giants in the Sky Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovink, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and

403

Research Highlight  

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Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

404

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Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Michalsky J, F Denn, C Flynn, G Hodges, P Kiedron, A Koontz, J Schlemmer, and SE Schwartz. 2010. "Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992-2008." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D07203, doi: 10.1029/2009JD012197. Box plots of each complete year\'s daily averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm. The dark horizontal line in each box plot is the median daily averaged AOD for the year; the top and bottom of the rectangular box spans the middle 50% of the data. The mean values for the year are plotted

405

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Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (δAOT/δFAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

406

Errvironmentaf Research  

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online at www.sciencedirect.com online at www.sciencedirect.com Environmental Research 10 1 (2006) 3 4 4 1 Errvironmentaf Research Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment Joanna urger^^^^', Michael ~ o c h f e l d ~ ~ ~ , Sean Christian W. ~ e i t n e r ~ . ~ , Stephen ~ e w e t t ~ , Daniel SnigarofP, Ronald snigarofff, Tim Starnrng, Shawn ~ a r ~ e f , Max ~ o b e r ~ * , Heloise chenelotd, Robert patrickh, Conrad D. volzi, James ~ e s t o d 'Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA b~onsortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Healrh Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ, USA CEnvironmental and Community Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

407

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Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shaw, R. A., Michigan Technological University - Physics Department Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yang F, M Ovchinnikov, and RV Shaw. 2013. "Minimalist model of ice microphysics in mixed-phase stratiform clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 40(14), doi:10.1002/grl.50700. Nordic winter landscape. Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are common features in the Arctic environment. They contain a mix of ice and "supercooled" water that, despite the freezing temperatures, remains in liquid form. Scientists aren't sure why these clouds exist in the Arctic for long periods of time, even while steadily losing ice particles through precipitation.

408

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Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

409

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TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

410

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Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

411

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Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 45, 2006, pp. 210-235. Figure 1 Figure 2 Because surface reflection of solar radiation plays a fundamental role in the surface energy budget, knowledge of its spatial and temporal variability is important for understanding the weather and climate of a specific region. Research instrumentation at the U.S. Southern Great Plains site-one of three locales around the world managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-continuously collects these types of data to help scientist investigate differences in

412

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Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: McComiskey, A, SE Schwartz, B Schmid, H Guan, ER Lewis, P Ricchiazzi, and JA Ogren. 2008. "Direct aerosol forcing: Calculation from observables and sensitivities to inputs." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D09202, doi:10.1029/2007JD009170. Figure 1. The sensitivity of calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing to input parameters has been examined to determine the consequences of uncertainties in these input parameters on calculated radiative forcing and to identify areas where measurements might be most profitably improved. Input

413

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Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

414

Research Highlight  

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Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level cloud, and upper troposphere water vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D16105, doi:10.1029/2008JD009905. Figure 1: Diurnal anomalies for tropical (left) ocean and (right) land: (top) the precipitation index (PI), high-level cloud (CLD) and upper

415

Research Highlight  

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Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J.E., S.Y. Zhang, and C.C. Chuang, Soot and smoke aerosol may not warm climate, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D21), 4657, doi:10.1029/2003JD003409, 2003. New research results from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program suggest that fossil fuel soot emissions and biomass smoke may actually have a negligible warming effect and, in some cases, may even result in a net cooling effect. Black carbon is the absorbing component of smoke aerosols that result from the incomplete combustion of various fuels, the most significant sources being fossil fuel

416

Research Highlight  

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Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(1), doi:10.1029/2012JD018464. Relationships between the three microphysical measures of homogeneous mixing degree (ψ1, ψ2, ψ3) and the two transition scale numbers (NLa, NL0), respectively. The results shown here are from the EMPM simulations.

417

Research Highlight  

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Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

418

Research Highlight  

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Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, J Barnard, LK Berg, CN Long, and C Flynn. 2011. "Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L07801, doi:10.1029/2010GL046282. Figure 1. Normalized total cloud radiative forcing and its direct and diffuse components as a function of wavelength. Typically, under cloudy conditions, radiative transfer parameterizations in climate models have been evaluated by calculating the total cloud impact on

419

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

420

Climate Research Roadmap Workshop: Summary Report, May 13-14, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recognition of the ongoing advances and challenges of climate change research, DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) organized a workshop asking the scientific community to identify the current state of climate science. The goal of the workshop was to determine the research challenges important for developing a predictive understanding of global climate. Participants were asked to focus on interdisciplinary research that capitalized on BER's scientific strengths in Atmospheric System Research, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science, and Climate and Earth System Modeling. Approximately 50 scientists representing these three areas were asked to identify desired outcomes for the next 10 years. Goals were identified for the near (1--3 years), mid (4--7 years), and long term (8--10 years). Discussions were focused by discipline (atmospheric, terrestrial, and modeling) and by latitude (high, temperate, and tropical). In addition, opportunities and needs for integration across disciplines and latitudes were identified with a specific focus on crosscutting challenges and outcomes. BER will use this workshop output to update its strategic plan for climate research.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

422

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

423

Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/I015299/1 Robert Upstill-Goddard Newcastle University Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange in coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/I015299/1 Robert Upstill of Holocene Monsoon intensity from Central Asia NE/I016414/1 Michael James Lancaster University Quantifying's University of Belfast 14C as a tool to trace terrestrial carbon in a complex lake: implications for food

424

Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are therefore poorly understood. However, fossil data preserve a vast archive of information on past ecosystems and how they have changed through time. My PhD research is composed of three studies that look at biogeogaphic distribution, ecosystem structure...

Redman, Cory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Research Ethics & Compliance Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Ethics & Compliance Support Dr Ted Rohr, Director RECS #12;http://research.unsw.edu.au/research-ethics-and-compliance-support-recs #12;Research is considered by: Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) A and B: � All human research involving more than low risk Human Research Ethics Advisory Panels (HREAPs) A to I: � All human research

Blennerhassett, Peter

426

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Submitter: Daum, P., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Liu, Y., and P. H. Daum, 2002: "Indirect warming effect from dispersion forcing," Nature 419(6872):580-581. Figure 1. Key = Green symbols: triangle - FIRE, northeastern Pacific; Crossed circles - SOCEX, Southern Ocean; Filled circle - ACE1, Southern Ocean; Blue symbols: Filled circles - ASTEX 8, northeastern Atlantic; Diamonds - SCMS 8, Florida coast; Filled triangles - Sounding 9, ASTEX; Filled squares - horizontal 9, ASTEX; Open inverted triangles - level 1; Open upright triangles - level 2; Open circles - level 3, all from southwest of San Diego 10; open diamonds - SCMS 11; stars - vertical, ASTEX

427

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony; Wiscombe, Warren; Ridgway, William; Cahalan, Robert; 1998: "Biases in Shortwave Column Absorption in the Presence of Fractal Clouds," J. Climate 11(3):431-446. Figure 1: Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle of 60 degree. From the top: from TOA to 5 km, from TOA to 1 km, from TOA to 0.5 km and, finally, from TOA to surface. Figure 2: Fractional cloudiness N = 0.777. (a) Horizontal distribution of optical depth, the same for both models. (b) Horizontal distribution of cloud height for optical model. Constant cloud top and cloud base; thus

428

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon." Science, 337(6098), doi:10.1126/science.1223447. Black to the core: Scientists are combining field and laboratory measurements to understand more about the physical properties of aerosols

429

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

430

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature Dependent Ice Ch Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y and BA Colle. 2011. "A new bulk microphysical scheme that includes riming intensity and temperature dependent ice characteristics." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3), 10.1175/2010MWR3293.1. (a) Coefficients of area-diameter (A-D) relationship in the new scheme. (b) Same as (a), except for the mass-diameter (M-D) relationship. (c) Same as (a), but for the velocity-diameter (V-D) relationship. (d) Same as (c), but each line shows the variation with Ri. More details of the figure are

431

Research Highlight  

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New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part I: theoretical development." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-040.1. Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part II: parcel model corroboration." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0152.1. A close-up of ice crystals. Ever noticed the different shapes of snowflakes sticking on the windowpane

432

Research Highlight  

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Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of height versus time displays obtained on July 29, 2002, during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment. Depicted are strong depolarizing upper tropospheric clouds (~10km), aerosols (δ ~.10 to .15) extending up to ~5.5km, and at lower right (scale adjusted to account for signal

433

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Scientists Understand Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarquhar GM, S Ghan, J Verlinde, A Korolev, JW Strapp, B Schmid, JM Tomlinson, M Wolde, SD Brooks, D Cziczo, MK Dubey, JW Fan, C Flynn, I Gultepe, J Hubbe, MK Gilles, A Laskin, P Lawson, WR Leaitch, P Liu, XH Liu, D Lubin, C Mazzoleni, AM Macdonald, RC Moffet, H Morrison, M Ovchinnikov, MD Shupe, DD Turner, SC Xie, A Zelenyuk, K Bae, M Freer, and A Glen. 2011. "Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: the impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds." Bulletin of the American Meteorological

434

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Hou, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lang, S. E., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Li, X., University of Maryland, Baltimore County Starr, D. O., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zeng X, WK Tao, M Zhang, AY Hou, S Xie, S Lang, X Li, DO Starr, and X Li. 2009. "A contribution by ice nuclei to global warming." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, EARLY VIEW, doi:10.1002/qj.449.

435

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere Submitter: Soden, B. J., University of Miami Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Soden, B.J., D.D. Turner, B.M. Lesht, and L.M. Miloshevich (2004), An analysis of satellite, radiosonde, and lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D04105, doi:10/1029/2003JD003828. Time-average relative humidity profiles from both original (black) and radiance-adjusted (blue) radiosonde soundings compared to the lidar (red) retrievals from field campaigns in 1996, 1997, 1999, and 2000.

436

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

437

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions of Cirrus Cloud Formation Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock, J. M., T. P. Ackerman, and D. D. Turner, 2004: Evidence of high ice supersaturation in cirrus clouds using ARM Raman lidar measurements. Geophys. Res. Letters, doi:10.1029/2004GL019705. To illustrate their findings, a continuous nine-hour segment of Raman lidar measurements showed upper tropospheric RHI measurements ranging from 120% near cloud tops and decreasing to about 70% at cloud base. To study the link between water vapor, cirrus cloud formation (homogenous and heterogenous) mechanisms, and their potential climatic impacts,

438

Research Highlight  

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All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454), doi:10.1007/s10546-013-9873-3. Coherent structures of the vertical velocity (left panels) and the energy dissipation rate (right panels) in updraft region during the day (a, b), night (c, d), and for entire 16 hours (e, f) of continental stratocumulus. Continental stratocumulus clouds are frequently observed in the cold side

439

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Stramler K, AD Del Genio, and WB Rossow. 2011. "Synoptically driven Arctic winter states." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3817.1. SHEBA winter hourly surface net (down - up) longwave radiation flux versus surface temperature. Blue circles indicate times when a combined radar-lidar cloud detection indicated clear skies, and red plus signs indicate times when clouds were detected. Time series of SHEBA winter hourly temperatures at the atmospheric temperature inversion altitude (magenta), surface (black), snow-sea ice

440

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lin W, M Zhang, and NG Loeb. 2009. "Seasonal variation of the physical properties of marine boundary layer clouds off the California coast." Journal of Climate, 22(10), doi:10.1175/2008JCLI2478.1. Image (a). Seasonal contrast of marine boundary-layer clouds between (a) summer (above) and (b) winter (below) off the California coast. Shown are cloud amount in the shaded box, cloud top and base heights and lifting condensation level (LCL) to the left, and cloud thickness and adiabatic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

442

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Jimenez, J., University of Colorado Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jimenez JL and . et al. 2009. "Evolution of organic aerosols in the atmosphere." Science, 326, doi: 10.1126/science.1180353. Total mass concentration (in micrograms per cubic meter) and mass fractions of non-refractory inorganic species and organic components in submicrometer aerosols measured with the AMS at multiple surface locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Inset: Distributions of O:C for the OA components identified at the different sites. Relationship between O:C and hygroscopicity (k, or equivalently the

443

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., P. Minnis, B. Xi, S. Sun-Mack, and Y. Chen, 2007: Validation of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties using ground-based measurements at the DOE ARM SGP site. Accepted by J. Geophys. Res. Wielicki, B. A. and Co-authors (2000), CERES Validation Plan Overview, Release 4, 10/20/00, 58 pp. (Available at http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/ceres/validation/ ceresval_r4.0_over.pdf) Figure 1. Time series of surface-derived cloud-base and -top heights and temperatures (1-hour average) and matched MODIS-derived effective cloud heights and temperatures (30-km x 30-km box) for daytime single-layer and

444

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2009. "Single-scattering properties of aggregates of plates." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 135(639), 10.1002/qj.378. Aggregates of plates imaged by Cloud Particle Imager (left panel) and idealized geometry of aggregates of plates with AI=0.61 (right panel). Asymmetry parameter (g) at λ=0.55 μm of 80 different aggregates of seven 100 μm plates attached together, as functions of (a) AI, (b) 1-AR, and (c) An. The correlation coefficient and constants for a fitting equation,

445

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Boutle IA, SJ Abel, PG Hill, and CJ Morcrette. 2013. "Spatial variability of liquid cloud and rain: observations and microphysical effects." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, , doi:10.1002/qj.2140. Different sizes of water droplets as well as varying water content dramatically alter cloud properties-often at a resolution finer than is currently in use by most climate models. Although clouds can extend for several kilometers, their properties-for example, liquid and rainwater content-can change dramatically over very

446

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the UK Met Office Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morcrette CJ, EJ O'Connor, and JC Petch. 2012. "Evaluation of two cloud parametrization schemes using ARM and Cloud-Net observations." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 138(665), doi:10.1002/qj.969. Integrating different metrics-and their errors and biases-used in weather and climate models may improve predictions by both types of models. What works for the weather models does not for climate models. Devising a common language, which translates into integrating the slew of metrics that the weather and climate science community uses, could be a way to improve

447

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

448

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Submitter: Zhang, Q., University of California, Davis Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Setyan A, Q Zhang, M Merkel, WB Knighton, Y Sun, C Song, J Shilling, TB Onasch, S Herndon, D Worsnop, JD Fast, R Zaveri, LK Berg, A Wiedensohler, BA Flowers, MK Dubey, and R Subramanian. 2012. "Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: Results from CARES." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8131-2012. High-resolution mass spectra (colored by ion category) and elemental ratios of the OA factors. Average contribution of ion categories to the total

449

Research Highlight  

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Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Humidities Up to 95% Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bond, T., University of Illinois, Urbana Rood, M. J., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Brem BT, FC Mena Gonzalez, SR Meyers, TC Bond, and MJ Rood. 2011. "Laboratory-measured optical properties of inorganic and organic aerosols at relative humidities up to 95%." Aerosol Science and Technology, 46(2), doi:10.1080/02786826.2011.617794. Optical properties of the nigrosin benchmark aerosol as a function of relative humidity (RH). Measured extinction (σep) and scattering (σsp) for 467 nm, 530 nm and 660 nm are shown in 1a), 1b) and 1c); calculated

450

Research Highlight  

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Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shupe MD, OG Persson, IM Brooks, M Tjernstrom, J Sedlar, T Mauritsen, S Sjogren, and C Leck. 2013. "Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-9379-2013. Figure 1. Normalized profiles of (a) vertical velocity skewness and (b) variance, (c) turbulent dissipation rate, and (d) potential temperature. Black curves are all data, while red and green are for decoupled and coupled cases, respectively. Normalization is relative to the cloud top

451

Research Highlight  

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Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Submitter: Zhang, G. J., University of California, San Diego Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, G. J., and H. Wang, 2006. Toward mitigating the double ITCZ problem in NCAR CCSM3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L06709, doi:10.1029/2005GL025229 (23 March 2006). Figure 1. Climate models commonly suffer from a problem known as the double-ITCZ, which is illustrated here via observed and model-simulated rainfall at the surface. The error is seen in the region circled where, compared to observations (Image A), the original climate model (Image B) produces a second, erroneous equatorial ITCZ band southward from the one

452

Research Highlight  

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Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., and W. W. Grabowski (2007). Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06808, doi:10.1029/2006GL028767. In this figure, the lines indicate theoretical calculations of cloud droplet size for clouds with various droplet concentrations in which no mixing occurs. The cloud droplet size shows significant variability with height. Traditionally, observations of air mixing and cloud droplet size come from in situ aircraft probes, which collect data at very high horizontal

453

Research Highlight  

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First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

454

Center Research  

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5 5 Center Research ... Supports Electric Utility Restructuring Winds of change in the U.S. power sector: factors listed in the left column have created a gap between the prices utilities must charge to recover their embedded costs and the lower rates they would have to charge in a competitive environment. Possible responses to these pressures are listed to the right. The electricity industry in the U.S. is being dramatically restructured by state regulatory commissions and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Efforts are underway to create a wholesale market for electricity, with wholesale prices to distributing utility companies no longer being regulated. Discussions in several states and at the FERC are aimed at revising the regulation of the structure, operation, and pricing of the

455

Research Highlight  

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Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations, which represent disaggregated data, differ from those derived from satellite-based data, which represent data aggregated at a range of levels. Currently, many climate change models treat the two types of data the same. Aerosols-tiny airborne particles from sources like pollution or desert

456

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Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Submitter: Sheridan, P., U.S. Department of Commerce/NOAA Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sheridan, P, W Arnott, J Ogren, E Andrews, D Atkinson, D Covert, H Moosmuller, A Petzold, B Schmid, A Strawa, R Varma, and A Virkkula. 2005. "The Reno Aerosol Optics Study: An evaluation of aerosol absorption measurement methods." Aerosol Science and Technology 39(1):1-16. This magnification shows the size of aerosol particles relative to the pore size of the filter used during one of the study's sampling runs. Aerosol particles are gaining increasing scientific attention as a key factor in climate change. Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, or by altering cloud properties, aerosols have the potential to

457

Research Highlight  

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Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

458

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bouniol D, F Couvreux, PH Kamsu-Tamo, M Leplay, F Guichard, F Favot, and EJ O'Connor. 2012. "Diurnal and seasonal cycles of cloud occurrences, types, and radiative impact over West Africa." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-051.1. Clouds occurring at different levels in the sky have varying impacts on Earth's energy budget. Clouds with bases between five and seven kilometers above the Earth's surface, also known as mid-level clouds, occur over West Africa all year-round and may have major impacts on the Earth's energy budget,

459

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Submitter: Lubin, D., National Science Foundation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lubin, D., and A.M. Vogelmann, 2006: A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic, Nature, 439, 26 January, 453-456, doi:10.1038/nature04449 In a process known as the first aerosol indirect effect, enhanced aerosol concentrations cause the droplets in a cloud to be smaller and more numerous within a cloud of fixed water amount. This study found that this process can make many clouds more opaque and emit more thermal energy to the surface. The warming of the Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice area and thickness observed over recent decades are believed to result from

460

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, and P. Yang, 2003: "Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA," Journal of Applied Meteorology 42(6):701-715. The SHEBA experiment in Barrow, Alaska used data collected by the ground-based radiation observations from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). (Photo Credit: SHEBA Project Office) Key Contributors: S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, P. Yang, In the frigid environs of the Acrtic, ARM scientists at the North Slope of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Research Highlight  

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An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar Processing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, R McGraw, and L Lei. 2013. "An application of linear programming to polarimetric radar differential phase processing." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, , . ACCEPTED. C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar fields of radar reflectivity factor Z and processed specific differential phase KDP for a section of a Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) convective event as output from LP methods implemented for the ARM PyART processing suite. Detailed microphysical insights from weather radar systems are in demand

462

Research Highlight  

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Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-train Satellite Data Submitter: Yuan, J., University of Washington Houze, R., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Yuan J and RA Houze. 2010. "Global variability of mesoscale convective system anvil structure from A-train satellite data." Journal of Climate, 23, 5864-5888. Figure. 1 Annual mean (2007) climatology of anvil clouds associated with (a) small separated MCSs (<12000 km^2, the smallest 25%), (b) large separated MCSs (>40000 km^2, the largest 25%), and (c) connected MCSs. The color indicates percentage of area covered by MCS anvil clouds for each 5°x5° grid. In the tropics, upper-level clouds containing ice and mixtures of ice and

463

Research Highlight  

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Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

464

Research Highlight  

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Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Data Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, R.T Cederwall, M. Zhang, and J.J. Yio, Comparison of SCM and CSRM forcing data derived from the ECMWF model and from objective analysis at the ARM SGP site, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D16), 4499, doi:10.1029/2003JD003541, 2003. Observed (left) and ECMWF-derived (right) forcing fields of time-height distributions of the derived (top) vertical velocity, (middle) total advective tendency and temperature, and (bottom) total advective tendency of moisture during the selected strong precipitation period during summer

465

Research Highlight  

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Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

466

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Matrosov, S. Y., CIRES/NOAA/ESRL/University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A An example of MMCR (a) and WACR (b) ARM radar measurements of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all hydrometeors in the vertical column is an important task, which is crucial for model parameterization and validation purposes. For many years, the remote sensing efforts within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were focused primarily on either non-precipitating or only weakly-precipitating (e.g., drizzling)

467

Research Highlight  

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Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Submitter: Kirchstetter, T. W., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hadley OL and TW Kirchstetter. 2012. "Black carbon reduction of snow albedo." Nature Climate Change, , doi:10.1038/nclimate1433. Spectrally weighted snow albedo over the 300-2,500 nm solar spectrum: derived from our experiments (dots, 1 standard deviation) and modelled using SNICAR (shaded bands). Upper and lower boundaries of the shaded bands correspond to modelled albedo assuming BC mass absorption cross-sections, at 550 nm, of 7.5 and 15 m2/g, respectively. Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and

468

Research Highlight  

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Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 127, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.020. Fig.1. Idealized shapes of ice crystals used in this study: (a) Gaussian random sphere (GS), (b) droxtal (DX), (c) budding Bucky ball (3B), and (d) column (COL). All models are visualized with dipoles. For (b), (c), and (d)

469

Research Highlight  

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Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD, JS Daniel, G De Boer, EW Eloranta, P Kollias, E Luke, CN Long, DD Turner, and J Verlinde. 2008. "A focus on mixed-phase clouds: The status of ground-based observational methods." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, accepted for publication in October 2008 issue. Figure 1. Retrieved cloud properties for 9 October 2004 at Barrow: (a) Multisensor cloud phase classification, (b) radar Doppler spectra cloud phase classification, (c) ice water content, (d) ice particle effective radius, (e) adiabatic liquid water content scaled to the microwave

470

Research Highlight  

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Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20), doi:10.5194/acp-11-10503-201. Profiles of ensemble- and horizontally averaged a) cloud water mixing ratio, b) rain mixing ratio, c) ice mixing ratio, d) cloud droplet concentration, e) rain number concentration, and f) ice number concentration, Ni, for pristine (blue), polluted (green), and highly

471

Research Highlight  

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A Bulk Parameterization of Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei A Bulk Parameterization of Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kogan, Y., University of Oklahoma - CIMMS Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Mechem, D. B., and Y. L. Kogan, 2007: A bulk parameterization of giant CCN. J. Atmos. Sci., conditionally accepted. Mean quantities as a function of GCCN concentration for polluted (squares) and clean (diamonds) background CCN conditions. Radiative quantities as a function of GCCN concentration for polluted and clean background CCN conditions shown in (a) optical depth; (b) albedo; (c) susceptibility; and (d) susceptibility relative to the control simulations without GCCN. A parameterization for giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), suitable for

472

Research Highlight  

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Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Randall, D.A., K.-M. Xu, R.C.J. Somerville, and S. Iacobellis, 1996: "Single-Column Models and Cloud Ensemble Models as Links between Observations and Climate Models," J. Climate 9(8)1683-1697. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 We have developed a Single-Column Model (SCM) to validate GCM cloud-radiation parameterizations against ARM observational data. The SCM is a computationally efficient one-dimensional representation of the atmospheric column overlying a single GCM grid cell. The SCM is integrated

473

Research Highlight  

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Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Berg, LK, and EI Kassianov. 2008. "Temporal variability of fair-weather cumulus statistics at the ARM SGP site." Journal of Climate 21, 3344-3358. Figure 1. Five-year mean ARSCL VAP values of cloud fraction (black), cloud-base height (orange circles), cloud-top height (red), cloud thickness (blue), and cloud-chord length (green), and their average daily bias for each year (B) and low-altitude moisture (C). While fair-weather clouds (FWC) are small in size, they are ubiquitous,

474

Research Highlight  

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Using Copulas to Model Complex Clouds Using Copulas to Model Complex Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Norris, P. M., NASA - GMAO/UMBC - GEST Hou, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Norris PM, L Oreopoulos, AY Hou, WK Tao, and X Zeng. 2008. "Representation of 3D heterogeneous cloud fields using copulas: Theory for water clouds." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 134(636), doi:10.1002/qj.321. Contours containing (brown-80%, orange-60%, cyan-40%, and blue-20%) of the joint inter-layer S probability, such that the probability densities within each contour are larger than those outside. Thick contours are from the GCE

475

Research Highlight  

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When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shilling, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shilling JE, RA Zaveri, JD Fast, L Kleinman, M Alexander, MR Canagaratna, E Fortner, JM Hubbe, JT Jayne, A Sedlacek, A Setyan, S Springston, DR Worsnop, and Q Zhang. 2013. "Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-2091-2013. Organic aerosols from tree emissions increase when mixed with manmade sources, impacting the climate. It's easy to visualize particles and gases from vehicle exhaust or burning trash wafting into the atmosphere. It's harder to envision similar gases

476

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, MD Shupe, O Persson, and H Morrison. 2011. "Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi:10.5194/acp-11-10127-2011. Soundings of mid-day decoupled stratocumulus at Barrow, Alaska. (A) Measured 17:34Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.61W). (B) 50-m LES simulation 20Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.91W). Gray shading marks the extent of the

477

Research Highlight  

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Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Long CN and SA McFarlane. 2012. "Quantification of the impact of Nauru Island on ARM measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), 628-636. McFarlane SA, CN Long, and DM Flynn. 2005. "Impact of island-induced clouds on surface measurements: analysis of the ARM Nauru Island Effect Study data." Journal of Applied Meteorology, 44, 1045-1065. Conceptual model of the Nauru Island Effect and production of cloud plume. Approximate ARM Nauru site location is shown on the western side of the

478

Research Highlight  

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Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The respective flux and heating rate errors (model-3DMC) for (a),(b) ATEX and (c),(d) GATE A. The error profiles in (a) and (c) are to be interpreted as ICA, solid lines; MRO, dashed lines; RO, dotted lines. (b) and (d) also show the differences between MRO and RO. The horizontal lines are the

479

Research Highlight  

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Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Submitter: Dong, Q., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Fu, Q., W.B. Sun, and P. Yang, 1999: "Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Ice Particles at Thermal Infrared Wavelengths," J. Atmos. Sci. 56(16): 2937-2947. We examined a number of commonly used methods for the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals at thermal infrared wavelengths. It is found that, for randomly oriented nonspherical particles, Mie theory using equivalent ice spheres tends to overestimate the absorption efficiency while the anomalous diffraction

480

Research Highlight  

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Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Global Model with Embedded Explicit Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Pritchard, M. S., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Pritchard MS, MW Moncrieff, and RC Somerville. 2011. "Orogenic propagating precipitation systems over the US in a global climate model with embedded explicit convection." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68, doi:10.1175/2011JAS3699.1. Characteristic time-longitude structure of central U.S. summer diurnal convection (35-45 N) (a) as observed in 2005 from space-borne infrared imagers, and as simulated by (b) the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) v3.5

482

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Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the standard way (AM2, top panel) of mixing solar reflection and transmission differs systematically from the Independent Column Approximation approach. Because cloud-radiation interactions depend critically on the vertical amount of clouds, different assumptions about how this alignment occurs

483

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Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shupe MD, VP Walden, E Eloranta, T Uttal, JR Campbell, SM Starkweather, and M Shiobara. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part I: occurrence and macrophysical properties." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 626-644. Shupe MD. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part II: thermodynamic phase characteristics." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 645-661. Figure 1: (a) Annual cycles of monthly mean cloud occurrence fraction at six Arctic atmospheric observatories. The average cloud fraction for all

484

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Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long CN. 2010. "Correcting for circumsolar and near-horizon errors in sky cover retrievals from sky images." The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 4, doi:10.2174/1874282301004010045. Long CN, JM Sabburg, J Calbo, and D Pages. 2006. "Retrieving cloud characteristics from ground-based daytime all-sky images." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 23, 633-652. Sample sky image (left) and corresponding cloud decision image (right) showing an example of the over-estimating problem. White and gray in the

485

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When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penide, G., Laboratoire d\\\'Optique Atmospherique Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Penide G, V Kumar, A Protat, and P May. 2013. "Statistics of drop size distribution parameters and rain rates for stratiform and convective precipitation during the North Australian wet season." Monthly Weather Review, 141(9), 10.1175 /mwr-d-12-00262.1. Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility at Darwin, Australia, helped scientists determine how drop size distribution and rain rates are affected by larger-scale weather patterns. Rainfall comes in a variety of forms: mist, drizzle, showers, downpours. The type and frequency of rainfall usually depends on the season and

486

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Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter over Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, and B Cairns. 2012. "Evaluation of hydrometeor phase and ice properties in cloud-resolving model simulations of tropical deep convection using radiance and polarization measurements." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(11), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-0314.1. Liquid index (LI) values are directly derived from multi-directional polarized reflectances. POLDER measurements (dashed line envelop) show

487

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New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarlane SA, K Gaustad, E Mlawer, C Long, and J Delamere. 2011. "Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 4, 1713-1733. Time series of daily percent vegetation derived from MFR measurements for (top) 2001-2008 at 10-m tower, which is located over an unmanaged pasture; (middle) 2001-2004 at 25-m tower, which is located over a managed field; and (bottom) 2005-2008 at 25-m tower. The different seasonal cycles at the

488

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Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective mass flux for the (top) wet, (middle) dry, and (bottom) break period from models and available observational estimates. Dashed lines are fine resolution model results. Note the different x axis scale for the third and fourth columns. An intercomparison of global atmospheric model simulations of tropical

489

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Parameterization of Riming Intensity and Its Impact on Ice Fall Speed Using Parameterization of Riming Intensity and Its Impact on Ice Fall Speed Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y, DJ Leo, and BA Colle. 2011. "Parameterization of riming intensity and its impact on ice fall speed using ARM data." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3), 10.1175/2010MWR3299.1. (a) Scatter plot of the observed Doppler velocities from the MMCR against the ice fall velocities derived using the Heymsfield and Donner (1990) formula. (b) Same as (a), but shows the ice fall velocities derived using Eq. 4 with RMF_para. Annual long-term mean precipitation in mm day-1 for: (a) GPCPv2, (b) CTL

490

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Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Submitter: Prenni, A. J., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Prenni, A. J., J. Y. Harrington, M. Tjernstrom, P. J. DeMott, A. Avramov, C. N. Long, S. M. Kreidenweis, P. Q. Olsson, and J. Verlinde, (2006): Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate?, BAMS, Vol.88, Iss. 4; pg. 541-550. ACIA, 2004: Impacts of a Warming Arctic: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. Cambridge University Press, 1020pp. Additional Key Contact: Long, C. N. , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Figure 1. Time series for the 2-day simulation plotted over Oliktok Point for Standard IN and M-PACE IN concentrations: (a) liquid water path (g

491

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Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Westwater, E.R., B.B. Stankov, D.Cimini, Y. Han, J.A. Shaw, B.M. Lesht, C.N. Long, 2003, Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 21. ARM's Nauru99 campaign provided a rare opportunity to compare original and corrected land-based radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements with those obtained at sea. (ARM photo) Key Contributors: B. B. Stankov, D. Cimini, Y. Han, J. A Shaw, B. M. Lesht, C. N. Long Along the equator in the Central Pacific, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation

492

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Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. Radiative cooling across the full infrared spectrum: The far-infrared (the left half of the figure, from 15 to 1000 microns) plays a key role in heat transfer in the atmosphere, but scientists could not measure it, and model calculations were consequently very uncertain. Field observations from

493

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Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Iacobellis, S.F., McFarquhar, G.M., Mitchell, D.L., and Somerville, R.C.J., 2003: "The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics," J. Climate 16(18): 2979-2996. Scientists validated the results of both models by comparing them with the solar radiation as measured by the ARM instruments in the same grid cell. Scientists compared predictions of two models (red and blue lines) with measurements taken by ARM instruments (yellow line) at the same location. The models predict the amount and optical properties of clouds and the

494

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Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

495

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Cloud Tomography: a Novel Method for Determining 3D Cloud Liquid Water Cloud Tomography: a Novel Method for Determining 3D Cloud Liquid Water Distribution Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, D., Y. Liu, and W. Wiscombe, 2007a: Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography. J. Geophys. Res., submitted. Cloud tomography is a novel method for determining cloud water distribution by measuring cloud microwave emission from multiple directions. The upper plot shows a 2D cross-sectional snapshot of the liquid water structure of a stratocumulus cloud simulated by a large-eddy model. It also shows the four scanning microwave radiometers used to retrieve the cloud liquid water

496

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Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Crewell, S., University of Cologne Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ebell, K., University of Cologne Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lohnert U, DD Turner, and S Crewell. 2009. "Ground-based temperature and humidity profiling using spectral infrared and microwave observations. Part I: Simulated retrieval performance in clear-sky conditions." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 48(5), 1017-1032. Crewell S, K Ebell, U Loehnert, and DD Turner. 2009. "Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?"

497

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Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Submitter: Kiehl, J., NCAR Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Petch, J.C., and J.T. Kiehl, 1997: "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model." In Proceedings from the Seventh ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Here is summary of the poster "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model" (Petch and Kiehl) presented at the ARM 7th Science Team Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, March 1997. SCCM3, a single-column version of CCM3, has been forced with TOGA-COARE

498

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"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

499

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Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Keppel-Aleks, G., University of Michigan Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Keppel-Aleks G, JT Randerson, K Lindsay, BB Stephens, JK Moore, SC Doney, PE Thornton, NM Mahowald, FM Hoffman, C Sweeney, PP Tans, PO Wennberg, and SC Wofsy. 2013. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide variability in the Community Earth System Model: evaluation and transient dynamics during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries." Journal of Climate, 26(13), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00589.1. How models, such as the Community Earth System Model, simulate the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere will likely hold the key to monitoring climate

500

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Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hagos SM and R Leung. 2012. "Large-scale environmental variables and transition to deep convection in cloud resolving model simulations: A vector representation." Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 4(M11001), 2012MS000155, doi:10.1029/2012MS000155. The relationship between the mean 400hPa heating (Khr-1437 ) at time = 0 and the projection onto the favorable large-scale moisture profile at time = -1 hr. From Jekyll to Hyde, this anvil cloud is an example of tropical clouds that evolve from fair-weather to stormy. Scientists at PNNL used observational