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1

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

2

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

4

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE TERRESTRIAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL SILICON CYCLE AT A FORESTED WATERSHED IN NORTHERN VERMONT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of the global silicon cycle is becoming increasingly recognized because of its role in the consumption of atmospheric CO2. However, the terrestrial componentů (more)

Garvin, Christopher J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

Ahmad, Sajjad

6

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

7

Grid-BGC: a grid-enabled terrestrial carbon cycle modeling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is ...

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On behalf of the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program managers in the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD), Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcome to the 2011 SBR Principal Investigators meeting. Thank you in advance for your attendance and your presentations at this year's meeting. As the events in Japan continue to unfold, we are all reminded that the research we perform on radionuclide behavior in the environment has implications beyond legacy waste cleanup and in fact has its place in the discussion on the expanded use of nuclear power. As in the past, there are three broad objectives to the Principal Investigators meeting: (1) to provide opportunities to share research results and promote interactions among the SBR scientists and other invited guests; (2) to evaluate the progress of each project within the program; and (3) to showcase the scientific expertise and research progress over the past year to senior managers within the DOE Office of Science, the technology offices within DOE, and other invited attendees from other Federal Agencies. This past year has seen a few significant changes within BER and within the SBR program. In November, our Associate Director for BER, Anna Palmisano, retired from Federal service. Just this month, Dr. Sharlene Weatherwax (Division Director for Biological Systems Sciences) has been named as the new Associate Director for BER. In August, BER welcomed Dr. Gary Geernaert as the new Division Director for CESD. Gary joins the division from Los Alamos National Laboratory with a background in atmospheric science. Within the SBR program, a new Strategic Plan was completed last June (currently posted on the SBR and the Office of Science website). The new strategic plan is intended to foster integration within the Environmental Systems Science portion of the BER budget that includes both SBR and Terrestrial Ecosystem Sciences (TES). Both these programs share a goal of advancing a predictive understanding of environmental processes and utilizing iterative, multidisciplinary approaches to understand complex environmental systems of relevance to DOE. CESD in general is undergoing continued discussions on integration among its programs in an effort to develop a new strategic plan for the division. This effort also includes identifying opportunities for integration with BER's Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD). The program this year includes three poster presentation sessions, six plenary sessions, and three breakout sessions. The plenary session on Tuesday morning will feature introductory presentations by BER program staff and three keynote addresses from Dr. Ken Bencala (USGS), Dr. Michael (Mick) Follows (MIT) and Dr. Sue Brantley (PSU) that will lead into three breakout sessions Tuesday afternoon. The breakout sessions are intended to highlight key developments in SBR research and foster a dialog among session participants on scientific paths forward in each particular area. The SBR program managers are asking for input from the SBR community at these sessions to help guide future efforts and/or identify areas of integration within BER programs. On Wednesday, plenary sessions will continue in the morning, followed by an early afternoon poster session. After an extended break for lunch, plenary sessions will continue in the afternoon, followed by an evening poster session. Thursday's plenary session will focus on selected highlights of research efforts at the IFRC sites and on a new potential TES field effort in the Arctic. This new field site is an obvious point of integration between the SBR and TES programs.

Hazen Ed., T.C.

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Progress report on terrestrial model development (TERRA and HABITAT): Research in support of the CERES earth system modeling project  

SciTech Connect

Although there is only a developing understanding of the many processes affecting and coupling the atmosphere, oceans, and land systems of the earth, we are embarked on an effort to construct a prototype model (CERES) of the full Earth system. As part of this effort, we have proposed to the EPA to construct an Earth System Framework for the CERES model that supports flexible, modular development, coupling, and replacement of Earth System submodel components. This project has two specific areas of study. These areas are (1) the terrestrial contribution to the biogeochemical cycling and (2) the interactions of climate and the land ecosystems. The objectives of these two areas of study are: development of a globally distributed model of terrestrial ecosystem productivity, linking model to the submodels, using coupled system to explore biogeochemical cycles, exploration of greenhouse effect, development of models of surface, and the study of the dynamics of climate change and vegetation response.

Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Amthor, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

11

Terrestrial Ecology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Terrestrial...

12

ORNL DAAC for Biogeochemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Welcome about us image About Us Provides detailed information about the ORNL DAAC. projects image About Data Lists the data products available from the ORNL DAAC. access image Get Data Guides you through the steps needed to acquire the data. tools image Data Tools Some tools to help you work with the data. uso image Help Need assistance? Our staff is happy to help. ORNL DAAC The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information

13

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

FRANCIS, A.J.; GILLOW, J.P.; DODGE, C.J.

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1 Brian C. Jackman (2005), Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L14808, doi:10.1029/2005GL023073. 1. Terrestrial Implications of Gamma Ray Bursts in Our Galaxy [2

Jackman, Charles H.

16

Final Project Report: "┬?┬?Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"┬?┬Ł  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "┬?┬?Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."┬?┬Ł This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also benefits efforts to trace Hg contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers, into which EFPC flows, and to distinguish Hg from the Y-12 plant from that released from a nearby coal ash accident.

Johnson, Thomas M

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

┬╗ Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ┬╗ Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

18

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research ┬╗ Climate and Research ┬╗ Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ┬╗ ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

19

[Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

Wigand, P.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Why Sequence Biogeochemically Important Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? DOE-JGI will be sequencing three biogeochemically important bacteria, Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002 and Azospira suillum strain PS. These organisms represent diverse genera capable of anaerobically oxidizing both iron(II) and humic acids by using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Two of these organisms, strain 2002 and strain TPSY, are also capable of the anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation of uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). Left to right, Azospira suillum PS, Ferrutens nitratireducens 2002, and Diaphorobacter TPSY. Nitrate-dependent microbial metal oxidation is of critical importance because of its potential effect on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminants. Nitrate-dependent Iron(II) oxidation by organisms such as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biogeochemical Controls | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Biogeochemical Biogeochemical Controls Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Biogeochemical Controls Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Savannah River National Laboratory researches long-term economic in-situ remediation of sites with mixed contaminants

22

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

23

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1986. The program is focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, and this research forms the basis, in conjunction with remote sensing, for definition and quantification of processes leading to impacts at the global level. This report is organized into sections devoted to Detection and Management of Change in Terrestrial Systems, Biogeochemical Phenomena, Subsurface Microbiology and Transport, Marine Sciences, and Theoretical (Quantitative) Ecology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A generic reaction-based biogeochemical simulator  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a generic biogeochemical simulator, BIOGEOCHEM. The simulator can read a thermodynamic database based on the EQ3/EQ6 database. It can also read user-specified equilibrium and kinetic reactions (reactions not defined in the format of that in EQ3/EQ6 database) symbolically. BIOGEOCHEM is developed with a general paradigm. It overcomes the requirement in most available reaction-based models that reactions and rate laws be specified in a limited number of canonical forms. The simulator interprets the reactions, and rate laws of virtually any type for input to the MAPLE symbolic mathematical software package. MAPLE then generates Fortran code for the analytical Jacobian matrix used in the Newton-Raphson technique, which are compiled and linked into the BIOGEOCHEM executable. With this feature, the users are exempted from recoding the simulator to accept new equilibrium expressions or kinetic rate laws. Two examples are used to demonstrate the new features of the simulator.

Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Yeh, Gour T.; C.T. Miller, M.W. Farthing, W.G. Gray, and G.F. Pinder

2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Organochlorine Turnover in Forest Ecosystems: The Missing Link in the Terrestrial Chlorine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Research in the last 20 years has shown that chlorine undergoes transformations between inorganic and organic forms as part of a complex biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial systems. Natural organochlorine production appears to be associated with the decomposition of plant material on the soil surface, though the chlorine cycle budget implies that a proportion of natural organochlorine enters soil through plant litter and atmospheric deposition as well. Organochlorine compounds may form through biotic and abiotic pathways, but the rates and magnitude of production in the field remain undefined. We have performed a time-dependent trace of chlorine concentration through forest ecosystems, revealing distinct fractions of naturally produced organochlorine in plant biomass. Aliphatic organochlorine constitutes an intrinsic component of healthy leaves that persists through senescence and humification of the plant material, making a substantial contribution to the pool of soil organochlorine. Plant leaves also contain soluble aromatic organochlorine compounds that leach from leaf litter during early decay stages. As decay progresses, high concentrations of insoluble aromatic organochlorine accrue in the humus, through de novo production as well as adsorption. The rates of aromatic organochlorine production and degradation vary seasonally and conversely. This study presents the first unambiguous evidence that there exist multiple pools of chlorinated organic matter in the soil environment and that leaf litter deposition makes a significant and refractory contribution to the soil organochlorine pool, providing key insights into the biogeochemical chlorine cycle.

A Leri; S Myneni

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

ORNL DAAC, Biogeochemical Parameters for Ecosystem Modeling,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameters for Ecosystem Modeling The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set entitled "Literature-Derived Parameters for the BIOME-BGC Terrestrial Ecosystem...

27

Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Grid-BGC: A Grid-Enabled Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Modeling System, Euro-Par 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is to utilize Globus Grid technology to integrate inexpensive commodity cluster computational resources at CU with the mass storage system at NCAR while hiding the logistics of data transfer and job submission from the scientists. We describe a typical process for simulating the terrestrial carbon cycle, present our solution architecture and software design, and describe our implementation experiences with Grid technology on our systems. By design the Grid-BGC software framework is extensible in that it can utilize other grid-accessible computational resources and can be readily applied to other climate simulation problems which have similar workflows. Overall, this project demonstrates an end-to-end system which leverages Grid technologies to harness distributed resources across organizational boundaries to achieve a cost-effective solution to a computeintensive problem. 1

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry M. Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

BSCSP Terrestrial Factsheet 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Terrestrial Sequestration 1 FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership...

30

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) North Dakota State University

31

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective Diameter in Ice Clouds and Its Application to Terrestrial Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research:...

32

Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest, savannas, deserts, temperate grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra, and chaparral. The carbon cycle is an important mechanism in the coupling of terrestrial ecosystems with climate through biological fluxes of CO{sub 2}. The influence of terrestrial ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} can be modeled via several means at different timescales. Important processes include plant dynamics, change in land use, as well as ecosystem biogeography. Over the past several decades, many terrestrial ecosystem models (see the 'Model developments' section) have been developed to understand the interactions between terrestrial carbon storage and CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere, as well as the consequences of these interactions. Early TECMs generally adapted simple box-flow exchange models, in which photosynthetic CO{sub 2} uptake and respiratory CO{sub 2} release are simulated in an empirical manner with a small number of vegetation and soil carbon pools. Demands on kinds and amount of information required from global TECMs have grown. Recently, along with the rapid development of parallel computing, spatially explicit TECMs with detailed process based representations of carbon dynamics become attractive, because those models can readily incorporate a variety of additional ecosystem processes (such as dispersal, establishment, growth, mortality etc.) and environmental factors (such as landscape position, pest populations, disturbances, resource manipulations, etc.), and provide information to frame policy options for climate change impact analysis.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Berry, Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Terrestrial Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program Capture and Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems Background Clean, affordable energy is essential for U.S. prosperity and security in the 21st century. More than half of the electricity currently generated in the United States comes from coal-fired boilers, and there is little indication that this percentage will diminish through 2020 and beyond. In addition, the use of coal for electricity generation is projected to more than double in developing nations by 2020. This ever growing demand for fossil-fuel-based power and the consequential rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations requires innovative methods to capture and store CO 2 . Terrestrial ecosystems, which include both soil and vegetation, are widely recognized

34

Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coreless Terrestrial Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differentiation in terrestrial planets is expected to include the formation of a metallic iron core. We predict the existence of terrestrial planets that have differentiated but have no metallic core--planets that are effectively a giant silicate mantle. We discuss two paths to forming a coreless terrestrial planet, whereby the oxidation state during planetary accretion and solidification will determine the size or existence of any metallic core. Under this hypothesis, any metallic iron in the bulk accreting material is oxidized by water, binding the iron in the form of iron oxide into the silicate minerals of the planetary mantle. The existence of such silicate planets has consequences for interpreting the compositions and interior density structures of exoplanets based on their mass and radius measurements.

L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enrichment strategy coupled with 454 ampli- con pyrosequencing to identify putative uranium-enrichments had large amounts of U(VI) precipi- tants due to the complexation of uranium and

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanfordĺs 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview) P. Long (PI), PNNL; J. Banfield, U. of California-Kukkadapu, M. LiptonŚPNNL; D. Lovley, U. of Massachusetts-Stanford U. , J. Fredrickson, PNNL; K. Henne, M. -J. Kwon,

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport;contaminant metals and radionuclides in situ. This researchattenuation of metals and radionuclides) must be compatible

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Field Validation Test Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Andrea McNemar, U.S. Department of Energy, andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center North Dakota State University Summary of Field Test Site and Operations:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

42

Biogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogeochemical redox processes is crucial for predicting and protecting environmental health and can provide new the chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of many major and trace elements including Fe, and mobility of these elements in the environment are directly affected by reduction and oxidation. In addition

Sparks, Donald L.

43

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable...

45

SWP.terrestrial.factsheet0919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.odowd@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Sequestration Programs - Regional Terrestrial and Local Terrestrial Sequestration (Combined With Enhanced Coalbed Methane Sequestration) Test Location Entire Region (Regional Program); San Juan Basin (Local Pilot Test) Amount and Source of CO 2

46

Dr. Yeqiao (Y.Q.) Wang Professor in Terrestrial Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Dr. Yeqiao (Y.Q.) Wang Professor in Terrestrial Remote Sensing Department of Natural Resources://www.ltrs.uri.edu ________________________________________________________________________ Research Interests My research interests and teaching responsibilities are in terrestrial remote sensing. M.Sc., Natural Resources Management & Engineering: Univ. of Connecticut, 1992. M.Sc., Remote Sensing

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

47

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies  

SciTech Connect

An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to determine the 'age' and rate of change of carbon stocks or as a biogeochemical tracer to elucidate processes and pathways. It is this dual nature that can be exploited across scales in space (individual plant, plot or research site, ecosystem, regional, and global) and time (days to millennia). For example, across regional scales, {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements of atmosphere CO{sub 2} can be used to attribute carbon dioxide to sources (e.g., respiration vs. fossil fuel emissions) or sinks ( e.g,. photosynthesis), which cannot be readily inferred from concentration, net flux measurements, or {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} [eg. Graven et al., 2009; Levin and Hessheimer, 2000; Turnbull et al., 2007]. At smaller scales, similar analyses can be used to elucidate the source, and 'age' of the below ground component undergoing heterotrophic respiration. Net (biome or ecosystem) uptake of carbon is the difference of two large fluxes: photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon fixation by photosynthesis is, to a large extent, a single process with theoretical underpinnings. On the other-hand, net ecosystem or biome respiration integrates microbial (heterotrophic) and plant (autotrophic) respiration. Eddy covariance methods can be used to estimate bulk CO{sub 2} fluxes but they cannot discriminate the process nor the source of the respired CO{sub 2}. It is these processes that are parameterized in predictive models and contribute to the uncertainty in the climate forcing effect of the carbon cycle in the future [Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Heimann and Reichstein, 2008].

Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change  

SciTech Connect

The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

Emanuel, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Schimel, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA). Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Martian Windchill in Terrestrial Terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an average temperature of ?63 ║C and winter lows of ?120 ║C, Mars sounds far too cold for humans. However, thermometer readings from Mars are highly misleading to Terrestrials who base their expectations of thermal comfort on their experience in ...

Randall Osczevski

53

Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration - Science for Enhancement and Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is time to re-evaluate all available options that might not be permanent yet have the potential to buy time, bridging to a future when new energy system technologies and a transformed energy infrastructure can fully address the climate challenge. Terrestrial sequestration is one option large enough to make a contribution in the coming decades using proven land management methods and with the possibility that new technologies could significantly enhance the opportunity. Here we review progress on key scientific, economic, and social issues; postulate the extent to which new technologies might significantly enhance terrestrial sequestration potential; and address remaining research needs.

Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Amonette, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Jastrow, Julie D [ORNL; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; McCarl, Bruce [Texas A& M University; Thomson, Dr. Allison [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Metting, F. Blaine [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Network Packing Problem in Terrestrial Broadcasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of terrestrial video broadcasting, digital technology most likely will re- ... digital broadcasting has been carried out by the Italian Communicationsá...

55

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons NA Source...

56

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons NA Source...

57

A proposed sensor deployment to investigate biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon, California (CON 5)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon,of UCLA, is impaired for mercury, a potent neurotoxin, whichhealth and wildlife t o ĽMercury methylation is the process

Sarah Rothenberg; Jenny Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What kind of environment may exist on terrestrial planets around other stars? In spite of the lack of direct observations, it may not be premature to speculate on exoplanetary climates, for instance to optimize future telescopic observations, or to assess the probability of habitable worlds. To first order, climate primarily depends on 1) The atmospheric composition and the volatile inventory; 2) The incident stellar flux; 3) The tidal evolution of the planetary spin, which can notably lock a planet with a permanent night side. The atmospheric composition and mass depends on complex processes which are difficult to model: origins of volatile, atmospheric escape, geochemistry, photochemistry. We discuss physical constraints which can help us to speculate on the possible type of atmosphere, depending on the planet size, its final distance for its star and the star type. Assuming that the atmosphere is known, the possible climates can be explored using Global Climate Models analogous to the ones developed to sim...

Forget, Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An offline unstructured biogeochemical model (UBM) for complex estuarine and coastal environments  

SciTech Connect

Due to increased pollutant loads and water use from coastal development and population growth, occurrences of low-dissolved oxygen and "hypoxic zones" have increased. Reports of fish kills and water quality impairment are also becoming more frequent in many coastal waters. Water quality managers and regulatory agencies rely on numerical modeling tools to quantify the relative contributions of anthropogenic and "natural" pollutant loads (nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand) on dissolved oxygen levels and use the results for remedial activities and source control. The ability to conduct seasonlong simulations with sufficient nearshore resolution is therefore a key requirement. Mesh flexibility and the ability to increase site specific resolution without disturbing the larger domain setup and calibration are critical. The objective of this effort was to develop a robust biogeochemical model suitable for simulation of water quality dynamics including dissolved oxygen in complex coastal environments with multiple tidal channels, tidal flats, and density-driven circulation using unstructured-grid formulation. This paper presents an offline unstructured biogeochemical model that uses the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) discretization of the study domain and the corresponding hydrodynamic solution to drive biogeochemical kinetics based on a water quality model CE-QUAL-ICM. In this paper, the linkage between selected hydrodynamic and water quality models is subjected to several scalar transport and biogeochemical module tests (plume transport and dilution, BOD/DO sag, and phytoplankton/nutrients reaction), and results are compared to their analytical solutions as part of model validation. A preliminary application of the biogeochemical model with a year-long simulation of Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound, USA, is presented as an example and a test of the tool in a real estuary setting. The model reproduced the dynamics and seasonal variations in the biogeochemical state variables and was used to test short-term wind-driven dynamics that could influence dissolved oxygen concentrations in Hood Canal.

Kim, Tae Yun; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecosystems: Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress Gary K. Jacobs (jacobsgk@ornl.gov, 865-576-0567) Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008, MS-6035 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Roger C. Dahlman (roger.dahlman@science.doe.gov, 301-903-4951) Office of Science/Biological and Environmental Research U. S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 F. Blaine Metting, Jr. (blaine.metting@pnl.gov, 509-375-2607) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 902 Battelle Blvd. PO Box 999, P7-54 Richland, WA 99352 Introduction Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of

63

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

64

BIOGEOCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF AMMONIA DISCHARGES FROM POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. DOE Fossil Energy program trough the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This project was supported under the DOE-Fossil Energy Program. ORNL Ponds at Tennessee Valley Authority's Paradise Fossil Plant in Kentucky. This research is closely linked

65

Scientific Posters from the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program's Annual PI Meeting, 2012  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ľ\tIdentification and Characterization of Microbial Proteins Important for Extracellular Electron Transfer Reactions

66

Terrestrial applications of bifacial photovoltaic solar panels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bifacial Photovoltaic solar cells (so-called transparent bifacial photovoltaic solar cells) offer additional absorption by rear side, which is a significant advantage over ordinary Photovoltaic solar cells. A range of experiments have been done on bifacial ... Keywords: absorption, panels, photovoltaic, solar cells, terrestrial

P. Ooshaksaraei; R. Zulkifli; S. H. Zaidi; M. Alghoul; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two main kinds of bio-optical models of primaryof statistical biogeochemical/bio- optical trends, withusing a non intrusive bio-optical method. Biogeosciences, 4,

Claustre, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Current Issues in Terrestrial Solar Radiation Instrumentation for Energy, Climate and Space Applications Preprint prepared for New RAD '99  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reductions of uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements are needed to validate the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. Characterization of solar energy resources for renewable technologies requires greater time and spatial resolution for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. We describe progress in measurements of broadband diffuse-sky radiation, and characterization of field instrument thermal offsets and spectral irradiance. The need and prospects for absolute references for diffuse and long-wave terrestrial solar radiation measurements are discussed. Reductions in uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square meter to a few (one to two) watts per square meter are reported, which reduce time and labor to quantify and identify trends in artificial optical radiation sources, terrestrial solar radiation, and the Earth's radiation budget.

Stoffel, T. L.; Reda, I.; Myers, D. R.; Renne, D.; Wilcox, S. W.; Treadwell, J.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

71

Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

Del Grande, Nancy Kerr (San Leandro, CA)

1977-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

74

Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

An Investigation of Linked Physical And Biogeochemical Processes In Heterogeneous Soils In The Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding contaminant fate and transport. This work explored the effects of soil structure (i.e. layers, lenses) on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes under changing hydrologic conditions (e.g. rainfall, introduction of groundwater, and fluctuating water table heights). A homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam and a sand-over-loam layered column were constructed for the first series of experiments. The second series of experiments employed two soil columns with lenses that were packed identically with sterilized and untreated sediments. Each consisted of two lenses of organic-rich loam in a medium-grained sand matrix. Lenses were located at different vertical depths and were horizontally offset. In-situ collocated probes collected soil hydrologic and chemical data. In the layered column, enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of Fe(III) and SO42- reducing microorganisms also show 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. The greatest concentrations of aqueous FeS clusters (FeSaq) were observed in close proximity to the soil interface. To our knowledge, this was the first documentation of FeSaq in partially saturated sediments. Mineral and soil aggregate composite layers were also most abundant near the soil layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an order of magnitude decrease of hydraulic conductivity. In the live lens column, Fe-oxide bands formed at the fringes of the lenses that retarded water flow rates by an order of magnitude compared to the sterilized column. Microbial activity also produced insoluble gases and that led to the creation of a separate gas phase that reduced hydraulic conductivity. This limited the interaction between groundwater with soil-pore waters that led to the formation of geochemically distinct water masses in relatively close proximity to one another. No such changes were observed in the sterilized column. When compared to homogenous columns, the presence of soil heterogeneities altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes considerably which highlights the need to consider soil heterogeneity in contaminant fate and transport models. These findings suggest that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale.

Hansen, David Joseph

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome sequencing. Principal Investigators: Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer...

79

NETL: Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration A "Hands-On" Workshop for the Appalachian Coal & Electric Utilities Industries Table of Contents Disclaimer General Conference Information Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

80

Advanced Stirling conversion systems for terrestrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) is developing heat engines for terrestrial Solar distributed Heat Receivers. SNLA has identified the Stirling to be one of the most promising candidates for the terrestrial applications. The free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) has the potential to meet the DOE goals for both performance and cost. Free-piston Stirling activities which are directed toward a dynamic power source for the space application are being conducted. Space power system requirements include high efficiency, very long life, high reliability and low vibration. The FPSE has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either solar or nuclear powered. Generic free-piston technology is currently being developed for use with a residential heat pump under an Interagency Agreement. Also, an overview is presented of proposed conceptual designs for the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) using a free-piston Stirling engine and a liquid metal heat pipe receiver. Power extraction includes both a linear alternator and hydraulic output capable of delivering approximately 25 kW of electrical power to the electric utility grid. Target cost of the engine/alternator is 300 dollars per kilowatt at a manufacturing rate of 10,000 units per year. The design life of the ASCS is 60,000 h (30 y) with an engine overhaul at 40,000 h (20 y). Also discussed are the key features and characteristics of the ASCS conceptual designs.

Shaltens, R.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Implementation of variably saturated flow into PHREEQC for the simulation of biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software tool for the simulation of one-dimensional unsaturated flow and solute transport together with biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone was developed by integrating a numerical solution of Richards' equation into the geochemical modelling ... Keywords: Cation exchange, Geochemical modelling, Hydraulic properties, Reactive transport, Surface complexation, Unsaturated flow

L. Wissmeier; D. A. Barry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Biogeochemical studies of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trace and major elemental composition were determined in the organs of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys of California, and in soils, sediments, and agricultural fertilizer that constitute the various sources of elements in the waterfowl. These data provide a biogeochemical baseline for waterfowl populations wintering in an area being developed for geothermal power. This baseline in the Imperial Valley is affected by soil and sediment composition, agricultural effluents in irrigation and stream water, and spent shot deposited by hunters in waterfowl habitats. The waterfowl acquire a set of trace elements from these sources and concentrations increase in their organs over the wintering period. Nickel, arsenic, selenium, bromine, and lead are the primary elements acquired from soil sources, agricultural effluents, and spent shot in the Imperial Valley. The assessment of effects from geothermal effluents on waterfowl populations in complex because there are large influxes of materials into the Imperial Valley ecosystem that contain trace elements, i.e., irrigation water, phosphatic fertilizers, pesticides, and lead shot. Multiple sources exist for many elements prominent in the expected geothermal effluents. The relationships between the two California valleys, the Imperial and Sacramento, are apparent in the trace element concentrations in the organs of waterfowl obtained in those two valleys. Arsenic is absent in the waterfowl organs obtained in the Sacramento Valley and relatively common in the Imperial Valley waterfowl. The effect of any release of geothermal effluent in the Imperial Valley waterfowl habitats will be difficult to describe because of the complexity of the biogeochemical baseline and the multiple sources of trace and major elements in the ecosystem.

Koranda, J.J.; Stuart, M.; Thompson, S.; Conrado, C.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Quality assessment of GPS reprocessed terrestrial reference frame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International GNSS Service (IGS) contributes to the construction of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) by submitting time series of station positions and Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP). For the first time, its submission to the ... Keywords: GNSS, Geocenter motion, Loading, Systematic errors, Terrestrial reference frames

Xavier Collilieux; Laurent MÚtivier; Zuheir Altamimi; Tonie Dam; Jim Ray

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

85

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energ├şas Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

86

Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

What is the Potential for Carbon Sequestration by the Terrestrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the Potential for Carbon Sequestration by the Terrestrial Biosphere? Roger C. Dahlman 1 , Gary K. Jacobs 2 , and F. Blaine Metting, Jr. 2 This paper highlights some of...

90

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

91

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

92

Terrestrial carbon cycle dynamics under recent and future climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When forced by historical emissions of CO 2 from fossil fuels and land-use change, the coupled climateľcarbon cycle model accurately reproduces historical atmospheric CO 2 trends, as well as terrestrial and oceanic uptake for the past two decades. Under six twenty-first-century CO 2 emissions scenarios, both terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks continue to increase, though terrestrial uptake slows in the latter half of the century. Climateľcarbon cycle feedbacks are isolated by comparing a coupled model run with a run where climate and the carbon cycle are uncoupled. The modeled positive feedback between the carbon cycle and climate is found to be relatively small, resulting in an increase in simulated CO 2 of 60 ppmv at the year 2100. Including non-CO 2 greenhouse gas forcing and increasing the modelĺs climate sensitivity increase the effect of this feedback to 140 ppmv. The UVic model does not, however, simulate a switch from a terrestrial carbon sink to a source during the twenty-first century, as earlier studies have suggested. This can be explained by a lack of substantial reductions in simulated vegetation productivity due to climate changes. 1.

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin; J. Meissner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways

Zach, R

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in the document describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1982 to 1983. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigating critical Hanford and basic subsurface scienceAbiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsliquid waste release to the Hanford vadose zone, where

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technetium, strontium, and plutonium, as well as metalSelf-Consistent Model of Plutonium Sorption: Quantificationenvironmental behavior of plutonium through the development

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. ; L. Kerkhof, Rutgers U. ; R. Kukkadapu, PNNL; M.Lipton, PNNL; D. Lovley, U.Amherst; C. Murray, PNNL; A. Peacock, Microbial Insights; F.

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silicate weathering and radionuclide sorption- desorption2 ) that can sequester radionuclides into bound form duringFacilitated Transport of Radionuclides in a Semi-Arid Vadose

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scale and complexity of the DOE stewardship responsibilityin the organic phase suggests that does not occur under theJ. Bagar, SSRL; R. Bush, DOE-LM; J. Davis, P. FoxŚLBNL; K.

Hawkes, Daniel S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: Ľ September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled ôOcean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.ö A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. Ľ December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled ôCarbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.ö This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on ôLarge scale fertilization,ö has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on ôpatch fertilizationö discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on ômodel developmentö summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biogeochemical Evolution of the Western Interior Basin of North America during a Kasimovian Highstand and Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the geochemical facies of the Hushpuckney Shale using XRF scanning data and the bioturbation indices, which will contribute to a better understanding of the biogeochemical environment prevalent during the deposition of the Hushpuckney Shale. The Hushpuckney Shale Member of the Swope Formation (Kasimovian Stage) preserved in KGS Spencer core 2 - 6, consists of a black shale submember overlain by bioturbated gray shale. Millimeter-scale core description and analysis of XRF scanning data enables identification of geochemical facies within the study core and contributes to understanding the environment of shale deposition. The XRF spectrometer produces X-ray image of the core and abundance values of selected major and trace elements, including iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), titanium (Ti), zircon (Zr), potassium (K) and phosphorous (P). Canfield and Thamdrup's (2009) classification of geochemical environments is used to recognize oxic/aerobic, manganous-nitrogenous, ferruginous and sulfidic facies within the black shale submember. A modification of Droser and Bottjer's (1986) semi-quantitative field classification of bioturbation is used to identify facies variations within the gray shale submember. Abundance of apatite nodules and lamina in the black shale submember of the study core suggest that black shale sediments accumulated slowly in a sediment-starved basin. A high abundance of sulfide-scavenged elements, including Mo, Zn, V, Ni and Cr, identifies the sulfidic facies in the black shale submember, and indicates deposition in an oxygen-depleted environment with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide. The overlying ferruginous facies has lower abundances of sulfide-scavenged elements and lacks cryptic Fe-laminations. The uppermost black shale submember facies, the manganous-nitrogenous facies, has cryptic Fe laminations and a relatively high P/Ca ratio. Abundance of cryptic iron laminations and apatite nodules and lamina indicates the syngenetic deposition of iron and phosphate due to Fe-P coupling mechanism. The gray shale submember is burrowed, indicating deposition under oxygenated conditions. Bioturbation indices reveal the variations in the intensity and nature of burrows within the gray shale, which corresponds to the changes in the depositional environment that may be related to the rise and fall of sea-level.

Banerjee, Sikhar

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midlatitude regions experienced frequent droughts during the twentieth century, but their impacts on terrestrial carbon balance are unclear. This paper presents a century-scale study of drought effects on the carbon balance of terrestrial ...

Jingfeng Xiao; Qianlai Zhuang; Eryuan Liang; Xuemei Shao; A. David McGuire; Aaron Moody; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Atmospheric and Terrestrial Mobile Laboratory (ATML).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ionospheric disturbance dynamo signature in geomagnetic variations is investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. The model results are tested against reference magnetically quiet time observations on 21 June 1993, and disturbance effects were observed on 11 June 1993. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed diurnal and latitude variations of the geomagnetic horizontal intensity and declination for the reference quiet day in midlatitude and low-latitude regions but underestimates their amplitudes. The patterns of the disturbance dynamo signature and its source 'anti-Sq' current system are well reproduced in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the model significantly underestimates the amplitude of disturbance dynamo effects when compared with observations. Furthermore, the largest simulated disturbances occur at different local times than the observations. The discrepancies suggest that the assumed high-latitude storm time energy inputs in the model were not quantitatively accurate for this storm.

Zak, Bernard Daniel; Rahn, Thom (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Nitschke, Kim (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Ivey, Mark D.; Mora, Claudia (Los Alamos National Laboratory); McDowell, Nate (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Love, Steve (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Dubey, M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Michelsen, Hope A.; Guilderson, Tom (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Schubert, William Kent; Costigan, Keeley (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Chylek, Petr (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bambha, Ray P.; Roskovensky, John K.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

Cummer, Steven A.

106

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Developers: Dr. Jerry Olson, Dr. Sarah Kurtz, Dr. Daniel Friedman, Alan Kibbler, and Charlene Karmer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Richard King, Jim Ermer, Dmitri D. Krut, Hector Cotal, Peter Colter, Hojun Yoon, Nassar Karam, and Gregory S. Glenn, Spectrolab, Inc. The triple-junction solar cell - or TJ solar cell - generates a lot of energy from just a very little amount of material. How much energy? A 1-cm2 cell can generate as much as 35 W of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity to power the typical American household. This cell can do this, first, because it

107

TERRESTRIAL, HABITABLE-ZONE EXOPLANET FREQUENCY FROM KEPLER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from Kepler's first 136 days of operation are analyzed to determine the distribution of exoplanets with respect to radius, period, and host-star spectral type. The analysis is extrapolated to estimate the percentage of terrestrial, habitable-zone (HZ) exoplanets. The Kepler census is assumed to be complete for bright stars (magnitude 0.5 Earth radius and periods <42 days. It is also assumed that the size distribution of planets is independent of orbital period and that there are no hidden biases in the data. Six significant statistical results are found: there is a paucity of small planet detections around faint target stars, probably an instrumental effect; the frequency of mid-size planet detections is independent of whether the host star is bright or faint; there are significantly fewer planets detected with periods <3 days, compared to longer periods, almost certainly an astrophysical effect; the frequency of all planets in the population with periods <42 days is 29%, broken down as terrestrials 9%, ice giants 18%, and gas giants 3%; the population has a planet frequency with respect to period which follows a power-law relation dN/dP {approx} P{sup {beta}-1}, with {beta} {approx_equal} 0.71 {+-} 0.08; and an extrapolation to longer periods gives the frequency of terrestrial planets in the HZs of FGK stars as {eta}{sub Circled-Plus} {approx_equal} (34 {+-} 14)%. Thus about one-third of FGK stars are predicted to have at least one terrestrial, HZ planet.

Traub, Wesley A., E-mail: wtraub@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Simulating past and future dynamics of natural ecosystems in the United States. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 17(2)1045  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Simulations of potential vegetation distribution, natural fire frequency, carbon pools, and fluxes are presented for two DGVMs (Dynamic Global Vegetation Models) from the second phase of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project. Results link vegetation dynamics to biogeochemical cycling for the conterminous United States. Two climate change scenarios were used: a moderately warm scenario from the Hadley Climate Centre and a warmer scenario from the Canadian Climate Center. Both include sulfate aerosols and assume a gradual CO2 increase. Both DGVMs simulate a reduction of southwestern desert areas, a westward expansion of eastern deciduous forests, and the expansion of forests in the western part of the Pacific Northwest and in north-central California. Both DGVMs predict an increase in total biomass burnt in the next century, with a more pronounced increase under the Canadian scenario. Under the Hadley scenario, both DGVMs simulate increases in total carbon stocks. Under the Canadian scenario, both DGVMs simulate a decrease in live vegetation carbon. We identify similarities in model behavior due to the climate forcing and explain differences by the different structure of the models and their different sensitivity to

Dominique Bachelet; Ronald P. Neilson; Thomas Hickler; Raymond J. Drapek; James M. Lenihan; Martin T. Sykes; Benjamin Smith; Stephen Sitch; Kirsten Thonicke

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan  

SciTech Connect

This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Characterization of extrasolar terrestrial planets from diurnal photometric variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of massive planets orbiting nearby stars has become almost routine, but current techniques are as yet unable to detect terrestrial planets with masses comparable to the Earth's. Future space-based observatories to detect Earth-like planets are being planned. Terrestrial planets orbiting in the habitable zones of stars-where planetary surface conditions are compatible with the presence of liquid water-are of enormous interest because they might have global environments similar to Earth's and even harbor life. The light scattered by such a planet will vary in intensity and colour as the planet rotates; the resulting light curve will contain information about the planet's properties. Here we report a model that predicts features that should be discernible in light curves obtained by low-precision photometry. For extrasolar planets similar to Earth we expect daily flux variations up to hundreds of percent, depending sensitively on ice and cloud cover. Qualitative changes in surface or climate generate significant changes in the predicted light curves. This work suggests that the meteorological variability and the rotation period of an Earth-like planet could be derived from photometric observations. Other properties such as the composition of the surface (e.g., ocean versus land fraction), climate indicators (for example ice and cloud cover), and perhaps even signatures of Earth-like plant life could be constrained or possibly, with further study, even uniquely determined.

E. B. Ford; S. Seager; E. L. Turner

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improving radiological assessment of doses to man from terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NKS B-programme EcoDoses project started in 2003 as a collaboration between all the Nordic countries. The aim of the project is to improve the radiological assessments of doses to man from terrestrial ecosystems. The first part, conducted in 2003, has focussed on an extensive collation and review of both published and unpublished data from all the Nordic countries for the nuclear weapons fallout period and the post-Chernobyl period. This included data on radionuclides in air filters, precipitation, soil samples, milk and reindeer. Based on this, an improved model for estimating radioactive fallout based on precipitation data during the nuclear weapons fallout period has been developed. Effective ecological half- lives for 137Cs and 90Sr in milk have been calculated for the nuclear weapons fallout period. For reindeer the ecological half- lives for 137Cs have been calculated for both the nuclear weapons fallout period and the post-Chernobyl period. The data were also used to compare modelling results with observed concentrations. This was done at a workshop where the radioecological food-and-dose module in the ARGOS decision support system was used to predict transfer of deposited radionuclides to foodstuffs and subsequent radiation doses to man. The work conducted the first year is presented in this report and gives interesting, new results relevant for terrestrial radioecology. Key words Nuclear weapons fallout, deposition modelling, food chain modelling, ecological half-lives in reindeer and milk NKS-98

Pohjoismainen Ydinturvallisuustutkimus; Edited Tone; D. Bergan; Astrid Lil

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes and continents are lacking. Here we present data describing the relationships between net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and climate factors as measured using the eddy covariance method at 125 unique sites in various ecosystems over six continents with a total of 559 site-years. We find that NEE observed at eddy covariance sites is (1) a strong function of mean annual temperature at mid- and high-latitudes, (2) a strong function of dryness at mid- and low-latitudes, and (3) a function of both temperature and dryness around the mid-latitudinal belt (45 N). The sensitivity of NEE to mean annual temperature breaks down at ~ 16 C (a threshold value of mean annual temperature), above which no further increase of CO2 uptake with temperature was observed and dryness influence overrules temperature influence.

Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

Stephen C. Piper

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Remote sensing for the geobotanical and biogeochemical assessment of environmental contamination  

SciTech Connect

Under Contract Number DE-AC08-90NV10845, the DOE has funded the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to examine several aspects of remote sensing, specifically with respect to how its use might help support Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) activities at DOE sites located throughout the country. This report represents partial fulfillment of DRI`s obligations under that contract and includes a review of relevant literature associated with remote sensing studies and our evaluation and recommendation as to the applicability of various remote sensing techniques for DOE needs. With respect to DOE ERWM activities, remote sensing may be broadly defined as collecting information about a target without actually being in physical contact with the object. As the common platforms for remote sensing observations are aircraft and satellites, there exists the possibility to rapidly and efficiently collect information over DOE sites that would allow for the identification and monitoring of contamination related to present and past activities. As DOE sites cover areas ranging from tens to hundreds of square miles, remote sensing may provide an effective, efficient, and economical method in support of ERWM activities. For this review, remote sensing has been limited to methods that employ electromagnetic (EM) energy as the means of detecting and measuring target characteristics.

Wickham, J.; Chesley, M.; Lancaster, J.; Mouat, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

Verity, P. [ed.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The interspecific biomassdensity relationship for terrestrial plants: where do clonal red seaweeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interspecific biomass┬▒density relationship for terrestrial plants: where do clonal red seaweeds (or ramet, for clonal plants) density is negatively related to stand biomass. Stand biomass and ramet biomass was higher than average values expected from the terrestrial interspecific biomass

Scrosati, Ricardo

119

Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

Pasko, Victor

120

Terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral data fusion products for geological outcrop analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Close-range hyperspectral imaging is an emerging technique for remotely mapping mineral content and distributions in inaccessible geological outcrop surfaces, allowing subtle chemical variations to be identified with high resolution and accuracy. Terrestrial ... Keywords: Ground-based, Integration, Surface modelling, Terrestrial laser scanning, Virtual outcrop models, Visualisation

Simon J. Buckley, Tobias H. Kurz, John A. Howell, Danilo Schneider

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Externally Occulted Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph: Simulations and Sensitivities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multitude of coronagraphic techniques for the space-based direct detection and characterization of exo-solar terrestrial planets are actively being pursued by the astronomical community. Typical coronagraphs have internal shaped focal plane and/or pupil plane occulting masks which block and/or diffract starlight thereby increasing the planet's contrast with respect to its parent star. Past studies have shown that any internal technique is limited by the ability to sense and control amplitude, phase (wavefront) and polarization to exquisite levels - necessitating stressing optical requirements. An alternative and promising technique is to place a starshade, i.e. external occulter, at some distance in front of the telescope. This starshade suppresses most of the starlight before entering the telescope - relaxing optical requirements to that of a more conventional telescope. While an old technique it has been recently been advanced by the recognition that circularly symmetric graded apodizers can be well appro...

Lyon, Richard G; Lo, Amy; Cash, Webster; Starkman, Glenn D; Vanderbei, Robert J; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Copi, Craig J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions ľ through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels ľ to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

SEW ECOREGION/SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 228 West Main St., MS-CH-17, Goldendale, WA 98620; (509) 773-5703; DaveM@co.klickitat.wa.us Joe Zendt at Grand Coulie/Chief Joe Black-capped chickadee Parus atricopillus HEP Species used in the loss Centrocercus urophasianus Use at Grand Coulie/Chief Joe Lesser scaup Aytha affinis HEP Species used in the loss

128

SOLAR TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH AND SPACE WEATHER ACTIVITIES Anastasios Anastasiadis, Ioannis A. Daglis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a suitable background for creating a national space weather initiative that is still missing. 1. BACKGROUND in five cities (see Fig. 1). We ought to mention that the numerous Greek space scientists living as well as in the Section of Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics (http://www.uoa.gr). The personnel

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

129

Summaries of physical research in geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summaries in this document describe the work performed during 1975 and include the scope of the work to be performed in 1976. The Division of Physical Research, through its Geosciences Program, supports research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, basic meteorology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, physical oceanography, seismology, and natural resource analysis including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary relationships, as well as their relationships, as well as their relationship to ERDA's technological needs.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioresources are generated in a variety of environments and each presents unique risks and benefits associated with land application. Bioresources from livestock, urban and bioenergy systems were selected and evaluated through field, greenhouse and laboratory studies of potential risk and benefits of recycling to agricultural and urban landscapes. The waste stream, including feedstock sources and treatment processes, affects composition and properties of bioresources and effects on biogeochemical cycles of amended soils. Variation of decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates among bioresources used to amend soil for turfgrass and forage reflected variation among contrasting feedstock sources and treatments prior to application. During turfgrass establishment, plant available nitrogen and nitrogen mineralized from a bioresource from livestock waste streams, (Geotube! residual solids, supplied N in excess of crop uptake potential and contributed to leaching loss of N. In contrast, N mineralization rates from bioresources generated during methane production from dairy manure (manure solids) were not sufficient to maximize crop production, necessitating N fertilizer application. In addition to variation of composition, bioresource effects on crop productivity and environmental quality vary among management practices and between forage and turfgrass cropping systems. Large application rates of bioresources increase soil nutrient concentration and potential crop productivity, but contribute to increased nutrient loss in drainage and surface runoff. Yet, incorporation or Alum treatment of bioresources will reduce runoff loss of dissolved P and protect water quality without sacrificing crop productivity. Alum treatment of bioresources prior to land application effectively reduced runoff loss of dissolved P to levels observed for control soil. For situations in which large, volume-based bioresource rates are top-dressed or incorporated, export of applied nutrients environmental impacts were compared between forage and turfgrass systems. Starting during the initial year of production, annual export of applied N and P in Tifway bermudagrass sod was greater than export through forage harvests of Tifton 85. Low forage yield limited N and P export from Tifton 85 during the year of establishment, but increased forage yield during the second year increased export of manure N and P to levels more comparable to sod. As variation between compost sources, turfgrass and forage production systems, and application methods indicated, effective management of bioresources is necessary to balance benefits and risk in cropping systems. Integrated assessment of bioresource composition and crop-specific management of application method and rate will enable sustainable bioresource cycling and crop productivity.

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evidence for Biomagnification of Gold Nanoparticles within a Terrestrial Food Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoparticles from the rapidly increasing number of consumer products that contain manufactured nanomaterials are being discharged into waste streams. Increasing evidence suggests that several classes of nanomaterials may accumulate in sludge derived from wastewater treatment and ultimately in soil following land application as biosolids. Little research has been conducted to evaluate the impact of nanoparticles on terrestrial ecosystems, despite the fact that land application of biosolids from wastewater treatment will be a major pathway for the introduction of manufactured nanomaterials to the environment. To begin addressing this knowledge gap, we used the model organisms Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi and Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm) to investigate plant uptake and the potential for trophic transfer of 5, 10, and 15 nm diameter gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Samples were analyzed using both bulk analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as spatially resolved methods such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF). Our results demonstrate trophic transfer and biomagnification of gold nanoparticles from a primary producer to a primary consumer by mean factors of 6.2, 11.6, and 9.6 for the 5, 10, and 15 nm treatments, respectively. This result has important implications for risks associated with nanotechnology, including the potential for human exposure.

J Judy; J Unrine; P Bertsch

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Bio-char sequestration in terrestrial ecosystemsľa review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The application of bio-char (charcoal or biomass-derived black carbon (C)) to soil is proposed as a novel approach to establish a significant, long-term, sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide in terrestrial ecosystems. Apart from positive effects in both reducing emissions and increasing the sequestration of greenhouse gases, the production of bio-char and its application to soil will deliver immediate benefits through improved soil fertility and increased crop production. Conversion of biomass C to bio-char C leads to sequestration of about 50 % of the initial C compared to the low amounts retained after burning (3%) and biological decomposition (bio-char is highly dependent on the type of feedstock, but is not significantly affected by the pyrolysis temperature (within 350ľ500 ? C common for pyrolysis). Existing slash-andburn systems cause significant degradation of soil and release of greenhouse gases and opportunies may exist to enhance this system by conversion to slash-and-char systems. Our global analysis revealed that up to 12 % of the total anthropogenic C emissions by land use change (0.21 Pg C) can be off-set annually in soil, if slash-and-burn is replaced by slash-and-char. Agricultural and forestry wastes such as forest residues, mill residues, field crop residues, or urban wastes add a conservatively estimated

Johannes Lehmann; John Gaunt; Marco Rondon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Externally Occulted Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph: Simulations and Sensitivities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multitude of coronagraphic techniques for the space-based direct detection and characterization of exo-solar terrestrial planets are actively being pursued by the astronomical community. Typical coronagraphs have internal shaped focal plane and/or pupil plane occulting masks which block and/or diffract starlight thereby increasing the planet's contrast with respect to its parent star. Past studies have shown that any internal technique is limited by the ability to sense and control amplitude, phase (wavefront) and polarization to exquisite levels - necessitating stressing optical requirements. An alternative and promising technique is to place a starshade, i.e. external occulter, at some distance in front of the telescope. This starshade suppresses most of the starlight before entering the telescope - relaxing optical requirements to that of a more conventional telescope. While an old technique it has been recently been advanced by the recognition that circularly symmetric graded apodizers can be well approximated by shaped binary occulting masks. Indeed optimal shapes have been designed that can achieve smaller inner working angles than conventional coronagraphs and yet have high effective throughput allowing smaller aperture telescopes to achieve the same coronagraphic resolution and similar sensitivity as larger ones. Herein we report on our ongoing modeling, simulation and optimization of external occulters and show sensitivity results with respect to number and shape errors of petals, spectral passband, accuracy of Fresnel propagation, and show results for both filled and segmented aperture telescopes and discuss acquisition and sensing of the occulter's location relative to the telescope.

Richard G. Lyon; Sally Heap; Amy Lo; Webster Cash; Glenn D. Starkman; Robert J. Vanderbei; N. Jeremy Kasdin; Craig J. Copi

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Red waters of Myrionecta rubra are biogeochemical hotspots for the Columbia River estuary with impacts on primary/secondary productions and nutrient cycles  

SciTech Connect

The localized impact of blooms of the mixotrophic ciliate Myrionecta rubra in the Columbia River estuary during 2007-2010 was evaluated with biogeochemical, light microscopy, physiological and molecular data. M. rubra affected surrounding estuarine nutrient cycles, as indicated by high and low concentrations of organic nutrients and inorganic nitrogen, respectively, associated with red waters. M. rubra blooms also altered the energy transfer pattern in patches of the estuarine water that contain the ciliate by creating areas characterized by high primary production and elevated levels of fresh autochthonous particulate organic matter, therefore shifting the trophic status in emergent red water areas of the estuary from net heterotrophy towards autotrophy. The pelagic estuarine bacterial community structure was unaffected by M. rubra abundance, but red waters of the ciliate do offer a possible link between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes since they were associated with elevated dissolved organic matter and enhanced microbial secondary production. Taken together these findings suggest that M. rubra red waters are biogeochemical hotspots of the Columbia River estuary.

Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McCue, Lee Ann; Needoba, Joe A.; Crump, Byron C.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Campbell, Victoria; Zuber, Peter A.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Estimating the Seasonal Carbon Source-Sink Geography of a Natural, Steady-State Terrestrial Biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks represents a needed input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models. For the terrestrial biosphere, initial monthly estimates of overall metabolism and net biosphere-atmosphere ...

Elgene O. Box

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Inferring Changes in Terrestrial Water Storage Using ERA-40 Reanalysis Data: The Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial water storage is an essential part of the hydrological cycle, encompassing crucial elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, groundwater, snow, and land ice. On a regional scale, it is however not a readily measured ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Pedro Viterbo; Daniel LŘthi; Christoph Schńr

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

139

Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

Pigeon, Timothy David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dynamic Response of Terrestrial Hydrological Cycles and Plant Water Stress to Climate Change in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration CO2 and climate change are expected to have a major effect on terrestrial ecosystem hydrological cycles and plant water stress in the coming decades. The present study investigates the potential responses of ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reaction-based Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research sought to examine biogeochemical processes likely to take place in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel during the in situ ethanol biostimulation experiment conducted at Area 2 during 2005-2006. The in situ experiment in turn examined the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into this layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Central Florida (2004-2007), the development of biogeochemical and reactive transport models and the conduction of numerical simulations at laboratory, column, and field scales.

Tsyh Yeh, Gour

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

I N V I T E D R E V I E W Methane emissions from wetlands: biogeochemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Methane is responsible for about 18% of human- induced radiative forcing, making it the second most) with their large areal extent and high CH4 fluxes per area. However, the dominant research effort has focused on CH- tries at northern latitudes with their greater research (a) (b) Fig. 2 Global methane sources in (a

145

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loik Abstract Loik Abstract Climate Change Impacts on Shrub-Forest Ecotones in the Western US Principle Investigator: Michael E. Loik, University of California, Santa Cruz Co-PI: Daniel F. Doak, University of California, Santa Cruz (after Aug. 2007: University of Wyoming) Unfunded collaborator: Ronald P. Neilson, Pacific Northwest Forest Service Research Laboratory Abstract:: This research is motivated by (i) the importance of snow as a dominant form of precipitation for a large portion of arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States, (ii) uncertainty in how changes in snow climate will affect ecotones between terrestrial ecosystems of the West, and (iii) the need to better understand how climate change impacts recruitment of dominant organisms of range and forest lands of the West, in order to better predict climate change effects on distributions of terrestrial ecosystems.

146

Summaries of FY 1995 geosciences research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either direct or indirect to the Department of Energy`s long-range technological needs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Research Opportunities. ... NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships Program; NIST NRC Program Description. ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Terrestrial origin of SNC meteorites and 30 Myr extinctions' shower source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong strengthening of material under high confining pressure and jet nature of outflow from impact craters permit to show meteoroid impacts of >=10E6 Mt TNT equivalent are capable of ejecting rocks up to ~1 km in size from the Earth into space. That permits one to propose the terrestrial origin of some NEA's and SNC meteorites. It is shown the isotopic anomalies of nitrogen, argon and xenon can be related with terrestrial mantle samples. The same applies to the oxygen isotope shifts if one recalls the known manifestations of the kinetic effects of isotopic fractionation.

E. M. Drobyshevski

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities, and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, briefly describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Summaries of FY 1993 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the DOE`s many missions. The Geosciences Research Program is supported by the Office of Energy Research. The participants in this program include DOE laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the DOE and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar-atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Terrestrial laser scanning for measuring the solid wood volume, including branches, of adult standing trees in the forest environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to assess the solid wood volume (i.e., stem and branch diameters of more than 7cm) of adult standing trees in the forest environment. The solid wood volume of 42 trees of different ... Keywords: 3D tree modelling, Forestry, LiDAR, Terrestrial laser scanning, Wood volume

Mathieu Dassot; AurÚLie Colin; Philippe Santenoise; Meriem Fournier; ThiÚRy Constant

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Research - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research is outlined our research proposals below. Samples of completed research may be found under "Sample Papers" and under "Project Highlights" on á...

154

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

155

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

156

William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William R. Wiley Environmental William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

157

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

158

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R and D Progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of standing aboveground biomass, utilization of aboveground biomass in long-lived products, or protection of carbon (organic and inorganic) compounds present in soils. There are potential co-benefits from efforts to sequester carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. For example, long-lived valuable products (wood) are produced, erosion would be reduced, soil productivity could be improved through increased capacity to retain water and nutrients, and marginal lands could be improved and riparian ecosystems restored. Another unique feature of the terrestrial sequestration option is that it is the only option that is ''reversible'' should it become desirable or permissible. For example, forests that are created are thus investments which could be harvested should CO{sub 2} emissions be reduced in other ways to acceptable levels 50-100 years from now.

Jacobs, G.K.

2001-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Modeling Study of the ENSO Influence on the Terrestrial Energy Profile in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the El Ni˝oľSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) on the terrestrial energy profile over North America is studied using a 15-yr model simulation. A large-area basin scale (LABs) land surface model is driven using the European Centre for ...

Ji Chen; Praveen Kumar

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

Hopkins, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS: INTERPLANETARY ASPECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for high-resolution solar wind data and to the National Space Science Data Center (NASAA COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS, with peak value of -16 nT. In this paper the interplanetary aspects of these two solar

162

BGP-S: a protocol for terrestrial and satellite network integration in network layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accomplish network layer integration of terrestrial and satellite IP networks, special exterior gateway protocols are needed. In this work, a new exterior gateway protocol called Border Gateway Protocol-Satellite version (BGP-S) is introduced that ... Keywords: BGP-4, IP-based routing, exterior gateway protocol, satellite networks

Eylem Ekici; Chao Chen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Western. Sleeter Chapter 9 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems.L., Hawbaker, T.J., and Sleeter, B.M., 2012, Projected future carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes

Fleskes, Joe

164

Supervised identification and reconstruction of near-planar geological surfaces from terrestrial laser scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial laser scanning is an effective method for digitally capturing outcrops, enabling them to be visualized, analyzed, and revisited in an office environment without the limitations of fieldwork (such as time constraints, weather conditions, outcrop ... Keywords: Bedding, Fractures, LIDAR, Moment of inertia analysis, Outcrop characterization, Segmentation

D. GarcÝA-SellÚS; O. Falivene; P. ArbuÚS; O. Gratacos; S. Tavani; J. A. Mu˝Oz

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial and land use. MODIS active fire detections 2000-2006 for Southern California 2001-2004 mean annual burned (bottom), expressed as fraction of grid cell that burns each year. From Giglio et al. (2005), Atmos. Chem

Christian, Eric

166

Monitoring Precipitation over the Arctic Terrestrial Drainage System: Data Requirements, Shortcomings, and Applications of Atmospheric Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort is under way aimed at historical analysis and monitoring of the pan-Arctic terrestrial drainage system. A key element is the provision of gridded precipitation time series that can be readily updated. This has proven to be a daunting ...

Mark C. Serreze; Martyn P. Clark; David H. Bromwich

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Modeling Plot-Level Biomass and Volume Using Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nationĺs forested areas using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne, and more recently, terrestrial lidar (light detection and ranging) systems are capable of producing accurate measurements of individual tree dimensions and also possess the ability to characterize three-dimensional vertical forest structure. This study investigates the potential of airborne and terrestrial scanning lidar systems for modeling forest volume and aboveground biomass on FIA subplots in the Malheur National Forest, eastern Oregon. A methodology for the creation of five airborne lidar metric sets (four point cloud-based and one individual tree based) and four terrestrial lidar metric sets (three height-based and one distance-based) is presented. Metrics were compared to estimates of subplot aboveground biomass and gross volume derived from FIA data using national and regional allometric equations respectively. Simple linear regression models from the airborne lidar data accounted for 15 percent of the variability in subplot biomass and 14 percent of the variability in subplot volume, while multiple linear regression models increased these amounts to 29 percent and 25 percent, respectively. When subplot estimates of biophysical parameters were scaled to the plot-level and compared with plot-level lidar metrics, simple linear regression models were able to account for 60 percent of the variability in biomass and 71 percent of the variation in volume. Terrestrial lidar metrics produced moderate results with simple linear regression models accounting for 41 percent of the variability in biomass and 46 percent of the variability in volume, with multiple linear regression models accounting for 71 percent and 84 percent, respectively. Results show that: (1) larger plot sizes help to mitigate errors and produce better models; and (2) a combination of height-based and distance-based terrestrial lidar metrics has the potential to estimate biomass and volume on FIA subplots.

Sheridan, Ryan D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial or academic partner perform joint research with outcomes ... these collaborations arise spontaneously and the researchers jointly pursue ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Story Research at PNNL Home Featured Highlights Archive Research Directorates Energy & Environment Fundamental & Computational Sciences National Security Facilities...

170

Guest Researchers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If confidentiality of cooperative research results are desired a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) may be appropriate. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

172

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

173

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

174

Dr J Michael Kuperberg | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Climate and Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ┬╗ Dr J Michael Kuperberg Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities

175

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect

This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New  

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Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The goal of the Interagency Agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory is to conduct research to enhance understanding of the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Performer Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling its contribution to the atmospheric carbon cycle. Active methane fluxes (from deep sediment hydrates and seeps) contribute to shallow sediment biogeochemical carbon cycles, which in turn

178

Anthropogenic impacts on global storage and emissions of mercury from terrestrial soils: Insights from a new global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We develop a mechanistic global model of soil mercury storage and emissions that ties the lifetime of mercury in soils to the lifetime of the organic carbon pools it is associated with. We explore the implications of considering terrestrial mercury cycling in the framework of soil carbon cycling and suggest possible avenues of future research to test our assumptions and constrain this type of model. In our simulation, input of mercury to soil is by atmospheric deposition, in part through leaf uptake and subsequent litter fall, and is moderated by surface photoreduction and revolatilization. Once bound to organic carbon, mercury is transferred along a succession of short?lived to long?lived carbon pools and is ultimately reemitted by respiration of these pools. We examine the legacy of anthropogenic influence on global mercury storage and emissions and estimate that storage of mercury in organic soils has increased by ?20 % since preindustrial times, while soil emissions have increased by a factor of 3 (2900 Mg yr ?1 versus 1000 Mg yr ?1). At steady state, mercury accumulates in the most recalcitrant soil carbon pools and has an overall lifetime against respiration of 630 years. However, the impact of anthropogenic emissions since preindustrial times has been concentrated in more labile pools, so that the mean lifetime of present?day anthropogenic mercury in all pools is ?80 years. Our analysis suggests that reductions in anthropogenic emissions would lead to immediate and large reductions in secondary soil mercury emissions.

Nicole V Smith?downey; Elsie M. Sunderl; Daniel J. Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Jackson, Brian; Greenberg, Richard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

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and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

182

Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

1976-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Constraining the Radii of Neutron Stars with Terrestrial Nuclear Laboratory Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron star radii are primarily determined by the pressure of isospin asymmetric matter which is proportional to the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy. Available terrestrial laboratory data on the isospin diffusion in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies constrain the slope of the symmetry energy. Using this constraint, we show that the radius (radiation radius) of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star is between 11.5 (14.4) and 13.6 (16.3) km.

Bao-An Li; Andrew W. Steiner

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

A new UV-A/B protecting pigment in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune  

SciTech Connect

A new ultraviolet (UV)-A/B absorbing pigment with maxima at 312 and 330 nanometers from the cosmopolitan terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is described. The pigment is found in high amounts (up to 10% of dry weight) in colonies grown under solar UV radiation but only in low concentrations in laboratory cultures illuminated by artificial light without UV. Its experimental induction by UV as well as its capacity to efficiently protect Nostoc against UV radiation is reported.

Scherer, S.; Chen, T.W.; Boeger, P. (Universitaet Konstanz (West Germany))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Research Home  

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Cancer & Radiation Radiochemistry & Instrumentation Genome Dynamics BioenergyGTL Technology Centers Resources Research Research in the Life Sciences Division contributes to...

188

Research Gallery  

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Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

189

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Summaries Modeling the Sensitivity of Convection to Tropospheric Humidity Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: General...

190

Research Library  

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LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

191

Research Facilities  

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FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

192

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ERDA supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound underlay of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric and solar sciences which relate to ERDA's many missions. This research may be conducted in the major ERDA laboratories, industry, universities and other government agencies. Such support provides for payment of salaries, purchase of equipment and other materials, an allowance for overhead costs, and is formalized by a contract between ERDA and the organization performing the work. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the work performed during 1976, include the scope of the work to be performed in 1977 and provide information regarding some of the research planned for 1978. The Division of Basic Energy Sciences, through its Geosciences Program, supports research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary relationships, as well as their relationship to ERDA's technological needs.

Not Available

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5?20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION THROUGH ACCRETION OF SUBLIMATING ICY PLANETESIMALS IN A COLD NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Most of the theories of the solar system formation stand on the assumption that the formation of planetesimals occurs in a transparent (i.e., optically thin) nebula, in which H{sub 2}O ice is unstable at the formation region of the terrestrial planet due to direct stellar irradiation. However, in the astronomical context, it is confirmed by both observations and numerical models that protoplanetary disks are initially opaque (i.e., optically thick) owing to floating small dust particles, and the interior of the disk is colder than the transparent disk. If planetesimals are formed in the opaque cold nebula, they should be mainly composed of H{sub 2}O ice, even at the formation region of terrestrial planets. Abundant icy material would help the formation of planetesimals through enhancement of the dust amount. Icy planetesimals start sublimation when the protoplanetary disk gets transparent through clearance of small dust particles. Here, we investigated the consequence of such icy planetesimal formation through numerical simulations of the competition between the sublimation and accretion of icy planetesimals. It was shown that various types of planets ranging from rocky planets to water-ball planets can be formed inside the location of the snow line of a transparent disk depending on the disk mass and the time evolution of disk transparency. We found size-dependent water content of icy planetesimals, which suggests potential difference in the redox state between meteorites and terrestrial planets at the same distance from the central star.

Machida, Ryosuke [Current address: Fixstars Corporation, 1-11-1 Ohsaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0032 (Japan); Abe, Yutaka, E-mail: mach@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

196

Representation of Terrestrial Hydrology and Large-Scale Drought of the Continental United States from the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) is a state-of-the-art landľatmosphere reanalysis product that provides improved representation of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle compared to previous global reanalyses, having the potential to ...

Justin Sheffield; Ben Livneh; Eric F. Wood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Consequences of Considering CarbonľNitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of carbonľnitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of Biases in JRA-25/JCDAS Precipitation and Their Impact on the Global Terrestrial Carbon Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a modeled precipitation field and examines how its bias affects the modeling of the regional and global terrestrial carbon cycle. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation produced by the Japanese 25-yr reanalysis (JRA-...

Makoto Saito; Akihiko Ito; Shamil Maksyutov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

200

Time Scales of Terrestrial Carbon Response Related to Land-Use Application: Implications for Initializing an Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic vegetation and carbon cycling component, LM3V, of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) prototype Earth system model (ESM2.1), has been designed to simulate the effects of land use on terrestrial carbon pools, including ...

Lori T. Sentman; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

203

Ed O'Loughlin | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ed O'Loughlin Environmental chemist - Biosciences Ed O'Loughlin is an environmental chemist/environmental microbiologist specializing in the biogeochemical processes controlling the cycling of major/minor elements and the fate and transport of contaminants in natural systems. Ed's research intersects several major disciplines, including environmental microbiology, environmental chemistry, and geology. He has been studying biogeochemical processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems for nearly 25 years, the last 12 of which have been with the Molecular Environmental Science Group in the Biosciences Division at Argonne. Ed's current research focuses on the effects of microbial transformations of carbon, iron, and sulfur on the fate and transport of uranium and

204

Agile Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of agile software development methods in software-based research environments.

Cunningham, Hamish

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

206

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound basis of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences which relate to DOE's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the work performed during 1978, include the scope of the work to be performed in 1979 and provide information regarding some of the research planned for 1980. The following is an outline of the research areas included: geology, geophysics, and earch dynamics (large-scale earth movements; evolution of geologic structures; properties of earth materials; rock flow, fracture, and failure; continental drilling for scientific purposes); geochemistry (geothermal fluids; static rock--water interactions; organic geochemistry; geochemical migration); energy resource recognition, evaluation, and utilization (resource definition and utilization; reservoir dynamics and modeling; magma energy resources; information compilation, evaluation, and dissemination); hydrologic and marine sciences (ground water hydrology; fresh water systems; oceanography); and solar--terrestrial/atmospheric interactions (magnetospheric physics and chemistry; upper atmosphere chemistry and physics; solar radiation; meteorology and climatology). (RWR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

US fuel cell research and applications, 1960--1989  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the major fuel cell research and development (R and D) programs funded by the US government and the private sector, with a particular focus on terrestrial applications. Included in this overview is information on funding levels, project descriptions and goals, and selected accomplishments. Brief assessments as to the proximity of commercialization for each of the primary types of fuel cells are also furnished. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Kinzey, B.R.; Sen, R.K.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Research - Programs - Climate &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Research Areas The Carbon Cycle Better Models for Robust Climate Projection Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Projects Contacts Facilities & Centers Publications Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Climate & Carbon Sciences Program The global carbon cycle strongly regulates earth's climate, while anthropogenic disturbance of the carbon cycle is the main cause of current and predicted climate change. At the same time, humans depend on the terrestrial carbon cycle for food, fiber, energy, and pharmaceuticals. The Climate and Carbon Sciences Program of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory encompasses both atmospheric and

210

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

211

Underwater Networking Research at USC/ISI John Heidemann Wei Ye Jack Wills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater Networking Research at USC/ISI John Heidemann Wei Ye Jack Wills {johnh. By comparison, underwater sensing today is often expensive, sparsely deployed, and wired, or with very limited of terrestrial sensor networks underwater. To this end we are developing new approaches for hardware, with a new

Heidemann, John

212

NABIR Field Research Center Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to understand fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow for the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up, managing, or understanding fate and transport at DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites.

Watson, David

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Summaries of FY 1994 geosciences research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geosciences Research Program is directed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Research (OER) through its Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES). Activities in the Geosciences Research Program are directed toward the long-term fundamental knowledge of the processes that transport, modify, concentrate, and emplace (1) the energy and mineral resources of the earth and (2) the energy byproducts of man. The Program is divided into five broad categories: Geophysics and earth dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy resource recognition, evaluation, and utilization; Hydrogeology and exogeochemistry; and Solar-terrestrial interactions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs in these main areas and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

RESEARCH TITLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wilmington 35 Eidgen÷ssische Technische Hochschule, Switzerland 36 Emory University School of Medicine 37 ExxonMobil Research and ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

Wanlass, M.W.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling Tools and Applications for Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This conference paper describes the variations in terrestrial spectral irradiance on photovoltaic devices can be an important consideration in photovoltaic device design and performance. This paper describes three available atmospheric transmission models, MODTRAN, SMARTS2, and SPCTRAL2. We describe the basics of their operation and performance, and applications in the photovoltaic community. Examples of model input and output data and comparisons between the model results for each under similar conditions are presented. The SMARTS2 model is shown to be much easier to use, as accurate as the complex MODTRAN model, and more accurate than the historical NREL SPCTRAL2 model.

Myers, D. R.; Emery, K. E.; Gueymard, C.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Neuroimaging Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

219

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

220

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.

Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) - A possible expert-system based cooperative effort to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) The technique of gravitational microlensing is currently unique in its ability to provide a sample of terrestrial exoplanets around both Galactic disk and bulge stars, allowing to measure their abundance and determine their distribution with respect to mass and orbital separation. In order to achieve these goals in reasonable time, a well-coordinated effort involving a network of either 2m or 4 x 1m telescopes at each site is required. It could lead to the first detection of an Earth-mass planet outside the Solar system, and even planets less massive than Earth could be discovered. From April 2008, ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) is planned to provide a platform for a three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring. As an expert system embedded in eSTAR (e-Science Telescopes for Astronomical Research), ARTEMiS will give advice on the optimal targets to be observed at any given time, and will also alert on deviations from ordinary microlensing light curves by means of the SIGNALMEN anomaly detector. While the use of the VOEvent (Virtual Observatory Event) protocol allows a direct interaction with the telescopes that are part of the HTN (Heterogeneous Telescope Networks) consortium, additional interfaces provide means of communication with all existing microlensing campaigns that rely on human observers. The success of discovering a planet by microlensing critically depends on the availability of a telescope in a suitable location at the right time, which can mean within 10 min. Real-time modelling offers the opportunity of live discovery of extra-solar planets, thereby providing ''Science live to your home''.

M. Dominik; K. Horne; A. Allan; N. J. Rattenbury; Y. Tsapras; C. Snodgrass; M. F. Bode; M. J. Burgdorf; S. N. Fraser; E. Kerins; C. J. Mottram; I. A. Steele; R. A. Street; P. J. Wheatley; L. Wyrzykowski

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Research Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My research is in the area of network control and management, with a research goal of improving the robustness and manageability of networked systems, and contributing to the design of future network architectures. Benefiting from my cross-disciplinary background in electrical engineering, telecommunications, and computer science, I try to bring a comprehensive viewpoint in my contributions to networking research. My vision is to facilitate the design of networks that are scalable, evolvable, and can work smartly with minimal human involvement.

Hammad Iqbal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists then measured how the particles were distributed in the vapor using a mobility scanner that determined particle sizes. In the other approach, researchers...

225

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) and Sulfate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Martin, S. T., Harvard University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s):...

226

Research Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Physics to simulate a next generation light sources based on x-ray free electron lasers. My research includes: Designing parallel algorithms for numerical optimization....

227

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Brass Ring of Climate Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s):...

228

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Into Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s):...

229

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal...

230

Operations Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2005 ... Operations Research. Report 2005-01. On a closedness theorem. Miklˇs Ujvßri. Marc 2005. E÷tv÷s Lorßnd University of Sciences. Departmentá...

231

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

232

UNIRIB: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mission focus of the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is to perform nuclear physics research, and provide training and education. UNIRIB member universities...

233

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Analysis Results: 1998 Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes...

234

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

235

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

236

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference:...

237

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Lee, S., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

238

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ,...

239

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Ice Crystals on Ice Sedimentation Rates in Cirrus Clouds and GCM Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Rasch, P., Pacific...

240

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Arctic Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Co-Existence of Water and Ice in Arctic Clouds Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

242

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

243

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Thin Ice: Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Clouds Examined for Improvements Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

244

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution + Storm Clouds Warmer Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

245

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-Funded Algorithms Lead to Marked Improvements in Global Weather Forecast Model Submitter: Morcrette, J. J., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research:...

246

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Forecast Errors Are Climate Errors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column...

247

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather View full sized image New research suggests that China's impressive feat of cutting...

248

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by PNNL and researchers from the University of Washington and Oregon Health & Science University shows how using a relatively simple method for engineering nanoparticle...

249

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To achieve higher power levels, researchers now are turning their attention to advanced fuel designs. PNNL is developing a new metal fuel for light water reactors intended...

250

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Aerosols and the Third Polar Ice Cap Submitter: Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

251

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Relative Humidity on Aerosols-Implications for Climate Submitter: Lacis, A. A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

252

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research:...

253

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Dance of Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Song, C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle...

254

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols Using MFRSR Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

255

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

256

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Earle, M., Environment Canada Liu, P., Environment Canada Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

257

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Boundary Detection and Analysis from Micro Pulse Lidar Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working...

258

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation...

259

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facility sites. For many years now, vertically pointing ARM instruments in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Manus Island in the Pacific Ocean (in Papua New Guinea) have...

260

Atmospheric constraints for the CO2 partial pressure on terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, several potentially habitable, probably terrestrial exoplanets and exoplanet candidates have been discovered. The amount of CO2 in their atmosphere is of great importance for surface conditions and habitability. In the absence of detailed information on the geochemistry of the planet, this amount could be considered as a free parameter. Up to now, CO2 partial pressures for terrestrial planets have been obtained assuming an available volatile reservoir and outgassing scenarios. This study aims at calculating the allowed maximum CO2 pressure at the surface of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting near the outer boundary of the habitable zone by coupling the radiative effects of the CO2 and its condensation at the surface. These constraints might limit the permitted amount of atmospheric CO2, independent of the planetary reservoir. A 1D radiative-convective cloud-free atmospheric model was used. CO2 partial pressures are fixed according to surface temperature and vapor pressure curve. Considered scena...

von Paris, Philip; Hedelt, Pascal; Rauer, Heike; Selsis, Franck; Stracke, Barbara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Summary outline of DOE geoscience and geoscience - related research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) supports long-range, basic research in those areas of the geosciences which are relevant to the nation's energy needs. The objective of the Geoscience program is to develop a quantitative and predictive understanding of geological, geophysical and geochemical structures and processes in the solid earth and in solar-terrestrial relationships. This understanding is to assure an effective knowledge base for energy resource recognition, evaluation and utilization in an environmentally acceptable manner. The work is carried out primarily in DOE laboratories and in universities, although some is conducted by other federal agencies and by the National Academy of Sciences. Principal areas of interest include: Geology, Geophysics, and Earth Dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy Resource Recognition, Evaluation and Utilization; Hydrologic and Marine Sciences; and Solar-Terrestrial/Atmospheric Interactions.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 ÁM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HSľ by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HSľ preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ ľ1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Operations research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Evita, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice wrote: Politics, the Art of the Possible. To those of us in the operations research community, we postulate: Operations Research, the Science of Better - (i.e. better processes, better systems and better decisions). ...

William P. Pierskalla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

265

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan ┬╗ Research projects Yuan ┬╗ Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

266

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

267

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

268

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

269

Summaries of FY 92 geosciences research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the Department of Energy and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions and their subdivisions including Earth dynamics, properties of Earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News November 5, 2007. The NICCR National office will release the 2008/2009 RFP on March 1st, 2008. Other important dates will be announced in the near future. July 17, 2006. The selection of the new NICCR Coastal Center has been completed. Seven competitive applications were submitted in April, and reviewed by a panel of technical experts shortly thereafter. As a result of the competitive review, the application from Tulane University was selected by DOE. It is expected that a cooperative agreement between Tulane University and the DOE will be in place to manage the new Coastal Center by September 1, 2006. The next NICCR request for proposals is expected to include a research focus on potential effects of climatic change and/or sea level rise on the structure and functioning of coastal terrestrial ecosystems. All coastal ecosystem research to be supported by NICCR will be in the United States.

271

The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is internationally recognized as a key NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, evapotranspiration, streamflow, soil moisture, etc.) is being used to improve water resource and Hydro-energy NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions and fluxes results to address multiple national application solutions. Knowledge of terrestrial water, energy

Houser, Paul R.

272

Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway  

SciTech Connect

One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

Rayno, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

274

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

275

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

276

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, G de Boer, G Feingold, J Harrington, M Shupe, and...

277

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Del Genio AD, J Wu, and Y Chen. 2012. "Characteristics of...

278

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Catch Aerosols in the Act Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

279

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Nucleation Link to Aerosols for Global Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: DeMott, P. J., Colorado State University Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research:...

280

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics  

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Topics to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Twitter Bookmark...

282

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mentors to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Twitter...

283

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals on Twitter Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Google Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Delicious Rank EERE...

284

Studies of encapsulation materials for terrestrial photovoltic arrays. Forth quarterly progress report, June 16, 1976--September 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on four studies on encapsulation: (1) Evaluation of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays; (2) Definition of encapsulant service environments and test conditions; (3) Evaluation of properties of encapsulation materials; and (4) Development of accelerated and abbreviated testing mathods for predicting performance of encapsulation materials over a 20-year lifetime. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.

1976-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70 (2008) 10741087 Centennial geomagnetic activity studied by a new,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70 (2008) 1074┬ş1087 Centennial geomagnetic Available online 1 February 2008 Abstract We reanalyse geomagnetic activity during the last century using enough to make a significant effect for long-term estimates. The Ah index verifies that geomagnetic

Mursula, Kalevi

286

Virtual architectural 3d model of the imperial cathedral (kaiserdom) of k÷nigslutter, germany through terrestrial laser scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The imperial cathedral (Kaiserdom) of K÷nigslutter, Germany, is one of the most important examples of Romanesque architecture north of the Alps. In April 2010 complex conservation and restoration works were finished to celebrate the 875th ... Keywords: 3D, CAD, laser scanning, modelling, terrestrial, visualisation

Thomas P. Kersten; Maren Lindstaedt

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 13991409 Probing the solar wind-inner magnetospheric coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/magnetosphere interactions; Radiation belts; Particle acceleration; Solar cycle; Forecasting; Space weather 1. IntroductionJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 1399┬ş1409 Probing the solar wind, and therefore the modeling of the flux is of direct relevance to the development of space weather applications

Vassiliadis, Dimitrios

288

Co-Investigators:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our Interdisciplinary Science investigation addresses the primary biogeochemical cycles of planet Earth and considers, in particular, how they are being changed by humans. The efforts focus on the cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and selected trace gases. Process-based models are developed as modules, in concert with database management techniques which synthesize the in-situ and remote sensing data needed to characterize regional and global scales. Models of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles are a central theme. They provide a rigorous means for developing quantitative projections of the interactions of atmospheric composition, climate, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, ocean circulation and sea level, and the effects of human activities. The family of models being developed in this investigation provide the predictive link between the physical and biological Earth system and the human dimensions of global change. The long-term goal of our IDS research is to understand the primary biogeochemical cycles of the planet, the nature of the coupling between the Biogeochemical Subsystem and the Physical-Climate Subsystem, and the characteristics of the human forcing of the Biogeochemical Subsystem and hydrological cycle. Our strategy is to study how element cycles function in natural systems where perturbations in biogeochemical states are driven primarily by climate variability

John D. Aber; William R. Emanuel; Leonard A. Fisk; Barrett N. Rock; David L. Skole

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

290

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., NOAA - Coop. Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate models: Results from Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T03, doi:10.1029/2010JD015433. Relationship between De and Vm for all tropical cirrus cloud types (solid

291

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol humidification factor f(RH) from Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol extinction and relative humidity. Upgrades to the Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF)

292

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

293

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

294

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the tropics. By improving an existing, sophisticated, global climate model, scientists can now simulate cloud and rainfall more accurately. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research program, a research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and

295

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

296

For Researchers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Export Control Export Control Berkeley Lab policy is to comply with all applicable state and federal laws, including those relating to Export Control. Berkeley Lab's Export Control Program is designed to support Berkeley Lab's and the University of California's international activities by ensuring compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations in the context of our fundamental research mission. Much of the Lab's compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations is based on our remaining within the "fundamental research" exception, i.e. performing basic or applied research for which the resulting information is ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community. Do not sign non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements. Contact Parul Jain at 495-2306 or the Tech Transfer Department if you need or are

297

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown here is the SGP Central Facility, where the most comprehensive instrument suite is hosted. Moisture trapped in soil provides water necessary for vegetation and crops, but how much of that moisture makes its way into the atmosphere and influences regional meteorology? The poor understanding of the role of soil

298

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

299

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

300

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with SCAM, CAPT Forecasts and M-PACE Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Liu, X, S Xie, and SJ Ghan. 2007. "Evaluation of a new mixed-Phase cloud microphysics parameterization with the NCAR single column climate model (SCAM) and ARM M-PACE observations." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L23712, doi:10.1029/2007GL031446. Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Research Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

303

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Classifying Cloud Phase Classifying Cloud Phase Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD. 2007. "A ground-based multisensory cloud phase classifier." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L22809, doi:10.1029/2007GL031008. Observations of (a) lidar backscatter, (b) lidar depolarization ratio, (c) radar reflectivity, (d) radar mean Doppler velocity, (e) radar Doppler spectrum width, (f) microwave radiometer-derived liquid water path, and (g) the resulting multisensor cloud-phase classification mask. Cloud phase identification is a necessary prerequisite to performing cloud property retrievals from remote sensor measurements. Most retrieval

304

Free Air C02 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Oak Ridge FACE Site and Experiment on CO2 Enrichment of Sweetgum  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The facility was established with support from the ORNL Director's R&D Fund and the Biological and Environmental Research program of the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Additional support was provided by the Terrestrial Ecology and Global Change (TECO) program through the National Science Foundation. This project was part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contributed to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling. Data from the ORNL FACE experiment are being used in an model benchmarking activity at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. [Copied from http://face.ornl.gov/goals.html

305

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Our silicon group members have backgrounds in physics, chemistry, mathematics, materials science, and electrical engineering. Russell Bauer Howard Branz Sachit Grover Vincenzo LaSalvia Benjamin Lee William Nemeth Matt Page Lorenzo Roybal Pauls Stradins, (Acting Group Manager) Charles Teplin Qi Wang David Young Hao-Chih Yuan Photo of 21 people standing in front of a building with a silver, cylinder-shaped structure on one side. Photo of Pauls Stradins Pauls Stradins Senior Scientist II Group Manager Primary Research Interests High-efficiency silicon photovoltaics: advanced passivation techniques and industrially-relevant processes Interfacing Si cell with other materials for high-efficiency tandem Nanostructured semiconductor materials for photovoltaics: Si quantum

306

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, L18805, doi:10.1029/2012GL052831. An example of dusty MSSC: (a) CALIOP TAB profiles at 532nm; (b) CALIOP depolarization profiles at 532nm; (c) CloudSat CPR radar reflectivity profiles; (d) Identified dust layers and MSSC; (e) Global distribution of

307

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Probing of Dense Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis, AB. 2008. "Multiple-scattering lidar from both sides of the clouds: Addressing internal structure." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S10, doi:10.1029/2007JD009666. Figure 1. Lidar observations of a dense cloud. Left: standard (single-scattering/on-beam) lidar. Right: multiple-scattering/off-beam lidar. Note the extreme narrowness of the FOV in the standard case, as is required to restrict as much as possible the signal to a single backscatter. Also note the weak penetration, O(1) MFP, of the two-way

308

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

309

Research Highlight  

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Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Chen, R., University of Maryland Wood, R., University of Washington Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Ferraro, R., NOAA/NESDIS, WWBG Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chen, R, R Wood, Z Li, R Ferraro, and F Chang. 2008. "Studying the vertical variation of cloud droplet effective radius using ship and space-borne remote sensing data." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, doi:10.1029/2007JD009596. Figure 1. Coincident images of C-band radar reflectivity and MODIS cloud profile at UTC 15:55, Oct. 18, 2001. a) RHB C-band radar reflectivity

310

Research Highlight  

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Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

311

Research Highlight  

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Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

312

Research Highlight  

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ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D04211, doi:10.1029/2007JD009225. Time-height cross sections of active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) cloud frequency (a) and modeled cloud fraction (b) CAM3, (c) AM2, and (d) CAM3LIU at Barrow during M-PACE. The unit is %. Liquid fraction as a function of cloud height. (a) UND citation data, (b)

313

Research Highlight  

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How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D Ôëą 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

314

Research Highlight  

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CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ACCEPTED. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation (Seff) against CCN concentration at 1% S (N1%) for horizontal cloud penetrations, 50 for MASE and 34 for POST. Seff is the S for which nearby below cloud CCN spectra, NCCN(S), equals mean droplet concentration (Nc). Figure 2. One second droplet concentration, Nc, and vertical velocity

315

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

316

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Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

317

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, C Flynn, and M Cribb. 2012. "Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D00K38, doi:10.1029/2011JD016490. A team of scientists found that aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Aerosols were identified from as far away as Mongolia and Siberia. These findings have considerable implications for atmospheric

318

Research Highlight  

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Invisible Giants in the Sky Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovink, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and

319

Research Highlight  

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Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

320

Research Highlight  

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Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Michalsky J, F Denn, C Flynn, G Hodges, P Kiedron, A Koontz, J Schlemmer, and SE Schwartz. 2010. "Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992-2008." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D07203, doi: 10.1029/2009JD012197. Box plots of each complete year\'s daily averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm. The dark horizontal line in each box plot is the median daily averaged AOD for the year; the top and bottom of the rectangular box spans the middle 50% of the data. The mean values for the year are plotted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

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Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (╬┤AOT/╬┤FAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

322

Errvironmentaf Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

online at www.sciencedirect.com online at www.sciencedirect.com Environmental Research 10 1 (2006) 3 4 4 1 Errvironmentaf Research Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment Joanna urger^^^^', Michael ~ o c h f e l d ~ ~ ~ , Sean Christian W. ~ e i t n e r ~ . ~ , Stephen ~ e w e t t ~ , Daniel SnigarofP, Ronald snigarofff, Tim Starnrng, Shawn ~ a r ~ e f , Max ~ o b e r ~ * , Heloise chenelotd, Robert patrickh, Conrad D. volzi, James ~ e s t o d 'Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA b~onsortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Healrh Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ, USA CEnvironmental and Community Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

323

Research Highlight  

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Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shaw, R. A., Michigan Technological University - Physics Department Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yang F, M Ovchinnikov, and RV Shaw. 2013. "Minimalist model of ice microphysics in mixed-phase stratiform clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 40(14), doi:10.1002/grl.50700. Nordic winter landscape. Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are common features in the Arctic environment. They contain a mix of ice and "supercooled" water that, despite the freezing temperatures, remains in liquid form. Scientists aren't sure why these clouds exist in the Arctic for long periods of time, even while steadily losing ice particles through precipitation.

324

Research Highlight  

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Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

325

Research Highlight  

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TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

326

Research Highlight  

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Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

327

Research Highlight  

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Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 45, 2006, pp. 210-235. Figure 1 Figure 2 Because surface reflection of solar radiation plays a fundamental role in the surface energy budget, knowledge of its spatial and temporal variability is important for understanding the weather and climate of a specific region. Research instrumentation at the U.S. Southern Great Plains site-one of three locales around the world managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-continuously collects these types of data to help scientist investigate differences in

328

Research Highlight  

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Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: McComiskey, A, SE Schwartz, B Schmid, H Guan, ER Lewis, P Ricchiazzi, and JA Ogren. 2008. "Direct aerosol forcing: Calculation from observables and sensitivities to inputs." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D09202, doi:10.1029/2007JD009170. Figure 1. The sensitivity of calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing to input parameters has been examined to determine the consequences of uncertainties in these input parameters on calculated radiative forcing and to identify areas where measurements might be most profitably improved. Input

329

Research Highlight  

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Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Dependence on Dry Air Sources Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Lateral entrainment rate in shallow cumuli: Dependence on dry air sources and probability density functions." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20812, doi:10.1029/2012GL053646. Probability density functions (PDFs) of entrainment rate (╬╗) for different dry air sources in eight cumulus flights. The rate at which cloud engulfs dry air (entrainment rate) has proven to be one of the strongest controls on the climate sensitivity of climate models;

330

Research Highlight  

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Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

331

Research Highlight  

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The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life in the Midlatitude Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, X Dong, B Xi, S McFarlane, A Kennedy, B Lin, and P Minnis. 2012. "Life cycle of midlatitude deep convective systems in a Lagrangian framework." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117(D23), D23201, doi:10.1029/2012JD018362. The life cycle of a convective system tracked by the automated tracking algorithm in the study domain. Time increases from the top left to the bottom right, and each image represents an hour. The colors represent regions given by the hybrid classification.

332

Research Highlight  

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ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

333

Research Highlight  

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Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, and M Zhang. 2000. "Impact of the convective triggering function on single-column model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research 105: 14983-14996. Six-hour accumulated precipitation valid at 12 UTC 18 July 2005. (a) Radar Observation, (b) DCAPE, (c) GSM without the DCAPE trigger, and (d) GSM with the DCAPE trigger. Considerable improvement of precipitation forecast is obtained by the GSM with the new trigger compared to the radar observation.

334

Research Highlight  

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Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications for Aerosol Indirect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Observed impacts of vertical velocity on cloud microphysics and implications for aerosol indirect effects." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L21808, doi:10.1029/2012GL053599. Joint probability density functions (PDF) of relative dispersion (╬Á) versus vertical velocity (w) along horizontal aircraft legs for each cumulus flight (date given in legend). The red lines denote weighted least

335

Research Highlight  

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Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Rotstayn, L., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Rotstayn, L., and Y. Liu, Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase in Cloud Droplet Spectral Dispersion with Droplet Number Concentration, Journal of Climate: Vol. 16, No. 21, pp.3476-3481, May 2003. Figure 1. Measurements of the relation between the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum and the cloud droplet number concentration (N). The lower, middle, and upper curves show the parameterizations used in the LOWER, MIDDLE, and UPPER simulations, respectively. A recent study by DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

336

Research Highlight  

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Giants in the Sky Giants in the Sky For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A few large particles in a crowd of tiny ones have often been ignored when calculating the amount of sunlight bounced back into space in clean-sky conditions. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that these "giant" particles have a larger-than-expected impact on the amount of sunlight reflected away from Earth, by as much as 45 percent. They also showed that particles larger than one micron (0.000039 inch) occur much more frequently than expected, up to 85 percent of the time. "Many routine measurements are unable to sample large particles, thus they may overlook the residence of many 'Gullivers in the country of Lilliput,' said Dr. Evgueni

337

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Figs. 1a and 1b contain rms differences from 72 radiosondes for AERI retrievals (blue), GOES retrievals (black), and AERI+GOES retrievals (red) for temperature and mixing ratio respectively during the 1997 Water Vapor IOP. A measure of meteorological the variability of the temperature and water vapor is indicated by the green line. Figs. 1c and 1d show the TPW for the same cases from GOES, AERI+GOES, radiosonde, and the ARM SGP CART microwave radiometer and relative percent differences in TPW amounts. Figure 2. Four consecutive radiosonde, GOES, and AERI+GOES comparisons from

338

Research Highlight  

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Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Emissions (CARES) Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fast JD, WI Gustafson, LK Berg, WJ Shaw, M Pekour, M Shrivastava, JC Barnard, RA Ferrare, CA Hostetler, JA Hair, M Erickson, BT Jobson, B Flowers, MK Dubey, S Springston, RB Pierce, L Dolislager, J Pederson, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Transport and mixing patterns over central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, 1759-1783. Aircraft sampling flight patterns are shown over central California in this aerial overlay. Researchers collected and analyzed measurements from

339

Research Highlight  

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Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kafle, D. N., University of California, Riverside Coulter, R. L., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kafle DN and RL Coulter. 2013. "Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(13), 10.1002/jgrd.50536. Vertical profiles of multi-year annually averaged AOD (z) at different ARM sites: SGP, NSA, TWP, GRW, and FKB. Inset plots are the profiles of corresponding relative standard deviation, Srel (z). The corresponding 1-sigma measurement errors are given in horizontal bars.

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Research Highlight  

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Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively delicate but has the power to tip the balance between ice and water in Arctic clouds. This image of an ice crystal was obtained from a Cloud Particle Imager during ISDAC. The imager was mounted on aircraft flying through clouds at a speed of 100 m/s.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Highlight  

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New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

342

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Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

343

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The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

344

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Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

345

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Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Tr├╝ssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G K├Ânig-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

346

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Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

347

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Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

348

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Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Submitter: Jakob, C., Monash University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Jakob, C., R. Pincus, C. Hannay, and K.M. Xu (2004). Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D03202, doi:10.1029/2003JD003473. In evaluating climate models, time and space represent key challenges when extrapolating observations into simulations. Researchers supported by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have explored an alternative method based on "point series data" to arrive at model cloud predictions. Point series data are obtained over time through measurements

349

Research Highlight  

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The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern California Measured During CARES and CalNex Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cahill JF, K Suski, JH Seinfeld, RA Zaveri, and KA Prather. 2012. "The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-10989-2012. The CARES campaign took place in Sacramento in order to sample the city's urban plume. Photo courtesy of Jason Tomlinson. Researchers, including DOE scientists working at Pacific Northwest National

350

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Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kollias, P. and M. A. Miller, 2007: Cloud and Precipitation Observations at Niamey During the 2006 ARM Mobile Facility Deployment. Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters. Daily observed cloud fraction in Niamey during the AMF deployment. The cloud fraction is derived using measurements from the 94-GHz radar, the MPL, and the ceilometer. The vertical resolution is 260 m, and a 5-day temporal filter is applied to the daily cloud fraction profiles. (a) Monthly-averaged cloud and precipitation fraction. The monthly mean and standard deviation of cirrus cloud top (white line), middle cloud tops

351

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Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kay, JE, T L'Ecuyer, A Gettelman, G Stephens, and C O'Dell. "The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum." To appear in Geophysical Research Letters. Clouds and downwelling radiation 2007-2006 differences (June 15-Sept 15). a. Total cloud fraction differences based on radar and lidar data. b. Downwelling SW radiative flux difference. c. Downwelling LW radiative flux difference. The Western Arctic Ocean is outlined in brown. ARM ground-based radiation observations at Barrow, Alaska.

352

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

353

Research Highlight  

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Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

354

Research Highlight  

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Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hanlon, C., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hanlon CJ, JB Stefik, AA Small, J Verlinde, and GS Young. 2013. "Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , . ACCEPTED. In many atmospheric science field campaigns, investigators are budgeted some number of flight hours to collect data under specific, imperfectly forecastable atmospheric conditions. In such field campaigns, investigators must assess atmospheric conditions each day and make a resource-allocation decision: are conditions good enough to use some of our scarce flight hours

355

Research Highlight  

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Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the brightness of sky in nearby clear areas. In cloud-free areas light is scattered mainly by air molecules, but aerosols also contribute. Figure 2. Top: Average increase in MODIS clear-sky reflectivity (R) near clouds. The difference between areas near illuminated and shadowy cloud

356

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Model Development Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Smith-Mrowiec, A. A., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mrowiec AA, C Rio, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, AD Del Genio, OM Pauluis, AC Varble, and J Fan. 2012. "Analysis of cloud-resolving simulations of a tropical mesoscale convective system observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical fluxes and draft properties in convective and stratiform regions." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D19201, doi:10.1029/2012JD017759.

357

Research Highlight  

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A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

358

Research Highlight  

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"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

359

Research Highlight  

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A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

360

Research Highlight  

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The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud Fraction and Reflectance Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Feingold, G., NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory Koren, I., Weizmann Institute of Science Remer, L., NASA - GSFC, Laboratory for Atmospheres Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Koren, I, L Oreopoulos, G Feingold, LA Remer, and O Altaratz. 2008. "How small is a small cloud?" Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Journal, in press Cloud mask for a sparse cumulus cloud field as inferred by using the same threshold at four different spatial resolutions. The upper-left panel is for the original Landsat resolution and the lower-right panel is for a

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361

Research Highlight  

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Burning on the Prairies Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the beginning of the experiment at the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory in March 2005. What does it mean for the carbon cycle? The deep drought in the United States that fueled wildfires and damaged crops in 2012 has now continued well into 2013. However, long before the droughts and fires wreaked havoc, a team of

362

Research Highlight  

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Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: China S, C Mazzoleni, K Gorkowski, AC Aiken, and MK Dubey. 2013. "Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles." Nature Communications, 4, 2122, doi:10.1038/ncomms3122. La Conchas fire, New Mexico Analyzing fresh, carbon-rich aerosols in smoke from the largest wildfire in New Mexico (2011), scientists report large impacts of wildfires on climate. A research study, published last week in Nature Communications, has revealed that smoke from wildfires, or biomass-burning events, contains

363

Research Highlight  

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Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds on Earth's Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Qian, Y., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qian Y, CN Long, H Wang, JM Comstock, SA McFarlane, and S Xie. 2012. "Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(4), doi:10.5194/acp-12-1785-2012. Clouds get in the way of the dawn light, perfectly framing the Raman lidar instrument at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. This ground-based laser is a remote sensing instrument used for measuring

364

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved ╬Ąc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved ╬Ąc versus MODIS ╬Ąc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

365

Research Highlight  

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Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

366

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

367

Research Highlight  

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The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

368

Research Highlight  

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Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

369

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Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level cloud, and upper troposphere water vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D16105, doi:10.1029/2008JD009905. Figure 1: Diurnal anomalies for tropical (left) ocean and (right) land: (top) the precipitation index (PI), high-level cloud (CLD) and upper

370

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Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J.E., S.Y. Zhang, and C.C. Chuang, Soot and smoke aerosol may not warm climate, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D21), 4657, doi:10.1029/2003JD003409, 2003. New research results from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program suggest that fossil fuel soot emissions and biomass smoke may actually have a negligible warming effect and, in some cases, may even result in a net cooling effect. Black carbon is the absorbing component of smoke aerosols that result from the incomplete combustion of various fuels, the most significant sources being fossil fuel

371

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Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(1), doi:10.1029/2012JD018464. Relationships between the three microphysical measures of homogeneous mixing degree (¤ł1, ¤ł2, ¤ł3) and the two transition scale numbers (NLa, NL0), respectively. The results shown here are from the EMPM simulations.

372

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Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

373

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Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, J Barnard, LK Berg, CN Long, and C Flynn. 2011. "Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L07801, doi:10.1029/2010GL046282. Figure 1. Normalized total cloud radiative forcing and its direct and diffuse components as a function of wavelength. Typically, under cloudy conditions, radiative transfer parameterizations in climate models have been evaluated by calculating the total cloud impact on

374

CONDITIONS OF PASSAGE AND ENTRAPMENT OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS IN SPIN-ORBIT RESONANCES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical evolution of terrestrial planets resembling Mercury in the vicinity of spin-orbit resonances is investigated using comprehensive harmonic expansions of the tidal torque taking into account the frequency-dependent quality factors and Love numbers. The torque equations are integrated numerically with a small step in time, including the oscillating triaxial torque components but neglecting the layered structure of the planet and assuming a zero obliquity. We find that a Mercury-like planet with a current value of orbital eccentricity (0.2056) is always captured in 3:2 resonance. The probability of capture in the higher 2:1 resonance is approximately 0.23. These results are confirmed by a semi-analytical estimation of capture probabilities as functions of eccentricity for both prograde and retrograde evolutions of spin rate. As follows from analysis of equilibrium torques, entrapment in 3:2 resonance is inevitable at eccentricities between 0.2 and 0.41. Considering the phase space parameters at the times of periastron, the range of spin rates and phase angles for which an immediate resonance passage is triggered is very narrow, and yet a planet like Mercury rarely fails to align itself into this state of unstable equilibrium before it traverses 2:1 resonance.

Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil [United States Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC, 20392-5420 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batvia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

376

Standard Specification for Physical Characteristics of Nonconcentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Reference Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification describes the physical requirements for primary and secondary terrestrial nonconcentrator photovoltaic reference cells. A reference cell is defined as a device that meets the requirements of this specification and is calibrated in accordance with Test Method E1125 or Test Method E1362. 1.2 Reference cells are used in the determination of the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices, as stated in Test Methods E948 and E1036. 1.3 Two reference cell physical specifications are described: 1.3.1 Small-Cell Package DesignŚA small, durable package with a low thermal mass, wide optical field-of-view, and standardized dimensions intended for photovoltaic devices up to 20 by 20 mm, and 1.3.2 Module-Package DesignŚA package intended to simulate the optical and thermal properties of a photovoltaic module design, but electric connections are made to only one photovoltaic cell in order to eliminate problems with calibrating series and parallel connections of cells. Physical dimensions ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Standard Test Method for Electrical Performance of Concentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules and Systems Under Natural Sunlight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the electrical performance of photovoltaic concentrator modules and systems under natural sunlight using a normal incidence pyrheliometer. 1.2 The test method is limited to module assemblies and systems where the geometric concentration ratio specified by the manufacturer is greater than 5. 1.3 This test method applies to concentrators that use passive cooling where the cell temperature is related to the air temperature. 1.4 Measurements under a variety of conditions are allowed; results are reported under a select set of concentrator reporting conditions to facilitate comparison of results. 1.5 This test method applies only to concentrator terrestrial modules and systems. 1.6 This test method assumes that the module or system electrical performance characteristics do not change during the period of test. 1.7 The performance rating determined by this test method applies only at the period of the test, and implies no past or future performance level. 1.8...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Standard Test Methods for Electrical Performance of Nonconcentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules and Arrays Using Reference Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays under natural or simulated sunlight using a calibrated reference cell. 1.1.1 These test methods allow a reference module to be used instead of a reference cell provided the reference module has been calibrated using these test methods against a calibrated reference cell. 1.2 Measurements under a variety of conditions are allowed; results are reported under a select set of reporting conditions (RC) to facilitate comparison of results. 1.3 These test methods apply only to nonconcentrator terrestrial modules and arrays. 1.4 The performance parameters determined by these test methods apply only at the time of the test, and imply no past or future performance level. 1.5 These test methods apply to photovoltaic modules and arrays that do not contain series-connected photovoltaic multijunction devices; such module and arrays should be tested according to Test Methods E 2236. 1.6 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Interim qualification tests and procedures for terrestrial photovoltaic thin-film flat-plate modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides recommended procedures and specifications for qualification tests that are structured to evaluate terrestrial thin-film flat-plate photovoltaic nonconcentrating modules intended for power generation applications. The qualification tests provided in this document are designed to evaluate flat-plate thin-film photovoltaic (PV) module design performance and susceptibility to known failure mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on testing and evaluating module performance characteristics and design features that will affect possible degradation of module performance and physical properties resulting from solar exposure, environmental weathering, mechanical loading, corrosion, and module shadowing. Because of limited thin-film module field operation experience and the evolutionary nature of new thin-film module material technologies and designs, these tests should not be considered definitive or complete, nor do they provide a basis to predict 30-year field life. Current understanding of failure and degradation mechanisms and the relationship between accelerated tests and field reliability is not sufficient to allow accurate estimation of life-expectancy, nor are the cycling tests given in this document considered to be equivalent to a full 30-year field exposure. However, the test and evaluation procedures given in this document provide a common approach for conducting qualification tests. Acceptable results from these tests should provide reasonable assurance that the modules that pass these tests will perform reliably in the field but for an unspecified period of time. 8 refs., 6 figs.

DeBlasio, R.; Mrig, L.; Waddington, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Postdoctoral Research Awards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postdoctoral Research Awards: Investing in Innovative Clean Energy Technologies to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Postdoctoral Research Awards:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Research Briefs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Briefs The annually published Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center Research Briefs highlights recent accomplishments supporting our missions. Our research focuses...

382

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

383

Human Subjects Research, Office of Research Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research includes a wide variety of activities such as in vivo and in vitro studies, research on medical records, collection of data through surveys or observation, research...

384

Studies of encapsulant materials for terrestrial solar-cell arrays. First quarterly progress report, October 9--December 9, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study 1 of this contract is entitled ''Evaluation of World Experience and Properties of Materials for Encapsulation of Terrestrial Solar-Cell Arrays.'' The approach of this study is to review and analyze world experience and to compile data on properties of encapsulants for photovoltaic cells and for related applications. The objective of the effort is to recommend candidate materials and processes for encapsulating terrestrial photovoltaic arrays at low cost for a service life greater than 20 years. The objectives of Study 2, ''Definition of Encapsulant Service Environments and Test Conditions,'' are to develop the climatic/environmental data required to define the frequency and duration of detrimental environmental conditions in a 20-year array lifetime and to develop a corresponding test schedule for encapsulant systems. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C. (comp.)

1975-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

ON THE NOTION OF WELL-DEFINED TECTONIC REGIMES FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS IN THIS SOLAR SYSTEM AND OTHERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of coupled mantle convection and planetary tectonics is used to demonstrate that history dependence can outweigh the effects of a planet's energy content and material parameters in determining its tectonic state. The mantle convection-surface tectonics system allows multiple tectonic modes to exist for equivalent planetary parameter values. The tectonic mode of the system is then determined by its specific geologic and climatic history. This implies that models of tectonics and mantle convection will not be able to uniquely determine the tectonic mode of a terrestrial planet without the addition of historical data. Historical data exists, to variable degrees, for all four terrestrial planets within our solar system. For the Earth, the planet with the largest amount of observational data, debate does still remain regarding the geologic and climatic history of Earth's deep past but constraints are available. For planets in other solar systems, no such constraints exist at present. The existence of multiple tectonic modes, for equivalent parameter values, points to a reason why different groups have reached different conclusions regarding the tectonic state of extrasolar terrestrial planets larger than Earth ({sup s}uper-Earths{sup )}. The region of multiple stable solutions is predicted to widen in parameter space for more energetic mantle convection (as would be expected for larger planets). This means that different groups can find different solutions, all potentially viable and stable, using identical models and identical system parameter values. At a more practical level, the results argue that the question of whether extrasolar terrestrial planets will have plate tectonics is unanswerable and will remain so until the temporal evolution of extrasolar planets can be constrained.

Lenardic, A. [Department of Earth Science, Rice University, MS 126, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Crowley, J. W., E-mail: ajns@rice.edu, E-mail: jwgcrowley@gmail.com [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Harvard University, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Interim summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations and some conclusions made of the interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments may be used in predicting heat source behavior in the event of contact of these heat sources with land or ocean and in assessing the risk to the environment. These studies indicate that plutonium transport from the heat sources is mostly a physical process involving the movement of extremely fine particles rather than the chemical migration of plutonium ions.

Patterson, J.H.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Matlack, G.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

388

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

389

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 METHODS DERIVATION MODULE 3: METHODS DERIVATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M3-1 1 Introduction and Basis for the Approach The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has in place a radiation dose limit of 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for the protection of aquatic organisms (DOE Order 5400.5), and has proposed dose limits for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These limits are: 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for aquatic animals; 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for terrestrial plants; and 0.1 rad/d (1 mGy/d) for terrestrial animals. Because the biota protection limits are dose-based, a calculational method is needed to demonstrate compliance. In theory, derived radionuclide concentration limits for environmental media (e.g., Biota Concentration Guides, BCGs, for water, sediment, or soil) provide a relatively straightforward and simple means to do so. However, because of the

390

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Representing Twentieth-Century SpaceľTime Climate Variability. Part II: Development of 1901ľ96 Monthly Grids of Terrestrial Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the construction of a 0.5░ latľlong gridded dataset of monthly terrestrial surface climate for the period of 1901ľ96. The dataset comprises a suite of seven climate elements: precipitation, mean temperature, diurnal ...

Mark New; Mike Hulme; Phil Jones

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Recent Climate-Driven Increases in Vegetation Productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence of an Acceleration of the Northern Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain much of the global reservoir of terrestrial carbon that is potentially reactive in the context of near-term climate change. Annual variability and recent trends in vegetation productivity across Alaska and northwest ...

J. S. Kimball; M. Zhao; A. D. McGuire; F. A. Heinsch; J. Clein; M. Calef; W. M. Jolly; S. Kang; S. E. Euskirchen; K. C. McDonald; S. W. Running

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Global Trends and Variability in Soil Moisture and Drought Characteristics, 1950ľ2000, from Observation-Driven Simulations of the Terrestrial Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global and regional trends in drought for 1950ľ2000 are analyzed using a soil moistureľbased drought index over global terrestrial areas, excluding Greenland and Antarctica. The soil moisture fields are derived from a simulation of the ...

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

396

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates and In Situ River Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage, evapotranspiration, and freshwater runoff to the ocean has a major influence on the terrestrial water and energy budgets and thereby on ...

R. Alkama; B. Decharme; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave; J. Sheffield; A. Voldoire; S. Tyteca; P. Le Moigne

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience Materials Science Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Geoscience Geoscience photo The Geoscience Research...

398

Microanalysis Research Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Microanalysis Research Group Staff. ... Joseph M. Conny, Research Chemist. Jeff M. Davis, Materials Research Engineer. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Preserving research data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consortium for Political and Social Research. Ann Arbor, MI;Access to Publicly Funded Research Data. The Public Domainof the products of scientific research. Meanwhile, research

Jacobs, James A; Humphrey, Charles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ON THE PHYSICS OF GALVANIC SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study was conducted to investigate the governing physics of galvanic source electromagnetic (EM) methods for terrestrial and marine exploration scenarios. The terrestrial exploration scenario involves the grounded electric dipole source EM (GESTEM) method and the examination of how the GESTEM method can resolve a thin resistive layer representing underground gas and/or hydrocarbon storage. Numerical modeling studies demonstrate that the loop transient EM (TEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are insensitive to a thin horizontal resistor at depth because they utilize horizontal currents. In contrast to these standard EM methods, the GESTEM method generates both vertical and horizontal transient currents. The vertical transient current interacts with a thin horizontal resistor and causes charge buildup on its surface. These charges produce a measurable perturbation in the surface electric field at early time. The degree of perturbation depends on source waveform. When the GESTEM method is energized with step-off waveform, the perturbation due to a thin horizontal resistor is small. This is because the step-off waveform mainly consists of low frequency signals. An alternative is taking the time-derivative of the step-off responses to approximate the impulse response which includes higher frequency signals. In order to improve degree of perturbation especially due to a localized small 3-D resistor, the diffusion angle of the vertical transient current, 45 should be considered to make vertical currents coupled to a resistive target efficiently. The major drawback of the GESTEM method lies in the fact that GESTEM sounding can not be interpreted using 1-D inversion schemes if there is near-surface inhomogeneity. The marine exploration scenario investigates the physics of marine frequency-domain controlled source EM (FDCSEM) and time-domain controlled source EM (TDCSEM) methods to explore resistive hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine environments. Unlike the marine MT (MMT) method, these two methods are very sensitive to a thin hydrocarbon reservoir at depth because their sources generate vertical as well as horizontal currents. As for the FDCSEM method, the normalized EM peak response occurs where the airwave starts to dominate the seafloor EM response in the background model. This point is a function of source frequency, seawater depth and seafloor resistivity. The peak magnitude of the normalized EM response depends on whether the high concentration of vertical currents can reach and interact with the reservoir effectively. Noise levels of the EM receivers are important factors for successful FDCSEM and TDCSEM survey design. The major benefit of using magnetic field responses over electric ones is that the noise level of magnetic receiver theoretically allows for greater surface coverage compared to that of the electric receiver. Like the GESTEM method, the TDCSEM method also requires the use of a proper transient EM pulse such that the relatively high frequencies are produced. The impulse response of the TDCSEM method is characterized by two-path diffusion of the EM signal. The initial response is caused by faster signal diffusion through the less conductive seafloor, while the later arrivals result from slower diffusion through the more conductive seawater. Therefore, at larger separations, the effects of the seafloor and seawater are separable. This can be useful in reducing the airwave problem associated with the FDCSEM method in shallow marine environments.

David Alumbaugh and Evan Um

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

Bats that walk: a new evolutionary hypothesis for the terrestrial behaviour of New Zealand's endemic mystacinids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assemblages at Riversleigh to rep- resent closed forest communities. Description The following description of the humerus is based on both specimens (QM F30573 and QM F30574) except where indicated. Terminology for humeral morphology and orientation is given... criti- cism. This work has been supported by Australian Research Council grants LP0453664 and DP0770660 for Riversleigh WHA fossil research and col- laboration by UNSW and NZ researchers, and by Phil Creaser and the CREATE fund at UNSW. References 1...

Hand, Suzanne J; Weisbecker, Vera; Beck, Robin M D; Archer, Michael; Godthelp, Henk; Tennyson, Alan J D; Worthy, Trevor H

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM4 Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, W Chapman, JE Kay, B Medeiros, MD Shupe, S Vavrus, and JE Walsh. 2011. "A characterization of the present-day Arctic atmosphere in CCSM4." Journal of Climate, 25(8), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00228.1. Time-height cross-sections of simulated (top) and observed (second row) cloud phase at Barrow, Alaska. The difference between the frequencies of occurrence of each phase is indicated in the third row. Monthly distributions of liquid (dark) and ice (light) water paths at

404

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeled Compared to Measured O:C and H:C Elemental Ratios of Secondary Modeled Compared to Measured O:C and H:C Elemental Ratios of Secondary Organic Material Download a printable PDF Submitter: Martin, S., Pierce Hall School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chen Q, Y Liu, N Donahue, J Shilling, and S Martin. 2011. "Particle-phase chemistry of secondary organic material: modeled compared to measured O:C and H:C elemental ratios provide constraints." Environmental Science & Technology, , 10.1021/es104398s. Figure 1. Measurements and predictions. The first row shows particle mass yields at 298 K. The second row shows the modeled and measured particle-average O:C and H:C ratios for increasing particle mass concentrations.

405

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2012. "On spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 113, 715-720. The ratio of ¤ë0╬╗(r)/¤ë0╬╗(r0) plotted against ¤ë0╬╗(r) for four wavelengths, ╬╗=0.86, 1.65, 2.13 and 3.75 um. An example for the aggregates ice crystal habits is shown (see Yang et al. 2000. "Parameterization of

406

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Processes, and Intraseasonal Dynamic Variations Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, Graeme L., Webster, Peter J., Johnson, Richard H., Engelen, Richard, L'Ecuyer, Tristan. 2004: Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures. Journal of Climate: Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 2213-2224. The "humidistat" feedback mechanism suggests that the hydrological cycle and sea surface temperatures mutually regulate each other in phases: the destabilization phase, the convective phase, and the restoring phase. These

407

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unique Properties of the Arctic Stratiform Cloud-Top Region Unique Properties of the Arctic Stratiform Cloud-Top Region Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sedlar J, MD Shupe, and M Tjernstr├Âm. 2011. "On the relationship between thermodynamic structure and cloud top, and its climate significance in the Arctic." Journal of Climate, 25(7), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00186.1. Occurrence frequency of low-level, stratiform cloud cases used in the analysis (black), percentage of these cases where the cloud top was identified to occur within the inversion (CII, gray), and percentage where the cloud top was observed to be capped by the inversion (CCI, white) for the ASCOS, SHEBA, and Barrow locations. The total number of cases analyzed

408

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle Number Distributions During Nucleation Events Download a printable PDF Submitter: McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jiang J, J Zhao, M Chen, J Scheckman, BJ Williams, FL Eisele, and PH McMurry. 2011. "First measurements of neutral atmospheric cluster and 1-2 nm particle number distributions during nucleation events." Aerosol Science and Technology, 45, doi:10.1080/02786826.2010.546817. Jiang J, M Chen, C Kuang, M Attoui, and PH McMurry. 2011. "Electrical mobility spectrometer using a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter for measurement of aerosol size distributions down to 1 nm."

409

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water measurements were obtained during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) by Eugene Clothiaux and Tom Ackerman of Penn State University using an ARM microwave radiometer. The radiometer was deployed at Pularumpi, Melville Island (11.55 S, 130.56 E) off the north coast of Australia for November-December 1995. Time series of these results are shown in Figure 1. Time series of integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) and liquid

410

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter ╬▒ as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ¤ë such

411

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing the "Light Precipitation Problem" in the ECMWF Global Model Addressing the "Light Precipitation Problem" in the ECMWF Global Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ahlgrimm, M., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ahlgrimm M and R Forbes. 2013. "Improving the representation of low clouds and drizzle in the ECMWF model based on ARM observations from the Azores." Monthly Weather Review, , . ACCEPTED. Monthly mean cloud and precipitation occurrence from observations (red), the control version of the single column model (green) and the SCM experiment (blue). (a) Total cloud occurrence. (b) Low cloud (solid) and deep boundary layer (dashed) cloud occurrence. (c) Precipitation occurrence

412

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Leeuw G, EL Andreas, MD Anguelova, ER Lewis, C O'Dowd, M Schulz, and SE Schwartz. 2011. "Production flux of sea-spray aerosol." Reviews of Geophysics, 49, RG2001, doi:10.1029/2010RG000349. Lewis ER and SE Schwartz. 2004. Sea Salt Aerosol Production: Mechanisms, Methods, Measurements, and Models-A Critical Review. Washington DC: American Geophysical Union. Parameterizations of size-dependent SSA production flux evaluated for wind speed U10 = 8 m s-1. Also, central values (curves) and associated uncertainty ranges (bands) from Lewis and Schwartz (2004). Abscissa denotes

413

Research Highlight  

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Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Submitter: Lovejoy, S., McGill University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, J. D. Stanway, 2001: "Direct Evidence of planetary scale atmospheric cascade dynamics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 86(22): 5200-5203. Left: Power spectrum of the 5 different aircraft measured liquid water data sets from the FIRE experiment (averaged over 10 equally logarithmically spaced points on the k-axis and vertically offset). The absolute slopes with ╬ĺ = 1.45 is indicated (straight line on top of graph) for reference. The number of sets used to compute the average from top to bottom: 4, 3, 1, 2, 5. A constant aircraft speed of 100m/s has been assumed. Right: Ensemble

414

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A Tall Order: Climate Models Fall Short in Predicting African Sahel A Tall Order: Climate Models Fall Short in Predicting African Sahel Rainfall Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roehrig, R., Meteo-France CNRM/GMME/MOANA Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Roehrig R, D Bouniol, F Guichard, F Hourdin, and JL Redelsperger. 2013. "The present and future of the West African Monsoon: A process-oriented assessment of CMIP5 simulations along the AMMA transect." Journal of Climate, 26(17), doi:10.1175/jcli-d-12-00505.1. The wealth of data available from field campaigns between the Gulf of Guinea and the Sahara Desert allowed scientists to evaluate the ability of climate models to accurately predict rainfall in the area.

415

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Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

416

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Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long, C. N., J. M. Sabburg, J. Calbo, and D. Pages, (2006): Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-based Daytime Color All-sky Images, JTech, 23, No. 5, 633┬ľ652. Long, C. N., J. M. Sabburg, J. Calbo, and D. Pages, (2006): Papers of Note: Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-based Daytime Color All-sky Images, BAMS, 87, No. 6, 743┬ľ744. Figure 1. Sky image (left) from 1300 LST Sept 4, 2004, and corresponding cloud decision image (right) denoting originally retrieved clear sky (blue), thin cloud (gray), and opaque cloud (white). Black denotes masked

417

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Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Submitter: Boyle, J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Climate Model Forecast Experiments for TOGA-COARE. J. Boyle,S. Klein,G. Zhang,S. Xie,X. Wei. Accepted by Monthly Weather Review Figure 1. Profiles of the apparent heat source (Q1) at the TOGA-COARE central site for the observations and day-two forecasts of the CAM, CAM with Zhang modification (ZMO), and AM2 averaged over the entire TOGA-COARE period are shown. Units are degrees Kelvin day. The CAM with the Zhang modified deep convection produced the best fit to the observations. Proper simulation of both the magnitude and level of maximum heating were shown to

418

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Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wang, K., P. Wang, Z. Li, M. Cribb, and M. Sparrow (2007). A simple method to estimate actual evapotranspiration from a combination of net radiation, vegetation index, and temperature, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15107, doi:10.1029/2006JD008351. Wang, K., Z. Li, and M. Cribb (2006). Estimation of evaporative fraction from a combination of day and night land surface temperature and NDVI: A new method to determine the Priestley-Taylor parameter. Remote Sensing of Environment, 102, 293-305. Time series of the measured (dot) and predicted ET (line) using equation

419

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Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation of Surface Models Submitter: Robock, A., Rutgers University Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Robock, A., Luo, L., Wood, E. F., Wen, F., Mitchell, K. E., Houser, P. R., Schaake, J. C., Lohmann, D., Cosgrove, B., Sheffield, J., Duan, Q., Higgins, R. W., Pinker, R. T., Tarpley, J. D., Basara, J. D., Crawford, K. C., Evaluation of the North American Land Data Assimilation System over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D22), 8846, doi:10.1029/2002JD003245, 2003 An example of the model discrepancies is shown in a comparison of monthly mean diurnal cycle data from July 1999 at the ARM Southern Great Plains

420

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New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, S Collis, J Straka, A Protat, C Williams, and S Krueger. 2013. "A summary of convective core vertical velocity properties using ARM UHF wind profilers in Oklahoma." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, , . ACCEPTED. ARM UHF profiler observations of reflectivity Z (top) and retrieved storm vertical velocity (bottom); overlaid contours bound regions of updrafts greater than 1.5 m/s. Summary median (diamond), 90th (triangle), and 95th (star) percentile data set properties of Oklahoma convective core updrafts including: (A)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

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The Significance of Multilayer Cloud Systems in Tropical Convection The Significance of Multilayer Cloud Systems in Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, GL, and NB Wood. 2007. "Properties of tropical convection observed by millimeter-wave radar systems." Monthly Weather Review 135: 821-842. Storm classifications (derived from k-means clustering analysis) applied to MWR observations from (a) Manus during MJO, (b) Manus during MJO transition, (c) Indian Ocean (JASMINE experiment) during monsoon, and (d) tropical convection off the Florida coast (CRYSTAL-FACE experiment) of cloud and precipitation echo top heights. The relative frequencies of

422

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The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, AM Vogelmann, W Lin, EP Luke, AT Cialella, P Minnis, MM Khaiyer, ER Boer, and MP Jensen. 2013. "The role of cloud microphysics parameterization in the simulation of mesoscale convective system clouds and precipitation in the Tropical Western Pacific." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(4), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0104.1. The spatial distribution of cloud types at 3 UTC on 27 December 2003 as observed by GOES-9 and as simulated by the three commonly used microphysics

423

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Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Jeong, M.-J., Z. Li, E. Andrews, and S.-C. Tsay (2007). Effect of aerosol humidification on the column aerosol optical thickness over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10202, doi:10.1029/2006JD007176. (a)-(j) Column-mean aerosol humidification factor as functions of the weighted column mean RH, . The ambient RH at one of the ten level-legs of the In-situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) measurements is replaced with RH equals 99%. Comparison of estimated column R(RH) following six different methods (M1~M6). Gray solid lines and black dashed lines are linear fit and

424

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Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2011. "Spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(12), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-060.1. Ratio of reflectance R╬╗ plus transmittance T╬╗ over single scattering albedo ¤ë0╬╗ plotted against the sum R╬╗+T╬╗ for two cloud optical depths: 5 and 10. The aerosol optical depth at 0.55 ╬╝m is 0.2 (rural type of aerosol). Different dots correspond to different wavelengths from 0.4 to

425

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Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., B. Xi, and P. Minnis, 2006: Observational Evidence of Changes in Water vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP site. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L19818,doi:10.1029/2006GL027132. Figure 1. This plot shows that atmospheric precipitable water vapor and downwelling infrared radiation decreased, but solar radiation increased at the SGP site from 1997 to 2004. The amount of water vapor, the dominant greenhouse gas, has a greater effect on infrared radiation than on solar. Figure 2. This plot shows that solar radiation at the surface increased

426

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Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

427

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Surface Characterization Data for the ARM SGP CART Site Surface Characterization Data for the ARM SGP CART Site Submitter: Cialella, A. T., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 The ARM External Data Center (XDC) is continually searching for surface characterization data for the ARM CART sites. These data can provide a better understanding of geophysical parameters, allowing for more accurate parameterization within General Circulation Models (GCMs), thus improving their preditive power. Below are a sample of surface characterization data available and their sources: The land use/land cover map above was provided by Oklahoma State University (Figure 1). Eighty-eight covertypes, interpreted from county orthophotos, were generalized to 25 cover types. The resolution of the data is 200m by

428

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Cloud Regimes in the TWP and Their Evolution over the MJO Cloud Regimes in the TWP and Their Evolution over the MJO Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Chen, Y, and AD Del Genio. 2008. "Evaluation of tropical cloud regimes in observations and a general circulation model." Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-008-0386-6. Mean highest cloud-top vertical profiles from ARSCL (solid) and ISCCP (dashed) for each ISCCP cloud regime at Manus. Relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud regime as a function of lag in pentads relative to the MJO peak for eight MJO events covering November-April of 1999-2003. Red = deep convective, orange = anvil, yellow = congestus, green = thin cirrus, blue = shallow cumulus, violet =

429

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Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Comparison of Boundary Layer Clouds Schemes in Climate Models with Satellite Observations Key Contributors: James McCaa, as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at University of Washington Chris Bretherton, University of Washington Dennis Hartmann, University of Washington Steven Ghan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine boundary layer clouds are among the most difficult clouds to represent in climate models. A team of atmospheric scientists from the University of Washington (UW) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

430

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Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2011. "Influence of humidified aerosol on lidar depolarization measurements below ice-precipitating Arctic stratus." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(10), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-037.1. Correlated MMCR radar reflectivities and DABUL lidar depolarizations below cloud base calculated with a reasonably low number of large, coarse-mode

431

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Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Luke, E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, EP Luke, and P Kollias. 2010. "Automated retrievals of precipitation parameters using non-Rayleigh scattering at 95-GHz." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 27(9), 10.1175/2010JTECHA1343.1. Time-height mapping of the retrieved vertical air motion for the 1 May 2007 event at SGP. Simultaneous measurements of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution parameters in precipitation are challenging. The ARM W-band radars (95-GHz), despite being used primarily for cloud sensing, offer

432

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An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette Cloud radiative feedback-the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed by clouds before it reaches the earth and bounces back into the atmosphere-is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. However, cloud properties

433

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Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817, doi:10.1029/2006GL027869. In March 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility recorded the strongest Saharan dust storm to reach the Niamey area in two years. The storm lasted several days, and visibility was reduced to 15 percent of normal. Observations (solid lines and star symbols) and results from two models

434

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Statistics of Vertical Velocities from Monsoonal Convection with Statistics of Vertical Velocities from Monsoonal Convection with Verification Download a printable PDF Submitter: Collis, S. M., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Collis S, A Protat, PT May, and C Williams. 2013. "Statistics of storm updraft velocities from TWP-ICE including verification with profiling measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 52(8), 10.1175/jamc-d-12-0230.1. A scatter plot of profiler-derived vertical velocities versus the scanning radar-retrieved vertical velocities. Dots represent minimum values, triangles represent mean values, and diamonds represent maximum values. The solid line is a fit to all maximum, mean, and minimum values, while the

435

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Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

436

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Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Submitter: Pawlak, D. T., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pawlak, DT, EJ Clothiaux, MF Modest, and JNS Cole. 2004. Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 61: 2588-2601. Of all the physical and dynamical calculations required in numerical weather prediction and climate modeling, radiation calculations consume the most computational time. This is because the radiation transfer physics of the atmosphere involve molecular absorption that occurs in narrowly defined absorption bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The exact location in the

437

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Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus Submitter: Wang, Y., Department of Geography Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Liu, X., Institute of Earth Environment Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang Y, C Long, J Mather, and X Liu. 2010. "Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus." Climate Dynamics, , doi:10.1007/s00382-009-0736-z. Figure 1: (A) The time series includes the clear-sky shortwave (SW) flux (blue) and the all-sky SW flux (black) over Manus. The green line indicates a 60-day running mean. (B) Wavelet power (WP) of CRF (color shading) with

438

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Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Submitter: Daum, P., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Liu, Y., and P. H. Daum, 2002: "Indirect warming effect from dispersion forcing," Nature 419(6872):580-581. Figure 1. Key = Green symbols: triangle - FIRE, northeastern Pacific; Crossed circles - SOCEX, Southern Ocean; Filled circle - ACE1, Southern Ocean; Blue symbols: Filled circles - ASTEX 8, northeastern Atlantic; Diamonds - SCMS 8, Florida coast; Filled triangles - Sounding 9, ASTEX; Filled squares - horizontal 9, ASTEX; Open inverted triangles - level 1; Open upright triangles - level 2; Open circles - level 3, all from southwest of San Diego 10; open diamonds - SCMS 11; stars - vertical, ASTEX

439

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Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony; Wiscombe, Warren; Ridgway, William; Cahalan, Robert; 1998: "Biases in Shortwave Column Absorption in the Presence of Fractal Clouds," J. Climate 11(3):431-446. Figure 1: Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle of 60 degree. From the top: from TOA to 5 km, from TOA to 1 km, from TOA to 0.5 km and, finally, from TOA to surface. Figure 2: Fractional cloudiness N = 0.777. (a) Horizontal distribution of optical depth, the same for both models. (b) Horizontal distribution of cloud height for optical model. Constant cloud top and cloud base; thus

440

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More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon." Science, 337(6098), doi:10.1126/science.1223447. Black to the core: Scientists are combining field and laboratory measurements to understand more about the physical properties of aerosols

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biogeochemical research terrestrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

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Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

442

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A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature Dependent Ice Ch Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y and BA Colle. 2011. "A new bulk microphysical scheme that includes riming intensity and temperature dependent ice characteristics." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3), 10.1175/2010MWR3293.1. (a) Coefficients of area-diameter (A-D) relationship in the new scheme. (b) Same as (a), except for the mass-diameter (M-D) relationship. (c) Same as (a), but for the velocity-diameter (V-D) relationship. (d) Same as (c), but each line shows the variation with Ri. More details of the figure are

443

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New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part I: theoretical development." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-040.1. Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part II: parcel model corroboration." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0152.1. A close-up of ice crystals. Ever noticed the different shapes of snowflakes sticking on the windowpane

444

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Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of height versus time displays obtained on July 29, 2002, during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment. Depicted are strong depolarizing upper tropospheric clouds (~10km), aerosols (╬┤ ~.10 to .15) extending up to ~5.5km, and at lower right (scale adjusted to account for signal

445

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Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Scientists Understand Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarquhar GM, S Ghan, J Verlinde, A Korolev, JW Strapp, B Schmid, JM Tomlinson, M Wolde, SD Brooks, D Cziczo, MK Dubey, JW Fan, C Flynn, I Gultepe, J Hubbe, MK Gilles, A Laskin, P Lawson, WR Leaitch, P Liu, XH Liu, D Lubin, C Mazzoleni, AM Macdonald, RC Moffet, H Morrison, M Ovchinnikov, MD Shupe, DD Turner, SC Xie, A Zelenyuk, K Bae, M Freer, and A Glen. 2011. "Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: the impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds." Bulletin of the American Meteorological

446

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Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Hou, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lang, S. E., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Li, X., University of Maryland, Baltimore County Starr, D. O., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zeng X, WK Tao, M Zhang, AY Hou, S Xie, S Lang, X Li, DO Starr, and X Li. 2009. "A contribution by ice nuclei to global warming." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, EARLY VIEW, doi:10.1002/qj.449.

447

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"Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere Submitter: Soden, B. J., University of Miami Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Soden, B.J., D.D. Turner, B.M. Lesht, and L.M. Miloshevich (2004), An analysis of satellite, radiosonde, and lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D04105, doi:10/1029/2003JD003828. Time-average relative humidity profiles from both original (black) and radiance-adjusted (blue) radiosonde soundings compared to the lidar (red) retrievals from field campaigns in 1996, 1997, 1999, and 2000.

448

Research Highlight  

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Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

449

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Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions of Cirrus Cloud Formation Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock, J. M., T. P. Ackerman, and D. D. Turner, 2004: Evidence of high ice supersaturation in cirrus clouds using ARM Raman lidar measurements. Geophys. Res. Letters, doi:10.1029/2004GL019705. To illustrate their findings, a continuous nine-hour segment of Raman lidar measurements showed upper tropospheric RHI measurements ranging from 120% near cloud tops and decreasing to about 70% at cloud base. To study the link between water vapor, cirrus cloud formation (homogenous and heterogenous) mechanisms, and their potential climatic impacts,

450

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All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454), doi:10.1007/s10546-013-9873-3. Coherent structures of the vertical velocity (left panels) and the energy dissipation rate (right panels) in updraft region during the day (a, b), night (c, d), and for entire 16 hours (e, f) of continental stratocumulus. Continental stratocumulus clouds are frequently observed in the cold side

451

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Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Stramler K, AD Del Genio, and WB Rossow. 2011. "Synoptically driven Arctic winter states." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3817.1. SHEBA winter hourly surface net (down - up) longwave radiation flux versus surface temperature. Blue circles indicate times when a combined radar-lidar cloud detection indicated clear skies, and red plus signs indicate times when clouds were detected. Time series of SHEBA winter hourly temperatures at the atmospheric temperature inversion altitude (magenta), surface (black), snow-sea ice

452

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Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lin W, M Zhang, and NG Loeb. 2009. "Seasonal variation of the physical properties of marine boundary layer clouds off the California coast." Journal of Climate, 22(10), doi:10.1175/2008JCLI2478.1. Image (a). Seasonal contrast of marine boundary-layer clouds between (a) summer (above) and (b) winter (below) off the California coast. Shown are cloud amount in the shaded box, cloud top and base heights and lifting condensation level (LCL) to the left, and cloud thickness and adiabatic

453

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

454

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New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Jimenez, J., University of Colorado Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jimenez JL and . et al. 2009. "Evolution of organic aerosols in the atmosphere." Science, 326, doi: 10.1126/science.1180353. Total mass concentration (in micrograms per cubic meter) and mass fractions of non-refractory inorganic species and organic components in submicrometer aerosols measured with the AMS at multiple surface locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Inset: Distributions of O:C for the OA components identified at the different sites. Relationship between O:C and hygroscopicity (k, or equivalently the

455

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Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., P. Minnis, B. Xi, S. Sun-Mack, and Y. Chen, 2007: Validation of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties using ground-based measurements at the DOE ARM SGP site. Accepted by J. Geophys. Res. Wielicki, B. A. and Co-authors (2000), CERES Validation Plan Overview, Release 4, 10/20/00, 58 pp. (Available at http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/ceres/validation/ ceresval_r4.0_over.pdf) Figure 1. Time series of surface-derived cloud-base and -top heights and temperatures (1-hour average) and matched MODIS-derived effective cloud heights and temperatures (30-km x 30-km box) for daytime single-layer and

456

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Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2009. "Single-scattering properties of aggregates of plates." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 135(639), 10.1002/qj.378. Aggregates of plates imaged by Cloud Particle Imager (left panel) and idealized geometry of aggregates of plates with AI=0.61 (right panel). Asymmetry parameter (g) at ╬╗=0.55 ╬╝m of 80 different aggregates of seven 100 ╬╝m plates attached together, as functions of (a) AI, (b) 1-AR, and (c) An. The correlation coefficient and constants for a fitting equation,

457

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A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Boutle IA, SJ Abel, PG Hill, and CJ Morcrette. 2013. "Spatial variability of liquid cloud and rain: observations and microphysical effects." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, , doi:10.1002/qj.2140. Different sizes of water droplets as well as varying water content dramatically alter cloud properties-often at a resolution finer than is currently in use by most climate models. Although clouds can extend for several kilometers, their properties-for example, liquid and rainwater content-can change dramatically over very

458

Research Highlight  

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Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the UK Met Office Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morcrette CJ, EJ O'Connor, and JC Petch. 2012. "Evaluation of two cloud parametrization schemes using ARM and Cloud-Net observations." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 138(665), doi:10.1002/qj.969. Integrating different metrics-and their errors and biases-used in weather and climate models may improve predictions by both types of models. What works for the weather models does not for climate models. Devising a common language, which translates into integrating the slew of metrics that the weather and climate science community uses, could be a way to improve

459

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A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

460

Research Highlight  

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Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Submitter: Zhang, Q., University of California, Davis Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Setyan A, Q Zhang, M Merkel, WB Knighton, Y Sun, C Song, J Shilling, TB Onasch, S Herndon, D Worsnop, JD Fast, R Zaveri, LK Berg, A Wiedensohler, BA Flowers, MK Dubey, and R Subramanian. 2012. "Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: Results from CARES." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8131-2012. High-resolution mass spectra (colored by ion category) and elemental ratios of the OA factors. Average contribution of ion categories to the total

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461

Research Highlight  

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Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Humidities Up to 95% Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bond, T., University of Illinois, Urbana Rood, M. J., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Brem BT, FC Mena Gonzalez, SR Meyers, TC Bond, and MJ Rood. 2011. "Laboratory-measured optical properties of inorganic and organic aerosols at relative humidities up to 95%." Aerosol Science and Technology, 46(2), doi:10.1080/02786826.2011.617794. Optical properties of the nigrosin benchmark aerosol as a function of relative humidity (RH). Measured extinction (¤âep) and scattering (¤âsp) for 467 nm, 530 nm and 660 nm are shown in 1a), 1b) and 1c); calculated

462

Research Highlight  

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Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shupe MD, OG Persson, IM Brooks, M Tjernstrom, J Sedlar, T Mauritsen, S Sjogren, and C Leck. 2013. "Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-9379-2013. Figure 1. Normalized profiles of (a) vertical velocity skewness and (b) variance, (c) turbulent dissipation rate, and (d) potential temperature. Black curves are all data, while red and green are for decoupled and coupled cases, respectively. Normalization is relative to the cloud top

463

Research Highlight  

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Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Submitter: Zhang, G. J., University of California, San Diego Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, G. J., and H. Wang, 2006. Toward mitigating the double ITCZ problem in NCAR CCSM3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L06709, doi:10.1029/2005GL025229 (23 March 2006). Figure 1. Climate models commonly suffer from a problem known as the double-ITCZ, which is illustrated here via observed and model-simulated rainfall at the surface. The error is seen in the region circled where, compared to observations (Image A), the original climate model (Image B) produces a second, erroneous equatorial ITCZ band southward from the one

464

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Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., and W. W. Grabowski (2007). Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06808, doi:10.1029/2006GL028767. In this figure, the lines indicate theoretical calculations of cloud droplet size for clouds with various droplet concentrations in which no mixing occurs. The cloud droplet size shows significant variability with height. Traditionally, observations of air mixing and cloud droplet size come from in situ aircraft probes, which collect data at very high horizontal

465

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First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

466

Center Research  

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5 5 Center Research ... Supports Electric Utility Restructuring Winds of change in the U.S. power sector: factors listed in the left column have created a gap between the prices utilities must charge to recover their embedded costs and the lower rates they would have to charge in a competitive environment. Possible responses to these pressures are listed to the right. The electricity industry in the U.S. is being dramatically restructured by state regulatory commissions and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Efforts are underway to create a wholesale market for electricity, with wholesale prices to distributing utility companies no longer being regulated. Discussions in several states and at the FERC are aimed at revising the regulation of the structure, operation, and pricing of the

467

Research Highlight  

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Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations, which represent disaggregated data, differ from those derived from satellite-based data, which represent data aggregated at a range of levels. Currently, many climate change models treat the two types of data the same. Aerosols-tiny airborne particles from sources like pollution or desert

468

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Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Submitter: Sheridan, P., U.S. Department of Commerce/NOAA Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sheridan, P, W Arnott, J Ogren, E Andrews, D Atkinson, D Covert, H Moosmuller, A Petzold, B Schmid, A Strawa, R Varma, and A Virkkula. 2005. "The Reno Aerosol Optics Study: An evaluation of aerosol absorption measurement methods." Aerosol Science and Technology 39(1):1-16. This magnification shows the size of aerosol particles relative to the pore size of the filter used during one of the study's sampling runs. Aerosol particles are gaining increasing scientific attention as a key factor in climate change. Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, or by altering cloud properties, aerosols have the potential to

469

Research Highlight  

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Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

470

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bouniol D, F Couvreux, PH Kamsu-Tamo, M Leplay, F Guichard, F Favot, and EJ O'Connor. 2012. "Diurnal and seasonal cycles of cloud occurrences, types, and radiative impact over West Africa." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-051.1. Clouds occurring at different levels in the sky have varying impacts on Earth's energy budget. Clouds with bases between five and seven kilometers above the Earth's surface, also known as mid-level clouds, occur over West Africa all year-round and may have major impacts on the Earth's energy budget,

471

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Submitter: Lubin, D., National Science Foundation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lubin, D., and A.M. Vogelmann, 2006: A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic, Nature, 439, 26 January, 453-456, doi:10.1038/nature04449 In a process known as the first aerosol indirect effect, enhanced aerosol concentrations cause the droplets in a cloud to be smaller and more numerous within a cloud of fixed water amount. This study found that this process can make many clouds more opaque and emit more thermal energy to the surface. The warming of the Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice area and thickness observed over recent decades are believed to result from

472

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, and P. Yang, 2003: "Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA," Journal of Applied Meteorology 42(6):701-715. The SHEBA experiment in Barrow, Alaska used data collected by the ground-based radiation observations from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). (Photo Credit: SHEBA Project Office) Key Contributors: S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, P. Yang, In the frigid environs of the Acrtic, ARM scientists at the North Slope of

473

Research Highlight  

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An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar Processing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, R McGraw, and L Lei. 2013. "An application of linear programming to polarimetric radar differential phase processing." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, , . ACCEPTED. C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar fields of radar reflectivity factor Z and processed specific differential phase KDP for a section of a Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) convective event as output from LP methods implemented for the ARM PyART processing suite. Detailed microphysical insights from weather radar systems are in demand

474

Research Highlight  

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Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-train Satellite Data Submitter: Yuan, J., University of Washington Houze, R., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Yuan J and RA Houze. 2010. "Global variability of mesoscale convective system anvil structure from A-train satellite data." Journal of Climate, 23, 5864-5888. Figure. 1 Annual mean (2007) climatology of anvil clouds associated with (a) small separated MCSs (<12000 km^2, the smallest 25%), (b) large separated MCSs (>40000 km^2, the largest 25%), and (c) connected MCSs. The color indicates percentage of area covered by MCS anvil clouds for each 5┬░x5┬░ grid. In the tropics, upper-level clouds containing ice and mixtures of ice and

475

Research Highlight  

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Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

476

Research Highlight  

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Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Data Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, R.T Cederwall, M. Zhang, and J.J. Yio, Comparison of SCM and CSRM forcing data derived from the ECMWF model and from objective analysis at the ARM SGP site, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D16), 4499, doi:10.1029/2003JD003541, 2003. Observed (left) and ECMWF-derived (right) forcing fields of time-height distributions of the derived (top) vertical velocity, (middle) total advective tendency and temperature, and (bottom) total advective tendency of moisture during the selected strong precipitation period during summer

477

Research Highlight  

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Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

478

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Matrosov, S. Y., CIRES/NOAA/ESRL/University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A An example of MMCR (a) and WACR (b) ARM radar measurements of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all hydrometeors in the vertical column is an important task, which is crucial for model parameterization and validation purposes. For many years, the remote sensing efforts within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were focused primarily on either non-precipitating or only weakly-precipitating (e.g., drizzling)

479

Research Highlight  

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Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Submitter: Kirchstetter, T. W., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hadley OL and TW Kirchstetter. 2012. "Black carbon reduction of snow albedo." Nature Climate Change, , doi:10.1038/nclimate1433. Spectrally weighted snow albedo over the 300-2,500 nm solar spectrum: derived from our experiments (dots, 1 standard deviation) and modelle