Sample records for bioenergy working group

  1. STAFFREPORT Prepared for the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAFFREPORT Prepared for the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group: Air Resources Board 2010 2009 PROGRESS TO PLAN BIOENERGY ACTION PLAN FOR CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION #12, and et. al. 2010. 2009 Progress to Plan Bioenergy Action Plan for California. California Energy

  2. 2012 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the California Energy Commission with input from the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group. This report to Governor Edmund G. Brown Karen Ross Secretary, Department of Food and Agriculture Matthew Rodriquez, California Energy Commission Ken Pimlott Director, Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Caroll

  3. Bioenergy Review Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme Science report: SC070001/SR2 #12;ii Science Report ­ Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work The Environment Agency is the leading public, biomass, bioenergy, waste, wood-fuel, land, land-take, mapping, 2010, GIS Research Contractor: Forest

  4. Orchid Bioenergy Group Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThe communityOrchid Bioenergy Group Ltd

  5. Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists and engineers at Idaho National Laboratory are working with partners throughout the bioenergy industry in preprocessing and characterization to ensure optimum feedstock quality. This elite team understands that addressing feedstock variability is a critical component in the biofuel production process.

  6. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Babetta...

  7. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Los Alamos developing next-generation of biofuels from renewable resources Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus...

  8. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Capabilities JBEI News News...

  9. Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy.

  10. QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    and a framework that details timelines, leadership, resource allocation, and an assessment plan that is clearlyQEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group The topic of the QEP should fit should be supported by a thorough understanding of the institutional context and by assessment data

  11. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  12. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group report: Neutrino physics Acknowledgements TheWorking group report: Neutrino physics Coordinators: SANDHYAthe report of the neutrino physics working group at WHEPP-X.

  13. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  14. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  15. Water Resources Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

  16. Fact Sheet: Bioenergy Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | DepartmentFact

  17. Working Group Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented in theWorkBusiness1: Model4:

  18. Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Sco McWilliams U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consor;um (PVMC) Infrared Thermography Infrared Thermography (IRT) has been demonstrated...

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites.

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call...

  1. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  2. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Chairman's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Chairman's Corner Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Chairman's Corner Presentation-given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG)...

  3. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update fupwgspring12unruh.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting:...

  4. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Participants Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants The following Federal agencies have participated in the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group or engaged in...

  5. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Chairman's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Chairman's Corner Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Chairman's Corner Presentation covers the Federal Utility...

  6. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2012...

  7. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  8. Agenda: High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG) meeting on May 18, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 11, 1998 Meeting June 22, 1998 Meeting May 27, 1998 Meeting November 3, 1997 Meeting September 18, 1997 Meeting More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group...

  10. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Federal agencies have participated in the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group or engaged in a utility energy service contract project.

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Commitment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment Investor-owned electric utility industry members of the Edison Electric Institute pledge to assist...

  12. Fusion Technology Working Group Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Snowmass Fusion Technology Working Group Summary Presented by M. Abdou, S. Milora Snowmass July 23, 1999 #12;Technology Working Group Subgroup # 1 Subgroup # 2 Solid Walls Ulrickson / Mattas Liquid Walls / Ying Chamber Technology Abdou / Ulrickson Heating/CD/Fueling Swain / Temkin Magnets Schultz / Woolley

  13. Sustainable Bioenergy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Bioenergy Sustainable Bioenergy Argonne's research in bioenergy includes topics associated with feedstock production and biomass conversion. Argonne scientists also...

  14. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Charter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom

  15. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom7-29-11

  16. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group matrix

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom7-29-11Rev

  17. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the states Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nations first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the states RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the states carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the states interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the states energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  18. RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear...

  19. Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 th Meeting of the Joint Working Group of the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy on Safety in Inter-Institutional Collaborations (U.S.-Japan Safety Monitoring...

  20. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countries participating in the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) are leveraging their resources and taking collective action to strengthen national and international efforts to facilitate the adoption...

  1. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, FL Hosted by: Florida Power & Light Monday, November 3 9:00 am - 4:30 pm Advanced UESC...

  2. Informal Assessment Work Group Meeting Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Informal Assessment Work Group Meeting Notes November 15, 2006 Present: Rula Awwad-Rafferty, Doug Baker, Dick Battaglia, Ben Beard, Suzi Billington, Alton Campbell, Jeanne Christiansen, Gail Eckwright is completed for all programs by May 2007? (Can we do the level of work needed in this time period?) Doug

  3. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

  4. Locally Led Conservation The Local Work Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grants Conservation Stewardship Program Environmental Quality Incentive Program Farm & Ranch Lands1 Locally Led Conservation & The Local Work Group Mark Habiger NRCS #12;2 What Is "Locally Led Conservation"? Community Stakeholders 1. Assessing their natural resource conservation needs 2. Setting

  5. DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laporte, TX to near Lake Charles, LA. This system has approximately 228 miles of DOT regulated H2 pipeline of DOT regulated H2 pipeline. Portions of this system operating since early 1983. Pipeline sizeDOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 31, 2005 Augusta, Georgia #12;Hydrogen Pipeline

  6. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  7. Bioenergy Walkthrough

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies OfficeOVERVIEW

  8. Bioenergy Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science |MaterialsNaturalBioenergy

  9. Federal ESPC Steering Committee Working Group Charter ESPC Data Working Group (WG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Federal ESPC Steering Committee Working Group Charter Name ESPC Data Working Group (WG) Problem information on their ESPC projects, differing reporting requirements and definitions of terms have made underscored the need to make ESPC-related data more accurate and complete, so that it can be used more

  10. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TEC Working Group Topic Groups

  12. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Standardization (ISO) published the ISO 50001 energy management standard in 2011. ISO 50001 provides industrial companies with guidelines for integrating energy efficiency into their management practices including fine-tuning production processes... efficiency. GSEPs Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) advocates the increased adoption of EnMS or ISO 50001 in industry and commercial buildings. It goal is to accelerate the adoption and use of energy management systems in industrial facilities...

  13. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TEC Working Group Topic

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TEC Working Group TopicDepartmentTribal

  16. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Overview (FUPWG) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet overview of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG), including group objectives, activities, and services.

  17. Photoelectrochemical Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrative Judgea. Part BPhotoelectrochemical Working Group

  18. Communicating about bioenergy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Perla, Dr. Donna [US Environmental Protection Agency] [US Environmental Protection Agency; Lucier, Dr. Al [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement] [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defining and measuring sustainability of bioenergy systems are difficult because the systems are complex, the science is in early stages of development, and there is a need to generalize what are inherently context-specific enterprises. These challenges, and the fact that decisions are being made now, create a need for improved communications among scientists as well as between scientists and decision makers. In order for scientists to provide information that is useful to decision makers, they need to come to an agreement on how to measure and report potential risks and benefits of diverse energy alternatives, including problems and opportunities in various bioenergy production pathways. Scientists also need to develop approaches that contribute information relevant to policy and decision making. The need for clear communication is especially important at this time when there is a plethora of scientific papers and reports, and it is difficult for the public or decision makers to assess the merits of each analysis. We propose three communication guidelines for scientists whose work can contribute to decision making: (1) relationships between the question and the analytical approach should be clearly defined and make common sense; (2) the information should be presented in a manner that nonscientists can understand; and (3) the implications of methods, assumptions and limitations should be clear. The scientists job is to analyze information in order to build a better understanding of environmental, cultural and socioeconomic aspects of the sustainability of energy alternatives. The scientific process requires transparency, debate, review, and collaboration across disciplines and time. This paper serves as an introduction to the papers in the special issue on Sustainability of Bioenergy Systems: Cradle to Grave because scientific communication is essential to developing more sustainable energy systems. Together these four papers provide a framework under which the effects of bioenergy can be assessed and compared to other energy alternatives in order to foster sustainability.

  19. Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado...

  20. 2014-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Membership 2014-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Membership This document...

  1. Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 This document provides a summary of the Hydrogen...

  2. Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Summary report from the May 17, 2007...

  3. Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications...

  4. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  5. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update on May 22, 2013.

  6. Bioenergy 2015 Press Room

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy 2015 online press room provides contacts, information, and resources to members of the media who cover Bioenergy 2015 conference-related news.

  7. National Bioenergy Day 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy, the use of agricultural waste and forestry byproducts to generate heat and energy, will be celebrated during the second annual National Bioenergy Day on October 22, 2014. This is an...

  8. EFCOG Work Management Sub-Working Group Session on Overview and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EFCOG Work Management Sub-Working Group Session on Overview and Results from WP&C Assist Visits across Complex EFCOG Work Management Sub-Working Group Session on Overview and...

  9. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  10. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology assessment was conducted as part of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan mandated by Act 253 collected in preparing this task and include: 1. The State should continue a bioenergy technology assessment-oil production X Y Charcoal production X X Y Bio-oil production for fuels X X Y Combustion X Y Renewable diesel

  11. T2 working group summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Caspi et al.

    2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The T2 Working Group has reviewed and discussed the issues and challenges of a wide range of magnet technologies: superconducting magnets using NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Sn and HTS conductor with fields ranging from 2-15 T and permanent magnets up to 4 T. The development time of these technologies varies significantly, but all are considered viable, providing an unprecedented variety of choice that can be determined by a balance of cost and application requirements. One of the most significant advances since Snowmass '96 is the increased development and utilization of Nb{sub 3}Sn. All of the current US magnet programs (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and Texas A and M) have programs using Nb{sub 3}Sn. There are also active programs in HTS development at BNL and LBNL. A DOE/HEP sponsored program to increase the performance and reduce the cost of Nb{sub 3}Sn is in its second year. The program has already made significant advances. The current funding for this program is $500k/year and an increase to $2M has been proposed for FY02.

  12. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  13. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even...

  14. High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, May 14, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting on May 14, 2007 in Arlington, Va.

  15. Proposed Agenda for High T Working Group Meeting: Paris

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, Thursday, May 26,2005.

  16. Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting on September 14, 2006.

  17. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Welcome to Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers welcoming attendees to Portland at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  18. International Working Group for New Virtual Reality Applications in Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's developed VR applications in architecture. Group members come from eight universities around the worldWORLD8 International Working Group for New Virtual Reality Applications in Architecture YOSHIHIRO the activities of World8, an international working group on virtual reality (VR), and demonstrates the group

  19. Hydrogen Storage Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / Current Status Aerogels are the scaffold; template with organic functional groups; physisorption, acid benign Inexpensive #12;Self-Assembled Nanocomposites R&D Needs 1. Studying silica aerogels 2. Modifying aerogels 3. Theoretical Modeling - various chemical structures / materials 4. Functionalization

  20. September 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory10MEASUREMENTSensors,8, 200810Work Force

  1. Work Force Retention Work Group Charter | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|ofEvents »SSL BasicsKawtarSue CangeWendeWoodWork Force

  2. Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering The DOE Biomass Program's feedstock research and development tools enable collaboration and sharing of feedstock development knowledge...

  3. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  4. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  5. Water Electrolysis Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFTEnergy ReviewInnovativeThe

  6. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergy Meeting Summaries TEC Working

  7. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  8. Catalysis Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom:EnergyJoshuaThis work plan proposesThe

  9. Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation Work Package ReportsSouthern States Energy

  10. Research Highlights Sorted by Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearchMaking SenseTitleWorking

  11. Meetings of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meets twice per year to share success stories, information on Federal Energy Management Program activities and other business.

  12. 2014-06-09 Issuance: Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group...

  13. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of June 11, 2008, biannual meeting of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group. ssawgsummaryreport0608.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage...

  14. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Financing Session Compilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Biloxi, Mississippi.

  15. assessment working group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 47 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

  16. airp work group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 35 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

  17. analysis working group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 48 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

  18. aer working group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 37 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

  19. Webinar: ASRAC Commercial/Industrial Pumps Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is conducting a public meeting and webinar for the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee's (ASRAC) Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group. For more information,...

  20. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Financing Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Session Compilation Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Financing Session Compilation Presentation covers the Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy...

  1. LPCC MB&UE Working Group CERN February 7, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Richard

    of 2! Jan Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus LPCC MB&UE Meeting September 2010 #12;LPCC MB&UE Working Group CERN

  2. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC December 4, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National...

  3. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  4. Summary of the TeV33 working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagley, P.P.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Colestock, P. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary of the TeV33 working group at Snowmass reports on work in the areas of Tevatron store parameters, the beam-beam interaction, Main Injector intensity (slip stacking), antiproton production, and electron cooling.

  5. Summary Report of the Energy Issues Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Agency Annual Energy Outlook 1999. #12;Fusion Power Plant Attractiveness, Technical RiskSummary Report of the Energy Issues Working Group Organizer: Farrokh Najmabadi Covenors: Jeffrey Sauthoff 1999 Fusion Summer Study July 12-23, 1999, Snowmass, CO Energy Working Group Web Site: http

  6. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC December 4, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory Working Group Meeting December 4, 2007 Argonne DC Offices, L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC Meeting

  7. New and emerging bioenergy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or fisheries. Examples of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol

  8. Presentation of progress of work in the "Accident Analysis" working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Presentation of progress of work in the "Accident Analysis" working group J.P. PINEAU INERIS Summary The "Accident Analysis" - AA - working group, initiated in January 1993, was at the origin of this investigation were presented at the Autumn 1994 ESReDA Seminar on Accident Analysis. A second step of the AA

  9. Working Group 5 Applying Mathematics in Realistic Situations Group Leaders: Ivan Meznik & Enrica Lemut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    Working Group 5 ­ Applying Mathematics in Realistic Situations Group Leaders: Ivan Meznik & Enrica Lemut Seven papers have been presented and discussed out of the 9 announced and the 8 included people presenting a contribution participated to all the Working Group sessions; also other people

  10. Bioenergy & Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Officeand theClean Cities program regularly conduct a joint Web conference for state energy office representatives and Clean Cities coordinators. The Web conferences...

  11. Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - DEC1387487090408 OECM Working Group April...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Team MA-50 DOEOECM 1 OECM PARS II Working Group: OA Module April 9, 2009 Created by: EESDekker PARS II Team Agenda * Obtain Consensus On Data Elements That Appear On...

  13. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group- Utility Interconnection Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses solar/photovoltaic (PV) projects to connect with utility in California and their issues.

  14. ASRAC Fans and Blower Working Group Creation Notice of Intent

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    consensus on the 7 terms of a proposed rule. Representation on the advisory committee or working group may be direct; that is, each member may represent a specific interest, or...

  15. Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

  16. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  17. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  18. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  19. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  20. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  1. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  2. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  3. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  4. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  5. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  6. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  7. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  8. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  9. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  10. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering Steven Chiang, Director Agribusiness Incubator a productive bioenergy industry, successful partnering amongst industry "players" is essential. This section of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan specifically evaluates facilitating the bioenergy industry through

  11. NuFact'03 machine working group summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.R. Edgecock; S. Machida; R.A. Rimmer

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The machine working group sessions at NuFact workshops have always been characterized by the presentation and discussion of both new ideas and the developments in existing concepts and by lively debate. The machine sessions at NuFact'03 were no exception to this. In this article, we will try and summarize the work presented and the discussion that took place.

  12. Work and Energy Simulation Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    Work and Energy Simulation Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names://phet.colorado.edu, in a browser and click on the Go to the simulations button. Open Work, Energy, and Power on the left. This lab uses three of the simulations on this page, Masses and Springs, Energy Skate Park, and The Ramp. I

  13. Osage Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource History ViewOrmatOsage Bioenergy

  14. Relative projective cover works for Broue's abelian defect group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    University, Chiba, Japan Tue. 22 June, 2010 Joint work with J¨urgen M¨uller and Felix Noeske Brou´e's abelian that A is a block algebra of OG with a defect group P and that AN is a block algebra of ONG(P) which is the Brauer´e's abelian defect group conjecture holds for all primes p and for all block algebras of OG if G = Co3, where

  15. Bioenergy Key Publications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 AgendaBioenergyKEY

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy Pumps

  17. Museum group works against cyberbullying By Abby Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Museum group works against cyberbullying By Abby Stewart StarNews Correspondent Published: Monday Month, and to recognize that, local students are participating in The Burnett-Eaton Museum Foundation-Eaton Museum Foundation. Winners of the contest will be announced at a program at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30

  18. BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efforts were undertaken Conversion took place during a period of less regulation on pipeline activityBP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station Two hydrogen pipelines

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2009 Meeting Welcome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) mission and services; Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Section 432 guidance; and American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA).

  20. Catalyst Working Group Kick-off Meeting: Personal Commentary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Personal commentary on future directions in fuel cell electrocatalysis, presented by Mark Debe, 3M, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

  1. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  2. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ABENGOA BIOENERGY CORPORATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ABENGOA BIOENERGY CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER A DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT INITIALLY IDENTIFIED AS GOV WORKS NO. 04-03- CA-79759...

  3. Seizing our Bioenergy Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the Bioenergy Technologies Office, were working with public and private partners to develop an industry of advanced biofuels and bioproducts from non-food biomass sources that is commercially...

  4. Factors for Bioenergy Market Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

    1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

  5. PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION WORKING GROUP: METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari R. A.; Whitlock, J.; Therios, I.U.; Peterson, P.F.

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the technical progress and accomplishments on the evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. We intend the results of the evaluations performed with the methodology for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. The PR and PP Working Group developed the methodology through a series of demonstration and case studies. Over the past few years various national and international groups have applied the methodology to nuclear energy system designs as well as to developing approaches to advanced safeguards.

  6. HEP-FCE Working Group on Libraries and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders Borgland; Peter Elmer; Michael Kirby; Simon Patton; Maxim Potekhin; Brett Viren; Brian Yanny

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report from the Libraries and Tools Working Group of the High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence. It presents the vision of the working group for how the HEP software community may organize and be supported in order to more efficiently share and develop common software libraries and tools across the world's diverse set of HEP experiments. It gives prioritized recommendations for achieving this goal and provides a survey of a select number of areas in the current HEP software library and tools landscape. The survey identifies aspects which support this goal and areas with opportunities for improvements. The survey covers event processing software frameworks, software development, data management, workflow and workload management, geometry information management and conditions databases.

  7. HEP-FCE Working Group on Libraries and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgland, Anders; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Viren, Brett; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report from the Libraries and Tools Working Group of the High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence. It presents the vision of the working group for how the HEP software community may organize and be supported in order to more efficiently share and develop common software libraries and tools across the world's diverse set of HEP experiments. It gives prioritized recommendations for achieving this goal and provides a survey of a select number of areas in the current HEP software library and tools landscape. The survey identifies aspects which support this goal and areas with opportunities for improvements. The survey covers event processing software frameworks, software development, data management, workflow and workload management, geometry information management and conditions databases.

  8. Transport Modeling Working Group Meeting Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenter Gets PeopleTransmissionModeling Working Group

  9. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  10. Preliminary results of the APAC spills working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.; Hesse, D.; kalinich, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mubayi, V.; Shinn, J.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spills Working Group is one of 6 working groups under the DOE-DP Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. Objectives are to assess methodologies available in this area, evaluate their adequacy for accident analysis at DOE facilities, identify development needs, and define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The group focused on methodologies for estimating 4 types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills. Computer models were identified with capabilities for quantifying release rates or released amounts from spills, and a set of sample test problems was established for evaluating a specific model for some common or probable accident release scenarios. The group agreed on a set of recommended computer codes which are classified according to spill type and hazard category. Code results for a given problem varied by up to an order of magnitude; this is attributed to differences in how the physics and thermodynamics of the problems were treated by the models.

  11. Bioenergy Success Stories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion BiochemicalDepartment ofBioenergy News61

  12. LEDSGP/about/working-groups | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups < LEDSGP‎ | about Jump to: navigation, search

  13. US-EU-Japan Working Group on Critical Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel forShale_Gas.pdfUS-EU-Japan Working Group on

  14. Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters | DepartmentKavita RaviValerie ReedWork Group Leadership

  15. Summary of working group g: beam material interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiselev, D.; /PSI, Villigen; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Schmidt, R.; /CERN

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, the workshop on High-Intensity and High-Brightness Hadron Beams (HB2010), held at Morschach, Switzerland and organized by the Paul Scherrer Institute, included a Working group dealing with the interaction between beam and material. Due to the high power beams of existing and future facilities, this topic is already of great relevance for such machines and is expected to become even more important in the future. While more specialized workshops related to topics of radiation damage, activation or thermo-mechanical calculations, already exist, HB2010 provided the occasion to discuss the interplay of these topics, focusing on components like targets, beam dumps and collimators, whose reliability are crucial for a user facility. In addition, a broader community of people working on a variety of issues related to the operation of accelerators could be informed and their interest sparked.

  16. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production Cornell University June, 2013 John Ferrell Feedstock Technology Lead Bioenergy Technologies Office US Department of Energy 2...

  17. The Endurance Bioenergy Reactor | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Endurance Bioenergy Reactor Share Description Argonne biophysicist Dr. Philip Laible and Air Force Major Matt Michaud talks about he endurance bioenergy reactor-a device that...

  18. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  19. November 13 - 15, 2012 HSS Work Group Leadership Meeting Summary - Work Force Retention

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O|Work Force Retention Work Group

  20. Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies #12;Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies By Andr of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels

  1. NREL: Innovation Impact - Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |Infrastructure The foundationBioenergy Menu Home

  2. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom September

  3. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Meeting Overview and Action Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom September

  4. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRouting TEC Working Group Topic GroupsSection

  5. Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Wolbers, S.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  6. Minutes of the October 2008 Meeting of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meeting minutes of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group from October 16, 2008, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

  7. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April through June 2008 update on activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  8. BIOENERGI ER BLEVET MODERNE 4DECEMBER 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , biogas og bioethanol. Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast, flydende og

  9. Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), organisk affald, biogas og bioethanol Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast

  10. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  11. Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Location: Hugoton, KS Eligibility: 1705 Snapshot In...

  12. Bioenergy 2015 Call for Posters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energys Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites students, researchers, public and private organizations, and members of the general public to submit abstracts that BETO will review and consider for inclusion in the poster session at BETOs eighth annual conference, Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. The conference will be held June 2324, 2015, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

  13. Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy Vision and Road Map Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy Vision and Road Map A diverse set...

  14. 12010-10-21 ESDSWG -Technolgy Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    12010-10-21 ESDSWG - Technolgy Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process Steve Olding 9th Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process 2009 Stakeholder needs identification Science needs End technologies Candidate technologies Known infusion barriers Infusion planning Technology matching Identified

  15. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Potential Environmental Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Potential Environmental Impacts of Bioenergy Development in Hawaii of the potential environmental impacts associated with bioenergy development in Hawaii was conducted as part included the characterization of the general environmental impacts and issues associated with bioenergy

  16. Interagency Sustainability Working Group: Update Report; December 2009, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2009 update report offered by the Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG). This report is updated bi-annually.

  17. INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    waste (which addresses tribal environmental issues) o How to encourage DOE to develop a technology assessment group focused on biomass? o Role of U.S. Department of Agriculture...

  18. Doing Ethos-Work: Exploring Group Ethos Among Indie Musicians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnock, Jon D.

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing the perspectives of Goffman, Aristotle and Burke this study investigated the concepts of ethos and group ethos in three case studies of indie music artists as discursive performances of character in action through ...

  19. Group work with families of nursing home residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Richard Tillett

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the counseling orientation. Both formats have been offered to families of nursing home residents, but it is not known if one format offers more positive results than the other, or if there is any difference. The study attempts to measure results in terms... consist. Thus, one of the goals of this study was to eventually improve the programs and services which nursing homes provide. By observing and recording the development of each group and by measuring each group's effectiveness in the terms described...

  20. Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form Fax completed form to the Agribusiness.hnei.hawaii.edu/bmpp/stakeholders.asp Partners are organizations that perform, intend to perform, or should perform bioenergy processes and/or requirements. Please tell us about your organization and the role it plays in bioenergy production in Hawaii

  1. United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental Directives |and

  2. Workforce Retention Work Group Status Overview - July 2012 | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008Ms.12.1AJanuary 2013,This report

  3. EM QA Working Group September 2011 Meeting Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EM HighlightsSeptemberQUALITY ASSURANCE WORKING

  4. July 2012, 10 CFR 851 Work Group Status Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |Julian Wong About10 CFR 851 Work

  5. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirstchampions, checklists,CaseyCatalysis Working

  6. Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented in theWorkBusiness1: Model4:9

  7. Working Group Reports Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop J. Vitko, Jr.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented in theWorkBusiness1: Model4:97

  8. State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Fernald Preserve |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWorkSunShotBelowTheThe documentLessonsReview |out

  9. Metadata Working Group Activity Summary for 2009-2010 (Prepared by Steven Folsom, Chair of Metadata Working Group)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Service - Inform the process for inclusion of local digital collections in a discovery service platform of metadata for digital objects within the UMass Libraries. The survey was sent to all Department Heads and a small number of other librarians who are known to work with digital objects and metadata. The questions

  10. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, Thomas; Pienkos, Phil; Sluiter, Justin; Magrini, Kim; McMillan, Jim

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National Bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  11. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  12. implementing bioenergy applied research & development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 A Northern Centre for Renewable Energy implementing bioenergy applied research & development to develop local solutions to these challenges by integrating campus operations, education, and research will help the University meet its current and future energy needs, reduce or eliminate our greenhouse gas

  13. Bioenergy 2015: Attendee Networking Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the Bioenergy 2015 Conference, this tool offers a concise listing of participants' background, areas of expertise, areas of need, and business contact information. Users can sort the information by clicking on the arrows in the header rows. Users can also filter by keywords by typing them into the search field in order to find individuals with skill sets complementary to their own.

  14. The ChiCI Group This paper describes the work, the vision, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    welcomes associate members from similar research groups around the globe. Eight of the full membersThe ChiCI Group Abstract This paper describes the work, the vision, and the approach of the Child Computer Interaction (ChiCI) group at the University of Central Lancashire in the UK. This group, formed

  15. 2015-03-26 Issuance: Fans and Blowers ASRAC Working Group; Notice...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Group Notice of Intent.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015-03-26: Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products; Notice of Intent to Establish an ASRAC Working Group 2014-06-09...

  16. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter The steeringcommittee discussed the draft charter. Two recommended changes were agreed upon: A sentence will be added to identify that the...

  17. Network Working Group S. Bryant, Ed. Request for Comments: 3985 Cisco Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    Network Working Group S. Bryant, Ed. Request for Comments: 3985 Cisco Systems Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5. PW Encapsulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Bryant & Pate Standards Track

  18. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter discussed whoshould sign and at what level the charter should be authorized. It was concluded thatthe Under Secretaries as the Central...

  19. High Temperature Membrane Working Group, Minutes of Meeting on September 14, 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These meeting minutes provide information about the High Temperature Membrane Working Group meeting on September 14, 2006 in San Francisco, Ca.

  20. May 21, 2012, Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Work Force Retention Work Group Charter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 20122 DOEDepartmentJune 29,05-21-12Work Force

  1. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005 and added to in 2007. This list includes cross sections which are experimentally important, and which are theoretically feasible (if difficult) to calculate. Basically all 2-3 cross sections of interest have been calculated, with the frontier now extending to 2 {yields} 4 calculations. Often these calculations exist only as private codes. Since 2007, two additional calculations have been completed: t{bar t}b{bar b} and W+3 jets, reflecting the advance of the NLO technology to 2 {yields} 4 processes. In addition, the cross section for b{bar b}b{bar b} has been calculated for the q{bar q} initial state with the gg initial state calculation in progress. Final states of such complexity usually lead to multi-scale problems, and the correct choice of scales to use can be problematic not only at LO, but also at NLO. The size of the higher order corrections and of the residual scale dependence at NLOcan depend strongly on whether the considered cross section is inclusive, or whether a jet veto cut has been applied. Depending on the process, dramatically different behavior can be observed upon the application of a jet veto. There is a trade-off between suppressing the NLO cross section and increasing the perturbative uncertainty, with application of a jet veto sometimes destroying the cancellation between infra-red logs of real and virtual origin, and sometimes just suppressing large (and very scale-sensitive) tree-level contributions. So far, there is no general rule predicting the type of behavior to be expected, but this is an important matter for further investigation. From the experimental side, an addition to the above wish-list that will be crucial is the determination of the accuracy to which each of the calculations needs to be known. This is clearly related to the experimental accuracy at which the cross sections can be measured at the LHC, and can determine, for example, for what processes it may be necessary to calculate electo-weak corrections, in addition to the higher order QCD corrections. On the theoretical side, it would also be interesting to categorize

  2. CCSM Polar Climate Working Group The Village at Breckenridge, Aspen/Bighorn Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CCSM Polar Climate Working Group AGENDA The Village at Breckenridge, Aspen/Bighorn Rooms Wednesday (Aspen/Bighorn Rooms) Focus: Abrupt Climate Change 1:30 PM-1:40 PM Opening Statement (M. Holland and Z Polar Climate Working Group Meeting (Aspen/Bighorn Rooms) Focus: Model Intercomparison Studies 3:30 PM-3

  3. Review of Sorghum Production Practices: Applications for Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorghum has great potential as an annual energy crop. While primarily grown for its grain, sorghum can also be grown for animal feed and sugar. Sorghum is morphologically diverse, with grain sorghum being of relatively short stature and grown for grain, while forage and sweet sorghums are tall and grown primarily for their biomass. Under water-limited conditions sorghum is reliably more productive than corn. While a relatively minor crop in the United States (about 2% of planted cropland), sorghum is important in Africa and parts of Asia. While sorghum is a relatively efficient user of water, it biomass potential is limited by available moisture. The following exhaustive literature review of sorghum production practices was developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to document the current state of knowledge regarding sorghum production and, based on this, suggest areas of research needed to develop sorghum as a commercial bioenergy feedstock. This work began as part of the China Biofuels Project sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program to communicate technical information regarding bioenergy feedstocks to government and industry partners in China, but will be utilized in a variety of programs in which evaluation of sorghum for bioenergy is needed. This report can also be used as a basis for data (yield, water use, etc.) for US and international bioenergy feedstock supply modeling efforts.

  4. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Ris Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only

  6. Bird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    providing bird habitat. Bioenergy grasslands promote agricultural multifunctionality and conservationBird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands Peter J. Blank1 *, David W, Wisconsin, United States of America Abstract Demand for bioenergy is increasing, but the ecological

  7. NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE The CAP & Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cultural Research Energy for SD Products & Services SD & Buildings Education Outreach #12;BIOENERGY NETWORK residues, waste streams and energy crops. Heat, electricity and biofuels for transport. Suggests

  8. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office engages with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on many projects, including guidance on the proper removal of corn stover...

  9. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Biomass 2014: Breakout Speaker Biographies Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview U.S. and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels...

  10. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research. In 2014, the Bioenergy KDF released new tools, including the Legislative Library, Biomass Scenario Model Tool, and DOE-Funded Content Page. This award is significant...

  11. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  12. July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |Julian Wong About UsHSS Focus Group

  13. July 10-11, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Work Group - Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |Julian Wong About UsHSS Focus Group

  14. Chair, CTBT working group B Radionuclide Expert Group and the U.S.

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of theNuclear Security AdministrationRadionuclide

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartment ofSecurity03Subgroup | Department ofGroup

  16. April 24, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Meeting - Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of SyntheticPowerManagementOpportunityUse23Group Charter

  17. Interagency Advanced Power Group, Joint Electrical and Nuclear Working Group, meeting minutes, November 16--17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reports on soldier power R&D review, N-MCT power electronic building blocks, silicon carbide power semiconductor work, and ground based radar were made to the Power Conditioning Panel. An introduction to high temperature electronics needs, research and development was made to the High Temperature Electronics Subcommittee. The Pulse Power Panel received reports on the navy ETC gun, and army pulse power. The Superconductivity Panel received reports on high-tc superconducting wires, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and superconducting applications. The Nuclear Working Group received presentations on the Topaz nuclear power program, and space nuclear work in the Department of Energy.

  18. BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Media News and Awards Supporting Organizations Redefining The Frontiers of Bioenergy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers | BioEnergy...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan...

  20. Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Bioenergy Technologies Office...

  1. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

  2. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic...

  3. analysing bioenergy demand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sorghum program that boasts about 40 6 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  4. assessing bioenergy options: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are reviewed Vermont, University of 9 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  5. alaska bioenergy program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and function of managed, semi 23 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  6. agency bioenergy agreement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carolina; Sponsorad Epa 1994-01-01 13 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  7. Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Bioenergy Day 2014 Project Overview Positive Impact The KDF supports the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry by providing unique value for researchers,...

  8. Report of the Finance Cost Reduction Working Group to the Federal ESPC Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Report of the Finance Cost Reduction Working Group to the Federal ESPC Steering Committee Reducing Financing Costs for Federal ESPCs Federal Energy Management Program Energy Savings Performance Contracting 2. REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPETITIVE FINANCING ACQUISITION .................................7 2.1 Use

  9. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Background Paper

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paper by Arlene Anderson and Tracy Carole presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group, with a focus on key drivers, purpose, and scope.

  10. The FERC EBB working group: Put a fork in us, we`re done

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636 required interstate pipelines to set up electronic bulletin boards for trading released capacity. Their goal was to foster an efficient and competitive secondary market for pipeline capacity. Five working groups were created to address the issues of core capacity, operationally available capacity, customer specific gas flows, communications protocols/operational logistics, and common codes. This paper describes the scope of the working groups and their accomplishments.

  11. Advancing sustainable bioenergy: Evolving stakeholder interests and the relevance of research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy L [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M [University of Minnesota; Dodder, Rebecca [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kaplan, Ozge [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Miller, C. Andy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability of future bioenergy production rests on more than continual improvements in its environmental, economic, and social impacts. The emergence of new biomass feedstocks, an expanding array of conversion pathways, and expected increases in overall bioenergy production are connecting diverse technical, social, and policy communities. These stakeholder groups have different and potentially conflicting values and cultures, and therefore different goals and decision making processes. Our aim is to discuss the implications of this diversity for bioenergy researchers. The paper begins with a discussion of bioenergy stakeholder groups and their varied interests, and illustrates how this diversity complicates efforts to define and promote sustainable bioenergy production. We then discuss what this diversity means for research practice. Researchers, we note, should be aware of stakeholder values, information needs, and the factors affecting stakeholder decision making if the knowledge they generate is to reach its widest potential use. We point out how stakeholder participation in research can increase the relevance of its products, and argue that stakeholder values should inform research questions and the choice of analytical assumptions. Finally, we make the case that additional natural science and technical research alone will not advance sustainable bioenergy production, and that important research gaps relate to understanding stakeholder decision making and the need, from a broader social science perspective, to develop processes to identify and accommodate different value systems. While sustainability requires more than improved scientific and technical understanding, the need to understand stakeholder values and manage diversity presents important research opportunities.

  12. Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    E2.3 Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy 50 #12;Same climate data (A1F1 scenario for 2050 - 2080) but the genotype is one which is less

  13. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015

  14. Lessons learned from facilitating the state and tribal government working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen lessons learned from my experience in facilitating the State and Tribal Government Working Group for the U.S. Department of Energy have been identified. The conceptual base for supporting the veracity of each lesson has been developed and the lessons are believed to be transferable to any stakeholder group. The crux of stakeholder group success if the two-directional, two-mode empowerment required in this case. Most of the lessons learned deal with the scope of that empowerment. A few of the lessons learned deal with the operations of the group.

  15. Closing plenary summary of working group 4 instrumentation and controls for ERL2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; Obina, T.

    2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group 4 was charged with presentations and discussions on instrumentation and controls with regards to Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). There were 4 sessions spanning 3.5 hours in which 7 talks were delivered, the first being an invited plenary presentation. The time allotted for each talk was limited to 20-25 minutes in order to allow 5-10 minutes for discussion. Most of the talks were held in joint session with working group 5 (Unwanted Beam Loss). This format was effective for the purpose of this workshop. A final series of discussion sessions were also held with working group 5. Summary of the working group 4 activities, presented in the closing plenary session. We had a plenary presentation on operational performance, experience, and future plans at the existing ERL injector prototype at Cornell. This included instrumentation data, controls system configurations, as well as description of future needs. This was followed by four talks from KEK and RIKEN/SPring-8 that described electron beam instrumentation already in use or under development that can be applied to ERL facilities. The final talks described the ERLs under construction at KEK and BNL. The format of having joint sessions with working group 5 was beneficial as there were a significant number of common topics and concerns with regards to the causes of beam loss, instrumentation hardware, and techniques used to measure and analyze beam loss.

  16. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like This ReturnBioactiveBSD

  17. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science |MaterialsNatural

  18. Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

  19. European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada Working Groupe on Internal Erosion in embankment dams, Granada : Spain (2010)" #12;

  20. Report on the NGS3 Working Group on Safeguards by Design For Aqueous Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael; Schanfein, Mark

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Working Group on SBD for Aqueous Reprocessing Facilities was to provide recommendations, for facility operators and designers, which would aid in the coordination and integration of nuclear material accountancy and the safeguards requirements of all concerned parties - operators, state/regional authorities, and the IAEA. The recommendations, which are to be provided to the IAEA, are intended to assist in optimizing facility design and operating parameters to ensure the safeguardability of the facility while minimizing impact on the operations. The one day Working Group session addressed a wide range of design and operating topics.

  1. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar Slides about the new Bioenergy KDF...

  2. Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy: Proceedings of IEA, Bioenergy, Task 17 Meeting in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6-9, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the results of the third meeting of Task 17 (Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy) within the framework of International Energy Agency (IEA), Bioenergy. (Minutes from the meeting can be seen at page 91.) The meeting was held in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6--9, 1999. The meeting was held soon after President Clinton of the United States signed Executive Order No.13134: DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING BIOBASED PRODUCTS AND BIOENERGY on August 12, 1999. Executive orders in the US are official documents, through which the President of the US manages the operation of the Federal Government. This order outlines the administration's goal of tripling the use of biomass products and bioenergy in the US by the year 2010. During the time of this meeting, it was also known from sources in Europe that the European Union (EU) commission was working on draft instructions to its member countries on how to increase the use of renewable energy from six to twelve percent in Europe within 10 years. The objectives of Task 17 support the goals of member countries for bioenergy production and use. These objectives are as follows: to stimulate the full-scale implementation of energy crops in the participating countries; to strengthen the contacts and co-operation between participating countries, scientists, biomass producers, machine developers, entrepreneurs, and end users to select the most urgent research and development areas and suggest projects of co-operation; to inform Ex-Co- members; and to deliver proceedings from the meetings.

  3. From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the Group. and Cockburn, A. (1995) From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the GroupLab Project. Research Report 95/580/32, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

  4. Sorghum bioenergy genotypes, genes and pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plews, Ian Kenneth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and this plant is a potentially important bioenergy crop for Texas. The diversity of the twelve high biomass sorghum genotypes was analyzed using 50 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers with genome coverage. The accumulation of biomass during sorghum development...

  5. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart BioeconomyAchieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy ProductionMay Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne...

  6. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a...

  7. Sorghum bioenergy genotypes, genes and pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plews, Ian Kenneth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and this plant is a potentially important bioenergy crop for Texas. The diversity of the twelve high biomass sorghum genotypes was analyzed using 50 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers with genome coverage. The accumulation of biomass during sorghum development...

  8. Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using Biological Interactions Lee Newman With D consequences: ­ Price of corn has doubled ­ Farmers are planting more corn for ethanol · Increase alternative

  9. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectivesreducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  10. Parity Violation in Photonuclear Reactions at HIGS Submission to Fundamental Symmetries and Neutrino Physics Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Neutrino Physics Working Group H. Gao,1 S.S. Jawalker,1 M.R. Schindler,2 W.M. Snow,3 R.P. Springer,1 and Ying Wu1 1 Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA 2 Department of Physics; W. Xu*, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics; Shi-Lin Zhu, Peking U; * to be confirmed I

  11. Service station requirements for safe use of hydrogen based fuels: NHA work group update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the results of the meeting of the working group on safety standards. A standard for an odorant for hydrogen leak detection is set forth. Recent activities with the National Fire Protection Association and the International Standard Organization are enumerated. The path forward is also summarized.

  12. Updated by Cornell University Library PSEC Documentation Working Group (August 2010) Search GuideCornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    the specific item you wish to find. Boolean operators To search for an exact phrase, enclose the search terms, will search for either of the words listed in the search box. The minus sign will exclude terms from yourUpdated by Cornell University Library PSEC Documentation Working Group (August 2010) Search Guide

  13. HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES, and student body." From David Ward, "A Vision for the Future," p. 9. This document lists the human-resource goals and plans of the Office of Human Resources, the Equity and Diversity Resource Center

  14. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting 2007 Hydrogen Program Annual Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications. The IPHE (International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy) safety program to assess storageHydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting 2007 Hydrogen Program Annual Review Crystal Laboratory and Elvin Yuzugullu Sentech, Inc. June 28, 2007 #12;SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage

  15. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Savannah River National Laboratory (Don Anton and Bruce Hardy, SRNL) Based on the operating conditionsHydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices 955 by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Laura Verduzco Sentech, Inc. February 28, 2007 #12;SUMMARY

  16. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar 12:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 Research Review Continued o Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt basedBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production

  17. Working Group Meeting Presentation Guidance at a Glance Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .31 O2 + 0.26 H2O 0.71 CO2 + 0.96 H2 #12;Key Performance Metrics Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-Oil Case (Ethanol Case) Bio-oil Storage Tank $106,040 Reformer $803,000 Shift Reactor, PSA, BOP $1Working Group Meeting Presentation Guidance at a Glance Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis

  18. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ReviewReport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 12:30ResearchReviewContinued Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt based Ethanol Reforming,ANL,RomeshKumar ..................23 MeritBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG), Hydrogen

  19. Euro Working Group on Transportation 2014 Estimating Travel Time Distribution under different Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Euro Working Group on Transportation 2014 Estimating Travel Time Distribution under different of the distribution of travel time is needed to properly estimate these values. Congestion distorts the distribution and particular statistical distributions are needed. Different distributions have been proposed in the literature

  20. Library Web Standards Recommendations of the SCIS Web Standards Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Library Web Standards Recommendations of the SCIS Web Standards Working Group Prepared by L. Jacobs: In support of research, teaching, and public service, the mission of the University of Lethbridge Library of the Library. Goals of Library Web Pages: To facilitate access to Library resources To supplement access

  1. PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

  2. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.

  3. EFCOG Work Management Sub-Working Group Session on Overview and Results from WP&C Assist Visits across Complex

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, EFCOG Work Management Subgroup Chair. EFCOG Work Management Subgroup--Introduction and Overview.

  4. Les Houches 2013: Physics at TeV Colliders: New Physics Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brooijmans; R. Contino; B. Fuks; F. Moortgat; P. Richardson; S. Sekmen; A. Weiler; A. Alloul; A. Arbey; J. Baglio; D. Barducci; A. J. Barr; L. Basso; M. Battaglia; G. Blanger; A. Belyaev; J. Bernon; A. Bharucha; O. Bondu; F. Boudjema; E. Boos; M. Buchkremer; V. Bunichev; G. Cacciapaglia; G. Chalons; E. Conte; M. J. Dolan; A. Deandrea; K. De Causmaecker; A. Djouadi; B. Dumont; J. Ellis; C. Englert; A. Falkowski; S. Fichet; T. Flacke; A. Gaz; M. Ghezzi; R. Godbole; A. Goudelis; M. Gouzevitch; D. Greco; R. Grober; C. Grojean; D. Guadagnoli; J. F. Gunion; B. Herrmann; J. Kalinowski; J. H. Kim; S. Kraml; M. E. Krauss; S. Kulkarni; S. J. Lee; S. H. Lim; D. Liu; F. Mahmoudi; Y. Maravin; A. Massironi; L. Mitzka; K. Mohan; G. Moreau; M. M. Mhlleitner; D. T. Nhung; B. O'Leary; A. Oliveira; L. Panizzi; D. Pappadopulo; S. Pataraia; W. Porod; A. Pukhov; F. Riva; J. Rojo; R. Rosenfeld; J. Ruiz-lvarez; H. Rzehak; V. Sanz; D. Sengupta; M. Spannowsky; M. Spira; J. Streicher; N. Strobbe; A. Thamm; M. Thomas; R. Torre; W. Waltenberger; K. Walz; A. Wilcock; A. Wulzer; F. Wrthwein; C. Wymant

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 3--21 June, 2013). Our report includes new computational tool developments, studies of the implications of the Higgs boson discovery on new physics, important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC, new studies of flavour aspects of new physics, and assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC.

  5. Philosophy 148 --Assignment #4 This assignment is due Thursday, April 17 at 3pm. If you work in a group, list your group members at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    work in a group, list your group members at the top of your submitted work. Hempel's Desiderata algebra B of propositions. Consider the following seven conditions that might be met by a confirmation restrict these seven principles to contingent E's and H's, then 6/7 of them can be satisfied by some

  6. Draft Bioenergy Master Plan for the State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Bioenergy Master Plan for the State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy DRAFT Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Volume I Prepared for State of Hawaii Department of Business

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)...

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update This is the May 2013 Update to the...

  9. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 2324, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conferenceBioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape...

  10. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 2324, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conferenceBioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape.

  11. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industry Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

  12. Special issue: bioenergy Don-Hee Park Sang Yup Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . As the field of bioenergy is rapidly moving forward with rather traditional bioethanol and biodiesel to more

  13. State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States on Issues, Opportunities, and Options for Advancing Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrnett, D. S.; Mulholland, D.; Zinsmeister, E.; Doris, E.; Milbrandt, A.; Robichaud. R.; Stanley, R.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One renewable energy option that states frequently consider to meet their clean energy goals is the use of biomass resources to develop bioenergy. Bioenergy includes bioheat, biopower, biofuels, and bioproducts. This document provides an overview of biomass feedstocks, basic information about biomass conversion technologies, and a discussion of benefits and challenges of bioenergy options. The Primer includes a step-wise framework, resources, and tools for determining the availability of feedstocks, assessing potential markets for biomass, and identifying opportunities for action at the state level. Each chapter contains a list of selected resources and tools that states can use to explore topics in further detail.

  14. Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy on Life Cycle Analyses of Bioenergy Systems Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Bioenergy Production Pathways

  15. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivares, Jose A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Min S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

  16. Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology & Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ninth annual Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy will be held from December 79, 2014, in San Diego, California, at the Westin Gaslamp Quarter. Bringing together representatives from various countries all around the Pacific Rim, this event will focus on the growth of the industrial biotechnology and bioenergy sectors in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Glenn Doyle, BETO's Deployment & Demonstration Technology Manager, will be moderating and speaking at a session on entitled "Utilizing Strategic Partnerships to Grow Your Business" on December 9.

  17. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 Agenda Bioenergy

  18. 2014-06-09 Issuance: Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Intent

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register? notice of intent to establish the manufactured housing working group to negotiate a notice of proposed rulemaking for energy efficiency standards for manufactured housing, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on June 9, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  19. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  20. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Oil and Gas Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy IDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan4: Oil and Gas Working Group

  1. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015: Oil and Gas Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy IDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan4: Oil and Gas Working Group5: Oil

  2. Assumptions for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy IDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan4: Oil and Gas Working Group5:

  3. Hydrogen Delivery Pipeline Working Group Workshop September 25-26, 2007 Center for Hydrogen Research, Aiken, GA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Delivery Pipeline Working Group Workshop September 25-26, 2007 Center for Hydrogen..................................................................................................... 1. Introduction The DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group (PWG) met on September 25-26, 2007 challenges and future goals for hydrogen pipeline research and development (R&D). One of the near-term goals

  4. 13 Sep 2001 http://www.ccsm.ucar.edu/working_groups/Software/reports/010628.html Report on CCSM Software Engineering Working Group Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the meeting with an overview of the new CCSM Software Engineering Group (CSEG). Tony is managing the group methodology. Steve Thomas (NCAR/SCD) presented early results from a high-performance spectral element method Kluzek erik@ucar.edu NCAR Keith Lindsay klindsay@ucar.edu NCAR Rebecca McKeown beckym@nrel

  5. Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

  6. Final Report. An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Andrew [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE grant, An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group, to New Mexico State University created the Solar America Board for Codes and Standards (Solar ABCs). From 2007 2013 with funding from this grant, Solar ABCs identified current issues, established a dialogue among key stakeholders, and catalyzed appropriate activities to support the development of codes and standards that facilitated the installation of high quality, safe photovoltaic systems. Solar ABCs brought the following resources to the PV stakeholder community; Formal coordination in the planning or revision of interrelated codes and standards removing stove pipes that have only roofing experts working on roofing codes, PV experts on PV codes, fire enforcement experts working on fire codes, etc.; A conduit through which all interested stakeholders were able to see the steps being taken in the development or modification of codes and standards and participate directly in the processes; A central clearing house for new documents, standards, proposed standards, analytical studies, and recommendations of best practices available to the PV community; A forum of experts that invites and welcomes all interested parties into the process of performing studies, evaluating results, and building consensus on standards and code-related topics that affect all aspects of the market; and A biennial gap analysis to formally survey the PV community to identify needs that are unmet and inhibiting the market and necessary technical developments.

  7. Webinar: Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Departments Bioenergy Technologies Office will present a live informational webcast on the Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001179) on November 3, 2014, 1:30 p.m.3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. This FOA seeks interdisciplinary projects that apply landscape design approaches to integrate cellulosic feedstock production into existing agricultural and forestry systems while maintaining or enhancing environmental and socio-economic sustainability including ecosystem services and food, feed, and fiber production. For the purposes of this FOA, cellulosic feedstock production refers to dedicated annual and perennial energy crops, use of agricultural and forestry residues, or a combination of these options.

  8. Digital Creation and Preservation Working Group Plan and oversee implementation for the Libraries' digital preservation program, particularly in relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    for the Libraries' digital preservation program, particularly in relation to the Libraries' unique resources to the Digital Strategies Group. Chair: Appointed by the Director of Libraries Membership: Members serveDigital Creation and Preservation Working Group Charge: Plan and oversee implementation

  9. 26 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 9.8.14 NFR BioEnergy Announces $312 Million Energy Project In South PLAQUEMINE, La. -- Today, Gov. Bobby Jindal and Chief Operating Officer Frank Randazzo of NFR BioEnergy mills. NFR BioEnergy will convert sugar cane waste, known as bagasse, into hardened energy pellets

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 2014 Update -- Sections Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and...

  11. In Search of Spatial Opportunities for Sustainable Bioenergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Syntheses , ORNL Center for Bioenergy Sustainability Seminar Building 1505, Ocoee Room (189) CONTACT : Email: Jennifer Smith...

  12. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems, Argonne National Laboratory wangbiomass2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program...

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  15. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County,...

  16. ORNL researchers contribute to major UN bioenergy and sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications 865.574.4399 ORNL researchers contribute to major bioenergy and sustainability report ORNL researchers Keith Kline and Virginia Dale contributed to a major...

  17. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of...

  20. Sandia Energy - "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities...

  1. Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of...

  3. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater...

  4. Report by the ESA-ESO Working Group on Extra-Solar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Perryman; O. Hainaut; D. Dravins; A. Leger; A. Quirrenbach; H. Rauer; F. Kerber; R. Fosbury; F. Bouchy; F. Favata; M. Fridlund; R. Gilmozzi; A. -M. Lagrange; T. Mazeh; D. Rouan; S. Udry; J. Wambsganss

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Various techniques are being used to search for extra-solar planetary signatures, including accurate measurement of radial velocity and positional (astrometric) displacements, gravitational microlensing, and photometric transits. Planned space experiments promise a considerable increase in the detections and statistical knowledge arising especially from transit and astrometric measurements over the years 2005-15, with some hundreds of terrestrial-type planets expected from transit measurements, and many thousands of Jupiter-mass planets expected from astrometric measurements. Beyond 2015, very ambitious space (Darwin/TPF) and ground (OWL) experiments are targeting direct detection of nearby Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone and the measurement of their spectral characteristics. Beyond these, `Life Finder' (aiming to produce confirmatory evidence of the presence of life) and `Earth Imager' (some massive interferometric array providing resolved images of a distant Earth) appear as distant visions. This report, to ESA and ESO, summarises the direction of exo-planet research that can be expected over the next 10 years or so, identifies the roles of the major facilities of the two organisations in the field, and concludes with some recommendations which may assist development of the field. The report has been compiled by the Working Group members and experts over the period June-December 2004.

  5. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

  6. BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed performance. Keywords Biohydrogen . Biomethane . Bioelectricity. Microbial electrolysis cell . Bioenergy

  7. animal manure-based bioenergy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sorghum program that boasts about 40 3 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  8. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 638645 Forest bioenergy system to reduce the hazard of wildfires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract'' for utilization in small power plants (o3 MW), and a wood-heating pellet manufacturing facility. The outlet for the wood fuel pellets is the growing market for house and business heating, and co for bioenergy. The start-up project is in the Nutrioso area of the Alpine Ranger District, Apache

  9. Beam diagnostics, collimation, injection/extraction, targetry, accidents and commissioning: Working group C&G summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Hasegawa, K.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Henderson, S.; /Oak Ridge; Schmidt, R.; /CERN; Tomizawa, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wittenburg, K.; /DESY

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of accelerators with high beam power or high stored beam energy is strongly dependent on the way the beam is handled, how beam parameters are measured and how the machine is commissioned. Two corresponding working groups have been organized for the Workshop: group C ''Beam diagnostics, collimation, injection/extraction and targetry'' and group G ''Commissioning strategies and procedures''. It has been realized that the issues to be discussed in these groups are interlaced with the participants involved and interested in the above topics, with an extremely important subject of beam-induced accidents as additional topic. Therefore, we have decided to combine the group sessions as well as this summary report. Status, performance and outstanding issues of each the topic are described in the sections below, with additional observations and proposals by the joint group at the end.

  10. Promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Production and Trade Issue Paper No. 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Production and Trade Issue Paper No. 17 June 2009 l ICTSD Programme School of Agriculture, Policy and Development University of Reading EU Support for Biofuels and Bioenergy on Agricultural Trade and Sustainable Development By Professor Alan Swinbank School of Agriculture, Policy

  11. 20 PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014 Bioenergy the name alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    speaking. But everything has a carbon footprint and some biofuels might not be so great if their carbon that the carbon footprint of bioenergy may be worse than some fossil fuels. But the truth is we didn't know that many of the assessments Called to account ­ bioenergy's carbon footprint #12;PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014

  12. Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cultivation of biomass for biofuels (trans- port fuels) and bioenergy (heat and power) has pro- voked much of the northern hemisphere, how- ever, a small, but growing proportion of biomass crops consist of tree species generation bioenergy crop in Europe, with the area cultivated expected to increase greatly by 2050 (Rowe et

  13. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 2122, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  14. Bioenergy 2015 Speaker Biographies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 Agenda

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal--

  16. Emergence BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,ElectrosolarElmhurst MutualEmergence BioEnergy

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchieving Them. ABeyondBioenergy Technologies

  18. Solarvest BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore JumpSolarezo JumpSolarvest BioEnergy Jump to:

  19. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergy

  20. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of Energy BigNews » BioEnergy

  1. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies Office HOMEMay

  2. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies Office

  3. Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2:Bioenergy SHARE Fundamental

  4. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also included.

  5. A Virtual Visit to Bioenergy Research at the National Laboratories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For National Bioenergy Day on October 22, bioenergy facilities across the country are holding open houses to increase public awareness of bioenergy and its role in the clean energy landscape. By the same token, the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is offering this virtual open house of its national laboratoriesthe facilities at the core of BETOs research and development. If you want to know how Energy Department bioenergy funding is making an impact, be sure to take a look at our national labs47% of BETO funding this past year went to the national laboratories. Of that funding, about half went to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory also received a large share.

  6. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proceedings from the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  7. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Grojean, C.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay,

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  8. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  9. Meeting of The New York State Sustainability Education Working Group Syracuse Center of Excellence In Environmental and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    In Environmental and Energy Systems 727 East Washington Street Syracuse, New York April 1, 2012 RECOMMENDED ACTIONMeeting of The New York State Sustainability Education Working Group Syracuse Center of Excellence STEPS The Goal: Every graduate of a New York college or university will be literate about how to live

  10. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff`s suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification.

  11. Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 15(3), 255-257 (2012). IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 15(3), 255-257 (2012). Page 255 IAU HISTORIC RADIO Wielebinski Hugo van Woerden 1 INTRODUCTION The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astron- omy (WGHRA Astronomy) and 41 (History of Astronomy), in order to: a) assemble a master list of surviving historically

  12. Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 12(3), 249-253 (2009). THE IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 12(3), 249-253 (2009). 249 THE IAU HISTORIC RADIO and Heritage. 1 Role of the Working Group This WG was formed at the 2003 General Assembly of the IAU as a joint a master list of surviving historically- significant radio telescopes and associated instru- mentation

  13. GSDI Legal and Economic Working Group: A Template for Reporting National Legal and Economic Issues Affecting Spatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    complementary laws. A basic policy assumption underlying most U.S. information law is that the economicGSDI Legal and Economic Working Group: A Template for Reporting National Legal and Economic Issues Affecting Spatial Data Infrastructure Developments The primary objective of the GSDI Legal and Economic

  14. 2011 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the California Energy Commission for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the California Energy Commission for the Bioenergy Commission Renewables Committee as part of the Preparation of the 2011 Bioenergy Action Plan ­ docket # 10 policy of the Energy Commission until the report is adopted. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The 2011 Bioenergy

  15. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #22, January - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January to March, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  16. Special issue: current status of bioenergy research Don-Hee Park Sang Yup Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes are presented. As the field of bioenergy is rapidly growing from traditional forms of bioethanol

  17. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #25, October - December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  18. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #20, July-September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  19. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  20. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #15, April - June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Platform Integration Project.

  1. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #23, April-June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April to June, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  2. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  3. Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

  4. Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.

    2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

  5. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  6. United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental Directives |and RadioactiveCooperation

  7. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008Ms.12.1AJanuaryEnergyTechnology

  8. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines future prospects of bioenergy production in the United States. The analysis examines three issues on liquid fuel and cellulosic ethanol. First, the amount that costs need to decrease in order to make cellulosic ethanol...

  9. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  10. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  11. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  12. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in a fluidized bed to create bio-oils, which can then be used to create hydrocarbon biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...

  14. OSU Potential Bioenergy Mentors Version 2, 11/13/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    electrochemical technologies for bioenergy generation and waste/wastewater treatment. More of methane from wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digesters through the co interests are a good match for their projects. Biological Conversion

  15. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape June 23-24, 2015 Bioenergy 2015 Logo Walter E. Washington Convention Center 801 Mt. Vernon Place, NW Washington, DC 20001 On...

  16. BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 23 BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234 Volume 5 Number 2 Bioenerg. Res. (2012) 5:341-362 DOI 10, the EROI was adjusted using quality factors that were calculated according to the price of each input

  17. 2001-2002 Long Range Plan Working Group Members | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the ImpactSCDOE Office ofThe LifeUserWork's The's's

  18. 2007 Long Range Plan Working Group Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the ImpactSCDOE Office ofThe LifeUserWork's

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Highlights of the Industry Working Group_Jessica White-Horton

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and Feedback onWorking

  20. Working Group Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaulShadesVirginia RegionsWisconsinWorking

  1. Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented in theWorkBusiness1: Model4:97

  2. Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented in theWorkBusiness1: Model4:97

  3. State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Weldon Spring Site |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWorkSunShotBelowTheThe documentLessonsReview

  4. Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them -A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them - A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40 1 Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them Martin Junginger, André Faaij, Peter

  5. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  6. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  7. Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal Investigators PostdoctoralSasha BioEnergy

  8. Solar America Initiative State Working Group: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Taylor

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the support from the Department of Energy, NARUC has educated thousands of stakeholders, including Public Utility Commissioners, commission staff, and State energy officials on solar energy technology, implementation, and policy. During the lifetime of this grant, NARUC staff engaged stakeholders in policy discussions, technical research, site visits, and educational meetings/webinars/materials that provided valuable education and coordination on solar energy technology and policy among the States. Primary research geared toward State decision-makers enabled stakeholders to be informed on current issues and created new solar energy leaders throughout the United States. Publications including a Frequently Asked Questions guide on feed-in tariffs and a legal analysis of state implementation of feed-in tariffs gave NARUC members the capacity to understand complex issues related to the economic impacts of policies supportive of solar energy, and potential paths for implementation of technology. Technical partnerships with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) instructed NARUC members on feed-in tariff policy for four States and solar PV resource assessment in seven States, as well as economic impacts of solar energy implementation in those States. Because many of the States in these technical partnerships had negligible amounts of solar energy installed, this research gave them new capacity to understand how policies and implementation could impact their constituency. This original research produced new data now available, not only to decision-makers, but also to the public at-large including educational institutions, NGOs, consumer groups, and other citizens who have an interest in solar energy adoption in the US. Under this grant, stakeholders engaged in several dialogs. These educational opportunities brought NARUC members and other stakeholders together several times each year, shared best practices with State decision-makers, fostered partnerships and relationships with solar energy experts, and aided in increasing the implementation of smart policies that will foster solar technology deployment. The support from the Department of Energy??s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has created solar energy leaders in the States; leaders who will serve to be a continuing valuable resource as States consider adoption of new low-carbon and domestic energy supply to meet the energy needs of the United States.

  9. New Physics at the LHC: A Les Houches Report. Physics at Tev Colliders 2007 - New Physics Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf H.; /Columbia U.; Delgado, A.; /Notre Dame U.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab; Grojean, C.; /CERN /Saclay, SPhT; Narain, Meenakshi; /Brown U.; Alwall, Johan; /SLAC; Azuelos, Georges; /Montreal U. /TRIUMF; Black, K.; /Harvard U.; Boos, E.; /SINP, Moscow; Bose, Tulika; /Brown U.; Bunichev, V.; /SINP, Moscow; Chivukula, R.S.; /Michigan State U.; Contino, R.; /CERN; Djouadi, A.; /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL; Dudko, Lev V.; /Durham U.; Ferland, J.; /Montreal U.; Gershtein, Yuri S.; /Florida State U.; Gigg, M.; /Durham U.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Herquet, M.; /Louvain U.; Hirn, J.; /Yale U. /Brown U. /Boston U. /Annecy, LAPTH /INFN, Turin /Valencia U., IFIC /Yale U. /Arizona U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba /Moscow State U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /CERN /Durham U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Sao Paulo, IFT /Fermilab /Zurich, ETH /Boston U. /DESY /CERN /Saclay, SPhT /Durham U. /Cambridge U. /Michigan State U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPTH /Fermilab /CERN /Arizona U. /Northwestern U. /Argonne /Kyoto U. /Valencia U., IFIC /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a collection of signatures for physics beyond the standard model that need to be explored at the LHC. The signatures are organized according to the experimental objects that appear in the final state, and in particular the number of high p{sub T} leptons. Our report, which includes brief experimental and theoretical reviews as well as original results, summarizes the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 11-29 June, 2007).

  10. 2014-05-05 Issuance: ASRAC Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group; Notice of Open Teleconference/Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of open teleconference/webinar regarding the commercial and industrial pumps working group, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on May 5, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  11. Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab: S1 Dark Matter Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerib, Daniel S.; Aprile, E.; /Case Western Reserve U. /Columbia U.; Baltz, E.A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dragowsky, M.R.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Gaitskell, R.J.; /Brown U.; Gondolo, P.; /Utah U.; Hime, A.; /Los Alamos; Martoff, C.J.; /Temple U.; Mei, D.-M.; /Los Alamos; Nelson, H.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Sadoulet, B.; /UC, Berkeley; Schnee, R.W.; /Case Western; Sonnenschein, A.H.; /Fermilab; Strigari, L.E.; /UC, Irvine

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we have described the broad and compelling range of astrophysical and cosmological evidence that defines the dark matter problem, and the WIMP hypothesis, which offers a solution rooted in applying fundamental physics to the dynamics of the early universe. The WIMP hypothesis is being vigorously pursued, with a steady march of sensitivity improvements coming both from astrophysical searches and laboratory efforts. The connections between these approaches are profound and will reveal new information from physics at the smallest scales to the origin and workings of the entire universe. Direct searches for WIMP dark matter require sensitive detectors that have immunity to electromagnetic backgrounds, and are located in deep underground laboratories to reduce the flux from fast cosmic-ray-muon-induced neutrons which is a common background to all detection methods. With US leadership in dark matter searches and detector R&D, a new national laboratory will lay the foundation of technical support and facilities for the next generation of scientists and experiments in this field, and act as magnet for international cooperation and continued US leadership. The requirements of depth, space and technical support for the laboratory are fairly generic, regardless of the approach. Current experiments and upgraded versions that run within the next few years will probe cross sections on the 10{sup -45}-10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} scale, where depths of 3000-4000 m.w.e. are sufficient to suppress the neutron background. On the longer term, greater depths on the 5000-6000 level are desirable as cross sections down to 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2} are probed, and of course, if WIMPs are discovered then building up a statistical sample free of neutron backgrounds will be essential to extracting model parameters and providing a robust solution to the dark matter problem. While most of the detector technologies are of comparable physical scale, i.e., the various liquid and solid-state detector media under consideration have comparable density, a notable exception is the low-pressure gaseous detectors. These detectors are very likely to play a critical role in establishing the galactic origin of a signal, and so it is important to design the lab with this capability in mind. For example, for a WIMP-nucleon cross section of 10{sup -43} cm{sup 2} (just below the present limit [20]), 100 of the current DRIFT-II modules of 1 m{sup 3} at 40 torr CS{sub 2} [63] would require a two-year exposure [61] to get the approximately 200 events [64] required to establish the signal's galactic origin. While detector improvements are under investigation, a simple scaling for the bottom of the MSSM region at 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2} would require a 100,000 m{sup 3} detector volume. If a factor of 10 reduction in required volume is achieved (e.g., higher pressure operation, more detailed track reconstruction, etc.) then an experimental hall of (50 m){sup 3} could accommodate the experiment. Because the WIMP-nucleon cross section is unknown, it is impossible to make a definitive statement as to the ultimate requirements for a directional gaseous dark matter detector, or any other device, for that matter. What is clear, however, is that whatever confidence one gives to specific theoretical considerations, the foregoing discussion clearly indicates the high scientific priority of, broad intellectual interest in, and expanding technical capabilities for increasing the ultimate reach of direct searches for WIMP dark matter. Upcoming experiments will advance into the low-mass Supersymmetric region and explore the most favored models in a complementary way to the LHC, and on a similar time scale. The combination of astrophysical searches and accelerator experiments stands to check the consistency of the solution to the dark matter problem and provide powerful constraints on the model parameters. Knowledge of the particle properties from laboratory measurements will help to isolate and reduce the astrophysical uncertainties, which will allow a more complete picture of

  12. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  13. 173TURTLE TAXONOMY WORKING GROUP Annotated List of Turtle Taxa Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetics, Ethics, and Taxonomy of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    173TURTLE TAXONOMY WORKING GROUP Annotated List of Turtle Taxa Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetics, Ethics, and Taxonomy of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises H. Bradley with Comments on Areas of Taxonomic Instability and Recent Change TURTLE TAXONOMY WORKING GROUP* * Authorship

  14. Chapter 9, Land and Bioenergy in Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), Bioenergy & Sustainability: bridging the gaps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods J, Lynd LR [Imperial College London, UK; Laser, M [Dartmouth College; Batistella M, De Castro D [EMBRAPA Monitoramento por Satelite, Campinas, Brasil; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Faaij, Andre [Energy Academy Europe, Netherlands

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we address the questions of whether and how enough biomass could be produced to make a material contribution to global energy supply on a scale and timeline that is consistent with prominent low carbon energy scenarios. We assess whether bioenergy provision necessarily conflicts with priority ecosystem services including food security for the world s poor and vulnerable populations. In order to evaluate the potential land demand for bioenergy, we developed a set of three illustrative scenarios using specified growth rates for each bioenergy sub-sector. In these illustrative scenarios, bioenergy (traditional and modern) increases from 62 EJ/yr in 2010 to 100, 150 and 200 EJ/yr in 2050. Traditional bioenergy grows slowly, increasing by between 0.75% and 1% per year, from 40 EJ/yr in 2010 to 50 or 60 EJ/ yr in 2050, continuing as the dominant form of bioenergy until at least 2020. Across the three scenarios, total land demand is estimated to increase by between 52 and 200 Mha which can be compared with a range of potential land availability estimates from the literature of between 240 million hectares to over 1 billion hectares. Biomass feedstocks arise from combinations of residues and wastes, energy cropping and increased efficiency in supply chains for energy, food and materials. In addition, biomass has the unique capability of providing solid, liquid and gaseous forms of modern energy carriers that can be transformed into analogues to existing fuels. Because photosynthesis fixes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, biomass supply chains can be configured to store at least some of the fixed carbon in forms or ways that it will not be reemitted to the atmosphere for considerable periods of time, so-called negative emissions pathways. These attributes provide opportunities for bioenergy policies to promote longterm and sustainable options for the supply of energy for the foreseeable future.

  15. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  16. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  17. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan 5th Annual Report for FY 2011 (pdf) Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan 4th Annual Report for FY 2010 (pdf) General Background Trails Use Survey Summary The...

  18. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II:7.1TrackingTrails » Trails

  19. CSTEC Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,Computers » Discussion CS267:

  20. Macro Industrial Working Group

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14Biomass feedstocksMU Eneg a~-s

  1. Winter 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWindWind Vision:Window3

  2. Buildings Sector Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy IDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan4: Oil andDecade Year-0 FullJuly

  3. Winter 2014 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New TodayWindows,4 C

  4. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O R NEUTRINO

  5. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O R NEUTRINOcloud

  6. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O R NEUTRINOcloudHow Do the

  7. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The

  8. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet2 C STEC W orking G

  9. Fall 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet2 C STEC W orking G3 C

  10. Summer 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success Stories Touching The LivesSummer 2 012 C STEC W

  11. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #13, October-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 13 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

  12. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #10, January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 10 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  13. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #9, October-December 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 9 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  14. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #12, July-September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 12 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  15. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WORKSHOP Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

  16. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  17. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #21, October - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center?s Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  18. Research questions How could the conversion of marginal agricultural lands to bioenergy switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    .R. and Schemske, D.W. 2010. Perennial biomass feedstocks enhance avian diversity. GCB Bioenergy 1080:1-12. Samson

  19. International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora Enso Photo: Stora Enso Topics I. Background for bioenergy;International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora

  20. *** Draft: do not cite or distribute -COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** Address Correspondence to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    *** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** Address;*** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** 10/23/01 Page 2 of 111 omasera@ate.oikos.unam.mx #12;*** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18

  1. Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slår fast, at biomasse er en ligeså værdifuld teknologi, der skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. RIS?NYT N O 42003 MODERNE BIOENERGI HAR STORE MULIGHEDER Moderne bioenergi har store muligheder Af Hans Larsen, Jens Kossmann og Leif Sønderberg Petersen

  2. SLU, Spring 2012 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SLU, Spring 2012 1/6 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp PNS0083 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp The course is given as part of the postgraduate research school "Bioenergy". The overall objective of the course is: 1. to enable the students

  3. Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,, Ewald Rametsteiner b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,?, Ewald Rametsteiner b Available online 11 November 2008 Keywords: Multi Criteria Analysis Bioenergy Sustainability a b s t r a c t Sustainable bioenergy systems are, by definition, embedded in social, economic, and environmental contexts

  4. Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014 Bioenergie, Chimica Verde e Agricoltura Destinato ai laureati di qualsiasi Facoltà che hanno dell'uso delle bioenergie o della chimica verde in agricoltura I Concorsi - promossi da Cremona

  5. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass ha?1 yr?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  6. Small-Scale Bioenergy Alternatives for Industry, Farm, and Institutions : A User`s Perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folk, Richard [ed.] [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Forest Products

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents research on biomass as an energy source. Topics include: bioenergy development and application; bioenergy combustion technology; and bioenergy from agricultural, forest, and urban resources. There are a total of 57 individual reports included. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  7. Minimizing invasive potential of Miscanthus 3 giganteus grown for bioenergy: identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    proportion of energy to be derived from biofuels (Robertson et al. 2008). Dedicated bioenergy crops are hence with grain-based biofuels. By cultivating bioenergy crops on marginal lands unfit for food crops, it may, USA Summary 1. Many species prioritized for bioenergy crop development possess traits associated

  8. An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    -specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economicAn integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

  9. Dear Participant, Welcome to the symposium `Bioenergy Research within SLU' on Tuesday, September 25, at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Participant, Welcome to the symposium `Bioenergy Research within SLU' on Tuesday, September 25 on the web page of the Research school Bioenergy (http://www.slu.se/sv/forskarskolor/bioenergy/) on Monday the arrival hall. · Journey time: about 30 minutes · Cost: about SEK 460. Ask the driver for a fixed price

  10. Bioenergy Feedstock Library and Least-Cost Formulation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 AgendaBioenergy

  11. Bioenergy Sustainability: How to Define & Measure It

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy Pumps New

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Announces Renewable Carbon Fiber

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy

  13. Urban Wood-Based Bio-Energy Systems in Seattle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan Gent, Seattle Steam Company

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Seattle Steam Company provides thermal energy service (steam) to the majority of buildings and facilities in downtown Seattle, including major hospitals (Swedish and Virginia Mason) and The Northwest (Level I) Regional Trauma Center. Seattle Steam has been heating downtown businesses for 117 years, with an average length of service to its customers of 40 years. In 2008 and 2009 Seattle Steam developed a biomass-fueled renewable energy (bio-energy) system to replace one of its gas-fired boilers that will reduce greenhouse gases, pollutants and the amount of waste sent to landfills. This work in this sub-project included several distinct tasks associated with the biomass project development as follows: a. Engineering and Architecture: Engineering focused on development of system control strategies, development of manuals for start up and commissioning. b. Training: The project developer will train its current operating staff to operate equipment and facilities. c. Flue Gas Clean-Up Equipment Concept Design: The concept development of acid gas emissions control system strategies associated with the supply wood to the project. d. Fuel Supply Management Plan: Development of plans and specifications for the supply of wood. It will include potential fuel sampling analysis and development of contracts for delivery and management of fuel suppliers and handlers. e. Integrated Fuel Management System Development: Seattle Steam requires a biomass Fuel Management System to track and manage the delivery, testing, processing and invoicing of delivered fuel. This application will be web-based and accessed from a password-protected URL, restricting data access and privileges by user-level.

  14. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotlands strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  15. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individuals data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  16. Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change Solutions;2 Table of Contents 1. Policy Setting 2. Biomass Volumes 2.1. Woody Biomass 2.1.1. Annual Residue Production 2.1.2. Pulp Chips 2.1.3. Existing Hog Fuel Piles 2.1.4. Forest Floor Biomass 2.2. Agricultural

  17. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Marc. M. Siah & Associates, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy future require an expeditious and broad implementation of clean and renewable energy applications of promising bioenergy projects in the state. To meet its clean energy goals, Hawaii cannot afford the perception that investment and green energy initiatives are hindered by a lack of support from State

  18. Review of Bioenergy Research A report for BBSRC Strategy Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    as part of a multi-faceted low-carbon solution for the UK's future energy supply. There are powerful, longReview of Bioenergy Research A report for BBSRC Strategy Board March 2006 [ BBSRC, 2006] 1 #12 Summary ________________________________________________________ 4 CHAPTER 1: DRIVERS FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

  19. Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks A N D R E S F . C L A R December 6, 2009. Accepted December 15, 2009. Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from

  20. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  1. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at levels sufficient to contribute a significant renewable energy resource to the State of HawaiHawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And Other Funding Sources Prepared for: Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute University of Hawai`i at Manoa 1680 East West Road, POST 109

  2. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy. Recovery of energy and valuable materials might reduce the cost of wastewater treatment, and somewhat

  3. 73TURTLE TAXONOMY WORKING GROUP Recommendations and Guidelines Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetics, Ethics, and Taxonomy of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    73TURTLE TAXONOMY WORKING GROUP Recommendations and Guidelines Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetics, Ethics, and Taxonomy of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises H. Bradley 4:73-84 2007 by Chelonian Research Foundation Turtle Taxonomy: Methodology, Recommendations

  4. IUFRO Landscape Ecology Working Group International Conference, 2127 September, 2010 Bragana, Symposium 7: A landscape approach to sustainable forest management: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on biodiversity conservation as a proxy for ecological dimensions of sustainable forest management the workIUFRO Landscape Ecology Working Group International Conference, 2127 September, 2010 Bragança, Portugal Symposium 7: A landscape approach to sustainable forest management: the challenge to adaptive

  5. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the U.S. Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L. [ed.] [comp.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McLane, V. [ed.] [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the Us and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  6. CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

    2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

  7. MEASUREMENT AND BASIC PHYSICS COMMITTEE OF THE U.S. CROSS-SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, ANNUAL REPORT 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH,D.L.; MCLANE,V.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. Its main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF, as well as periodic modifications and updates to the file, are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the US Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the US nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the US and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  8. 10 Questions for a Bioenergy Expert: Melinda Hamilton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meet Melinda Hamilton shes a bioenergy expert and the Director of Education Programs at Idaho National Laboratory. She recently took some time to share what shes doing to help ramp-up U.S. competitiveness in science and technology, why Jane Goodall led her to a career in science and what can happen in a lab if you dont start with a good plan.

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion BiochemicalDepartmentBIOENERGY

  10. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  11. Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

  12. High Plains Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail NaturalHiflux Ltd JumpPlains

  13. EDUCATION AT THE CONTROL LABORATORY Lately, teaching emphasis has been more on group and individual works and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 2 EDUCATION AT THE CONTROL LABORATORY Lately, teaching emphasis has been more on group processes. The laboratory carries a major role in this program. Control engineering students have seven

  14. Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, S.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

  15. Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

  16. 30 Robust og bredygtig bioenergi september 2012 Af Brian Vad Mathiesen, Henrik Lund,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

    30 Robust og bæredygtig bioenergi · september 2012 Af Brian Vad Mathiesen, Henrik Lund, Frede K erstatte de fossile brændsler med biobrændsler og bioenergi, og/eller i hvor høj grad vi skal satse på

  17. IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, flles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrdning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

  18. RESEARCH Open Access Short and long-term carbon balance of bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by offsetting fossil fuel electricity generation emissions, and potentially by avoided pyrogenic emissions dueRESEARCH Open Access Short and long-term carbon balance of bioenergy electricity production fueled bioenergy electricity production are offset by avoided fossil fuel electricity emissions. The carbon benefit

  19. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  20. Bioenergy Potential of the United States Constrained by Satellite Observations of Existing Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    liters ethanol, which implies an even larger increase in biomass demand (primary energy), from roughly 2 billion liters of ethanol (secondary bioenergy) in 2009, approximately half of the world's total ethanol ethanol production of 136 billion liters by 2022.2 Yet, these bioenergy targets are largely derived from

  1. Reducing effluent discharge and recovering bioenergy in an osmotic microbial fuel cell treating domestic wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to osmotic water extraction. Bioenergy recovered from wastewater can potentially support pumping system osmosis into an MFC for simultaneous wastewater treatment, bioenergy recovery, and water extraction and water extraction [9]. An MFC using an FO membrane as a separator between its anode and cathode is called

  2. Net carbon fluxes at stand and landscape scales from wood bioenergy harvests in the US Northeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    gas emissions implications of wood biomass (`bioenergy') harvests are highly uncer- tain yet of great') on long-term green- house gas emissions are uncertain (McKechnie et al., 2011), yet demand for wood (C) emitted from wood bioenergy may eventually be re-sequestered through regeneration and increased

  3. Extension Bulletin E-3164 New January 2012 Biodiversity Services and Bioenergy Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University b Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) Land and Water Program, Michigan State University Extension Growing bioenergy crops will transform agricultural://water.usgs.gov/nawqa). At the same time, the footprint of agriculture has expanded to cover nearly 40 percent of the earth's ice

  4. Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNLs capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

  5. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3CFostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Cora Dickson, Senior International Trade Specialist, Office of Energy and Environmental Industries, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce

  6. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biofuel policy and trends, and e) bioenergy impacts on U.S. grain prices are explained below. EconomicUSDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production

  7. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomass

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office New Directions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal-- Sections

  10. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of Energy DOE's Bioenergy

  11. Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreen BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search

  12. The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001 Power PlantAPRIL 1,TheThe Bioenergy

  13. Bioenergy expert Ragauskas named fourteenth Governor's Chair | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergy Technologies

  14. Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department ofTransportation Fuels BIOENERGY

  15. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergyUS0 ConferenceBiomass

  16. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergyUS0IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa

  17. Western BioEnergy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-Mohawk IrrWestWestNewWestern BioEnergy

  18. G K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm Inc Jump to:K.Bioenergy Pvt.

  19. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  20. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  1. Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL; Drell, Dr. Daniel [Office of Science, Department of Energy; Weatherwax, Sharlene [U.S. Department of Energy; Carruthers, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is only a first step. Other advances include the growing number of high-throughput techniques for protein production and characterization; a range of new instrumentation for observing proteins and other cell constituents; the rapid growth of commercially available reagents for protein production; a new generation of high-intensity light sources that provide precision imaging on the nanoscale and allow observation of molecular interactions in ultrafast time intervals; major advances in computational capability; and the continually increasing numbers of these instruments and technologies within the national laboratory infrastructure, at universities, and in private industry. All these developments expand our ability to elucidate mechanisms present in living cells, but much more remains to be done. The Centers are designed to accomplish GTL program objectives more rapidly, more effectively, and at reduced cost by concentrating appropriate technologies and scientific expertise, from genome sequence to an integrated systems understanding of the pathways and internal structures of microbes and plants most relevant to developing bioenergy compounds. The Centers will seek to understand the principles underlying the structural and functional design of selected microbial, plant, and molecular systems. This will be accomplished by building technological pathways linking the genome-determined components in an organism with bioenergy-relevant cellular systems that can be characterized sufficiently to generate realistic options for biofuel development. In addition, especially in addressing what are believed to be nearer-term approaches to renewable energy (e.g., producing cellulosic ethanol cost-effectively and energy-efficiently), the Center research team must understand in depth the current industrial-level roadblocks and bottlenecks (see section, GTL's Vision for Biological Energy Alternatives, below). For the Centers, and indeed the entire BER effort, to be successful, Center research must be integrated with individual investigator research, and coordination of activities,

  2. November 6, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on Aging Workforce/Strategic Initiatives - Meeting Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O|Work ForceNovember 4, 2014

  3. November 6, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on Aging Workforce/Strategic Initiatives - Package Bookmark

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O|Work ForceNovember 4,

  4. November 6, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on Aging Workforce/Strategic Initiatives- Illness and Injury Surveillance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O|Work ForceNovember 4, Office of

  5. December 4, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on 2008 HSS/Union Topical Wrap Up - Action Matrix

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8 Deaerators3 SEAB Meeting4 2008

  6. December 4, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on 2008 HSS/Union Topical Wrap Up - Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8 Deaerators3 SEAB Meeting4

  7. December 4, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on 2008 HSS/Union Topical Wrap Up - Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8 Deaerators3 SEABTopical

  8. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  9. Environmental and economic evaluation of bioenergy in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yimin Zhang; Shiva Habibi; Heather L. MacLean [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined life cycle environmental and economic implications of two near-term scenarios for converting cellulosic biomass to energy, generating electricity from cofiring biomass in existing coal power plants, and producing ethanol from biomass in stand-alone facilities in Ontario, Canada. The study inventories near-term biomass supply in the province, quantifies environmental metrics associated with the use of agricultural residues for producing electricity and ethanol, determines the incremental costs of switching from fossil fuels to biomass, and compares the cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions abatement achieved through the use of the bioenergy. Implementing a biomass cofiring rate of 10% in existing coal-fired power plants would reduce annual GHG emissions by 2.3 million metric tons (t) of CO{sub 2} equivalent (7% of the province's coal power plant emissions). The substitution of gasoline with ethanol/gasoline blends would reduce annual provincial light-duty vehicle fleet emissions between 1.3 and 2.5 million t of CO{sub 2} equivalent (3.5-7% of fleet emissions). If biomass sources other than agricultural residues were used, additional emissions reductions could be realized. At current crude oil prices ($70/barrel) and levels of technology development of the bioenergy alternatives, the biomass electricity cofiring scenario analyzed is more cost-effective for mitigating GHG emissions ($22/t of CO{sub 2} equivalent for a 10% cofiring rate) than the stand-alone ethanol production scenario ($92/t of CO{sub 2} equivalent). 67 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #26, January - March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding and improving sugar measurements in biomass hydrolysates; expansion of the NREL/DOE Biochemical Pilot Plant.

  11. National Bioenergy Center--Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: rapid analysis models for compositional analysis of intermediate process streams; engineered arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain.

  12. Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borden, Dustin Ross

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for use as a feedstock for ethanol production. Other factors such as water use efficiency, drought tolerance, yield potential, composition, and established production systems also make sorghum a logical choice as a feedstock for bioenergy production...

  13. Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borden, Dustin Ross

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by dedicated bioenergy sorghums (that are full photo-period sensitive), allowing for a more constant supply of feedstock to processing plants. Sweet sorghums would also allow the end user to obtain biomass when needed, however these types...

  14. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive biomass production in emerging bioenergy systems could increase nonpoint-source sediment and nutrient losses and impair surface and groundwater quality. Recycling biochar, a charcoal byproduct from pyrolysis of biomass, provides potential...

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils, which can be used to produce biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast...

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    biomass is heated with catalysts to create bio-oils, which are then used to produce biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast...

  17. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrumentthe carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  18. Integrated Photo-Bioelectrochemical System for Contaminants Removal and Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    cycling. INTRODUCTION Municipal wastewater treatment plants play a critical role in environmental represents an important, electricity-demanding step in most municipal wastewater treatment facilities fuel cells (MFCs)3 with algal bioreactors4 for wastewater treatment and bioenergy production. MFCs

  19. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , renovation and management effects on pasture productivity and quality under rotational grazing, and promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Practices Jackson's program focuses on structure and function of managed, semi cropping systems. Projects include comparing grass species' C-sequestration ability, ecosystem provisioning

  20. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased of Ethanol on Fuel Price Behavior and the Viability of Cellulosic Biofuels" presented by Jacob La

  1. Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Draft report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Working Group on Energy Facility Siting, chaired by the Policy Office with membership from the major program and staff offices of the Department, reviewed data regarding energy service needs, infrastructure requirements, and constraints to siting. The Working Group found that the expeditious siting of energy facilities has important economic, energy, and environmental implications for key Administration priorities.

  2. Indicators for assessing socioeconomic sustainability of bioenergy systems: A short list of practical measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Maggie R [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indicators are needed to assess both socioeconomic and environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators can help to identify and quantify the sustainability attributes of bioenergy options. We identify 16 socioeconomic indicators that fall into the categories of social well-being, energy security, trade, profitability, resource conservation, and social acceptability. The suite of indicators is predicated on the existence of basic institutional frameworks to provide governance, legal, regulatory and enforcement services. Indicators were selected to be practical, sensitive to stresses, unambiguous, anticipatory, predictive, calibrated with known variability, and sufficient when considered collectively. The utility of each indicator, methods for its measurement, and applications appropriate for the context of particular bioenergy systems are described along with future research needs. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major socioeconomic effects of the full supply chain for bioenergy, including feedstock production and logistics, conversion to biofuels, biofuel logistics and biofuel end uses. Ten of those 16 indicators are proposed to be the minimum list of practical measures of socioeconomic aspects of bioenergy sustainability. Coupled with locally-prioritized environmental indicators, we propose that these socioeconomic indicators can provide a basis to quantify and evaluate sustainability of bioenergy systems across many regions in which they will be deployed.

  3. Massachusetts Wind Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The meeting will feature a panel presentation and discussion on Shadow-Flicker, as well as updates related to the Community Wind Outreach Initiative. Panel speakers so far include: Elizabeth King...

  4. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Using Advanced Polymeric Membranes BESP 20 Michael Heben NREL Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity BESP 21 G. Kane Jennings...

  5. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of the meeting was ``A Path to Commercialization`` and discussion was devoted to addressing the nearest-term products and the time frame for implementation. The objectives of the meeting were to identify the barriers to commercialization, methods to overcome these barriers, and the actions required to achieve success. The meeting was planned to bring together government agencies and industry customers and, suppliers to discuss and conclude where the CFCC Program is today, where it is going, and how they plan to get there. It was also planned to join component developers with end users who can describe systems needs and projected schedules for introducing CFCC components in industrial applications.

  6. Mechanical Working Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents contains the minutes and viewgraphs from the October 27--28, 1992 meeting on the subject of power generation and delivery systems for military applications. Attendees represented the US Air Force and NASA. The thermal management panel reported on the capillary pump loop test facility, thermal control systems and compressors, and the oxygen heat pipe flight experiment. The aerospace power panel reported on the integrated power unit for the more electric airplane, the solar dynamic power system, the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor-gas-turbine program, the multi-megawatt CBC power system, and analytical modeling for heat pipe performance. The terrestrial power panel reported on a free piston stirling engine power generation system, fuel cell vehicles, and the advanced gas turbine project.

  7. Renewable Electricity Working Group Presentation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2.

  8. Working Group Industrial Presentation-2014

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) Monthly

  9. 2011-2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugust 2011 Thu, 08/18/2011MarchDecember1

  10. ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, and futureAn

  11. ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, and futureAn and MFRSR

  12. ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, and futureAn and

  13. BEDES Strategic Working Group Recommendations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAvi Shultz Avi7

  14. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  15. d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde 1 Har forbrnding og forgasning af biomasse en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 1 Har forbrænding og forgasning af biomasse en fremtid ? Charles Nielsen Elsam A/S #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 2 JaJa #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 3 Disposition

  16. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Patrick Lamers; Mohammad S. Roni; Jacob J. Jacobson; Brendi Heath

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  17. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume 2, Appendix A: Process and protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains documentation prepared by the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Working Group for conducting the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Assessment and training the assessment teams. It has the following five parts. (1) The Project Plan describes the genesis of the project, sets forth the goals, objectives and scope, provides definitions, the projected schedule, and elements of protocol. (2) The Assessment Plan provides a detailed methodology necessary to guide the many professionals who have been recruited to conduct the DOE-wide assessment. It provides guidance on which types and forms of plutonium are to be considered within the scope of the assessment, and lays out the assessment methodology to be used. (3) The memorandum from the Project to Operations Office Managers provides the protocol and direction for participation in the assessment by external stakeholders and members of the public; and the guidance for the physical inspection of plutonium materials in storage. (4) The memorandum from the Project to the assessment teams provides guidance for vulnerability screening criteria, vulnerability evaluation and prioritization process, and vulnerability quantification for prioritization. (5) The Team Training manual was used at the training session held in Colorado Springs on April 19--21, 1994 for all members of the Working Group Assessment Teams and for the leaders of the Site Assessment Teams. The goal was to provide the same training to all of the individuals who would be conducting the assessments, and thereby provide consistency in the conduct of the assessments and uniformity in reporting of the results. The training manual in Section A.5 includes supplemental material provided to the attendees after the meeting.

  18. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdates Techno-Economic Modeling ToolsJobthe

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartment ofSecurity03 -Summaries |

  20. Role of Bioenergy in the Kyoto Protocol, in the EU-ETS and in future Climate Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bioenergy use through: Internal emission reductions within the Greenhouse Gas capped sectors Offsetting/CDM CDM project pipeline: > 1000 projects of which: Registered projects: 334 Expected CERs (from RISOE Distribution of projects Bioenergy #12;The EU-ETS and biomass (1) In January 2005 the European