Sample records for bioenergy institute jbei

  1. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JD (2009) Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases.JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomassthe next-generation of biofuels— liquid fuels derived from

  2. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Capabilities JBEI News News...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: JBEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for Biofuels On September 18, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News & Events,...

  4. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, carbon-rich fossil fuels, primarily oil, coal, and natural gas, provide 85% of the energy consumed in the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become rapidly depleted. Fossil fuel use increases CO{sub 2} emissions and raises the risk of global warming. The high energy content of liquid hydrocarbon fuels makes them the preferred energy source for all modes of transportation. In the U.S. alone, transportation consumes >13.8 million barrels of oil per day and generates 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year. This release of greenhouse gases has spurred research into alternative, nonfossil energy sources. Among the options (nuclear, concentrated solar thermal, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, solar, and biomass), only biomass has the potential to provide a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource that can be converted into carbon-neutral transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped resource (estimated at more than a billion tons per year) of plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable, domestic source of liquid fuels. Well-established processes convert the starch content of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal, while plant cell walls (lignocellulose) represent a huge untapped source of energy. Plant-derived biomass contains cellulose, which is more difficult to convert to sugars; hemicellulose, which contains a diversity of carbohydrates that have to be efficiently degraded by microorganisms to fuels; and lignin, which is recalcitrant to degradation and prevents cost-effective fermentation. The development of cost-effective and energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuels is hampered by significant roadblocks, including the lack of specifically developed energy crops, the difficulty in separating biomass components, low activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and integrate JBEI's scientific program.

  5. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass.energy consumption in the processes needed to convert biomass into simple molecules that can be used for fuel

  6. Sandia Energy » JBEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitche This authorEnergyTeaches NuclearJBEI

  7. Sandia Energy - JBEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPowerHighlights -Igal BrenerJBEI Home

  8. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Babetta...

  9. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Los Alamos developing next-generation of biofuels from renewable resources Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus...

  10. Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists and engineers at Idaho National Laboratory are working with partners throughout the bioenergy industry in preprocessing and characterization to ensure optimum feedstock quality. This elite team understands that addressing feedstock variability is a critical component in the biofuel production process.

  11. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol areefficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal,address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws

  12. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentrations of ethanol and other fuel products. JBEI willwood of trees. Most ethanol for fuel use today is producedor proposed fuel molecules: ethanol, butanol, isopentanol,

  13. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The JBEI researchers, working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, have demonstrated that introducing a maize (corn)...

  14. Sandia Energy - JBEI Research Receives Strong Industry Interest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Receives Strong Industry Interest in DOE Technology Transfer Call Home Renewable Energy Energy Biofuels Facilities Partnership JBEI News News & Events Research &...

  15. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    . Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI

  16. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPowerHighlights -Igal BrenerJBEI

  17. Small-Scale Bioenergy Alternatives for Industry, Farm, and Institutions : A User`s Perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folk, Richard [ed.] [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Forest Products

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents research on biomass as an energy source. Topics include: bioenergy development and application; bioenergy combustion technology; and bioenergy from agricultural, forest, and urban resources. There are a total of 57 individual reports included. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs are providing the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use (see sidebar, Bridging the Gap from Fundamental Biology to Industrial Innovation for Bioenergy, p. 6). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations - the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast - with partners across the nation (see U.S. map, DOE Bioenergy Research Centers and Partners, on back cover). DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California; DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

  19. RESEARCH Open Access A comparative study of ethanol production using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    bioenergy research centers (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)) has given us a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Energy (DOE) Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC

  20. Sustainable Bioenergy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Bioenergy Sustainable Bioenergy Argonne's research in bioenergy includes topics associated with feedstock production and biomass conversion. Argonne scientists also...

  1. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies,

  2. Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy on Life Cycle Analyses of Bioenergy Systems Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Bioenergy Production Pathways

  3. Bioenergy Walkthrough

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies OfficeOVERVIEW

  4. Bioenergy Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science |MaterialsNaturalBioenergy

  5. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration...

  6. In Search of Spatial Opportunities for Sustainable Bioenergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Syntheses , ORNL Center for Bioenergy Sustainability Seminar Building 1505, Ocoee Room (189) CONTACT : Email: Jennifer Smith...

  7. Sandia Energy - "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities...

  8. Bioenergy 2015 Press Room

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy 2015 online press room provides contacts, information, and resources to members of the media who cover Bioenergy 2015 conference-related news.

  9. National Bioenergy Day 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy, the use of agricultural waste and forestry byproducts to generate heat and energy, will be celebrated during the second annual National Bioenergy Day on October 22, 2014. This is an...

  10. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology assessment was conducted as part of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan mandated by Act 253 collected in preparing this task and include: 1. The State should continue a bioenergy technology assessment-oil production X Y Charcoal production X X Y Bio-oil production for fuels X X Y Combustion X Y Renewable diesel

  11. Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering The DOE Biomass Program's feedstock research and development tools enable collaboration and sharing of feedstock development knowledge...

  12. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  13. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  14. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  15. New and emerging bioenergy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or fisheries. Examples of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol

  16. Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab's Associate Director for Bioscience and the CEO of DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), explains how special strains of microbes can convert the biomass of non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks and jet planes. Keasling's research team at JBEI has developed E.coli that can digest switchgrass and convert the plant sugars into gasoline, diesel or jet fuel, not unlike the process by which beer is brewed.

  17. Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab's Associate Director for Bioscience and the CEO of DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), explains how special strains of microbes can convert the biomass of non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks and jet planes. Keasling's research team at JBEI has developed E.coli that can digest switchgrass and convert the plant sugars into gasoline, diesel or jet fuel, not unlike the process by which beer is brewed.

  18. Bioenergy & Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office and the Clean Cities program regularly conduct a joint Web conference for state energy office representatives and Clean Cities coordinators. The Web conferences...

  19. Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

  20. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering Steven Chiang, Director Agribusiness Incubator a productive bioenergy industry, successful partnering amongst industry "players" is essential. This section of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan specifically evaluates facilitating the bioenergy industry through

  1. Bioenergy Key Publications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 AgendaBioenergyKEY

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy Pumps

  3. Factors for Bioenergy Market Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

    1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

  4. Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

  5. Communicating about bioenergy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Perla, Dr. Donna [US Environmental Protection Agency] [US Environmental Protection Agency; Lucier, Dr. Al [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement] [National Council on Air and Stream Improvement

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defining and measuring sustainability of bioenergy systems are difficult because the systems are complex, the science is in early stages of development, and there is a need to generalize what are inherently context-specific enterprises. These challenges, and the fact that decisions are being made now, create a need for improved communications among scientists as well as between scientists and decision makers. In order for scientists to provide information that is useful to decision makers, they need to come to an agreement on how to measure and report potential risks and benefits of diverse energy alternatives, including problems and opportunities in various bioenergy production pathways. Scientists also need to develop approaches that contribute information relevant to policy and decision making. The need for clear communication is especially important at this time when there is a plethora of scientific papers and reports, and it is difficult for the public or decision makers to assess the merits of each analysis. We propose three communication guidelines for scientists whose work can contribute to decision making: (1) relationships between the question and the analytical approach should be clearly defined and make common sense; (2) the information should be presented in a manner that nonscientists can understand; and (3) the implications of methods, assumptions and limitations should be clear. The scientists job is to analyze information in order to build a better understanding of environmental, cultural and socioeconomic aspects of the sustainability of energy alternatives. The scientific process requires transparency, debate, review, and collaboration across disciplines and time. This paper serves as an introduction to the papers in the special issue on Sustainability of Bioenergy Systems: Cradle to Grave because scientific communication is essential to developing more sustainable energy systems. Together these four papers provide a framework under which the effects of bioenergy can be assessed and compared to other energy alternatives in order to foster sustainability.

  6. Bioenergy Success Stories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion BiochemicalDepartment ofBioenergy News61

  7. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production Cornell University June, 2013 John Ferrell Feedstock Technology Lead Bioenergy Technologies Office US Department of Energy 2...

  8. The Endurance Bioenergy Reactor | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Endurance Bioenergy Reactor Share Description Argonne biophysicist Dr. Philip Laible and Air Force Major Matt Michaud talks about he endurance bioenergy reactor-a device that...

  9. Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies #12;Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies By André of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels

  10. NREL: Innovation Impact - Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |Infrastructure The foundationBioenergy Menu Home

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: JBEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different grape varietals can favorably balance the flavor characteristics of the wine they produce. In the future, makers of advanced biofuels might use a similar...

  12. Sandia Energy - JBEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePower Company'sInAsInternationalStructural

  13. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April through June 2008 update on activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  14. BIOENERGI ER BLEVET MODERNE 4DECEMBER 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , biogas og bioethanol. Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast, flydende og

  15. Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), organisk affald, biogas og bioethanol Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast

  16. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at levels sufficient to contribute a significant renewable energy resource to the State of HawaiHawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And Other Funding Sources Prepared for: Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute University of Hawai`i at Manoa 1680 East West Road, POST 109

  17. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  18. Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC Location: Hugoton, KS Eligibility: 1705 Snapshot In...

  19. Bioenergy 2015 Call for Posters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites students, researchers, public and private organizations, and members of the general public to submit abstracts that BETO will review and consider for inclusion in the poster session at BETO’s eighth annual conference, Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. The conference will be held June 23–24, 2015, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

  20. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Potential Environmental Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Potential Environmental Impacts of Bioenergy Development in Hawaii of the potential environmental impacts associated with bioenergy development in Hawaii was conducted as part included the characterization of the general environmental impacts and issues associated with bioenergy

  1. Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form Fax completed form to the Agribusiness.hnei.hawaii.edu/bmpp/stakeholders.asp Partners are organizations that perform, intend to perform, or should perform bioenergy processes and/or requirements. Please tell us about your organization and the role it plays in bioenergy production in Hawaii

  2. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, Thomas; Pienkos, Phil; Sluiter, Justin; Magrini, Kim; McMillan, Jim

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National Bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  3. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  4. implementing bioenergy applied research & development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 A Northern Centre for Renewable Energy implementing bioenergy applied research & development to develop local solutions to these challenges by integrating campus operations, education, and research will help the University meet its current and future energy needs, reduce or eliminate our greenhouse gas

  5. Bioenergy 2015: Attendee Networking Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the Bioenergy 2015 Conference, this tool offers a concise listing of participants' background, areas of expertise, areas of need, and business contact information. Users can sort the information by clicking on the arrows in the header rows. Users can also filter by keywords by typing them into the search field in order to find individuals with skill sets complementary to their own.

  6. Ris Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only

  7. STAFFREPORT Prepared for the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAFFREPORT Prepared for the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group: Air Resources Board 2010 2009 PROGRESS TO PLAN BIOENERGY ACTION PLAN FOR CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION #12, and et. al. 2010. 2009 Progress to Plan Bioenergy Action Plan for California. California Energy

  8. Bird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    providing bird habitat. Bioenergy grasslands promote agricultural multifunctionality and conservationBird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands Peter J. Blank1 *, David W, Wisconsin, United States of America Abstract Demand for bioenergy is increasing, but the ecological

  9. NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE The CAP & Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cultural · Research Energy for SD Products & Services SD & Buildings · Education · Outreach #12;BIOENERGY NETWORK residues, waste streams and energy crops. Heat, electricity and biofuels for transport. · Suggests

  10. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office engages with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on many projects, including guidance on the proper removal of corn stover...

  11. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Biomass 2014: Breakout Speaker Biographies Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview U.S. and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels...

  12. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research. In 2014, the Bioenergy KDF released new tools, including the Legislative Library, Biomass Scenario Model Tool, and DOE-Funded Content Page. This award is significant...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: biomass conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass conversion Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: producing advanced biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced biofuels Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: lignocellulosic biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lignocellulosic biofuels Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  16. BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Media News and Awards Supporting Organizations Redefining The Frontiers of Bioenergy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers | BioEnergy...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan...

  18. Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Bioenergy Technologies Office...

  19. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

  20. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic...

  1. analysing bioenergy demand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sorghum program that boasts about 40 6 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  2. assessing bioenergy options: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are reviewed Vermont, University of 9 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  3. alaska bioenergy program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and function of managed, semi 23 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  4. agency bioenergy agreement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carolina; Sponsorad Epa 1994-01-01 13 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  5. Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Bioenergy Day 2014 Project Overview Positive Impact The KDF supports the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry by providing unique value for researchers,...

  6. Indicators for assessing socioeconomic sustainability of bioenergy systems: A short list of practical measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Maggie R [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indicators are needed to assess both socioeconomic and environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators can help to identify and quantify the sustainability attributes of bioenergy options. We identify 16 socioeconomic indicators that fall into the categories of social well-being, energy security, trade, profitability, resource conservation, and social acceptability. The suite of indicators is predicated on the existence of basic institutional frameworks to provide governance, legal, regulatory and enforcement services. Indicators were selected to be practical, sensitive to stresses, unambiguous, anticipatory, predictive, calibrated with known variability, and sufficient when considered collectively. The utility of each indicator, methods for its measurement, and applications appropriate for the context of particular bioenergy systems are described along with future research needs. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major socioeconomic effects of the full supply chain for bioenergy, including feedstock production and logistics, conversion to biofuels, biofuel logistics and biofuel end uses. Ten of those 16 indicators are proposed to be the minimum list of practical measures of socioeconomic aspects of bioenergy sustainability. Coupled with locally-prioritized environmental indicators, we propose that these socioeconomic indicators can provide a basis to quantify and evaluate sustainability of bioenergy systems across many regions in which they will be deployed.

  7. Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    E2.3 Bioenergy technology ­ balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy° 50° #12;Same climate data (A1F1 scenario for 2050 - 2080) but the genotype is one which is less

  8. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015

  9. Osage Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource History ViewOrmatOsage Bioenergy

  10. Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy.

  11. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like This ReturnBioactiveBSD

  12. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science |MaterialsNatural

  13. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar Slides about the new Bioenergy KDF...

  14. Sorghum bioenergy genotypes, genes and pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plews, Ian Kenneth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and this plant is a potentially important bioenergy crop for Texas. The diversity of the twelve high biomass sorghum genotypes was analyzed using 50 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers with genome coverage. The accumulation of biomass during sorghum development...

  15. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart Bioeconomy Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy ProductionMay Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne...

  16. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a...

  17. Sorghum bioenergy genotypes, genes and pathways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plews, Ian Kenneth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and this plant is a potentially important bioenergy crop for Texas. The diversity of the twelve high biomass sorghum genotypes was analyzed using 50 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers with genome coverage. The accumulation of biomass during sorghum development...

  18. Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using Biological Interactions Lee Newman With D consequences: ­ Price of corn has doubled ­ Farmers are planting more corn for ethanol · Increase alternative

  19. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectives—reducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  20. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration WorkshopBioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.

  1. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivares, Jose A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Min S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

  2. Draft Bioenergy Master Plan for the State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Bioenergy Master Plan for the State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy DRAFT Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Volume I Prepared for State of Hawaii Department of Business

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update This is the May 2013 Update to the...

  5. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 23–24, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conference—Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape...

  6. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 23–24, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conference—Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape.

  7. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industry Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

  8. Special issue: bioenergy Don-Hee Park Sang Yup Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . As the field of bioenergy is rapidly moving forward with rather traditional bioethanol and biodiesel to more

  9. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  10. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  11. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  12. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  13. State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States on Issues, Opportunities, and Options for Advancing Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrnett, D. S.; Mulholland, D.; Zinsmeister, E.; Doris, E.; Milbrandt, A.; Robichaud. R.; Stanley, R.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One renewable energy option that states frequently consider to meet their clean energy goals is the use of biomass resources to develop bioenergy. Bioenergy includes bioheat, biopower, biofuels, and bioproducts. This document provides an overview of biomass feedstocks, basic information about biomass conversion technologies, and a discussion of benefits and challenges of bioenergy options. The Primer includes a step-wise framework, resources, and tools for determining the availability of feedstocks, assessing potential markets for biomass, and identifying opportunities for action at the state level. Each chapter contains a list of selected resources and tools that states can use to explore topics in further detail.

  14. Bioenergy Review Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme Science report: SC070001/SR2 #12;ii Science Report ­ Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work The Environment Agency is the leading public, biomass, bioenergy, waste, wood-fuel, land, land-take, mapping, 2010, GIS Research Contractor: Forest

  15. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  16. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  17. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  18. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  19. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  20. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  1. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  2. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  3. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  4. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  5. Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology & Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ninth annual Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy will be held from December 7–9, 2014, in San Diego, California, at the Westin Gaslamp Quarter. Bringing together representatives from various countries all around the Pacific Rim, this event will focus on the growth of the industrial biotechnology and bioenergy sectors in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Glenn Doyle, BETO's Deployment & Demonstration Technology Manager, will be moderating and speaking at a session on entitled "Utilizing Strategic Partnerships to Grow Your Business" on December 9.

  6. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 Agenda Bioenergy

  7. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  8. Webinar: Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office will present a live informational webcast on the Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001179) on November 3, 2014, 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. This FOA seeks interdisciplinary projects that apply landscape design approaches to integrate cellulosic feedstock production into existing agricultural and forestry systems while maintaining or enhancing environmental and socio-economic sustainability including ecosystem services and food, feed, and fiber production. For the purposes of this FOA, cellulosic feedstock production refers to dedicated annual and perennial energy crops, use of agricultural and forestry residues, or a combination of these options.

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 2014 Update -- Sections Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and...

  10. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems, Argonne National Laboratory wangbiomass2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program...

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  13. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County,...

  14. ORNL researchers contribute to major UN bioenergy and sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications 865.574.4399 ORNL researchers contribute to major bioenergy and sustainability report ORNL researchers Keith Kline and Virginia Dale contributed to a major...

  15. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of...

  18. Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of...

  20. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater...

  1. BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed performance. Keywords Biohydrogen . Biomethane . Bioelectricity. Microbial electrolysis cell . Bioenergy

  2. animal manure-based bioenergy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sorghum program that boasts about 40 3 Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Bioenergy Technology Renewable Energy Websites Summary: technology assessment was conducted as part of the...

  3. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 638645 Forest bioenergy system to reduce the hazard of wildfires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract'' for utilization in small power plants (o3 MW), and a wood-heating pellet manufacturing facility. The outlet for the wood fuel pellets is the growing market for house and business heating, and co for bioenergy. The start-up project is in the Nutrioso area of the Alpine Ranger District, Apache

  4. 2012 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the California Energy Commission with input from the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group. This report to Governor Edmund G. Brown Karen Ross Secretary, Department of Food and Agriculture Matthew Rodriquez, California Energy Commission Ken Pimlott Director, Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Caroll

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Joint BioEnergy Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different grape varietals can favorably balance the flavor characteristics of the wine they produce. In the future, makers of advanced biofuels might use a similar...

  6. Promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Production and Trade Issue Paper No. 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Production and Trade Issue Paper No. 17 June 2009 l ICTSD Programme School of Agriculture, Policy and Development University of Reading EU Support for Biofuels and Bioenergy on Agricultural Trade and Sustainable Development By Professor Alan Swinbank School of Agriculture, Policy

  7. 20 PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014 Bioenergy the name alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    speaking. But everything has a carbon footprint and some biofuels might not be so great if their carbon that the carbon footprint of bioenergy may be worse than some fossil fuels. But the truth is we didn't know that many of the assessments Called to account ­ bioenergy's carbon footprint #12;PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014

  8. Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cultivation of biomass for biofuels (trans- port fuels) and bioenergy (heat and power) has pro- voked much of the northern hemisphere, how- ever, a small, but growing proportion of biomass crops consist of tree species generation bioenergy crop in Europe, with the area cultivated expected to increase greatly by 2050 (Rowe et

  9. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 21–22, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  10. Bioenergy 2015 Speaker Biographies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 Agenda

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal--

  12. Emergence BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,ElectrosolarElmhurst MutualEmergence BioEnergy

  13. Orchid Bioenergy Group Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThe communityOrchid Bioenergy Group Ltd

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchieving Them. ABeyondBioenergy Technologies

  15. Solarvest BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore JumpSolarezo JumpSolarvest BioEnergy Jump to:

  16. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergy

  17. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of Energy BigNews » BioEnergy

  18. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies Office HOMEMay

  19. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergy Technologies Office

  20. Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2:Bioenergy SHARE Fundamental

  1. A Virtual Visit to Bioenergy Research at the National Laboratories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For National Bioenergy Day on October 22, bioenergy facilities across the country are holding open houses to increase public awareness of bioenergy and its role in the clean energy landscape. By the same token, the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is offering this virtual open house of its national laboratories—the facilities at the core of BETO’s research and development. If you want to know how Energy Department bioenergy funding is making an impact, be sure to take a look at our national labs—47% of BETO funding this past year went to the national laboratories. Of that funding, about half went to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory also received a large share.

  2. 2011 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the California Energy Commission for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the California Energy Commission for the Bioenergy Commission Renewables Committee as part of the Preparation of the 2011 Bioenergy Action Plan ­ docket # 10 policy of the Energy Commission until the report is adopted. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The 2011 Bioenergy

  3. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #22, January - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January to March, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  4. Special issue: current status of bioenergy research Don-Hee Park Sang Yup Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes are presented. As the field of bioenergy is rapidly growing from traditional forms of bioethanol

  5. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #25, October - December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  6. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #20, July-September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  7. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  8. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #15, April - June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Platform Integration Project.

  9. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #23, April-June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April to June, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  10. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  11. Microarray Transcriptomics Data from the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional (18 partner), multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. BESC's approach to improve accessibility to the sugars within biomass involves 1) designing plant cell walls for rapid deconstruction and 2) developing multitalented microbes for converting plant biomass into biofuels in a single step (consolidated bioprocessing). Addressing the roadblock of biomass recalcitrance will require a multiscale understanding of plant cell walls from biosynthesis to deconstruction pathways. This integrated understanding would generate models, theories and finally processes that will be used to understand and overcome biomass recalcitrance.

  12. Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.

    2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

  13. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines future prospects of bioenergy production in the United States. The analysis examines three issues on liquid fuel and cellulosic ethanol. First, the amount that costs need to decrease in order to make cellulosic ethanol...

  14. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ABENGOA BIOENERGY CORPORATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ABENGOA BIOENERGY CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER A DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT INITIALLY IDENTIFIED AS GOV WORKS NO. 04-03- CA-79759...

  15. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  16. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  17. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  18. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  19. Seizing our Bioenergy Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the Bioenergy Technologies Office, we’re working with public and private partners to develop an industry of advanced biofuels and bioproducts from non-food biomass sources that is commercially...

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in a fluidized bed to create bio-oils, which can then be used to create hydrocarbon biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...

  1. OSU Potential Bioenergy Mentors Version 2, 11/13/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    electrochemical technologies for bioenergy generation and waste/wastewater treatment. More of methane from wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digesters through the co interests are a good match for their projects. Biological Conversion

  2. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape June 23-24, 2015 Bioenergy 2015 Logo Walter E. Washington Convention Center 801 Mt. Vernon Place, NW Washington, DC 20001 On...

  3. BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 23 BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234 Volume 5 Number 2 Bioenerg. Res. (2012) 5:341-362 DOI 10, the EROI was adjusted using quality factors that were calculated according to the price of each input

  4. Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them -A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them - A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40 1 Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them Martin Junginger, André Faaij, Peter

  5. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  6. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  7. Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal Investigators PostdoctoralSasha BioEnergy

  8. Chapter 9, Land and Bioenergy in Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), Bioenergy & Sustainability: bridging the gaps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods J, Lynd LR [Imperial College London, UK; Laser, M [Dartmouth College; Batistella M, De Castro D [EMBRAPA Monitoramento por Satelite, Campinas, Brasil; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Faaij, Andre [Energy Academy Europe, Netherlands

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we address the questions of whether and how enough biomass could be produced to make a material contribution to global energy supply on a scale and timeline that is consistent with prominent low carbon energy scenarios. We assess whether bioenergy provision necessarily conflicts with priority ecosystem services including food security for the world s poor and vulnerable populations. In order to evaluate the potential land demand for bioenergy, we developed a set of three illustrative scenarios using specified growth rates for each bioenergy sub-sector. In these illustrative scenarios, bioenergy (traditional and modern) increases from 62 EJ/yr in 2010 to 100, 150 and 200 EJ/yr in 2050. Traditional bioenergy grows slowly, increasing by between 0.75% and 1% per year, from 40 EJ/yr in 2010 to 50 or 60 EJ/ yr in 2050, continuing as the dominant form of bioenergy until at least 2020. Across the three scenarios, total land demand is estimated to increase by between 52 and 200 Mha which can be compared with a range of potential land availability estimates from the literature of between 240 million hectares to over 1 billion hectares. Biomass feedstocks arise from combinations of residues and wastes, energy cropping and increased efficiency in supply chains for energy, food and materials. In addition, biomass has the unique capability of providing solid, liquid and gaseous forms of modern energy carriers that can be transformed into analogues to existing fuels. Because photosynthesis fixes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, biomass supply chains can be configured to store at least some of the fixed carbon in forms or ways that it will not be reemitted to the atmosphere for considerable periods of time, so-called negative emissions pathways. These attributes provide opportunities for bioenergy policies to promote longterm and sustainable options for the supply of energy for the foreseeable future.

  9. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Stakeholder Comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Business, Economic Development and Tourism By University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School ......................................................................................2 Hawaii Department of Transportation, Harbors Division..........................................................................................................................7 The Gas Co

  10. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  11. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #13, October-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 13 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

  12. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #10, January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 10 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  13. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #9, October-December 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 9 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  14. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #12, July-September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 12 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  15. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WORKSHOP Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

  16. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  17. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #21, October - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center?s Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  18. Research questions How could the conversion of marginal agricultural lands to bioenergy switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    .R. and Schemske, D.W. 2010. Perennial biomass feedstocks enhance avian diversity. GCB Bioenergy 1080:1-12. Samson

  19. International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora Enso Photo: Stora Enso Topics I. Background for bioenergy;International Conference on Wood-based Bioenergy LIGNA+Hannover, Germany, 17-18 May 2007 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora

  20. *** Draft: do not cite or distribute -COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** Address Correspondence to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    *** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** Address;*** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18, 2001 *** 10/23/01 Page 2 of 111 omasera@ate.oikos.unam.mx #12;*** Draft: do not cite or distribute - COP7 Bioenergy Document: October 18

  1. Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slår fast, at biomasse er en ligeså værdifuld teknologi, der skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. RIS�NYT N O 42003 MODERNE BIOENERGI HAR STORE MULIGHEDER Moderne bioenergi har store muligheder Af Hans Larsen, Jens Kossmann og Leif Sønderberg Petersen

  2. SLU, Spring 2012 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SLU, Spring 2012 1/6 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp PNS0083 Bioenergy and social sciences: economics and sociology, 5hp The course is given as part of the postgraduate research school "Bioenergy". The overall objective of the course is: 1. to enable the students

  3. Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,, Ewald Rametsteiner b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,Ã?, Ewald Rametsteiner b Available online 11 November 2008 Keywords: Multi Criteria Analysis Bioenergy Sustainability a b s t r a c t Sustainable bioenergy systems are, by definition, embedded in social, economic, and environmental contexts

  4. Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014 Bioenergie, Chimica Verde e Agricoltura Destinato ai laureati di qualsiasi Facoltà che hanno dell'uso delle bioenergie o della chimica verde in agricoltura I Concorsi - promossi da Cremona

  5. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass haÃ?1 yrÃ?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  6. Minimizing invasive potential of Miscanthus 3 giganteus grown for bioenergy: identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    proportion of energy to be derived from biofuels (Robertson et al. 2008). Dedicated bioenergy crops are hence with grain-based biofuels. By cultivating bioenergy crops on marginal lands unfit for food crops, it may, USA Summary 1. Many species prioritized for bioenergy crop development possess traits associated

  7. An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    -specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economicAn integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

  8. Dear Participant, Welcome to the symposium `Bioenergy Research within SLU' on Tuesday, September 25, at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Participant, Welcome to the symposium `Bioenergy Research within SLU' on Tuesday, September 25 on the web page of the Research school Bioenergy (http://www.slu.se/sv/forskarskolor/bioenergy/) on Monday the arrival hall. · Journey time: about 30 minutes · Cost: about SEK 460. Ask the driver for a fixed price

  9. Bioenergy Feedstock Library and Least-Cost Formulation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015 AgendaBioenergy

  10. Bioenergy Sustainability: How to Define & Measure It

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy Pumps New

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Announces Renewable Carbon Fiber

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy

  12. Review of Sorghum Production Practices: Applications for Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorghum has great potential as an annual energy crop. While primarily grown for its grain, sorghum can also be grown for animal feed and sugar. Sorghum is morphologically diverse, with grain sorghum being of relatively short stature and grown for grain, while forage and sweet sorghums are tall and grown primarily for their biomass. Under water-limited conditions sorghum is reliably more productive than corn. While a relatively minor crop in the United States (about 2% of planted cropland), sorghum is important in Africa and parts of Asia. While sorghum is a relatively efficient user of water, it biomass potential is limited by available moisture. The following exhaustive literature review of sorghum production practices was developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to document the current state of knowledge regarding sorghum production and, based on this, suggest areas of research needed to develop sorghum as a commercial bioenergy feedstock. This work began as part of the China Biofuels Project sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program to communicate technical information regarding bioenergy feedstocks to government and industry partners in China, but will be utilized in a variety of programs in which evaluation of sorghum for bioenergy is needed. This report can also be used as a basis for data (yield, water use, etc.) for US and international bioenergy feedstock supply modeling efforts.

  13. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  14. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsÆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  15. Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change Solutions;2 Table of Contents 1. Policy Setting 2. Biomass Volumes 2.1. Woody Biomass 2.1.1. Annual Residue Production 2.1.2. Pulp Chips 2.1.3. Existing Hog Fuel Piles 2.1.4. Forest Floor Biomass 2.2. Agricultural

  16. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Marc. M. Siah & Associates, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy future require an expeditious and broad implementation of clean and renewable energy applications of promising bioenergy projects in the state. To meet its clean energy goals, Hawaii cannot afford the perception that investment and green energy initiatives are hindered by a lack of support from State

  17. Review of Bioenergy Research A report for BBSRC Strategy Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    as part of a multi-faceted low-carbon solution for the UK's future energy supply. There are powerful, longReview of Bioenergy Research A report for BBSRC Strategy Board March 2006 [© BBSRC, 2006] 1 #12 Summary ________________________________________________________ 4 CHAPTER 1: DRIVERS FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

  18. Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks A N D R E S F . C L A R December 6, 2009. Accepted December 15, 2009. Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from

  19. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  20. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy. Recovery of energy and valuable materials might reduce the cost of wastewater treatment, and somewhat

  1. 10 Questions for a Bioenergy Expert: Melinda Hamilton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meet Melinda Hamilton – she’s a bioenergy expert and the Director of Education Programs at Idaho National Laboratory. She recently took some time to share what she’s doing to help ramp-up U.S. competitiveness in science and technology, why Jane Goodall led her to a career in science and what can happen in a lab if you don’t start with a good plan.

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion BiochemicalDepartmentBIOENERGY

  3. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  4. Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

  5. Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, S.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

  6. Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

  7. 30 Robust og bredygtig bioenergi september 2012 Af Brian Vad Mathiesen, Henrik Lund,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

    30 Robust og bæredygtig bioenergi · september 2012 Af Brian Vad Mathiesen, Henrik Lund, Frede K erstatte de fossile brændsler med biobrændsler og bioenergi, og/eller i hvor høj grad vi skal satse på

  8. IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

  9. RESEARCH Open Access Short and long-term carbon balance of bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by offsetting fossil fuel electricity generation emissions, and potentially by avoided pyrogenic emissions dueRESEARCH Open Access Short and long-term carbon balance of bioenergy electricity production fueled bioenergy electricity production are offset by avoided fossil fuel electricity emissions. The carbon benefit

  10. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  11. Bioenergy Potential of the United States Constrained by Satellite Observations of Existing Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    liters ethanol, which implies an even larger increase in biomass demand (primary energy), from roughly 2 billion liters of ethanol (secondary bioenergy) in 2009, approximately half of the world's total ethanol ethanol production of 136 billion liters by 2022.2 Yet, these bioenergy targets are largely derived from

  12. Reducing effluent discharge and recovering bioenergy in an osmotic microbial fuel cell treating domestic wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to osmotic water extraction. Bioenergy recovered from wastewater can potentially support pumping system osmosis into an MFC for simultaneous wastewater treatment, bioenergy recovery, and water extraction and water extraction [9]. An MFC using an FO membrane as a separator between its anode and cathode is called

  13. Net carbon fluxes at stand and landscape scales from wood bioenergy harvests in the US Northeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    gas emissions implications of wood biomass (`bioenergy') harvests are highly uncer- tain yet of great') on long-term green- house gas emissions are uncertain (McKechnie et al., 2011), yet demand for wood (C) emitted from wood bioenergy may eventually be re-sequestered through regeneration and increased

  14. Extension Bulletin E-3164 New January 2012 Biodiversity Services and Bioenergy Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University b Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) Land and Water Program, Michigan State University Extension Growing bioenergy crops will transform agricultural://water.usgs.gov/nawqa). At the same time, the footprint of agriculture has expanded to cover nearly 40 percent of the earth's ice

  15. Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNL’s capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

  16. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3C—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Cora Dickson, Senior International Trade Specialist, Office of Energy and Environmental Industries, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce

  17. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biofuel policy and trends, and e) bioenergy impacts on U.S. grain prices are explained below. EconomicUSDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production

  18. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomass

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office New Directions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal-- Sections

  1. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of Energy DOE's Bioenergy

  2. Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreen BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search

  3. The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001 Power PlantAPRIL 1,TheThe Bioenergy

  4. Bioenergy expert Ragauskas named fourteenth Governor's Chair | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergy Technologies

  5. Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department ofTransportation Fuels BIOENERGY

  6. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergyUS0 ConferenceBiomass

  7. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergyUS0IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa

  8. Western BioEnergy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-Mohawk IrrWestWestNewWestern BioEnergy

  9. G K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm Inc Jump to:K.Bioenergy Pvt.

  10. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Renewable Energy Institute International

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Energy Institute International, in collaboration with Red Lion Bio-Energy and Pacific Renewable Fuels, is demonstrating a pilot, pre-commercial-scale integrated biorefinery for the production of high-quality, synthetic diesel fuels from agriculture and forest residues using advanced thermochemical and catalytic conversion technologies.

  11. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  12. Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL; Drell, Dr. Daniel [Office of Science, Department of Energy; Weatherwax, Sharlene [U.S. Department of Energy; Carruthers, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is only a first step. Other advances include the growing number of high-throughput techniques for protein production and characterization; a range of new instrumentation for observing proteins and other cell constituents; the rapid growth of commercially available reagents for protein production; a new generation of high-intensity light sources that provide precision imaging on the nanoscale and allow observation of molecular interactions in ultrafast time intervals; major advances in computational capability; and the continually increasing numbers of these instruments and technologies within the national laboratory infrastructure, at universities, and in private industry. All these developments expand our ability to elucidate mechanisms present in living cells, but much more remains to be done. The Centers are designed to accomplish GTL program objectives more rapidly, more effectively, and at reduced cost by concentrating appropriate technologies and scientific expertise, from genome sequence to an integrated systems understanding of the pathways and internal structures of microbes and plants most relevant to developing bioenergy compounds. The Centers will seek to understand the principles underlying the structural and functional design of selected microbial, plant, and molecular systems. This will be accomplished by building technological pathways linking the genome-determined components in an organism with bioenergy-relevant cellular systems that can be characterized sufficiently to generate realistic options for biofuel development. In addition, especially in addressing what are believed to be nearer-term approaches to renewable energy (e.g., producing cellulosic ethanol cost-effectively and energy-efficiently), the Center research team must understand in depth the current industrial-level roadblocks and bottlenecks (see section, GTL's Vision for Biological Energy Alternatives, below). For the Centers, and indeed the entire BER effort, to be successful, Center research must be integrated with individual investigator research, and coordination of activities,

  13. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Environmental and economic evaluation of bioenergy in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yimin Zhang; Shiva Habibi; Heather L. MacLean [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined life cycle environmental and economic implications of two near-term scenarios for converting cellulosic biomass to energy, generating electricity from cofiring biomass in existing coal power plants, and producing ethanol from biomass in stand-alone facilities in Ontario, Canada. The study inventories near-term biomass supply in the province, quantifies environmental metrics associated with the use of agricultural residues for producing electricity and ethanol, determines the incremental costs of switching from fossil fuels to biomass, and compares the cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions abatement achieved through the use of the bioenergy. Implementing a biomass cofiring rate of 10% in existing coal-fired power plants would reduce annual GHG emissions by 2.3 million metric tons (t) of CO{sub 2} equivalent (7% of the province's coal power plant emissions). The substitution of gasoline with ethanol/gasoline blends would reduce annual provincial light-duty vehicle fleet emissions between 1.3 and 2.5 million t of CO{sub 2} equivalent (3.5-7% of fleet emissions). If biomass sources other than agricultural residues were used, additional emissions reductions could be realized. At current crude oil prices ($70/barrel) and levels of technology development of the bioenergy alternatives, the biomass electricity cofiring scenario analyzed is more cost-effective for mitigating GHG emissions ($22/t of CO{sub 2} equivalent for a 10% cofiring rate) than the stand-alone ethanol production scenario ($92/t of CO{sub 2} equivalent). 67 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy: Proceedings of IEA, Bioenergy, Task 17 Meeting in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6-9, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the results of the third meeting of Task 17 (Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy) within the framework of International Energy Agency (IEA), Bioenergy. (Minutes from the meeting can be seen at page 91.) The meeting was held in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6--9, 1999. The meeting was held soon after President Clinton of the United States signed Executive Order No.13134: DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING BIOBASED PRODUCTS AND BIOENERGY on August 12, 1999. Executive orders in the US are official documents, through which the President of the US manages the operation of the Federal Government. This order outlines the administration's goal of tripling the use of biomass products and bioenergy in the US by the year 2010. During the time of this meeting, it was also known from sources in Europe that the European Union (EU) commission was working on draft instructions to its member countries on how to increase the use of renewable energy from six to twelve percent in Europe within 10 years. The objectives of Task 17 support the goals of member countries for bioenergy production and use. These objectives are as follows: to stimulate the full-scale implementation of energy crops in the participating countries; to strengthen the contacts and co-operation between participating countries, scientists, biomass producers, machine developers, entrepreneurs, and end users to select the most urgent research and development areas and suggest projects of co-operation; to inform Ex-Co- members; and to deliver proceedings from the meetings.

  16. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #26, January - March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding and improving sugar measurements in biomass hydrolysates; expansion of the NREL/DOE Biochemical Pilot Plant.

  17. National Bioenergy Center--Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: rapid analysis models for compositional analysis of intermediate process streams; engineered arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain.

  18. Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borden, Dustin Ross

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for use as a feedstock for ethanol production. Other factors such as water use efficiency, drought tolerance, yield potential, composition, and established production systems also make sorghum a logical choice as a feedstock for bioenergy production...

  19. Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borden, Dustin Ross

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by dedicated bioenergy sorghums (that are full photo-period sensitive), allowing for a more constant supply of feedstock to processing plants. Sweet sorghums would also allow the end user to obtain biomass when needed, however these types...

  20. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive biomass production in emerging bioenergy systems could increase nonpoint-source sediment and nutrient losses and impair surface and groundwater quality. Recycling biochar, a charcoal byproduct from pyrolysis of biomass, provides potential...

  1. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils, which can be used to produce biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    biomass is heated with catalysts to create bio-oils, which are then used to produce biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast...

  3. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  4. Integrated Photo-Bioelectrochemical System for Contaminants Removal and Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    cycling. INTRODUCTION Municipal wastewater treatment plants play a critical role in environmental represents an important, electricity-demanding step in most municipal wastewater treatment facilities fuel cells (MFCs)3 with algal bioreactors4 for wastewater treatment and bioenergy production. MFCs

  5. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , renovation and management effects on pasture productivity and quality under rotational grazing, and promoting Sustainable Bioenergy Practices Jackson's program focuses on structure and function of managed, semi cropping systems. Projects include comparing grass species' C-sequestration ability, ecosystem provisioning

  6. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased of Ethanol on Fuel Price Behavior and the Viability of Cellulosic Biofuels" presented by Jacob La

  7. Advancing sustainable bioenergy: Evolving stakeholder interests and the relevance of research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy L [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M [University of Minnesota; Dodder, Rebecca [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kaplan, Ozge [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Miller, C. Andy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability of future bioenergy production rests on more than continual improvements in its environmental, economic, and social impacts. The emergence of new biomass feedstocks, an expanding array of conversion pathways, and expected increases in overall bioenergy production are connecting diverse technical, social, and policy communities. These stakeholder groups have different and potentially conflicting values and cultures, and therefore different goals and decision making processes. Our aim is to discuss the implications of this diversity for bioenergy researchers. The paper begins with a discussion of bioenergy stakeholder groups and their varied interests, and illustrates how this diversity complicates efforts to define and promote sustainable bioenergy production. We then discuss what this diversity means for research practice. Researchers, we note, should be aware of stakeholder values, information needs, and the factors affecting stakeholder decision making if the knowledge they generate is to reach its widest potential use. We point out how stakeholder participation in research can increase the relevance of its products, and argue that stakeholder values should inform research questions and the choice of analytical assumptions. Finally, we make the case that additional natural science and technical research alone will not advance sustainable bioenergy production, and that important research gaps relate to understanding stakeholder decision making and the need, from a broader social science perspective, to develop processes to identify and accommodate different value systems. While sustainability requires more than improved scientific and technical understanding, the need to understand stakeholder values and manage diversity presents important research opportunities.

  8. d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde 1 Har forbrnding og forgasning af biomasse en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 1 Har forbrænding og forgasning af biomasse en fremtid ? Charles Nielsen Elsam A/S #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 2 JaJa #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk vækstområde 3 Disposition

  9. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014—United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Patrick Lamers; Mohammad S. Roni; Jacob J. Jacobson; Brendi Heath

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  10. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006) Trends in Oil Sup-ply and Demand, the Potential forthe U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become

  11. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuelsenergy crops, can provide much larger amounts of biomass for production of transportation fuels.a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a

  12. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource thatof plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable,

  13. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdates Techno-Economic Modeling ToolsJobthe

  14. POSITION: JBEI Postdoctoral Appointee JOB ID: 645831 MANAGER: Ben Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senes, Alessandro

    with applications in advanced biofuels, renewable energy, nanobiology, nanotoxicology, and biofuels. The Biomass techniques, such as systems and synthetic biology, to accelerate development of the nation's biofuels developing a focus on systems and synthetic biology as they relate to biofuel production. Applied research

  15. Sandia Energy - JBEI Research Receives Strong Industry Interest in DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePower

  16. 15570_JBEI_trifold_released2:Layout 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with Well-BoreAldo BonaseraOffice

  17. Urban Wood-Based Bio-Energy Systems in Seattle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan Gent, Seattle Steam Company

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Seattle Steam Company provides thermal energy service (steam) to the majority of buildings and facilities in downtown Seattle, including major hospitals (Swedish and Virginia Mason) and The Northwest (Level I) Regional Trauma Center. Seattle Steam has been heating downtown businesses for 117 years, with an average length of service to its customers of 40 years. In 2008 and 2009 Seattle Steam developed a biomass-fueled renewable energy (bio-energy) system to replace one of its gas-fired boilers that will reduce greenhouse gases, pollutants and the amount of waste sent to landfills. This work in this sub-project included several distinct tasks associated with the biomass project development as follows: a. Engineering and Architecture: Engineering focused on development of system control strategies, development of manuals for start up and commissioning. b. Training: The project developer will train its current operating staff to operate equipment and facilities. c. Flue Gas Clean-Up Equipment Concept Design: The concept development of acid gas emissions control system strategies associated with the supply wood to the project. d. Fuel Supply Management Plan: Development of plans and specifications for the supply of wood. It will include potential fuel sampling analysis and development of contracts for delivery and management of fuel suppliers and handlers. e. Integrated Fuel Management System Development: Seattle Steam requires a biomass Fuel Management System to track and manage the delivery, testing, processing and invoicing of delivered fuel. This application will be web-based and accessed from a password-protected URL, restricting data access and privileges by user-level.

  18. Role of Bioenergy in the Kyoto Protocol, in the EU-ETS and in future Climate Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bioenergy use through: Internal emission reductions within the Greenhouse Gas capped sectors Offsetting/CDM CDM project pipeline: > 1000 projects of which: Registered projects: 334 Expected CERs (from RISOE Distribution of projects Bioenergy #12;The EU-ETS and biomass (1) In January 2005 the European

  19. Factors contributing to carbon fluxes from bioenergy harvests in the U.S. Northeast: an analysis using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    not statistically significant. Bioenergy harvests using WTH generated fewer wood products and resulted in more of fossil fuels for energy production (`bioenergy' such as combusting woodchips or pellets for electricity to the atmo- sphere) into and out of the forest system, as well as C transferred to wood products, the life

  20. Bioenergy Watershed Restoration in Regions of the West: What are the Environmental/Community Issues?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Huff, D.D.; Kaufmann, M.R.; Shepperd, W.D.; Sheehan, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the western mountainous regions, wildfire risks are elevated due to both fire suppression activities which have changed the forest structure making it more susceptible to stand-killing fires and the expansion of human structures (houses, light commercial) into these same forests, By providing a market for currently noncommercial but flammable materials (small trees, tops, and branches), new and existing bioenergy industries could be a key factor in reducing the regional forest fuel loads. Although bioenergy would appear to be an ideal answer to the problem in many ways, the situation is complicated and numerous issues need resolution. A public fearful of logging in these regions needs assurance that harvesting for bioenergy is an environmentally and socially responsible solution to the current fuel build up in these forests. This is especially important given that biomass harvesting cannot pay its own way under current energy market conditions and would have to be supported in some fashion.

  1. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program Year Book; 1992-1993 Yearbook with 1994 Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy administers five Regional Bioenergy Programs to encourage regionally specific application of biomass and municipal waste-to-energy technologies to local needs, opportunities and potentials. The Pacific Northwest and Alaska region has taken up a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided its five participating state energy programs. This report describes the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program, and related projects of the state energy agencies, and summarizes the results of technical studies. It also considers future efforts of this regional program to meet its challenging assignment.

  2. Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy 2015Bioenergy Pumps New

  3. Biomass and Bioenergy 30 (2006) 316320 How to recover more value from small pine trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Preliminary results support the proposition there is an available, large supply of biomass with highBiomass and Bioenergy 30 (2006) 316­320 How to recover more value from small pine trees: Essential USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 2500 South Pine Knoll Drive, Flagstaff, AZ 86001

  4. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #27, April - June 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April-June, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding performance of alternative process configurations for producing ethanol from biomass; investigating Karl Fischer Titration for measuring water content of pretreated biomass slurries.

  5. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  6. National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Summer 2011 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer 2011 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: evaluating new analytical techniques for measuring soluble sugars in the liquid portion of biomass hydrolysates, and measurement of the fraction of insoluble solids in biomass slurries.

  7. BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS A multi-electrode continuous flow microbial fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS A multi-electrode continuous flow microbial fuel cell with separator microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires the development of compact reactors with multiple electro- des continuous flow treatment using actual wastewaters. Keywords Microbial fuel cell . Scaling up . Separator

  8. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #28, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program sessions and special topic sessions; assessment of waste water treatment needs; and an update on new arabinose-to-ethanol fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strains.

  9. National Bioenergy Center - Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program topic areas; results from reactive membrane extraction of inhibitors from dilute-acid pretreated corn stover; list of 2010 task publications.

  10. Switchgrass for Bioenergy held at the University of NebraskaLincoln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    * Pest Management * Soil and Water Management Held at a site developed exclu- sively for the clinics. Cenusa bioenergy, a USDA-funded research initiative, is investigating the creation of a sustainable at: In-FieldTrainingforAgribusinessProfessionals Know how. Know now. Crop Management Diagnostic

  11. Importance of bioenergy markets for the development of the global energy system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    international bioenergy markets are still in their infancy, international trade of biofuels, wood pellets are the large resources potential and low production costs of biomass in export countries such as Brazil are not the same as the countries that could become important biomass users. The largest biomass production

  12. The Pennsylvania State University www.BioEnergyBridge.psu.edu 1 BioEnergy Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    and Fermentation Facilities · TechnoEconomic Analysis · Life Cycle Assessment · Sustainability Analysis · Engine engine testing Services · Field Trials · Onsite Saccharification and Fermentation Facilities · TechnoEconomic# trichard@psu.edu rtw103@psu.edu www.bioenergy.psu.edu Biomass Energy Center #12;© The Pennsylvania State

  13. Essays on Economic and Environmental Analysis of Taiwanese Bioenergy Production on Set-Aside Land 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, Chih-Chun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation examines Taiwan’s potential for bioenergy production using feedstocks grown on set-aside land and discusses the consequent effects on Taiwan’s energy security plus benefits and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Taiwan Agricultural Sector Model...

  14. Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD Assistant Professor Civil of algae and other nonconventional feedstocks, are being developed. This talk will explore several systems priorities. This is an especially challenging problem for algae-based biofuels because production pathways

  15. Hawai'i Bioenergy Master Plan Green Jobs, Biofuels Development, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i Bioenergy Master Plan Green Jobs, Biofuels Development, and Hawaii's Labor Market associated with biofuels in Hawai'i. In particular, it discusses how a potential biofuels industry might policy makers and leaders consider how best to support biofuels. One major labor market question

  16. Essays on Economic and Environmental Analysis of Taiwanese Bioenergy Production on Set-Aside Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, Chih-Chun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation examines Taiwan’s potential for bioenergy production using feedstocks grown on set-aside land and discusses the consequent effects on Taiwan’s energy security plus benefits and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Taiwan Agricultural Sector Model...

  17. Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM systems for microalgae capable of producing biofuels. Diesel and jet fuels are critical to our nation from renewable sources by 2020. Energy and financial analysts acknowledge that the world has entered

  18. Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

  19. Renewable Energy Institute International (REII): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-387

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will provide the Renewable Energy Institute with detailed on-site biomass gasifier syngas monitoring, using the NREL transportable Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer. This information will be used to optimize the parameters of the gasifier operation, insuring the quality of the syngas made in the Red Lion Bioenergy gasifier and its compatibility with catalytic conversion to fuels.

  20. Developing a Portfolio of Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production Systems for the US Midwest: A Research and Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    a growing portion of our bioenergy feedstocks. While such second generation feedstocks show numerous on fossil fuels. In response, the demand for feedstocks for liquid biofuels will continue to grow

  1. Developing a Portfolio of Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production Systems for the US Midwest: A Research and Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    a growing portion of our bioenergy feedstocks. While such "second generation" feedstocks show numerous on fossil fuels. In response, the demand for feedstocks for liquid biofuels will continue to grow

  2. Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bumguardner, Marisa

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics...

  3. Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion BiochemicalDepartment ofBioenergy

  4. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

  5. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  6. Bioenergy market competition for biomass: A system dynamics review of current policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert Jeffers

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in the United States and abroad to increase the use of biomass as an energy source due to environmental and energy security benefits. In the United States, the biofuel and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and different agencies and have different drivers, which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets based on varying policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry, as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand for biomass in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from export dominance.

  7. Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A lending program begins with a financial institution that procures the funds they lend from a number of other sources.

  8. Advantages and limitations of exergy indicators to assess sustainability of bioenergy and biobased materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maes, Dries, E-mail: Dries.Maes@uhasselt.be; Van Passel, Steven, E-mail: Steven.Vanpassel@uhasselt.be

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative bioenergy projects show a growing diversity in biomass pathways, transformation technologies and end-products, leading to complex new processes. Existing energy-based indicators are not designed to include multiple impacts and are too constrained to assess the sustainability of these processes. Alternatively, indicators based on exergy, a measure of “qualitative energy”, could allow a more holistic view. Exergy is increasingly applied in analyses of both technical and biological processes. But sustainability assessments including exergy calculations, are not very common and are not generally applicable to all types of impact. Hence it is important to frame the use of exergy for inclusion in a sustainability assessment. This paper reviews the potentials and the limitations of exergy calculations, and presents solutions for coherent aggregation with other metrics. The resulting approach is illustrated in a case study. Within the context of sustainability assessment of bioenergy, exergy is a suitable metric for the impacts that require an ecocentric interpretation, and it allows aggregation on a physical basis. The use of exergy is limited to a measurement of material and energy exchanges with the sun, biosphere and lithosphere. Exchanges involving services or human choices are to be measured in different metrics. This combination provides a more inclusive and objective sustainability assessment, especially compared to standard energy- or carbon-based indicators. Future applications of this approach in different situations are required to clarify the potential of exergy-based indicators in a sustainability context. -- Highlights: • Innovative bioenergy projects require more advanced sustainability assessments to incorporate all environmental impacts. • Exergy-based indicators provide solutions for objective and robust measurements. • The use of exergy in a sustainability assessment is limited to material exchanges, excluding exchanges with society. • The combination of exergy-based indicators with other indicators is very appropriate. • But this is only rarely applied.

  9. China-US Workshop on Biotechnology of Bioenergy Plants, Nov. 16-17, 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA Page 1 CChhiinnaa--UUSS WWoorrkksshhoopp oonn BBiiootteecchhnnoollooggyy ooff BBiiooeenneerrggyy PPllaannttss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    China-US Workshop on Biotechnology of Bioenergy Plants, Nov. 16-17, 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA://isse.utk.edu/jrceec/). The focus of this agreement is to promote research collaboration, academic exchange, student education) environmental sustainability of bioenergy production, (3) ecological foundations of water resources and quality

  10. Bioenergy: how much can we expect for 2050? This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    forage production to provide that amount of energy. Such a high level of bioenergy supply would roughly Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA helmut.haberl@aau.at Abstract Estimates of global primary bioenergy has doubled in the last century. We estimate the maximum physical potential of the world's total land

  11. National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2011-2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter 2011-2012 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: 34th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals; feasibility of NIR spectroscopy-based rapid feedstock reactive screening; demonstrating integrated pilot-scale biomass conversion. The Biochemical Process Integration Task focuses on integrating the processing steps in enzyme-based lignocellulose conversion technology. This project supports the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to foster development, demonstration, and deployment of 'biochemical platform' biorefineries that economically produce ethanol or other fuels, as well as commodity sugars and a variety of other chemical products, from renewable lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergy

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomass grown

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomassi Last

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update --

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomassi

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal biomassiOFFICE

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal-- Sections |

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-OilBioenergyMicroalgal--Following

  1. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies Office Investments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM -AliciaBioenergy Technologies Office has awarded

  2. Assessing the potential of bioenergy. Final report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, J.; Badin, J.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As electricity restructuring proceeds, traditional concepts of how energy is produced, transported, and utilized are likely to change dramatically. Marketplace, policy, and regulatory changes will shape both the domestic and global energy industry, improving opportunities for clean, low-cost energy, competitively priced fuels, and environmentally responsible power systems. Many of these benefits may be obtained by commercial deployment of advanced biomass power conversion technologies. The United BioEnergy Commercialization Association represents the US biomass power industry. Its membership includes investor-owned and public utilities, independent power producers, state and regional bioenergy, equipment manufacturers, and biomass energy developers. To carry out its mission, UBECA has been carrying out the following activities: production of informational and educational materials on biomass energy and distribution of such materials at public forums; technical and market analyses of biomass energy fuels, conversion technologies, and market issues; monitoring of issues affecting the biomass energy community; and facilitating cooperation among members to leverage the funds available for biomass commercialization activities.

  3. Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

  4. High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, A. P.; Allgaier, M.; Singer, S.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; VanderGheynst, J.S.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophilic microbial communities that are active in a high-solids environment offer great potential for the discovery of industrially relevant enzymes that efficiently deconstruct bioenergy feedstocks. In this study, finished green waste compost was used as an inoculum source to enrich microbial communities and associated enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose during thermophilic high-solids fermentation of the bioenergy feedstocks switchgrass and corn stover. Methods involving the disruption of enzyme and plant cell wall polysaccharide interactions were developed to recover xylanase and endoglucanase activity from deconstructed solids. Xylanase and endoglucanase activity increased by more than a factor of 5, upon four successive enrichments on switchgrass. Overall, the changes for switchgrass were more pronounced than for corn stover; solids reduction between the first and second enrichments increased by a factor of four for switchgrass while solids reduction remained relatively constant for corn stover. Amplicon pyrosequencing analysis of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes recovered from enriched samples indicated rapid changes in the microbial communities between the first and second enrichment with the simplified communities achieved by the third enrichment. The results demonstrate a successful approach for enrichment of unique microbial communities and enzymes active in a thermophilic high-solids environment.

  5. BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processing To meet United States Department of Energy projections, 110, 000 truckloads per day of feedstocksAgronomics BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele- ments of a production and delivery system include high-tonnage feedstocks, proven

  6. Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne stergrd, Ris National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne Østergård, Risø National Laboratory in the Agricultural Outlook from OECD-FAO, these predictions may be misleading and biomass may increase more rapidly Biomass and waste Hydro Nuclear Gas Oil Coal Fig 1 Total primary energy supply3 · The transport sector

  7. Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bumguardner, Marisa

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in surface runoff caused by sorghum residue removal for bioenergy production in the Oso Creek Watershed in Nueces County. The model simulated the removal of 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent residue removal. The WEPS model was used to quantify wind erosion soil...

  8. Bioenergy News

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green Bus rolled intoShannonThis

  9. Bioenergy and Bioproducts BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as an ethanol and bioproduct feedstock· Wide hybridization of energy crops to custom tailor composition

  10. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  11. Geek-Up[10.01.10]-- Mapping Bioenergy and Magnetic Vector Potential, New Atmosphere-Monitoring Tools and "Sour" Gas Streams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geeks, pay attention! We've got a BioEnergy Atlas, aerosols and climate, sour stuff, and 3D magnetic interactions in this edition of the Geek Up!

  12. To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well- being. Vision: To lead in science, innovationMission: To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food

  13. www.planetearth.nerc.ac.uk Autumn 2014 Trout in hot water Biodiversity and big data Bioenergy's carbon footprint Sustainable drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    's carbon footprint · Sustainable drainage Intothe #12;Front cover image courtesy Ben Langford About us NERC to account ­ bioenergy's carbon footprint What's the true cost of growing our fuel? 22 The science

  14. A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

  15. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  16. 08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

  17. A Review on Biomass Densification Systems to Develop Uniform Feedstock Commodities for Bioenergy Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing uniformly formatted, densified feedstock from lignocellulosic biomass is of interest to achieve consistent physical properties like size and shape, bulk and unit density, and durability, which significantly influence storage, transportation and handling characteristics, and, by extension, feedstock cost and quality. A variety of densification systems are considered for producing a uniform format feedstock commodity for bioenergy applications, including (a) baler, (b) pellet mill, (c) cuber, (d) screw extruder, (e) briquette press, (f) roller press, (g) tablet press, and (g) agglomerator. Each of these systems has varying impacts on feedstock chemical and physical properties, and energy consumption. This review discusses the suitability of these densification systems for biomass feedstocks and the impact these systems have on specific energy consumption and end product quality. For example, a briquette press is more flexible in terms of feedstock variables where higher moisture content and larger particles are acceptable for making good quality briquettes; or among different densification systems, a screw press consumes the most energy because it not only compresses but also shears and mixes the material. Pretreatment options like preheating, grinding, steam explosion, torrefaction, and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) can also help to reduce specific energy consumption during densification and improve binding characteristics. Binding behavior can also be improved by adding natural binders, such as proteins, or commercial binders, such as lignosulphonates. The quality of the densified biomass for both domestic and international markets is evaluated using PFI (United States Standard) or CEN (European Standard).

  18. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, David [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager] [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  19. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeeches Energy Speeches RSS JuneInstitute Engineering

  20. Seaborg Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter PrincipalfuelTorusconditionsSupportedScottInstitute

  1. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Institute Advanced Studies Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  2. LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIES OF BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK AND ENHANCED SOIL QUALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture can simultaneously address global food, feed, fiber, and energy challenges provided our soil, water, and air resources are not compromised in doing so. As we embark on the 19th Triennial Conference of the International Soil and Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO), I am pleased to proclaim that our members are well poised to lead these endeavors because of our comprehensive understanding of soil, water, agricultural and bio-systems engineering processes. The concept of landscape management, as an approach for integrating multiple bioenergy feedstock sources, including biomass residuals, into current crop production systems, is used as the focal point to show how these ever-increasing global challenges can be met in a sustainable manner. Starting with the 2005 Billion Ton Study (BTS) goals, research and technology transfer activities leading to the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Revised Billion Ton Study (BT2) and development of a residue management tool to guide sustainable crop residue harvest will be reviewed. Multi-location USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team research and on-going partnerships between public and private sector groups will be shared to show the development of landscape management strategies that can simultaneously address the multiple factors that must be balanced to meet the global challenges. Effective landscape management strategies recognize the importance of nature’s diversity and strive to emulate those conditions to sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. To illustrate those services, the soil quality impact of harvesting crop residues are presented to show how careful, comprehensive monitoring of soil, water and air resources must be an integral part of sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems. Preliminary analyses suggest that to sustain soil resources within the U.S. Corn Belt, corn (Zea mays L.) stover should not be harvested if average grain yields are less than 11 Mg ha-1 (175 bu ac-1) unless more intensive landscape management practices are implemented. Furthermore, although non-irrigated corn grain yields east and west of the primary Corn Belt may not consistently achieve the 11 Mg ha-1 yield levels, corn can still be part of an overall landscape approach for sustainable feedstock production. Another option for producers with consistently high yields (> 12.6 Mg ha-1 or 200 bu ac-1) that may enable them to sustainably harvest even more stover is to decrease their tillage intensity which will reduce fuel use, preserve rhizosphere carbon, and/or help maintain soil structure and soil quality benefits often attributed to no-till production systems. In conclusion, I challenge all ISTRO scientists to critically ask if your research is contributing to improved soil and crop management strategies that effectively address the complexity associated with sustainable food, feed, fiber and fuel production throughout the world.

  3. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  4. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  5. MODEL BASED BIOMASS SYSTEM DESIGN OF FEEDSTOCK SUPPLY SYSTEMS FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Jacob J. Jacobson; Kenneth M. Bryden

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering feedstock supply systems that deliver affordable, high-quality biomass remains a challenge for the emerging bioenergy industry. Cellulosic biomass is geographically distributed and has diverse physical and chemical properties. Because of this feedstock supply systems that deliver cellulosic biomass resources to biorefineries require integration of a broad set of engineered unit operations. These unit operations include harvest and collection, storage, preprocessing, and transportation processes. Design decisions for each feedstock supply system unit operation impact the engineering design and performance of the other system elements. These interdependencies are further complicated by spatial and temporal variances such as climate conditions and biomass characteristics. This paper develops an integrated model that couples a SQL-based data management engine and systems dynamics models to design and evaluate biomass feedstock supply systems. The integrated model, called the Biomass Logistics Model (BLM), includes a suite of databases that provide 1) engineering performance data for hundreds of equipment systems, 2) spatially explicit labor cost datasets, and 3) local tax and regulation data. The BLM analytic engine is built in the systems dynamics software package PowersimTM. The BLM is designed to work with thermochemical and biochemical based biofuel conversion platforms and accommodates a range of cellulosic biomass types (i.e., herbaceous residues, short- rotation woody and herbaceous energy crops, woody residues, algae, etc.). The BLM simulates the flow of biomass through the entire supply chain, tracking changes in feedstock characteristics (i.e., moisture content, dry matter, ash content, and dry bulk density) as influenced by the various operations in the supply chain. By accounting for all of the equipment that comes into contact with biomass from the point of harvest to the throat of the conversion facility and the change in characteristics, the BLM evaluates economic performance of the engineered system, as well as determining energy consumption and green house gas performance of the design. This paper presents a BLM case study delivering corn stover to produce cellulosic ethanol. The case study utilizes the BLM to model the performance of several feedstock supply system designs. The case study also explores the impact of temporal variations in climate conditions to test the sensitivity of the engineering designs. Results from the case study show that under certain conditions corn stover can be delivered to the cellulosic ethanol biorefinery for $35/dry ton.

  6. Sandia Energy - JBEI Updates Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdates Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for

  7. Sustainable Energy Research Team publications Whittaker, C., Adams, P., McManus, M.C Securing a Bioenergy Supply: UK and US in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    .C Securing a Bioenergy Supply: UK and US in Perspectives on Biofuels: Potential Benefits and Possible case studies. World Renewable Energy Congress. Sweden, May 8 ­ 13 · Griffin, P.W., Hammond, G.P., Ng, R.P. (2011) Greenhouse gas reporting for biofuels: A comparison between the RED, RTFO and PAS2050

  8. Monthly Highlights from Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station November 2009 Finding Conservation and Using Bio-Energy on Urban Fringe Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    methods for conducting on-farm energy audits. While utility companies and consultants have tools little about monitoring energy use on farms. While conservation is where farmers and the university make Conservation and Using Bio-Energy on Urban Fringe Farms Zane Helsel, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Agriculture

  9. Research Note The removal of tree stumps and coarse roots from felling sites as a source of woody biomass for bioenergy generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biomass for bioenergy generation is well established in parts of Europe, and interest has been expressed, current interest in renewable energy, including that from woody biomass, has generated interest and practitioners should be aware. Conifer stumps and associated roots can represent nearly 25% stem biomass

  10. Environmental Change Institute Environmental Change Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Environmental Change Institute 2012/13 eci Environmental Change Institute #12;ii Environmental 06 Educating environmental leaders 08 Centre for interdisciplinary doctoral training 10 A thriving, Dumfriesshire (ECI) #12;1 The Environmental Change Institute has 21 years' experience in helping governments

  11. Institute for ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF EVENTS 91 · REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE LIBRARIES 93 · INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY/PARK CITY MATHEMATICS. The Institute for Advanced Study has sustained this founding principle for more than sixty-five years

  12. Institute /or ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INSTITUTE LIBRARIES 63 INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY/PARK CITY MATHEMATICS INSTITUTE 66 · MENTORING PROGRAM sustained and has yielded an unsurpassed record of definitive scholarship. Although small in scale

  13. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Integrated Biomass Supply Systems" Guest Speaker: Timothy G. Rials, Professor and Director Center UTIA's research and development program on the use of forest and agricultural biomass for alternative, Institute of Agriculture. He joined the university after 13 years with the U.S. Forest Service, Southern

  14. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approach"" Guest Speaker: Xuesong Zhang Senior Research Scientist of Ecosystem Modeling at PNNL Abstract Change Research Institute (JGCRI), a collaboration between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and University of Maryland. Currently, he is a senior research scientist of ecosystem modeling at PNNL. His

  15. TU DELFT PROCESS TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE INSTITUTE LECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindken, Ralph

    TU DELFT PROCESS TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE INSTITUTE LECTURE CHEMICAL REACTORS WITH DIRECT HEATING is in contrast with conventional operation of catalytic reactors, where heat is generally supplied through the reactor wall and unnecessary heating of the fluid phase, catalyst support and reactor materials occur

  16. DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "As we launch the Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute at Northwestern Medicine, I

  17. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Material Science Who we are and what we do 2:23 Institute for Materials Science: Alexander V. Balatsky IMS is an interdisciplinary research and educational center...

  18. Institute for ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · PROGRAM IN THEORETICAL BIOLOGY 103 · REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE LIBRARIES 107 INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY Study has sustained its founding principle for seventy years. This com- mitment his yielded

  19. Achieving the Security, Environmental, and Economic Potential of Bioenergy. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggs, John A

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of business, government, environmental and academic leaders convened in a dialogue by the Aspen Institute proposed a series of actions to promote the widespread commercialization of both corn and cellulosic ethanol to improve energy security, the environment, and the economy. Co-chaired by Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President and former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and former Congressman Tom Ewing (R. IL), they developed a series of recommendations involving improved crop yields, processing of biomass into ethanol, manufacture of more cars that can burn either ethanol or gasoline, and the provision of ethanol pumps at more filling stations. Their report, "A High Growth Strategy for Ethanol, includes a discussion of the potential of ethanol, the group's recommendations, and a series of discussion papers commissioned for the dialogue.

  20. The National Cancer Institute,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Information Center Bldg. 82, Rm 123 Bethesda, MD 20892 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the Federal Government. NCI coordinates the government's cancer research program. It is the largest of the 17 biomedical research institutes and centers

  1. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  2. institution-logo Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    institution-logo Introduction Model Selection Experimental Design Bacteremia Summary Experimental in Validating Models of Infectious Diseases #12;institution-logo Introduction Model Selection Experimental Summary D. M. Bortz Experimental Design in Validating Models of Infectious Diseases #12;institution-logo

  3. Environmental assessment of the atlas bio-energy waste wood fluidized bed gasification power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzman, M.I.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlas Bio-Energy Corporation is proposing to develop and operate a 3 MW power plant in Brooklyn, New York that will produce electricity by gasification of waste wood and combustion of the produced low-Btu gas in a conventional package steam boiler coupled to a steam-electric generator. The objectives of this project were to assist Atlas in addressing the environmental permit requirements for the proposed power plant and to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the project compared to more conventional small power plants. The project`s goal was to help promote the commercialization of biomass gasification as an environmentally acceptable and economically attractive alternative to conventional wood combustion. The specific components of this research included: (1) Development of a permitting strategy plan; (2) Characterization of New York City waste wood; (3) Characterization of fluidized bed gasifier/boiler emissions; (4) Performance of an environmental impact analysis; (5) Preparation of an economic evaluation; and (6) Discussion of operational and maintenance concerns. The project is being performed in two phases. Phase I, which is the subject of this report, involves the environmental permitting and environmental/economic assessment of the project. Pending NYSERDA participation, Phase II will include development and implementation of a demonstration program to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the full-scale gasification project.

  4. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  5. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY INVITATION Description of work Estimated cost (1) (2) (3) 1 Construction of Institutional/Residential buildings, external development, HVAC, Elevators etc. for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, at the campus

  6. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  7. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series Dr Roger D Doherty M.A. D. Phil., Fellow TMS Emeritus Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University,...

  8. INSTITUTE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Computer Science, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Pod vodÆrenskou v 2, 182 07 Prague 8, Czech Republic. phone: (+420)266052083 ...

  9. IACM Institute Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Institute Overview Craig Blue, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2015 AMO Peer Review - May 28, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  10. INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    revolutionized how we deliver modern medicine to patients. Treatments for breast cancer, AIDS, leukemia for the treatment of cancer." Leonidas C. Platanias, MD, PhD, Interim Director of the Lurie Cancer Center and JesseTHE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF CANCER BIOLOGY THE INSTITUTES

  11. University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION The University Materials Science Institute of Alicante the needed multidisciplinary character of the materials area. It is important to highlight the fact participate in the Materials Science PhD program which is imparted at the UA. Scientific research

  12. National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

  13. Use of Institutional Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11.

  14. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  15. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  16. Institute /or ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCIENCE ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES MEMBERS, VISITORS AND RESEARCH STAFF 55 · REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE LIBRARIES 57 will permit." For nearly two-thirds of a century this founding principle has been sustained and has yielded

  17. Junggon Kim Robotics Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    planning algorithm for industrial robots. - Contributed to reducing noise and vibration of industrial robots. Research Assistant (Part-time internship) 3/1998 ­ 2/2000 Korea Institute of Science

  18. New England Fuel Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testimony of Michael C. Trunzo, President and CEO of the New England Fuel Institute Before the U.S. Department of Energy and the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Public Hearing...

  19. Petroleum Institute Scholarly Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 #12;- 5 - Scholarly Publications 2007 | The Petroleum Institute Patents Chemical Engineering Editor: C. Brandt Program Editors: K. Nandakumar Chemical Engineering A. A. Shehada Electrical Engineering A. Goharzadeh Mechanical Engineering F. Akgun Engineering S. Morad Petroleum Geosciences H. L. Lim

  20. Strategies for Achieving Institutional Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many strategies—including those derived from Institutional Change Principles–may be used to effect institutional change in support of energy and sustainability objectives.

  1. Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy Wallace E. Tyner (wtyner@purdue.edu), Thomas W. Hertel, Farzad Taheripour*, and Dileep K. Birur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy have profound global economic, environmental, and social consequences. Current studies do not provide of biofuels and lack of comprehensive studies on global impacts have opened up several research avenues. Since

  2. Biomass & Bioenergy, 2010, 34(5), 602-609, doi : 10.1016/j.biombioe.2010.01.002 MMMooodddeeelllllliiinnnggg aaannnhhhyyydddrrrooouuusss wwweeeiiiggghhhttt lllooossssss ooofff wwwooooooddd ccchhhiiipppsss ddduuurrriiinnnggg tttooorrrrrreeefffaaaccctttiiioo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Biomass & Bioenergy, 2010, 34(5), 602-609, doi : 10.1016/j.biombioe.2010.01.002 1 treatment ; Torrefaction ; Wood chips ; Reaction kinetics ; Wood fuels I. Introduction Biomass, it becomes also crucial to enhance the use of biomass as a source of energy. To use biomass as a source

  3. Bibliography of University of California Institute of Marine Resources Publication Series 1954 - 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of marine microalgae. Report to Solar Energy Researchdesert microalgae. Final Report to Solar Energy Researchby microalgae. Final report to the Bio-Energy Council. May

  4. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    potential to increase fuel efficiency, improve vehicle performance, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This session will explore opportunities and challenges with bringing...

  5. ORNL Bioenergy technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Davison, Brian; Narula, Chaintanya; Langholtz, Matt; Dale, Virginia

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL researchers discuss breakthroughs in biomass conversion, feedstocks, logistics and sustainability

  6. ORNL Bioenergy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Brian; Narula, Chaintanya; Langholtz, Matt; Dale, Virginia

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL researchers discuss breakthroughs in biomass conversion, feedstocks, logistics and sustainability

  7. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dr. Robert Graham, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Ensyn Corporation 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste...

  8. Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    feedstocks include high-tonnage sorghums, sugarcane, energy cane, forest prod- ucts, sweet sorghum, switchgrass, crop residues, oilseed crops, microalgae, municipal solid waste, and urban waste. Lignocellulosic accumulation (5­10 tons/acre) Energy Canes (Perennial) Subtropical production High water demand High biomass

  9. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil

  10. Bioenergy for Sustainable Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt% moisture, and theAprilGerard

  11. Bioenergy Frequently Asked Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced biofuels will help to provide benefits that are of strategic importance to the United States, including economic growth, energy security, environmental quality, and technology leadership....

  12. Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda AgendaDepartment ofBenVice-Presidentfunds

  13. International Bioenergy Trade

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartmentEnergyDemonstrationInteragency2,Energy 29, 2008

  14. Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass Facility

  15. Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Mostbio BioFuels

  16. BioEnergy Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of Energy Big

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Publications

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments Energy RatingsDepartmentRevs Up ItsInformation Resources Site Map

  18. Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol

  19. THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE HEART INSTITUTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE HEART INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE HEART INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "At the Bluhm disease as an ever-present threat. The great progress we have made to date has been heralded

  20. LANL Institutes - Information Science and Technology Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute (EI) Information Science and Technology Institute (ISTI) Institute for Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) Institute for Materials Science (IMS)...

  1. INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY LIVING LONGER ON LESS IN MASSACHUSETTS: THE NEW ECONOMIC (IN)SECURITY OF SENIORS Tatjana Meschede Laura Sullivan Thomas Shapiro #12;About the Institute on Assets and Social Policy The Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP), a research institute at the Heller School for Social Policy

  2. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvancedInstitute Engineering Institute

  3. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price  volatility,  energy  security,  and  climate   change  have  led  many  governments  to  institute  policies  promoting  bioenergy  

  4. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  5. Michigan Institute Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    . Kaita's present research interests focus on plasma-surface interactions and the use of liquid metalsMichigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Up Against the Wall: Liquid Lithium for the Chamber Technology Challenge in Fusion Energy Dr. Robert Kaita Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3:00 pm

  6. Institute for ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Institute's Trustees, dated June 6, 1930. Newark, New Jersey. It is fiindamental in our purpose, and our energetic objects in the Universe? To answer these questions, astronomers and astrophysicists use paper, Adassadnisetts HYMAN BASS Adrain Professor of Mathematics, Cohimbia University Neiv York, New York RICHARD B

  7. Cancer Research Beckman Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cancer Research Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY #12;T The medical and scientific worlds have known for many years that in order to truly understand and treat cancer, the fight has and cancerous tumors have to first be visualized at the smallest scales possible, and then treated in the most

  8. Institutions or, who does what and why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    it is infused with value" ­ Philip Selznick #12;Importance of Institutions Institutional characteristics

  9. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  10. Institutional Scholarship Awards: The Role of Student and Institutional Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Institutional Scholarship Awards: The Role of Student and Institutional Characteristics Paper analyzes data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS) to examine the awarding are those of the author alone. © 2000, Donald E. Heller #12;Institutional Scholarship Awards: The Role

  11. Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak and Melanie Hardbattle Projects series Sous-fonds Description o "Women and Sustainable Development: Canadian Perspectives (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Fonds Description Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds. ­ 1985

  12. Institutions G.C. Sciara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    an institution when it is infused with value" ­ Philip Selznick #12;Why they matter... ·They plan, implement

  13. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFPTri-PartyForThe StandardInspiringJennaInstitute

  14. IACM Institute Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5 , 3004GuidanceInstitute

  15. Tokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    Tokyo Institute of Technology 2004 #12; Tokyo Institute of Technology k O(n-k/2) (Efron et al 1996) 2O(B) (Shimodaira 2002, 2004) O(B) #12; Tokyo Institute of Technology of Technology 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 23 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 23 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

  16. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Henry [Texas A& M University; Yennello, Sherry [Texas A& M University; Tribble, Robert [Texas A& M University

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  17. Can Radiative Forcing Be Limited to 2.6 Wm?2 Without Negative Emissions From Bioenergy AND CO2 Capture and Storage?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, James A.; Luckow, Patrick W.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining bioenergy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies (BECCS) has the potential to remove CO2 from the atmosphere while producing useful energy. BECCS has played a central role in scenarios that reduce climate forcing to low levels such as 2.6Wm-2. In this paper we consider whether BECCS is essential to limiting radiative forcing (RF) to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 using the Global Change Assessment Model, a closely coupled model of biogeophysical and human Earth systems. We show that BECCS can potentially reduce the cost of limiting RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 but that a variety of technology combinations that do not include BECCS can also achieve this goal, under appropriate emissions mitigation policies. We note that with appropriate supporting land-use policies terrestrial sequestration could deliver carbon storage ranging from 200 to 700 PgCO2-equiavalent over the 21st century. We explore substantial delays in participation by some geopolitical regions. We find that the value of BECCS is substantially higher under delay and that delay results in higher transient RF and climate change. However, when major regions postponed mitigation indefinitely, it was impossible to return RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100. Neither finite land resources nor finite potential geologic storage capacity represented a meaningful technical limit on the ability of BECCS to contribute to emissions mitigation in the numerical experiments reported in this paper.

  18. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint Genome Institute’s Automation Approach and Historythroughput environment; – automation does not necessarilyissues “Islands of Automation” – modular instruments with

  19. Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative - 2015 Peer Review Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative - 2015 Peer Review...

  20. IFI TECHNICAL REPORTS Institute of Computer Science,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    version) Alexander GreÃ?1 and Gabriel Zachmann2 1 Institute of Computer Science II 2 Institute of Computer

  1. Social Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle Social Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle Federal agencies can use social networks and...

  2. Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udry, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on “Agriculture for Development in Sub-

  3. Elektronisk Institut Danmarks Tekniske Universitet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Elektronisk Institut Danmarks Tekniske Universitet Bygning 349 2800 Lyngby Eksamensprojekt tjener som dokumentation for et eksamensprojekt i forbindel­ se med civilingeniørstudiet ved Danmarks

  4. PRITZKER INSTITUTE FOR BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    for undergraduate students, such as Engineering Themes in Health, REU and PURE. 2. Promote innovative thinking academic units and elevate international reputation of the Pritzker Institute. #12;

  5. Integrative Bioengineering Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddington, David; Magin,L,Richard; Hetling, John; Cho, Michael

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfabrication enables many exciting experimental possibilities for medicine and biology that are not attainable through traditional methods. However, in order for microfabricated devices to have an impact they must not only provide a robust solution to a current unmet need, but also be simple enough to seamlessly integrate into standard protocols. Broad dissemination of bioMEMS has been stymied by the common aim of replacing established and well accepted protocols with equally or more complex devices, methods, or materials. The marriage of a complex, difficult to fabricate bioMEMS device with a highly variable biological system is rarely successful. Instead, the design philosophy of my lab aims to leverage a beneficial microscale phenomena (e.g. fast diffusion at the microscale) within a bioMEMS device and adapt to established methods (e.g. multiwell plate cell culture) and demonstrate a new paradigm for the field (adapt instead of replace). In order for the field of bioMEMS to mature beyond novel proof-of-concept demonstrations, researchers must focus on developing systems leveraging these phenomena and integrating into standard labs, which have largely been ignored. Towards this aim, the Integrative Bioengineering Institute has been established.

  6. Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    This talk will focus on the achievements of the Drexel Plasma Institute in direct application of plasmasMichigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Plasma Medicine: Mechanisms of Direct Non-Thermal Plasma Interaction with Living Tissue Prof. Alexander Fridman Drexel University

  7. Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute & Department of Decision Sciences Details of Seminar Date and statistics is leading to a greatly broadened theory of regression which draws on tools of convex analysis with factor analysis in finance and economics. Risk Management Institute Joint Seminar #12;

  8. WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) Strategic Plan Summary #12;WISER Strategic Plan Summary | 1 WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY 1 by developing and supporting undergraduate research in energy and sustainability related areas. · Develop co

  9. UNIVERSITT POTSDAM Institut fr Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Universität

    . But it will be clear that the proposed procedures can be used as a pretreatment in other data structures for generatingUNIVERSITÄT POTSDAM Institut für Mathematik Statistical Scaling of Categorical Data Henning Läuter of Categorical Data Henning Läuter and Ayad Ramadan Institute of Mathematics, University of Potsdam e

  10. UNIVERSITT POTSDAM Institut fr Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Universität

    . But it will be clear that the proposed procedures can be used as a pretreatment in other data structures for generatingUNIVERSITÄT POTSDAM Institut für Mathematik Modeling and Scaling of Categorical Data Henning Läuter of Categorical Data Henning Läuter and Ayad Ramadan Institute of Mathematics, University of Potsdam e

  11. DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Extramural Research 9000 Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is the principal health research agency of the U.S. Federal Government. The Office of Extramural Research (OER) provides

  12. Institute for Mineral and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for energy. Mining and processing are vulnerable to energy price increases. Power is the largest contributingInstitute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges #12;Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 2 Vision The vision of the Institute for Mineral and Energy

  13. INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY Tatjana Meschede Thomas M. Shapiro Laura Sullivan Jennifer Wheary LIVING LONGER ON LESS REPORT #3 #12;DevelopeD by: The Institute on Assets and Social Policy The Heller School for Social Policy and Management Brandeis University in collaboration with: Dmos | www

  14. April 19, 2011 Smithsonian Institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    -fuel and hybrid vehicles. The Smithsonian fulfilled the renewable energy goal by purchasing green power from windApril 19, 2011 Smithsonian Institution 2010 Scorecard on Sustainability and Energy Performance Below is the Smithsonian Institution's fiscal year 2010 scorecard on sustainability and energy

  15. Agricultural Research and the Role of the National Institute of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a change in support of agriculture? · A science-friendly President and administration · Secretary will address: 1. Climate Change 2. Bio-energy 3. Food safety 4. Nutrition 5. International food security #12;Just coincidentally, these areas are also Sec. Vilsack's stated priorities... 1. Climate Change 2. Bio

  16. Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    In Depth 6 Cover Story: "When Green is Gold: How BTI research applies to the bioenergy revolution Rising prices at the gas pump. Melting ice sheets. Economic uncertainty. What do they have to do need fuel for energy, but fossil fuels come at a high price not just in terms of dollars, but also

  17. Materials Research Institute 199 Materials Research Institute Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    to biotechnology, building materials to automobiles, and much more. With more than a century of expertise projects in Penn State history. MRI and the Huck Institutes for the Life Sciences will join together

  18. Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drmota, Michael

    Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics Contact: Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austria Content: Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics Layout: Ing. Doris Stückler, Mag. Angelika Eckel Copyright: Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics Photographs: Stefan Meyer Institute

  19. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Kenneth R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lally, Bryan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  20. Universitat Wurzburg Institut fur Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran-Gia, Phuoc

    pruft, ob zwischen allen Punkten eines Netzes eine elektrische Verbindung besteht. IsolationstestUniversitat Wurzburg Institut fur Informatik Research Report Series Kunstliche Neuronale Netze fur, die notwen- dige elektrische Verschaltung der Bauteile realisiert. Bei der Herstellung von Leiterplat

  1. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Treasury is accepting applications on the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which has opened the fiscal year 2015 funding round for the CDFI Program...

  2. Multiple Motivations Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The multiple motivations principle suggests that a portfolio approach—rather than a single strategy—may be required to achieve change. Research demonstrates that people and institutions adopt new...

  3. INSTITUT FRANAIS ECOLE NATIONALE SUPERIEURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INSTITUT FRANÇAIS DU PETROLE J)\\J MONT ECOLE NATIONALE SUPERIEURE DES MINES DE PARIS -THESE PETROLE Soutenue le 29 avril 1988 devant lejury composé de : Réf. I.F.P. 37269 P.c. de GRACIANSKY M

  4. Bioinformatics InstituteBII 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    bioinformatics Institute is dedicated to discover biomolecular mechanisms in a computational biology of biomolecular mechanisms that link genome information and phenotypes. Computational biology has entered a new biology becomes instrumental to generate qualitatively new biological insight. The Bioinformatics

  5. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20131 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  6. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20121 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  7. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Université Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  8. The Institutes of Technology [as amended by Institutes of Technology,] (Amendment, Act, 1963.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivalingam, Krishna M.

    The Institutes of Technology Act, 1961 [as amended by Institutes of Technology,] (Amendment, Act, 1963.] Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Bombay ­ 400 076 #12;THE INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY ACT. THE SCHEDULE #12;THE INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY, ACT, 1961 No. 59 of 1961 [as amended by Institutes of Technology

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachusetts Institute...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hood Building - MA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, HOOD BUILDING (MA.01 ) Eliminated from further...

  10. Shaoxing Jinggong Mechanical and Electrical Research Institute...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shaoxing Jinggong Mechanical and Electrical Research Institute Company SJMERI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shaoxing Jinggong Mechanical and Electrical Research Institute...

  11. Institut fr Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene Forschungsgruppe Virologie Das Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene an den Universitätskliniken Hamburg

  12. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and...

  13. Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown,Innoferm GmbH JumpInstitute forInstitution

  14. Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan RunhuaInner Mongolia FengweiCSU Institute for theInstitute

  15. Pyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -oil into Refinery-grade Crude Oil Following are the steps for upgrading bio-oil into refinery-grade crude oil

  16. Institutes and Centers.DIS 1 Weizmann Institute of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Ehud

    Center for the Biology of Aging Prof Head, The Carl and Micaela Einhorn-Dominic Center for Brain Research and Immunological Disorders Prof Head, The Murray H. & Meyer Grodetsky Center for Research of High Brain Functions Center for Brain Imaging Prof Head, The Willner Family Center for Vascular Biology Prof #12;Institutes

  17. Pastoral Institutions, Organizations & Resilience to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    within these limits? 3. What are the institutions that permit, facilitate or enforce these practices? #12

  18. NORTHWESTERN INSTITUTE ON COMPLEX SYSTEMS (NICO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadal, Jean-Pierre

    . __________________________________________________________________________________ Don Saari UCI Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Economics Director, Institute

  19. INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    · Program for Maternal and Child Health · Chronic Disease Care and Outcomes Program · Health EconomicsINSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR HEALTHCARE STUDIES THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH

  20. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Serve as the designated Water Resources Research Institute for the State of Texas, as part of the National Institutes for Water Resources Research Program and established

  1. POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS AND ELECTRIC UTILITY INVESTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    the Institute for Policy Reform (IPR) and the Agency for International Development (USAID), Cooperative

  2. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth [Carnegie Mellon University; Long, Darrell [The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz; Honeyman, Peter [University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kramer, William [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Shalf, John [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Felix, Evan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability. The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools. The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  3. Harvard Institute for International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Progress of Policy Reform and Variations in Performance at the Sub-National Level in India Nirupam Bajpai; trade and exchange rate policy; industrial policy; foreign investment policy and so on, India's stateHarvard Institute for International Development HARVARD UNIVERSITY The Progress of Policy Reform

  4. Name Institution Anderson, Jeff NCAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Jeff LASP Gettelman, Andrew NCAR Ghan, Steve PNNL Guba, Oksana SNL Guo, Huan UCAR/GFDL Gutowski Pacific Northwest National Lab Lu, Gang NCAR Lu, Xian U. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Ma, Po-Lun PNNL, Phil PNNL Richmond, Art NCAR Rothstein, Mathew NCAR Seland, Øyvind Norwegian Meteorological Institute

  5. INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE DELHI CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    ) Name of the work: Design, Supply,Installation, Testing and Commissioning of New Solar water Heater solar water heater panel manufacturers / Contractors with proven technical and financial capabilities terrace where the solar water heater has to be installed before quote the rates. The Institute reserves

  6. DANISH METEOROLOGICAL INSTITUTE ----------SCIENTIFIC REPORT ----------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Problems, Kola Science Center, Apatity, 184200, Russia 6 Geophysical Institute, Department for a peer-reviewed publication. In this project, to understand the factors driving climate and ecosystem changes in the Arctic regions we considered sources, correlation and trends for different anthropogenic

  7. An-Institut der JAHRESBERICHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 ANNUAL REPORT Institut für Solarenergieforschung Hameln associated with Messung der;Streiflichter Ataglance 2 ISFH-Jahresbericht 2006 1 2 4 5 3 6 7 #12;Streiflichter Ataglance 3 ISFH Annual Report laser. The red areas help the machine to determine the orientation of the edges of a wafer. Abb. 5: Ein

  8. Institute of Mathematical Statistics COLLECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Galin

    and Applications: A Festschrift in honor of Morris L. Eaton Galin Jones and Xiaotong Shen, Editors Institute¸oaita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 A CB (corporate bond) pricing probabilities and recovery rates model for de- riving default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 iii #12;Preface Morris L. ("Joe") Eaton is one of the preeminent theoretical statisticians

  9. Bowling Green State University Institutional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Bowling Green State University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Policy/Procedure Manual animal research at Bowling Green State University. Reading over the first three policies will provide #12;309A University Hall Bowling Green, OH 43403-0183 Phone 419-372-7716 Fax 419-372-6916 email hsrb

  10. TUM Institute for Advanced Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haug, Stephan

    , 85748 Garching When October 21, 2010, 9.00 a.m. With the new home for the TUM Institute for Advanced in Smart Grids Prof. Sandra Hirche (TUM) Dr. Dragan Obradovic (Siemens AG) Electrochemistry and the Future of the Automobile Dr. Frederick T. Wagner (General Motors R&D) 12:00 Lunch · Ideas Market (Faculty of Mechanical

  11. June 19, 2012 Smithsonian Institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    the Smithsonian continued to work on reducing energy intensity and greening the buildings. In September 2011June 19, 2012 Smithsonian Institution 2011 Scorecard on Sustainability and Energy Performance In October 2009 President Obama issued Executive Order 13514 ­ Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy

  12. May 31, 2013 Smithsonian Institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    for improvement; in fiscal year 2012 the Smithsonian continued to work on reducing energy intensity and greeningMay 31, 2013 Smithsonian Institution 2012 Scorecard on Sustainability and Energy Performance In October 2009 President Obama issued Executive Order 13514 ­ Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy

  13. Chemistry World Careers: Bioenergy pioneer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to our understanding of global warming, as it may help explain how increased carbon dioxide in the ocean at Penn State. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) use bacterial action to create electricity or hydrogen fuel.' But his concern for the environment drives everything he does in science. 'I care very deeply about global

  14. Bioenergy FAQs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FAQs How do the benefits compare to the development challenges posed by advanced biofuels? How much gasoline and diesel are displaced by the nearly 15 billion gallons of...

  15. The New Horizons of Bioenergy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's "Biomass 2011" conference, Argonne researcher Seth Snyder spoke with DOE Biomass Program head, Paul Bryan. In this conversation, Snyder explains the process of biochemical conversion, and talks about Argonne's patented resin wafer technology. The resin wafer electrodeionization technology may help significantly reduce the cost of producing clean energy and of the chemicals and water used in industry. The separations technology can also process biomass-based feedstocks into biofuels and chemicals.

  16. Online Toolkit Fosters Bioenergy Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The construction of this facility that will nearly triple the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically.

  17. BioEnergy Supply Chain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec eget tincidunt massa, sed sagittis nisl. Nullam feugiat vehicula dignissim. Donec id diam eu justo aliquet luctus vitae id nulla....

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  19. Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels; Zia Haq

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource assessment – do we have enough biomass? Techno-economic analysis – can biofuels be produced at competitive prices? • Integrated biorefineries – what is being funded at DOE and what are future plans?

  20. Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - NREL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-Year 1Education CityEducation

  1. Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - ORNL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-Year 1Education

  2. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  3. ABENGOA BIOENERGY | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  4. Abellon Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  6. Smithfield Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Bioenergy Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Bioenergy Research | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Boosting Bioenergy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  12. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  13. Gordian Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Alterra Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

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  15. Bioenergy KDF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. CEE Bioenergie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient expression efficiency. Throughout these analyses, using plasmids with the hygromycin selectable marker, it was determined that 1.5 mg l-1 hygromycin was the optimal dose for genetic transformation of foxtail millet. In contrast, the nptII selectable marker appeared to yield many escapes. Three methods of transformation were employed in an attempt to produce stable transformants. An in planta transformation experiment, similar to the floral dip method used in Arabidopsis, which utilized a red fluorescent protein pporRFP from coral Porites porites and the hygromycin selectable marker, was tested using immature inflorescences. Although several plants were PCR positive using endpoint and Real-Time PCR and there was transient expression using pporRFP and GUS reporters, no plants were positive on Southern blot. Dipping in Agrobacterium may damage the anther or the pistil because seed production was significantly reduced. Agrobacterium transformation using embryogenic calli was also tested. Although hundreds of plants were regenerated from selection, none were positive using PCR. The third method was to wound germinated seeds with an Agrobacterium coated needle, but none of the plants were PCR positive. Although the Yugu1 genotype was recalcitrant to genetic transformation, several avenues of future research should be considered for foxtail millet. Calli from different foxtail millet genotypes should be screened and selected for regeneration potential, and some genotypes may be more amenable to transformation. Additional selectable markers should also be tested as hygromycin appears to be too stringent and there are too many escapes with nptII. This project has provided training for the following personnel: Dr. Xinlu Chen (postdoc), Xiaomei Liu (postdoc), Jayashree Desai (postdoc) and Kyle Berk (Undergraduate researcher). Conference presentations and peer-reviewed journal articles partly supported by this grant includes the following: 1. Baxter H., Equi R., Chen X, Berk K. and Zale J. Establishing Efficient in vitro Protocols For Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L. cv. Yu

  18. Institutional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. From ideals to institutions : institutional entrepreneurship in Mexican small business finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canales, Rodrigo (Rodrigo J.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a combination of in-depth research and unique loan-level data, this dissertation explores the mechanisms of intentional institutional change. It argues that current accounts of institutions and institutional change ...

  20. Commercial & Institutional Green Building Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, S.; Mundell,C.; Meline, K.; Kraatz,J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings Voluntary Green Building Programs: • LEED www.usgbc.org • Living Building Challenge living-future.org/lbc • Green Globes www.greenglobes.com • WELL Buildings wellbuildinginstitute.com • ENERGY STAR energystar.gov ESL-KT-14...The North Central Branch Texas Public Works Association Commercial & Institutional Green Building Performance 11.19.2014 ESL-KT-14-11-26 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Q&A Your Presenters: Chris...