National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bioenergy crop production

  1. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran; Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences}; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Wullschleger, Stan D; Kline, Keith L; Wei, Yaxing; Singh, Nagendra; Kang, Shujiang

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  2. Assessing multimetric aspects of sustainability: Application to a bioenergy crop production system in East Tennessee

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parish, Esther S.; Dale, Virginia H.; English, Burton C.; Jackson, Samuel W.; Tyler, Donald D.

    2016-02-26

    This paper connects the science of sustainability theory with applied aspects of sustainability deployment. A suite of 35 sustainability indicators spanning six environmental, three economic, and three social categories has been proposed for comparing the sustainability of bioenergy production systems across different feedstock types and locations. A recent demonstration-scale switchgrass-to-ethanol production system located in East Tennessee is used to assess the availability of sustainability indicator data and associated measurements for the feedstock production and logistics portions of the biofuel supply chain. Knowledge pertaining to the available indicators is distributed within a hierarchical decision tree framework to generate an assessment ofmore » the overall sustainability of this no-till switchgrass production system relative to two alternative business-as-usual scenarios of unmanaged pasture and tilled corn production. The relative contributions of the social, economic and environmental information are determined for the overall trajectory of this bioenergy system s sustainability under each scenario. Within this East Tennessee context, switchgrass production shows potential for improving environmental and social sustainability trajectories without adverse economic impacts, thereby leading to potential for overall enhancement in sustainability within this local agricultural system. Given the early stages of cellulosic ethanol production, it is currently difficult to determine quantitative values for all 35 sustainability indicators across the entire biofuel supply chain. This case study demonstrates that integration of qualitative sustainability indicator ratings may increase holistic understanding of a bioenergy system in the absence of complete information.« less

  3. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu; Chen, Rick; Yang, Jun; Weston, David; Chen, Jay; Muchero, Wellington; Ye, Ning; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-01-01

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  4. USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production and Spur Economic Impact | Department of Energy 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact August 11, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture have awarded 10 grants totaling $12.2 million to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy

  5. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the project objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale...

  6. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of Advanced Logistical Systems and Focused Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues and Energy Crops in a Densified Large Square Bale Format OBP WBS: ...

  7. Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

    1998-11-08

    The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

  8. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: • Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? • How much could these areas produce sustainably? • How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? • How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? • What kind of water management is needed to maintain a productive crop? The answers to these questions will help supporting institutions across the state to improve land assessment and agronomic management practices for biomass production. In the last decade, energy supply has become a worldwide problem. Bioenergy crops could supply energy in the future. Bioenergy crops are plants, usually perennial grasses and trees, that produce a lot of biomass that can be converted into energy. Bioenergy crops can be grown for two energy markets: power generation, such as heat and electricity, or liquid fuel, such as cellulosic ethanol. These resources could reduce petroleum dependency and greenhouse gas production. Woody plants and herbaceous warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, giant miscanthus,energy cane, and high yielding sorghums, could be major sources of biomass in Mississippi.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration | Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration August 5, 2015 - 4:47pm Addthis How can our landscapes be managed most effectively to produce crops for food, feed, and bioenergy, while also protecting our water resources by preventing the loss of nutrients from the soil? Dr. Cristina Negri and her team at the U.S. Department of Energy's

  10. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  11. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Bioenergy Technologies Office background Feedstock assessment, production and logistics Biomass yield improvements Sustainable feedstock production Future...

  12. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioEnergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production May Wu Argonne National Laboratory Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart ...

  13. Using corngrass1 to engineer poplar as a bioenergy crop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meilan, Richard; Rubinelli, Peter Marius; Chuck, George

    2016-05-10

    Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to new bioenergy crops and methods of creating new bioenergy crops. For example, genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs) are used to create transgenic crops. In some embodiments, over-expression of miRNA is used to produce transgenic perennials, such as trees, with altered lignin content or composition. In some embodiments, the transgenic perennials are Populus spp. In some embodiments, the miRNA is a member of the miR156 family. In some embodiments, the gene is Zea mays Cg1.

  14. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart Bioeconomy Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production May Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the...

  15. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    through region-specific crop selection (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air

  16. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration | Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration Share Topic Energy Energy sources Renewable energy Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Powertrain research --Building design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources

  17. Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in the Mississippi River Watershed March 24, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability Review Jason Hill University of Minnesota ...

  18. Review of Sorghum Production Practices: Applications for Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Downing, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Sorghum has great potential as an annual energy crop. While primarily grown for its grain, sorghum can also be grown for animal feed and sugar. Sorghum is morphologically diverse, with grain sorghum being of relatively short stature and grown for grain, while forage and sweet sorghums are tall and grown primarily for their biomass. Under water-limited conditions sorghum is reliably more productive than corn. While a relatively minor crop in the United States (about 2% of planted cropland), sorghum is important in Africa and parts of Asia. While sorghum is a relatively efficient user of water, it biomass potential is limited by available moisture. The following exhaustive literature review of sorghum production practices was developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to document the current state of knowledge regarding sorghum production and, based on this, suggest areas of research needed to develop sorghum as a commercial bioenergy feedstock. This work began as part of the China Biofuels Project sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program to communicate technical information regarding bioenergy feedstocks to government and industry partners in China, but will be utilized in a variety of programs in which evaluation of sorghum for bioenergy is needed. This report can also be used as a basis for data (yield, water use, etc.) for US and international bioenergy feedstock supply modeling efforts.

  19. Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-20

    Scientists and engineers at Idaho National Laboratory are working with partners throughout the bioenergy industry in preprocessing and characterization to ensure optimum feedstock quality. This elite team understands that addressing feedstock variability is a critical component in the biofuel production process.

  20. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart Bioeconomy Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production May Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory PDF icon wu_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Integrated Biorefinery Process

  1. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production This presentation was given by John Ferrell at the Symbiosis Conference PDF icon symbiosis_conference_ferrell.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Terrestrial Feedstocks Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview

  2. Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Establish far-reaching goals to increase the role of biobased energy and products in our nation's economy PDF icon final_2006_vision.pdf More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update -- Sections Roadmap for

  3. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Los Alamos developing next-generation of biofuels from renewable resources Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce such costs by more than 90%. Overview of Research and Highlights The next-generation of biofuels are being developed at Los Alamos. Made

  4. Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Biomass resources are a sustainable and environmentally friendly feedstock that can contribute significantly to a diverse energy portfolio. PDF icon obp_roadmapv2_web.pdf More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2015

  5. Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee Biomass Research and Development Initiative October...

  6. Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... viable, bioenergy and biobased products industry." A November 2005 assessment of the current status on the ... so that our nation has the creative, well-prepared workforce that ...

  7. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O₃) and fine particulate matter (PM₂̣₅) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore » Model we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O₃ increases of 5–27 ppb in India, 1–9 ppb in China, and 1–6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM₂̣₅ increases of up to 2 μgm⁻³. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10–100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.« less

  8. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Division Leader Email Richard Sayre Senior Scientist Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this

  9. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and human health, including food supply, watershed cleanliness, soil quality, and ... by replacement scale to generate an aggregate 'energy crop air quality score' (ECAQS) ...

  10. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  11. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE FY 2017 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is accelerating the commercialization of first-of-a-kind technologies that use our Nation's abundant renewable biomass resources for the production of advanced biofuels and biobased products. Non-food sources of biomass, such as algae, agricultural residues and forestry trimmings, and energy crops like switchgrass, are being used in BETO-supported, cutting edge

  13. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce ...

  14. Bioenergy Research | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Research NREL's bioenergy science and technology group performs a full range of research from exploring biomass at the molecular level through biorefinery process optimization to bring biofuels and bio-products to market. Model of enzymes wrapping on cellulose; colorful circular structures entwined through blue strands Analysis & Characterization Our analysts take a field-to-finished product approach to bringing biofuels and bioproducts to market. woman in lab looking at four clear

  15. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  16. Orchid Bioenergy Group Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Orchid Bioenergy Group Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Orchid Bioenergy Group Ltd. Place: United Kingdom Sector: Bioenergy Product: A company formed to combine Fairport...

  17. Solarvest BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solarvest BioEnergy Place: Bloomington, Indiana Zip: 3057 Sector: Bioenergy, Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product: Solarvest BioEnergy's primary focus is to develop hydrogen, methane...

  18. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  19. Bioenergy Walkthrough

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HOW BIOENERGY PLAYS A ROLE 4 | Bioenergy Technologies ... ALGAE: CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS Resource Assessment ... ANALYSIS AND SUSTAINABILITY 24 | Bioenergy Technologies ...

  20. Osage Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Osage Bioenergy Place: Virginia Zip: 23060 Product: Virginia-based ethanol plant developer. References: Osage Bioenergy1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  1. Smithfield Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Smithfield Bioenergy Place: Smithfield, Virginia Zip: 23430 Product: Biodiesel producer based in Virgina References: Smithfield Bioenergy1 This article is a...

  2. Abellon Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abellon Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Abellon Bioenergy Place: Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Zip: 380054 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Ahmedabad-based start-up...

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy About Us » Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is accelerating the commercialization of first-of-a-kind technologies that use our nation's abundant renewable biomass resources for the production of advanced biofuels and biobased products. Non-food sources of biomass, such as algae, agricultural residues and forestry trimmings, and energy crops like switchgrass, are

  4. Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects Bioenergy & Biofuels Projects BIOENERGY & BIOFUELS 1 PROJECT in 1 LOCATION 25,000,000 GALLONS ANNUAL PRODUCTION CAPACITY 14,900,000 GALLONS OF GASOLINE SAVED ANNUALLY 132,000 METRIC TONS OF CO2 EMISSIONS PREVENTED ANNUALLY ALL FIGURES AS OF MARCH 2015 BIOENERGY & BIOFUELS PROJECT LOAN PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY

  5. NREL: Innovation Impact - Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Menu Home Home Solar Solar Wind Wind Analysis Analysis Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration What is cellulosic biomass? Close Cellulosic biomass comprises all non-edible plants-trees, grasses, algae, and the indigestible parts of food crops, such as corn stalks, leaves, and cobs. What are drop-in biofuels? Close Most of today's biofuels require changes to the fuel

  6. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 9, 2015 Cropped view of the winning infographic "Cellulosic Ethanol." Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot Bioenergy Technologies Office...

  7. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  8. PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

  9. Frontline BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Frontline BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Frontline BioEnergy LLC Place: Ames, Iowa Zip: 50010 Sector: Bioenergy, Biomass Product: Frontline BioEnergy Inc develops...

  10. A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

  11. Tersus BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tersus BioEnergy Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 5PT Sector: Bioenergy, Biomass Product: Subsidiary of Tersus...

  12. Advanced Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Bioenergy LLC Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip: 55305 Product: Developer of the 378.5m litre pa bioethanol plant in...

  13. Alterra Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alterra Bioenergy LLC Place: Macon, Georgia Sector: Biofuels Product: Manufacturer and distributor of biofuels. References: Alterra...

  14. Northeast Kansas Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northeast Kansas Bioenergy LLC Place: Hiawatha, Kansas Zip: 66434 Product: Developing and integrated Bioethanol Biodiesel...

  15. Emergence BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emergence BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Emergence BioEnergy Place: Massachusetts Product: MA-based startup company focused on providing power generation capabilities...

  16. Guangxi Gofar Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gofar Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangxi Gofar Bioenergy Place: Guangxi Autonomous Region, China Product: A Chinese biofuel developer References: Guangxi Gofar...

  17. Filter Specialty Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Filter Specialty Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Filter Specialty Bioenergy Place: Autryville, NC, North Carolina Product: The company runs a 6m liter biodiesel plant...

  18. Terranova Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terranova Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Terranova Bioenergy LLC Place: Larkspur, California Zip: 94939 Sector: Biofuels Product: California-based project...

  19. Fulcrum Bioenergy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 94588 Sector: Bioenergy, Renewable Energy Product: Fulcrum BioEnergy is a waste-to-fuels company that focuses on the development of clean, environmentally responsible...

  20. Bioenergy Impacts … Bioproducts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The development of renewable, plant-based alternatives will help reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Plants are replacing petrochemicals in plastics and products BIOENERGY To ...

  1. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.; Borland, Anne M.; Edwards, Erika; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Owen, Nick; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cestari De Paoli, Henrique; et al

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO₂ uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAMmore » crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM gained through intensive and expanded research efforts has potential for high returns on research investment in the foreseeable future. To help realize the potential of sustainable dryland agricultural systems, it is necessary to address scientific questions related to the genomic features, regulatory mechanisms, and evolution of CAM; CAM-into-C3 engineering; and the production of CAM crops. Answering these questions requires collaborative efforts to build infrastructure for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.« less

  2. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.; Borland, Anne M.; Edwards, Erika; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Owen, Nick; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cestari De Paoli, Henrique; Weston, David; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C.; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul E.; Stewart, J. Ryan; Guo, Hao -Bo; Nair, Sujithkumar S.; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J.; Yin, Hengfu; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W. M.; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A.; Petereit, Juli; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L.; Ceusters, John; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J.; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-Garcia, Casandra; Andrade, Jose Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltran, Juan D.; Dever, Louisa V.; Boxall, Susanna F.; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F.; Aguilar, Cristobal N.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A.M.

    2015-07-07

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO₂ uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM gained through intensive and expanded research efforts has potential for high returns on research investment in the foreseeable future. To help realize the potential of sustainable dryland agricultural systems, it is necessary to address scientific questions related to the genomic features, regulatory mechanisms, and evolution of CAM; CAM-into-C3 engineering; and the production of CAM crops. Answering these questions requires collaborative efforts to build infrastructure for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.

  3. Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

    2007-04-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ags ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

  4. Alterra Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alterra Bioenergy Place: Gordon, Georgia Zip: 31031 Product: Alterra has developed a 56.85mLpa (15m gallon) capacity, multifeedstock...

  5. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  6. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  7. Sustainable Bioenergy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Bioenergy Sustainable Bioenergy Argonne's research in bioenergy includes topics associated with feedstock production and biomass conversion. Argonne scientists also conduct cross-cutting research to examine biofuel sustainability with regards to energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and water impacts. The overall objective of this research is to reduce costs and improve sustainability in the biofuel supply chain. Bioenergy research team Video: Biofuel technology at Argonne

  8. Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.

    2001-02-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

  9. Economics of ethanol fuel for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, C.; Rotz, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate conventional and ethanol fuel consumption for crop production. The model was validated by obtaining a close comparison between simulated and actual diesel requirements for farms in Michigan. Parameters for ethanol consumption were obtained from laboratory tests using total fueling of spark-ignition engines and dual-fueling of diesel engines with ethanol. Ethanol fuel will always be more economically used in spark-ignition engines than in dual-fueled diesel engines. The price of gasoline must inflate at least 14 percent/year greater than that of ethanol and diesel must inflate at least 23 percent/year more than ethanol to allow economic use of ethanol as tractor fuel within the next 5 years. (Refs. 13).

  10. International Energy Agency Bioenergy 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year, Sweden is hosting the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Task 38 conference on climate change effects of biomass and bioenergy systems, bringing together several international experts with an interest in bioenergy for the two-day program. The aim of the conference is to provide cutting-edge knowledge about the climate effects of converting wood products into bioenergy , as well as methods to analyze these effects. Feedstocks and Algae Program Manager Alison Goss Eng will be representing the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office at the meeting.

  11. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability To enhance the benefits of bioenergy while mitigating concerns, the Biomass Program combines advanced analysis with applied research to understand and address the potential environmental impacts of bioenergy production. PDF icon sustainability_four_pager.pdf More Documents & Publications Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and

  12. C3 BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: C3 BioEnergy Place: Massachusetts Sector: Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biomass, Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: C3 BioEnergy is an early-stage biofuels technology...

  13. Chongqing Dianfeng Bioenergy Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dianfeng Bioenergy Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chongqing Dianfeng Bioenergy Power Co Ltd Place: Chongqing Municipality, China Sector: Biomass Product:...

  14. Kai BioEnergy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kai BioEnergy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kai BioEnergy Corporation Place: Del Mar, California Zip: 92014 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  15. Guangxi Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangxi Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd Place: Guangxi Autonomous Region, China Sector: Biomass Product: Guangxi-based biomass...

  16. Nantong BIOLUX Bioenergy Protein Feed Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nantong BIOLUX Bioenergy Protein Feed Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nantong BIOLUX Bioenergy Protein Feed Co Ltd Place: Nantong, Jiangsu Province, China Product: BIOLUX...

  17. Hawaii BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii BioEnergy LLC Place: Hawaii Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: Hawaiian-based consortium researching the viability...

  18. Webinar: Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office will present a live informational webcast on the Landscape Design for Sustainable Bioenergy Systems Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001179) on November 3, 2014, 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. This FOA seeks interdisciplinary projects that apply landscape design approaches to integrate cellulosic feedstock production into existing agricultural and forestry systems while maintaining or enhancing environmental and socio-economic sustainability including ecosystem services and food, feed, and fiber production. For the purposes of this FOA, cellulosic feedstock production refers to dedicated annual and perennial energy crops, use of agricultural and forestry residues, or a combination of these options.

  19. CEE Bioenergie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Germany Product: Holding company that will develop a portfolio of biogas plants through acquisitions and project development. References: CEE Bioenergie1 This...

  20. The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future for Bioenergy To meet the mandated national bioenergy goals, the United States' evolving bioenergy industry must be effcient, reliable, and sustainable. A key challenge to achieving these goals is synchronizing all of the steps in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain-from biomass production and logistics to bioenergy production, distribution, delivery, and end use. Each current and proposed production system will be subject to economic, environmental, and infrastructure challenges unique

  1. Bioenergy Sustainability Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Sustainability Analysis NREL's bioenergy sustainability analysis group works with researchers around the world through global multilateral collaborations to assess bioenergy and bioeconomy developments in multiple scientific and social fields. Illustration with a flattened world image in grayscale in the background with a dotted-line oval labeled "Global" and then a basic image of the United States superimposed on top of this in tan with a circle line labeled "United

  2. ABENGOA BIOENERGY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued a $132.4 million loan guarantee to finance Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas (ABBK), one of the first commercial-scale biofuel plants in the United States, located about 90 miles southwest of Dodge

  3. MODEL BASED BIOMASS SYSTEM DESIGN OF FEEDSTOCK SUPPLY SYSTEMS FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Jacob J. Jacobson; Kenneth M. Bryden

    2013-08-01

    Engineering feedstock supply systems that deliver affordable, high-quality biomass remains a challenge for the emerging bioenergy industry. Cellulosic biomass is geographically distributed and has diverse physical and chemical properties. Because of this feedstock supply systems that deliver cellulosic biomass resources to biorefineries require integration of a broad set of engineered unit operations. These unit operations include harvest and collection, storage, preprocessing, and transportation processes. Design decisions for each feedstock supply system unit operation impact the engineering design and performance of the other system elements. These interdependencies are further complicated by spatial and temporal variances such as climate conditions and biomass characteristics. This paper develops an integrated model that couples a SQL-based data management engine and systems dynamics models to design and evaluate biomass feedstock supply systems. The integrated model, called the Biomass Logistics Model (BLM), includes a suite of databases that provide 1) engineering performance data for hundreds of equipment systems, 2) spatially explicit labor cost datasets, and 3) local tax and regulation data. The BLM analytic engine is built in the systems dynamics software package PowersimTM. The BLM is designed to work with thermochemical and biochemical based biofuel conversion platforms and accommodates a range of cellulosic biomass types (i.e., herbaceous residues, short- rotation woody and herbaceous energy crops, woody residues, algae, etc.). The BLM simulates the flow of biomass through the entire supply chain, tracking changes in feedstock characteristics (i.e., moisture content, dry matter, ash content, and dry bulk density) as influenced by the various operations in the supply chain. By accounting for all of the equipment that comes into contact with biomass from the point of harvest to the throat of the conversion facility and the change in characteristics, the BLM evaluates economic performance of the engineered system, as well as determining energy consumption and green house gas performance of the design. This paper presents a BLM case study delivering corn stover to produce cellulosic ethanol. The case study utilizes the BLM to model the performance of several feedstock supply system designs. The case study also explores the impact of temporal variations in climate conditions to test the sensitivity of the engineering designs. Results from the case study show that under certain conditions corn stover can be delivered to the cellulosic ethanol biorefinery for $35/dry ton.

  4. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-29

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. This publication describes how the KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of bioenergy-related information.

  5. Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papoutsakis, Elefterios

    2015-04-30

    This is the final project report for project "Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production" for the funding period of 9/1/12 to 2/28/2015 (three years with a 6-month no-cost extension) OVERVIEW AND PROJECT GOALS The bottleneck of achieving higher rates and titers of toxic metabolites (such as solvents and carboxylic acids that can used as biofuels or biofuel precursors) can be overcome by engineering the stress response system. Thus, understanding and modeling the response of cells to toxic metabolites is a problem of great fundamental and practical significance. In this project, our goal is to dissect at the molecular systems level and build models (conceptual and quantitative) for the stress response of C. acetobutylicum (Cac) to its two toxic metabolites: butanol (BuOH) and butyrate (BA). Transcriptional (RNAseq and microarray based), proteomic and fluxomic data and their analysis are key requirements for this goal. Transcriptional data from mid-exponential cultures of Cac under 4 different levels of BuOH and BA stress was obtained using both microarrays (Papoutsakis group) and deep sequencing (RNAseq; Meyers and Papoutsakis groups). These two sets of data do not only serve to validate each other, but are also used for identification of stress-induced changes in transcript levels, small regulatory RNAs, & in transcriptional start sites. Quantitative proteomic data (Lee group), collected using the iTRAQ technology, are essential for understanding of protein levels and turnover under stress and the various protein-protein interactions that orchestrate the stress response. Metabolic flux changes (Antoniewicz group) of core pathways, which provide important information on the re-allocation of energy and carbon resources under metabolite stress, were examined using 13C-labelled chemicals. Omics data are integrated at different levels and scales. At the metabolic-pathway level, omics data are integrated into a 2nd generation genome-scale model (GSM) (Maranas group). Omics data are also integrated using bioinformatics (Wu and Huang group), whereby regulatory details of gene and protein expression, protein-protein interactions and metabolic flux regulation are incorporated. The PI (Papoutsakis) facilitated project integration through monthly meeting and reports, conference calls, and collaborative manuscript preparation. The five groups collaborated extensively and made a large number of presentations in national and international meetings. It has also published several papers, with several more in the preparation stage. Several PhD, MS and postdoctoral students were trained as part of this collaborative and interdisciplinary project.

  6. ABENGOA BIOENERGY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ABENGOA BIOENERGY ABENGOA BIOENERGY PDF icon DOE-LPOProject-PostersBIOAbengoa-Bioenergy.pdf More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget ...

  7. BETO Announces Launch of the Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Launch of the Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library BETO Announces Launch of the Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library February 26, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The Bioenergy Technologies Office is pleased to announce the release of a new Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (Bioenergy KDF) resource: the Legislative Library. Using this database, site visitors can track federal legislation relevant to the production and use of biofuels in the United States. Users can choose from a variety of

  8. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Biomass Program and its partners combine advanced analysis with applied research to understand and address the potential environmental, economic, and social impacts of bioenergy production.

  9. Terra Bioenergy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Terra Bioenergy Inc Place: Missouri Zip: MO 64068 Product: Privately-owned Missouri-based manufacturer of bioediesel. References: Terra...

  10. Bioenergy Geradora de Energia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geradora de Energia Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bioenergy - Geradora de Energia Place: Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 1456010 Sector: Wind energy Product: Brazil based...

  11. Crop production with conservation in the 80's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Crop production with conservation of the resources used is needed now and will continue to be needed in the future. The need for energy conservation has received emphasis since the oil embargo of 1973-74 and evidently the emphasis will continue for the foreseeable future. Soil conservation is a continuing goal. The task is to reduce soil-erosion losses due to wind and water in order to prevent loss of soil productivity permanently and to provide improved water quality. In many states soil conservation has become a public goal arrived at through public input in the decision-making process. The goal of this Conference on Crop Production with Conservation in the 80's was to explore and make available current research, thoughts, and trends on resource conservation in conjunction with crop production. The Conference was held at The Palmer House in Chicago on December 1 and 2, 1980. This conference report consists of 29 papers. 415 references, 47 figures, 106 tables.

  12. 2016 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. March 18, 2016 NREL Research Helps Convert Overabundant Methane into Useful Products The biological production of fuels and chemicals from methane represents a means of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions and, at the same time, utilizing an abundant-yet-underutilized, high-energy gas, making the process the subject of a promising new NREL study, published in Nature's Scientific Reports. Archives 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 |

  13. G K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: G.K.Bioenergy Pvt. Ltd. Place: Namakkal District, India Zip: 637 109 Sector: Biomass Product: Tamil Nadu-based biomass project...

  14. Hestia BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hestia BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hestia BioEnergy LLC Place: New York, New York Zip: 11378 Sector: Biomass Product: Hestia builds, operates and owns biomass...

  15. Borgford BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Borgford BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Borgford BioEnergy LLC Place: Colville, Washington State Zip: 99114 Sector: Biomass Product: Washington-based developer of...

  16. Four Rivers BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Four Rivers BioEnergy Place: Calvert City, Kentucky Zip: 42029 Product: Kentucky-based ethanol and biodiesel producer, which is...

  17. Western BioEnergy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Western BioEnergy Ltd Place: Cardiff, United Kingdom Zip: CF24 0EB Product: Developing a 13.8MW wood burning project in Margam,...

  18. Hoogen Bioenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany Zip: 1968 Product: Hoogen Bioenergie assist in building and operating biogas plants. References: Hoogen Bioenergie GmbH & Co.KG1 This article is a stub. You can...

  19. Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60603 Sector: Efficiency Product: Chicago-based company dedicated to...

  20. Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bioenergy: Energy produced from organic materials from plants or animals. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle 1 This article...

  1. Bioenergy Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Transportation » Bioenergy Success Stories Bioenergy Success Stories RSS The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) successes in developing sustainable, cost-competitive biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower translate into clean, affordable fuels for the cars and trucks of today and tomorrow, and products and power that can help reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Explore EERE's bioenergy success stories below. February 10, 2016 EERE Success Story-EERE National

  2. Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, David J.; Bryden, Kenneth Mark; Nelson, R. G.

    2012-10-06

    This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

  3. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting ...

  4. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D.

    2011-03-01

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  5. Kim Magrini | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kim Magrini Kim Magrini Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences Group Manager, Principal Scientist Kim.Magrini@nrel.gov | 303-384-7706 Research Interests Kim Magrini is a principal research scientist and group manager in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Bioenergy Center (NBC). She manages NREL's Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences Group, which focuses on the development of catalytic approaches to biofuels production from syngas and pyrolysis. She has 25 years of

  6. Nancy Dowe | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy Dowe Nancy Dowe Research Manager - Bioprocess Development Nancy.Dowe@nrel.gov | 303-384-6849 Research Interests Nancy Dowe is the section manager of NREL's National Bioenergy Center Bioprocess Development Group. The group is largely made up of fermentation scientists and engineers whose focus is on fermentation process development and pilot plant scale-up. Dowe has nearly 30 years of experience working with a wide variety of fermentation processes and microorganisms for the production of

  7. Facilities | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art bioenergy research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels, chemicals, and products. These facilities are available for testing feedstocks, processes, technologies, and equipment at laboratory- to- pilot scales. Government agencies, universities, and a variety of industries have taken advantage of the flexibility offered by these facilities to evaluate and validate their process

  8. Regional Feedstock Partnership: Woody Crops Presentation for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... field tests including clone test and biomass yield studies ... yield decrease in top five cultivars for post 2005 ... Willow Bioenergy Crops-Big Flats", Cornell University, ...

  9. Bioenergy Impacts … Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    biofuel production on water quality and quantity, and determine which biofuel crops are best suited to different geographic locations. Biofuel research is enabling wise water use

  10. Bioenergy Impacts … Green Racing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sports car racing is using biofuels to drive renewable fuel development BIOENERGY To learn more, visit bioenergy.energy.gov. BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Photo courtesy of Royal ...

  11. National Bioenergy Day 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy, the use of agricultural waste and forestry byproducts to generate heat and energy, will be celebrated during the third annual National Bioenergy Day on October 22, 2014. This is an opportunity to showcase bioenergy facilities and the bioenergy supply chain around the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will celebrate National Bioenergy Day with an educational display about the bioenergy supply chain and the bioeconomy in the lobby of the Energy Department’s Forrestal building in downtown Washington, D.C.

  12. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy is derived from organic matter to produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department is challenging high school-aged students to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates their research. For more information, please visit energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge Questions? Email BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov O P

  13. The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. The KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of

  14. Bioenergy and Biome Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation On July 12-14, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its ninth annual conference-Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation. Partnering with the Clean Energy Research and Education Foundation (CEREF), this year's conference will focus on opportunities to grow future

  15. Land-Use Change and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This publication describes the Biomass Program’s efforts to examine the intersection of land-use change and bioenergy production. It describes legislation requiring land-use change assessments, key data and modeling challenges, and the research needs to better assess and understand the impact of bioenergy policy on land-use decisions.

  16. Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc.; DuPont Experimental Station; Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser; Herrmann, Rafael; Presnail, James; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2007-05-10

    Extremophilic microorganisms are adapted to survive in ecological niches with high temperatures, extremes of pH, high salt concentrations, high pressure, radiation, etc. Extremophiles produce unique biocatalysts and natural products that function under extreme conditions comparab le to those prevailing in various industrial processes. Therefore, there is burgeoning interest in bioprospecting for extremophiles with potential immediate use in agriculture, the food, chemical, and pharm aceutical industries, and environmental biotechnology. Over the years, several thousand extremophilic bacteria, archaea, and filamentous fungi were collected at extreme environmental sites in the USA, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the faeild nuclear power plant in Ukraine, in and around Lake Baikal in Siberia, and at geothermal sites on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia. These organisms were cultured under proprietary conditions, and the cell- free supernatants were screened for biological activities against plant pathogenic fungi and major crop damaging insects. Promising peptide lead molecules were isolated, characterized, and sequenced. Relatively high hit rates characterized the tested fermentation broths. Of the 26,000 samples screened, over thousand contained biological activity of interest. A fair number of microorganisms expressed broad- spectrum antifungal or insecticidal activity. Two- dozen broadly antifungal peptides (AFPs) are alr eady patent protected, and many more tens are under further investigation. Tapping the gene pool of extremophilic microorganisms to provide novel ways of crop protection proved a successful strategy.

  17. The U.S. Dry-Mill Ethanol Industry: Biobased Products and Bioenergy Initiative Success Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the history of ethanol production in the United States and describes innovations in dry-mill ethanol production.

  18. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  19. Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States (2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-13

    Establish far-reaching goals to increase the role of biobased energy and products in our nations economy

  20. Bioenergy Key Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following key publications are issued by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  1. Global Bioenergy Partnership Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office Sustainability Technology Manager Kristen Johnson represented the Office at the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) Meetings in Rome, Italy. The event included three meetings, the 7th annual GBEP Working Group on Capacity Building, the 13th annual Task Force on Sustainability to discuss the experiences with the GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy, and the 18th annual GBEP Steering Committee to discuss strategies for sustainable bioenergy development and deployment.

  2. Bioenergy Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bioenergy Technology Ltd Place: East Sussex, United Kingdom Zip: TN22 5RU Sector: Biomass Product: Firm dedicated to the use of...

  3. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi; Fulbright, Scott P; Zeng, Xiaowei; Yates, Tracy; Wardle, Greg; Chisholm, Stephen T; Xu, Jian; Lammers, Peter

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  4. BioEnergy of America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of America Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy of America Place: Edison, New Jersey Zip: 8817 Product: Defunct New Jersey biodiesel project developer & owner. Company was...

  5. BioEnergy Solutions BES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions BES Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy Solutions (BES) Place: Bakersfield, California Zip: 93309 Product: Bakersfield-based firm installing and operating biogas...

  6. BioEnergy Engineering LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy Engineering LLC Place: Tennessee Sector: Biofuels Product: A biofuels engineering and design firm with proprietary...

  7. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  8. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools September 30, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis A researcher loads a biomass sample into spinning ring cup. Argonne National Laboratory has launched two online tools that assess the resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory A researcher loads a biomass

  10. Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

    2013-02-01

    This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

  11. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  12. Bioenergy KDF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English References: Bioenergy KDF1 Logo: Bioenergy KDF ORNL is designing and...

  13. Stephen R. Decker | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Science Center - Biomass Recalcitrance (project lead) BioEnergy Science Center - Enzymatic Fundamentals (contributor) DSM TSA (PI) Targeted Microbial Deconstruction ...

  14. Bioenergy Success Stories

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    61 Bioenergy Success Stories en Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October http:energy.goveeresuccess-storiesarticleslargest-cellulosic-ethanol-plant-wor...

  15. Bioenergy Impacts ? Green Racing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ushers in the next generation of road- relevant technologies and renewable fuels. Sports car racing is using biofuels to drive renewable fuel development BIOENERGY To learn more,...

  16. Bioenergy Key Publications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terrestrial Feedstocks R&D Feedstock Supply and Logistics: Biomass as a Commodity July ... Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework July 2013 Other Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs May ...

  17. 2010 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. October 14, 2010 Three NREL Biofuels Experts Make "Top 100 People in Bioenergy" List Three scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have been named among Biofuels Digest's "Top 100 People in Bioenergy" for 2010. Tom Foust, Al Darzins, and Phil Pienkos were selected as bioenergy leaders through a two-week Biofuels Digest reader poll that garnered more than

  18. Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool February 27, 2014 - 5:59pm Addthis The Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library aims to help the public, industry, and decision makers quickly and easily find legislation related to the production and use of biofuels. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs With thousands of proposed bills floating through Congress every session, it's difficult to keep track of legislation

  19. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Take hold of your energy future: Bioenergy is derived from organic matter to produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department challenges you to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates your research. Submissions are due by March 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. central time. Follow us on #BioenergizeME. Questions? Email

  20. BETO-Funded Study Offers Methods to Support a Water-Sustainable Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry | Department of Energy Study Offers Methods to Support a Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Industry BETO-Funded Study Offers Methods to Support a Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Industry January 27, 2016 - 12:55pm Addthis BETO’s sustainability work includes assessing water resource use and water quality impacts of bioenergy production. BETO's sustainability work includes assessing water resource use and water quality impacts of bioenergy production. Argonne National Laboratory released a

  1. Jeffery G. Linger | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffery G. Linger Jeffery G. Linger Research Scientist Jeffrey.Linger@nrel.gov | 303-384-7780 Research Interests Jeffrey G. Linger is a research scientist in the Applied Biology group within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center. Linger joined NREL in 2007 as a postdoctoral fellow studying the production of biofuels. Specifically, Linger uses molecular biology techniques to assess the feasibility of converting the microorganism Zymomonas mobilis into a

  2. Analysis and Characterization | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis and Characterization NREL's team of bioenergy analysts takes a field-to-finished product approach to bringing biofuels and bioproducts to market. We use computational modeling, techno-economic analysis, and related tools to study biomass from its potential as a feedstock, through conversion technologies, to sustainability in the marketplace and the world. young hybrid cottonwood trees growing in a field Biomass Feedstocks model of enzymes wrapping on cellulose; colorful circular

  3. Work with Us | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Us NREL provides partnerships and collaboration in the research and development of bioenergy including bio-based energy, fuels, and products. Woman in front of monitor displaying line graph in industrial facility; other workers in background. Leverage the expertise of our research staff and the efficiency of working in our world-class facilities. Contact Us Robert Baldwin Partnership and Business Development Email | 303-384-6858 Richard Bolin Partnership and Business Development Email

  4. Anne Elizabeth Ware | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elizabeth Ware Anne Elizabeth Ware Scientist Anne.Ware@nrel.gov | 303-384-6131 Research Interests Lignin structure and composition Terpenoid content in pine Analytical method development Pyrolysis oil characterization Affiliated Research Programs Bioenergy Science Center ARPA-E Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development Areas of Expertise Biomass composition analysis Analytical pyrolysis Thioacidolysis Extractives (i.e., lipids,

  5. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  6. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly concentrated protein co-product, has shown that the process is economically viable resulting in an increase in net present value (Perkis et al., 2008). According to the study, the revenue is expected to increase further with improved amino acid profile of the protein rich co-products and lower cost of cellulase enzyme mixture. Also, Kim and Dale (2008) discuss using life cycle analysis to enhance the environmental performance of the corn based ethanol. On the second phase of the research, concerted efforts were directed on assessing compositional variability of dry milling co-products collected from 4 different dry grind ethanol plants has been measured and its effect on enzymatic digestibility and fermentability. Fermentation utilized a recombinant glucose/xylose co-fermenting yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST)). No significant compositional variability among the samples was found. Simultaneous saccharification and glucose/xylose co-fermentation of the pretreated distillers grains at solids and cellulase loadings of 150 g dry solids per liter and 6.4 mg protein per g dry substrate, respectively, yielded 74-801% of theoretical maximum ethanol concentration using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST). The paper summarizing the results from the second phase of the Midwest Consortium is currently submitted to Bioresource Technology journal. The copy of the paper submitted is enclosed.

  7. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Webinar: Mobilizing Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy program will be hosting a webinar on Feb. 25, 2016 to present the findings of their “Mobilize Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains” project. Over the last three years, researchers have collaborated to examine the prospects for large-scale mobilization of bioenergy resources across the globe. Members of Bioenergy Technologies Office staff support the research and activities and IEA Bioenergy. Email to register to attend the webinar.

  8. Bioenergy systems report: The AID (Agency for International Development) approach. Using agricultural and forestry wastes for the production of energy in support of rural development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The Biomass Energy Systems and Technology project (BEST) seeks to integrate natural resources, private sector expertise, and financial support in order to convert biomass into marketable energy products at existing agro-processing facilities. This report documents BEST's approach to biomass promotion and includes sections on: the rationale for the project's commodity focus (sugar cane, rice, and wood); the relevant U.S. biomass experience with rice, cane, and wood residues, etc., which BEST draws upon; A.I.D.'s experience in the field application of rice, wood, and cane residue bioenergy systems; economic analyses of biomass systems (using examples from Indonesia and Costa Rica); research initiatives to develop off-season fuels for sugar mills, advanced biomass conversion systems, and energy efficiency in sugar factories; and the environmental aspects of biomass (including its ability to be used without increasing global warming).

  9. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other Participants * Abengoa Bioenergy New Technologies * Abengoa Bioenergy Trading * Abener - Teyma General Partnership * Virent Prime Abengoa Bioenergy U.S. Holdings, LLC ...

  10. Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Name: Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Address: Sector 18-D, Chandigarh Place: Chandigarh Zip: 160018...

  11. Sustainability in Bioenergy: A Nation Connected | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability in Bioenergy: A Nation Connected Sustainability in Bioenergy: A Nation Connected Addthis "Sustainability in Bioenergy: A Nation Connected" is a short documentary ...

  12. Bioenergy Impacts … Self-Loading Trailer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biorefineries are cutting their costs by using more efficient harvesting equipment BIOENERGY To learn more, visit bioenergy.energy.gov. BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Photo courtesy ...

  13. Bioenergy Impacts … National User Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    companies in moving their bioenergy business ventures from laboratory to commercial scale. ... Bioenergy companies are implementing new technology with less risk BIOENERGY To learn ...

  14. Could crop height affect the wind resource at agriculturally productive wind farm sites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2015-11-07

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length in a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. As a result, these considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.

  15. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

  16. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bonner, Ian J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Muth, Jr., David J.; Tomer, Mark; James, David; Porter, Sarah; Karlen, Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeledmore » to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.« less

  17. US BioEnergy Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: US BioEnergy Corp Place: South Dakota Zip: 57006 Product: Focused on biofuel production. Merged with VeraSun as of 1 April 2008. References:...

  18. Center for BioEnergy Sustainability | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability, or CBES, is a Center at Oak...

  19. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-01

    Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy. This document provides general information about bioenergy and its creation and potential uses.

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office Solicitations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financial Opportunities Bioenergy Technologies Office Solicitations Bioenergy Technologies Office Solicitations To explore current financial opportunity solicitations, click on ...

  1. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Announces Renewable Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Announces ... Related Articles Renewable Carbon Fibers Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Notice of ...

  2. Bioenergy 2015 Speaker Biographies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document outlines the speaker biographies for Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. The conference will be held on June 23–24, 2015, at the Washington Convention Center.

  3. Bioenergy & Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office and the Clean Cities program regularly conduct a joint Web conference for state energy office representatives and Clean Cities coordinators. The Web conferences...

  4. Bioenergy 2016 Confirmed Speakers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Confirmed speakers for Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation, which will be held on July 12–14, 2016, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

  5. Bioenergy Impacts: Biorefineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POET-DSM's Project LIBERTY and Abengoa's Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas are biorefineries that convert corn stover-non-edible corn stalks, stems, and leaves-into cellulosic ethanol, a ...

  6. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  7. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  8. Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Bioenergy EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds research, development, and

  9. Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources » Renewable Energy » Bioenergy Bioenergy Learn how Energy Department scientists and researchers produce clean, renewable fuel -- from algae. Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured 6 New Things Happening with Biofuels The science and industry of biofuels is changing rapidly. See what's new with the fuels of the future. World's First Algae Surfboard Makes Waves in San Diego Surfing into

  10. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff Directors Photo of Adam Bratis Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director Dr. Adam Bratis' role as Associate Lab Director is to guide NREL's research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This includes oversight in the areas of biochemical conversion, thermochemical conversion, algae, techno-economic and life-cycle analyses, and

  11. Bioenergy in a Multifunctional Landscape- Text-Alt Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How can our landscapes be managed most effectively to produce crops for food, feed, and bioenergy, while also protecting our water resources by preventing the loss of nutrients from the soil? Dr. Cristina Negri and her team at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory are tackling this question at an agricultural research site located in Fairbury, Illinois.

  12. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-11-01

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  13. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-07-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  14. Could crop height affect the wind resource at agriculturally productive wind farm sites?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2015-11-07

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length inmore » a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. As a result, these considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.« less

  15. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  16. NREL SBV Pilot Bioenergy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conversion technologies, biomass process and sustainability analysis, and feedstock logistics. Capabilities The NREL National Bioenergy Center develops, refines, and validates...

  17. Anhui Yineng Bioenergy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anhui Yineng Bioenergy Co Ltd Place: Hefei, Anhui Province, China Product: A Chinese bio-oil equipment manufacturer Coordinates: 31.86141, 117.27562 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  19. Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

  20. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    merit to bioenergy stakeholders, but also for its technical capabilities as a Web-based architecture. Visit the Bioenergy KDF, or learn more through the Bioenergy KDF Fact Sheet. ...

  1. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department challenges you to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates your research. Submissions are due by March 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. central time. Follow us on #BioenergizeME. Questions? Email BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov For more information, please visit

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE FY 2016 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) supports targeted research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) activities to advance the sustainable, nationwide production of advanced biofuels that will displace a share of petroleum-derived fuels, mitigate climate change, create jobs, and increase United States energy security. What We Do  Research and Development focused on addressing technical barriers, providing

  3. Events & Topics In Bioenergy | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events & Topics In Bioenergy Events & Topics In Bioenergy Dr. Chenyang Lu Smart Building with Wireless Sensor Networks Dr. Joseph Cullen "Measuring the Environmental Benefits of Wind Power" Dr. Pratim Biswas "Aerosol nanoparticle technology enabling solar energy applications: Biohybrid and biomimetic solar devices" Dr. Dewey Holten "Bioinspired and Biohybrid photosynthetic antenna systems for energy applications" Mark Henson "Modeling the Production of

  4. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivares, Jose A; Park, Min S; Unkefer, Clifford J; Bradbury, Andrew M; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2009-01-01

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

  5. Mapping intra-field yield variation using high resolution satellite imagery to integrate bioenergy and environmental stewardship in an agricultural watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Yuki; Ssegane, Herbert; Negri, Maria Cristina

    2015-07-31

    Biofuels are important alternatives for meeting our future energy needs. Successful bioenergy crop production requires maintaining environmental sustainability and minimum impacts on current net annual food, feed, and fiber production. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine under-productive areas within an agricultural field in a watershed using a single date; high resolution remote sensing and (2) examine impacts of growing bioenergy crops in the under-productive areas using hydrologic modeling in order to facilitate sustainable landscape design. Normalized difference indices (NDIs) were computed based on the ratio of all possible two-band combinations using the RapidEye and the National Agricultural Imagery Program images collected in summer 2011. A multiple regression analysis was performed using 10 NDIs and five RapidEye spectral bands. The regression analysis suggested that the red and near infrared bands and NDI using red-edge and near infrared that is known as the red-edge normalized difference vegetation index (RENDVI) had the highest correlation (R2 = 0.524) with the reference yield. Although predictive yield map showed striking similarity to the reference yield map, the model had modest correlation; thus, further research is needed to improve predictive capability for absolute yields. Forecasted impact using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model of growing switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) on under-productive areas based on corn yield thresholds of 3.1, 4.7, and 6.3 Mg·ha-1 showed reduction of tile NO3-N and sediment exports by 15.9%–25.9% and 25%–39%, respectively. Corresponding reductions in water yields ranged from 0.9% to 2.5%. While further research is warranted, the study demonstrated the integration of remote sensing and hydrologic modeling to quantify the multifunctional value of projected future landscape patterns in a context of sustainable bioenergy crop production.

  6. Mapping intra-field yield variation using high resolution satellite imagery to integrate bioenergy and environmental stewardship in an agricultural watershed

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hamada, Yuki; Ssegane, Herbert; Negri, Maria Cristina

    2015-07-31

    Biofuels are important alternatives for meeting our future energy needs. Successful bioenergy crop production requires maintaining environmental sustainability and minimum impacts on current net annual food, feed, and fiber production. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine under-productive areas within an agricultural field in a watershed using a single date; high resolution remote sensing and (2) examine impacts of growing bioenergy crops in the under-productive areas using hydrologic modeling in order to facilitate sustainable landscape design. Normalized difference indices (NDIs) were computed based on the ratio of all possible two-band combinations using the RapidEye and the National Agriculturalmore » Imagery Program images collected in summer 2011. A multiple regression analysis was performed using 10 NDIs and five RapidEye spectral bands. The regression analysis suggested that the red and near infrared bands and NDI using red-edge and near infrared that is known as the red-edge normalized difference vegetation index (RENDVI) had the highest correlation (R2 = 0.524) with the reference yield. Although predictive yield map showed striking similarity to the reference yield map, the model had modest correlation; thus, further research is needed to improve predictive capability for absolute yields. Forecasted impact using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model of growing switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) on under-productive areas based on corn yield thresholds of 3.1, 4.7, and 6.3 Mg·ha-1 showed reduction of tile NO3-N and sediment exports by 15.9%–25.9% and 25%–39%, respectively. Corresponding reductions in water yields ranged from 0.9% to 2.5%. While further research is warranted, the study demonstrated the integration of remote sensing and hydrologic modeling to quantify the multifunctional value of projected future landscape patterns in a context of sustainable bioenergy crop production.« less

  7. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy News Bioenergy News RSS May 10, 2016 CAB-Comm Final Report Documents Accomplishments from Six Years of Algal Research The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm), led by the University of California, San Diego, has just released its final report, detailing the many accomplishments and impactful contributions achieved in its six years of operation. CAB-Comm was established in 2010 through a competitive award from the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office

  8. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Breakout ...

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview This slideshow explains the work of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. PDF icon bioenergywalkthrough.pdf More Documents & ...

  10. Bioenergy Impacts … Renewable Jet Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and ... Biofuel is becoming an option for commercial and military airplanes BIOENERGY To learn ...

  11. Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report This ...

  12. Chapter 9, Land and Bioenergy in Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), Bioenergy & Sustainability: bridging the gaps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods J, Lynd LR; Laser, M; Batistella M, De Castro D; Kline, Keith L; Faaij, Andre

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we address the questions of whether and how enough biomass could be produced to make a material contribution to global energy supply on a scale and timeline that is consistent with prominent low carbon energy scenarios. We assess whether bioenergy provision necessarily conflicts with priority ecosystem services including food security for the world s poor and vulnerable populations. In order to evaluate the potential land demand for bioenergy, we developed a set of three illustrative scenarios using specified growth rates for each bioenergy sub-sector. In these illustrative scenarios, bioenergy (traditional and modern) increases from 62 EJ/yr in 2010 to 100, 150 and 200 EJ/yr in 2050. Traditional bioenergy grows slowly, increasing by between 0.75% and 1% per year, from 40 EJ/yr in 2010 to 50 or 60 EJ/ yr in 2050, continuing as the dominant form of bioenergy until at least 2020. Across the three scenarios, total land demand is estimated to increase by between 52 and 200 Mha which can be compared with a range of potential land availability estimates from the literature of between 240 million hectares to over 1 billion hectares. Biomass feedstocks arise from combinations of residues and wastes, energy cropping and increased efficiency in supply chains for energy, food and materials. In addition, biomass has the unique capability of providing solid, liquid and gaseous forms of modern energy carriers that can be transformed into analogues to existing fuels. Because photosynthesis fixes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, biomass supply chains can be configured to store at least some of the fixed carbon in forms or ways that it will not be reemitted to the atmosphere for considerable periods of time, so-called negative emissions pathways. These attributes provide opportunities for bioenergy policies to promote longterm and sustainable options for the supply of energy for the foreseeable future.

  13. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    made from renewable, non-food-based biomass, such as agricultural residues and woody biomass. February 26, 2014 BETO Announces Launch of the Bioenergy KDF Legislative...

  14. Bioenergy Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities DevelopBAU Stage 4:...

  15. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  16. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  17. Joshua Schaidle | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joshua Schaidle Joshua Schaidle Acting Thermochemical Conversion Platform Manager and Research Engineer Joshua.Schaidle@nrel.gov | 303-384-7823 Research Interests Joshua Schaidle works in the Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development group within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center (NBC) and leads a project focused on developing catalysts, processes, and reactor systems for the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors to produce fungible

  18. Richard Bolin | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard Bolin Richard Bolin Manager, Partnership Development Group Richard.Bolin@nrel.gov | 303-384-7716 Areas of Expertise Bolin works with biomass and biosciences researchers to create partnerships with companies, universities, and government agencies. He also develops winning proposals, manages projects, and markets NREL's bioenergy capabilities. Education MBA, Marketing and Organization Management, Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado at Boulder M.S., Molecular Biology, George

  19. Cindy Gerk | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cindy Gerk Cindy Gerk Project Leader Cindy.Gerk@nrel.gov | 303-384-7693 Areas of Expertise Extensive experience managing projects, planning and communicating results, and working closely with industry and DOE serving as a Project Leader and a Principal Investigator Management of reporting requirements to DOE for financial forecasts, milestone reports, and annual operating plans Management of communications projects for the NREL Biomass program and Bioenergy Technologies Office communications

  20. Daniel Carpenter | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel B. Fishman About Us Daniel B. Fishman - Technology Manager Daniel B. Fishman is a Technology Manager for the Bioenergy Technologies Office. Most Recent World's First Algae Surfboard Makes Waves in San Diego April 23

    Carpenter Daniel Carpenter Senior Scientist Daniel.Carpenter@nrel.gov | 303-384-6709 Research Interests Impact of feedstocks on thermochemical conversion performance (pyrolysis, catalytic pyrolysis, gasification), especially related to blending low-cost, sustainable

  1. 2009 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. November 5, 2009 NREL's Clean Energy Forum Attracts National Investment Community The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 22nd Clean Energy Industry Growth Forum this week attracted nearly 600 investors, entrepreneurs, scientists and policymakers to Denver. October 13, 2009 Web Portal Makes Finding Ways to Drive Green Even Easier The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable

  2. 2011 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. October 3, 2011 NREL Issues RFI on Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Services and Capabilities NREL seeks feedback from industry, academia, and other stakeholders on methods of working with the Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF). June 2, 2011 Science & Industry Peers Turn to NREL for Biomass Solutions The biomass industry looks to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  3. 2012 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. December 14, 2012 NREL and Johnson Matthey Announce Five-Year Collaboration on Biofuels The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will partner with Johnson Matthey, a global specialty chemicals company, in a five-year, $7 million effort to economically produce drop-in gasoline, diesel and jet fuel from non-food biomass feedstocks, the federal laboratory announced today. November 26, 2012

  4. 2013 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program.

  5. 2014 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. October 31, 2014 Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead NREL's cryogenic tank holds 500 dormant algae samples, and each must ease back into life. October 30, 2014 Industry Growth Forum Cultivates Clean Energy Entrepreneurship NREL's Industry Growth Forum brings together clean energy entrepreneurs and investors to facilitate the movement of innovation into the marketplace. September 19, 2014 NREL Industry Growth Forum

  6. Abhijit Dutta | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abhijit Dutta Abhijit Dutta Biorefinery Analysis Section Supervisor Abhijit.Dutta@nrel.gov | 303-384-7782 Research Interests Dutta is a senior engineer and the supervisor of the Biorefinery Analysis Section in the National Bioenergy Center (NBC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Dutta has more than 20 years of experience in process engineering, including expertise in process modeling. He led and/or contributed to analyses, detailed reports, and publications on biomass

  7. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuelsliquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview This slideshow explains the work of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. To download the file, right click and save it to your computer, then open the file with Adobe Reader. PDF icon bioenergy_overview_july_2014 More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview August 2014 Monthly News Blast 2013 Peer Review Presnentations-Plenaries

  9. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01

    April through June 2008 update on activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  10. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  11. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability To enhance the benefits of bioenergy while mitigating concerns, the Biomass Program combines...

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Bioenergy Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory Bioenergy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bioenergy Program at Idaho National Laboratory Name Bioenergy Program at Idaho National Laboratory AgencyCompany...

  13. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy This document provides general information about bioenergy and its creation and potential uses....

  14. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future Bioenergy: America's Energy Future Addthis Description Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. Text Version Below is the text version for the Bioenergy:

  15. Bioenergy 2015 Press Room | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Press Room Bioenergy 2015 Press Room This U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy 2015 online press room provides contacts, information, and resources to members of the media who cover Bioenergy 2015 conference-related news. Event Overview The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conference-Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. Co-hosted with the Clean Energy Research and Education Foundation, this year's conference

  16. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is committed to developing the resources, technologies, and systems needed to support a thriving bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and ad- vances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO’s Sustainability Technology Area proactively identifies and addresses issues that affect the scale-up potential, public acceptance, and long-term viability of advanced bioenergy systems; as a result, the area is critical to achieving BETO’s overall goals.

  17. Drought effects on composition and yield for corn stover, mixed grasses, and Miscanthus as bioenergy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Amber Hoover; Allison Ray; Jeffrey Lacey; Marnie Cortez; Courtney Payne; Doug Karlen; Stuart Birrell; David Laird; Robert Kallenbach; Josh Egenolf; Matthew Sousek; Thomas Voigt

    2014-11-01

    Drought conditions in 2012 were some of the most severe reported in the United States. It is necessary to explore the effects of drought on the quality attributes of current and potential bioenergy feedstocks. Compositional analysis data for corn stover, Miscanthus, and CRP grasses from one or more locations for years 2010 (normal precipitation levels) and 2012 (a known severe drought year nationally) was collected. Results & discussion: The general trend for samples that experienced drought was an increase in extractives and a decrease in structural sugars and lignin. The TEY yields were calculated to determine the drought effects on ethanol production. All three feedstocks had a decrease of 12-14% in TEY when only decreases of carbohydrate content was analyzed. When looking at the compounded effect of both carbohydrate content and the decreases in dry matter loss for each feedstock there was a TEY decrease of 25%-59%. Conclusion: Drought had a significant impact on the quality of all three bioenergy crops. In all cases where drought was experienced both the quality of the feedstock and the yield decreased. These drought induced effects could have significant economic impacts on biorefineries.

  18. Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNLs capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

  19. Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNL’s capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

  20. Assessing the Economic Viability of Bio-based Products for Missouri Value-added Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

    2005-11-30

    While research and development on biobased products has continued strong over the years, parallel attention on the economics and management of such product innovation has been lacking. With the financial support of the Department of Energy, the Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia has launched a pilot graduate education program that seeks to fill the gap. Within this context, a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program has been structured with an emphasis on new product and innovation economics and management. More specifically, this pilot graduate education program has the following major objectives: (1) To provide students with a strong background in innovation economics, management, and strategy. (2) To diversify the students academic background with coursework in science and technology. (3) To familiarize the student with biobased policy initiatives through interaction with state and national level organizations and policymakers. (4) To facilitate active collaboration with industry involved in the development and production of biobased products. The pilot education program seeks to develop human capital and research output. Although the research is, initially, focused on issues related to the State of Missouri, the results are expected to have national implications for the economy, producers, consumers and environment.

  1. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  2. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore » a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.« less

  3. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  4. Atmospheric inversion of the surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distributions of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, Tristram O.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous USA, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with consideration of the spatial information of crop production and consumption. Spatially distributed 5 county-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous USA are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon 10 fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 20022007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 0.03 Pg C yr? to 0.42 0.13 Pg C yr?, whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forest region is weakened from 0.410.12 Pg C yr? 15 to 0.29 0.12 Pg C yr?. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the West region from 0.066 0.04 Pg C yr? to 0.040 0.02 Pg C yr?1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increase in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop 20 products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides an atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance of a region.

  5. Webinar: Demonstration of NREL’s BioEnergy Atlas Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will host a free webinar on December 16 demonstrating how to use the BioEnergy Atlas tools. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office funded the BioEnergy Atlas tools, which include the BioFuels and BioPower Atlases. These tools are designed as first-pass visualization tools that allow users to view many bioenergy and related datasets in Google Maps. Users can query and download map data and view incentives and state energy data, as well as select an area on the map for estimated biofuels or biopower production potential. The webinar will review the data source and date of bioenergy data layers. The NREL team will show users how to view and download data behind the map, how to view state energy data and incentives, and how to view and edit potential biofuel or biopower production in a geographical location.

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office Releases Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) hosted the two-day Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, on June 20-€œ21, 2013. The conference brought together diverse members of the public, private, and academic sectors to explore the challenges and opportunities associated with expanding the commercial use of microbial-based products to increase biofeedstock production.

  7. Gordian Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Gordian Bioenergy is a private equity formed by undisclosed investors who want invest in Greenfield projects. They plan to developed 6 to 8 projects in the states of Bahia,...

  8. Peter N. Ciesielski | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N. Ciesielski Peter N. Ciesielski Research Scientist, Bioenergy and Biomaterials Peter.Ciesielski@nrel.gov | 303-384-7691 Research Interests I am a scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and have an interdisciplinary background and training. My research encompasses many aspects of bioenergy and biomaterials science. Biomass is an abundant, renewable resource that is naturally and continually mass-produced on this planet. Humans have been using biomass as source of fuel and

  9. Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - ORNL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Office of the Biomass Program Webinar April 23, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL - Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Agenda Overview of programs - Tim Theiss - Laboratory Relationship Manager, Biomass Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Mentor perspective - Erin Webb, Ph.D., P.E - Research Engineer, Renewable Systems Group - Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Post-graduate perspective - Scott Curran - Research

  10. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Conference 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Conference will be hosted in Berlin, Germany, from October 27 to 29, 2015. The conference will highlight recent research and market developments in bioenergy, such as challenges across bioenergy value chains, as well as crosscutting topics such as environmental sustainability, socioeconomic issues, and trade. The U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Manager Jim Spaeth will be moderating a panel on multidisciplinary projects within IEA Bioenergy. He will also be attending the IEA Executive Committee meeting on October 26, during which plans and commitments will be made for the IEA Bioenergy projects for the next triennium.

  11. Production and fuel characteristics of vegetable oil from oilseed crops in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auld, D.L.; Bettis, B.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential yield and fuel quality of various oilseed crops adapted to the Pacific Northwest as a source of liquid fuel for diesel engines. The seed yield and oil production of three cultivars of winter rape (Brassica napus L.), two cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and two cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were evaluated in replicated plots at Moscow. Additional trials were conducted at several locations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sunflower, oleic and linoleic safflower, and low and high erucic acid rapeseed were evaluated for fatty acid composition, energy content, viscosity and engine performance in short term tests. During 20 minute engine tests power output, fuel economy and thermal efficiency were compared to diesel fuel. Winter rape produced over twice as much farm extractable oil as either safflower or sunflower. The winter rape cultivars, Norde and Jet Neuf had oil yields which averaged 1740 and 1540 L/ha, respectively. Vegetable oils contained 94 to 95% of the KJ/L of diesel fuel, but were 11.1 to 17.6 times more viscous. Viscosity of the vegetable oils was closely related to fatty acid chain length and number of unsaturated bonds (R/sup 2/=.99). During short term engine tests all vegetable oils produced power outputs equivalent to diesel, and had thermal efficiencies 1.8 to 2.8% higher than diesel. Based on these results it appears that species and cultivars of oilseed crops to be utilized as a source of fuel should be selected on the basis of oil yield. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  12. Progress and Products from the Regional Feedstock Partnership Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office and the Sun Grant Initiative established the Regional Feedstock Partnership (RFP). The partnership was designed to address information gaps on productivity and yield potential of key energy crops and related sources of biomass. The RFP evolved into an expansive project with more than 100 field trials in 48 states incorporating advanced genetic material to ascertain current growth and yield characteristics, assess sustainability attributes, and define production economics. Engaging the nation’s leading researchers, the partnership has populated the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework with new data on energy crop yields, generated information to refine assumptions made in the 2016 Billion-Ton Report, and created new education and outreach tools for bioenergy stakeholders. RFP team leaders will assemble to highlight the critical advances and valuable products resulting from this important partnership. This meeting will be held directly after the Bioenergy 2016 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on July 14 from 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

  13. DOE and USDA Award $10 Million to Advance Biofuels, Bioenergy, and Biobased

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products | Department of Energy DOE and USDA Award $10 Million to Advance Biofuels, Bioenergy, and Biobased Products DOE and USDA Award $10 Million to Advance Biofuels, Bioenergy, and Biobased Products May 9, 2016 - 11:20am Addthis Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) awarded up to $10 million in funding, available through the Biomass Research and Development

  14. Bioenergy Documentary | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy Documentary Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central WikiSysop's picture Submitted by WikiSysop(15) Member 1 September, 2014 - 17:34 Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is...

  15. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sharpening Our Tools: Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop 8:00AM to 4:00PM PDT 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 Bioenergy Home About the Bioenergy Technologies Office Research & Development Education & ...

  16. INEOS New Planet BioEnergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INEOS New Planet BioEnergy Indian River BioEnergy Center 2015 DOE IBR Platform Peer Review March 24, 2015 Kelly Russell Regulatory and External Affairs This presentation does not ...

  17. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 21–22, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  18. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda Bioenergy 2015 Agenda Working agenda for Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. The conference will be held on June 23-24, 2015, at the Washington Convention Center. For more information about the conference, visit the Bioenergy 2015 Conference Web page. PDF icon bioenergy_2015_agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda Biomass 2013 Agenda

  19. Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Mission Development January 14, 2010 - Rev 3 DRAFT - Business Sensitive Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Contents 2 Mission Need for BioEnergy Integration Center 3 Overview of the BioEnergy Integration Center 4 Expected Outcomes and Benefits 5 Implementation Approach and Timeline 6 Financial Considerations DRAFT - BUSINESS SENSITIVE Henry Ford really had a

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corn Can Save the Earth | Department of Energy Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY

  1. Bioenergy for Sustainable Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Sustainable Development Bioenergy for Sustainable Development Deployment Markets Keynote Bioenergy for Sustainable Development Gerard Ostheimer, Global Lead, Sustainable Bioenergy High Impact Opportunity Of Sustainable Energy For All (SE4ALL) PDF icon ostheimer_biomass_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Biomass 2014: Breakout Speaker Biographies

  2. International Bioenergy Trade | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Bioenergy Trade International Bioenergy Trade Chris Wright, INL, presentation at the December 5, 2012, Biomass Program-hosted International Webinar on international bioenergy trade. PDF icon wright_2012_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Biochemical Conversion 2015 Peer Review Report 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Feedstock Supply and Logistics

  3. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discourse on this topic. We found that some tasks needed to be adjusted to meet changed conditions. Shortly after the start of SFBI, DOER recognized that establishing demonstration plots within state owned lands was not possible as the state enacted a temporary freeze on all timber harvesting on state lands, to allow for the completion of an assessment of current impacts of this activity and time to develop prudent policies on land conservation. Even more significantly, the state’s energy and environmental Secretary asked DOER to place a “sustainability” criterion for biomass in the RPS regulations, and the passage of the landmark Global Warming Solutions Act in 2008 committed DOER to very carefully consider and assure that biomass energy supported by the RPS met carbon reduction thresholds aligned with the state’s reduction commitments. These needs led to some adjustment of the SFBI scope and objectives to meet the policy challenges. Most notably was the funding and commissioning of the report by the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences which provided the sustainability and carbon impact framework necessary for DOER to move policy forward prudently. The “Manomet Study” has moved this emerging policy issue substantially forward, gained national and international significance, and provided a new look at how the forest sequesters carbon and the effect of the removal of growing stock for energy on future carbon sequestration and atmospheric flux. This activity provided information that supports the objectives of SFBI but to accommodate this work, several subtasks were combined and addressed within the framework of the Manomet research study. The expected outcomes of the SFBI include the development of biomass energy systems that support sustainable forest management, new investment in forestry and fuel supply infrastructure, biomass energy generation that contributes to greenhouse gas mitigation, and job creation in project development and operation and in the rural forestry sector.

  4. BioEnergie Park Soesetal GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergie Park Soesetal GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergie-Park Soesetal GmbH Place: Osterode, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip: 37520 Sector: Biomass Product: Lower...

  5. MBE Mitteldeutsche BioEnergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip: 6780 Product: MBE is a Bioethanol producer for the use as biofuel. References: MBE Mitteldeutsche BioEnergie GmbH & Co. KG1 This article is a stub....

  6. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News » BioEnergy Blog BioEnergy Blog RSS The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) blog posts are a great source to learn about the progress BETO is making toward its goals to sustainably develop cost-competitive biofuels and bioproducts. To see how far bioenergy has come (posts from 2012-2014), visit the Bioenergy Technologies Office Blog archive site. May 4, 2016 As part of the Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines initiative, researchers are exploring synergies among new bio-based fuels,

  7. Bioenergy 2016 Interactive Poster Session

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites students, researchers, public and private organizations, and the general public to submit abstracts for BETO to review and consider for inclusion in the poster session at BETO’s ninth annual conference, Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation.This year’s poster session will offer a new platform to engage conference attendees like never before as all posters will be required to feature an interactive element. Interactive elements can include voting or polling, social media, games and challenges, or any other activity that will involve the audience’s participation.

  8. Algal Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis To promote an understanding of the challenges and opportunities unique to microalgae, NREL's Algae Techno-Economic Analysis group focuses on techno-economic analysis (TEA) for the production and conversion of algal biomass into biofuels and coproducts. We help research technologies that will enable the production of cost-competitive hydrocarbon fuels and products from algal biomass in support of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy

  9. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy This document provides general information about bioenergy and its creation and potential uses. PDF icon biomass_basics.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy Bioenergy Impact Posters http://www.energy.gov/media/F...Biofuels_Lower_Gas_Prices.pdf

  10. Advancing sustainable bioenergy: Evolving stakeholder interests and the relevance of research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy L [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M [University of Minnesota; Dodder, Rebecca [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kaplan, Ozge [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Miller, C. Andy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2013-01-01

    The sustainability of future bioenergy production rests on more than continual improvements in its environmental, economic, and social impacts. The emergence of new biomass feedstocks, an expanding array of conversion pathways, and expected increases in overall bioenergy production are connecting diverse technical, social, and policy communities. These stakeholder groups have different and potentially conflicting values and cultures, and therefore different goals and decision making processes. Our aim is to discuss the implications of this diversity for bioenergy researchers. The paper begins with a discussion of bioenergy stakeholder groups and their varied interests, and illustrates how this diversity complicates efforts to define and promote sustainable bioenergy production. We then discuss what this diversity means for research practice. Researchers, we note, should be aware of stakeholder values, information needs, and the factors affecting stakeholder decision making if the knowledge they generate is to reach its widest potential use. We point out how stakeholder participation in research can increase the relevance of its products, and argue that stakeholder values should inform research questions and the choice of analytical assumptions. Finally, we make the case that additional natural science and technical research alone will not advance sustainable bioenergy production, and that important research gaps relate to understanding stakeholder decision making and the need, from a broader social science perspective, to develop processes to identify and accommodate different value systems. While sustainability requires more than improved scientific and technical understanding, the need to understand stakeholder values and manage diversity presents important research opportunities.

  11. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, Thomas; Pienkos, Phil; Sluiter, Justin; Magrini, Kim; McMillan, Jim

    2014-07-28

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National Bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  12. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individuals data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  13. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsÆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy

  16. Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool February 27, 2014 - 5:59pm Addthis The Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library aims to help...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance The Bioenergy Technologies Office supports targeted research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) activities to advance the sustainable, nationwide production of advanced biofuels that will displace a share of petroleum-derived fuels, mitigate climate change, create jobs, and increase United States energy security. PDF icon fy15_at-a-glance_beto.pdf More Documents &

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 6 Budget At-A-Glance Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) supports targeted research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) activities to advance the sustainable, nationwide production of advanced biofuels that will displace a share of petroleum-derived fuels, mitigate climate change, create jobs, and increase United States energy security. PDF icon BETO FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance More Documents &

  19. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Bioenergy From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Bioenergy Technologies Office, Webtrends archives by fiscal year. Microsoft Office document icon Bioenergy FY09 Microsoft Office document icon Bioenergy FY10 Microsoft Office document icon Bioenergy FY11 More Documents & Publications Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Geothermal Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Advanced Manufacturing Office Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Solar

  20. A Virtual Visit to Bioenergy Research at the National Laboratories |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Virtual Visit to Bioenergy Research at the National Laboratories A Virtual Visit to Bioenergy Research at the National Laboratories October 22, 2014 - 10:34am Addthis Watch researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory describe their bioenergy research funded by the Energy Department. Alicia Moulton Communications Specialist, Bioenergy Technologies Office For National Bioenergy Day on October 22, bioenergy facilities across the country are holding open houses to

  1. Bioenergy 2015: Presentations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Presentations Bioenergy 2015: Presentations This page displays the links to available presentations from Day One and Day Two of the Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO's) Bioenergy 2015 conference. Approved presentations have been made available. Copying or using any materials without the consent of the presentation owner is prohibited. Day One, June 23, 2015 Welcome and Introductory Keynotes Franklin (Lynn) Orr, Under Secretary for Science and Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Amy

  2. Bioenergy Impact Posters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Posters Bioenergy Impact Posters On October 1, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office kicked off Energy Action Month by displaying bioenergy impacts posters in the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C. PDF icon impact_posters_billion_dry_tons.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_bioproducts.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_biorefineries.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_cellulosic_ethanol.pdf PDF icon impact_posters_green_jobs.pdf PDF icon

  3. Bioenergy 2015 Press Kit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Press Kit Bioenergy 2015 Press Kit This U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy 2015 Press Kit provides contacts and resources to media who cover conference-related news. PDF icon bioenergy_2015_press_kit.pdf More Documents & Publications Rainbows and Leprechauns: Finding Gold in Partnerships (101) Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home Performance Opportunities (201) He Said, She Said: The Power of Messaging (101)

  4. Bibliography, Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    M. (2013). "Status of Advanced Biofuels Demonstration Facilities in 2012: A Report to IEA Bioenergy Task 39," http:demoplants.bioenergy2020.eufilesDemoplantsReportFinal.pd...

  5. Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guofu Bioenergy Science & Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100101 Sector:...

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife ...

  7. NREL-United States/Brazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United StatesBrazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL-United StatesBrazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop AgencyCompany...

  8. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy Integrated Biorefinery for Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol, Power, and Heat PDF icon ...

  9. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    07: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS August 20, 2010 EIS-0407: Final ...

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 2013 Update Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: May 2013 Update ... Plan, which sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. ...

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report PDF icon ...

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D ... chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. ...

  13. Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 24, 2015 - ...

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies ...

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2015 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy ...

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2015 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies ...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: November 2014 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy ...

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2016-Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies ...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update -- Sections This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy ...

  20. Jianping Yu | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jianping Yu Jianping Yu Section Supervisor, Photobiology Group, Biosciences Jianping.Yu@nrel.gov | 303-384-6252 Research Interests Production of fuels and chemicals from cyanobacteria Regulation of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism Ethylene-forming enzyme Affiliated Research Programs Cyanobacterial ethylene production (PI) Regulation of photosynthetic carbon metabolism (contributor) Genome-scale engineering in E. coli (contributor) Cyanobacterial hydrogen production (contributor) Photo of

  1. Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2013-03-01

    This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office Releases Symbiosis Biofeedstock...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference Summary Report Bioenergy Technologies Office Releases Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference Summary Report January 2, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

  3. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling March 25, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability PI: Marshall Wise Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any ...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office Program Management Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office will be hosting its biennial Program Management Peer Review on June 25, 2015 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

  5. Bioenergy Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EERE's bioenergy success stories below. November 30, 2015 The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol...

  6. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Breakout Session 3C-Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in ...

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slideshow explains the work of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. To download the file, right click and save it to your computer, then open the file with Adobe Reader....

  8. Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    intended to provide a practical, common methodology for measuring and recording the consumption and supply of biomass energy. It mainly emphasizes traditional bioenergy use, but...

  9. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-10-16

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  10. Whitney S. Jablonski | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whitney S. Jablonski Whitney S. Jablonski Senior Research Engineer Whitney.Jablonski@nrel.gov | 303-384-7685 Research Interests Whitney Jablonski is a staff engineer in the Thermochemical Catalysis research and development section within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center (NBC). Advanced feedstocks for gasification via pretreatment (e.g., torrefaction) Feedstock blending for creating an economical gasification feedstock Mitigation of activity loss from

  11. Ryan M. Ness | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan M. Ness Research Technician Ryan.Ness@nrel.gov | 303-384-6191 Research Interests Ryan M. Ness is a research technician in the Biomass Analysis group within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center. Ness has been with NREL since 2007. Ness's primary responsibilities involve bench-scale wet chemical and instrumental analysis of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks for the purpose of providing baseline, solids-intermediate, and biomass hydrolyzate

  12. Michael F. Crowley | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Crowley Michael F. Crowley Principal Scientist Michael.Crowley@nrel.gov | 303-384-6345 Research Interests Dr. Michael F. Crowley is a principal scientist in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Biosciences Center, having joined the laboratory in 2007 to develop a simulation and theory team. He leads the theory, modeling, and simulation efforts for biofuels research. He is the principal investigator for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)

  13. Michael T. Guarnieri | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. Guarnieri Michael T. Guarnieri Research Scientist Michael.Guarnieri@nrel.gov | 303-384-7921 Research Interests Dr. Michael Guarnieri is a research scientist in the National Bioenergy Center's Applied Biology group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular genetics, with a joint degree in biophysics and structural biology, at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 2009, where his research focused on structural and biophysical

  14. Seth M. Noone | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seth M. Noone Seth M. Noone Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory Manager Seth.Noone@nrel.gov | 303-384-7936 Research Interests Seth M. Noone manages the Fuel Synthesis and Catalysis Laboratory (FSCL) as part of the Thermochemical Catalysis research and development (R&D) section within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center (NBC). Advancing technology for producing renewable fuels from biomass Working with state-of-the-art equipment and laboratory design

  15. Shihui (Shane) Yang | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shihui Yang Shihui (Shane) Yang Scientist III Shihui.Yang@nrel.gov | 303-384-7825 Research Interests Shihui (Shane) Yang is a research scientist in the Bioprocess Research group within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center. He received his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of California at Riverside in 2005 and joined NREL in February 2011. His research interests include: Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of biomass pretreatment hydrolysate

  16. Darren J. Peterson | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darren J. Peterson Research Technician Darren.Peterson@nrel.gov | 303-384-6316 Areas of Expertise Darren J. Peterson is a research technician for the Biomass Analytical Team (BAT) within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Bioenergy Center (NBC). He is very proficient in performing the various Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAPs) for numerous clients. He provides analytical support for the engineers in the pilot plant as well as support for the fermentation group.

  17. Data and Tools | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data and Tools NREL provides data, tools, and models for analyzing bioenergy research and technologies, and for determining biomass resources and feedstocks. Laboratory Analytical Procedures NREL develops lab procedures to help researchers perform analyses for biofuels and bio-oils. Biomass Compositional Analysis Bio-Oil Analysis Microalgal Biofuels Analysis Biomass Feedstock and Resource Assessment Data International Biomass Resource Assessments NREL has completed resource assessments in many

  18. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Rizvi, L; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  19. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The British Mycological Society.

  20. BioEnergy Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    working to develop the advanced biofuels industry in a way that leads to positive impacts and that demonstrates responsible stewardship of the environment. Biofuel production...

  1. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... future national biomass assessment activities in the ... to pitch their creative business ideas to a panel ... to make an impact on the commercial products industry. ...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World Ethanol and Biodiesel Annual Production (Petroleum use @ 1150 B gyr) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Fuel (billion annual gallons) Ethanol ...

  3. Xiaowen Chen | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xiaowen Chen Xiaowen Chen Engineer III Xiaowen.Chen@nrel.gov | 303-384-6828 Research Interests Biomass to low-cost and clean sugar Biomass to high-yield and high-titer ethanol Biomass to advanced fuel Biomass to value-added chemicals and materials Areas of Expertise Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis Sugar production via acid pretreatment Furfural and HMF production via acid pretreatment Alkaline pretreatment (deacetylation) Mechanical refining High-solids enzymatic hydrolysis Kinetics and

  4. Biohydrogen | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biohydrogen NREL is developing biological hydrogen (H2) production technologies from sustainable resources to help answer the nation's need for renewable energy. Woman working with a bioreactor producing hydrogen via biomass fermentation. Unit has tubes, wires, and collection vessel We have developed two renewable platforms for sustainable hydrogen production. One platform is based on the microbial fermentation of sugars (i.e., lignocellulosic biomass) during which copious amounts of hydrogen

  5. Calvin Mukarakate | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calvin Mukarakate Calvin Mukarakate Senior Scientist Calvin.Mukarakate@nrel.gov | 303-384-7724 Research Interests Production of transportation fuels from biomass pyrolysis vapors Selective conversion of biomass pyrolysis vapors to form monomers for renewable polymers Production of hydrogen and chemical intermediates from pyrolysis aqueous waste streams Areas of Expertise Catalyst fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce transportation fuels and chemicals Reforming pyrolysis aqueous waste streams to

  6. Redox Biochemistry | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Biochemistry We study biomolecular reactions that convert electrochemical energy into chemical bonds of reduced products. This research advances the development of enzyme-based and microbial-based systems for the production of energy compounds and carriers. Illustration of an H-cluster and the conserved proton-transfer pathway (labeled with an arrow as PT) in [FeFe]-hydrogenase. A cartoon of a grey blob represents the structure with surface representations of blue spirals and helixes. An

  7. Venkat Subramanian | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Venkat Subramanian Venkat Subramanian Research Scientist Venkat.Subramanian@nrel.gov | 303-384-7719 Research Interests Algal biofuels (hydrogen and biodiesel) Characterizing metabolic pathways leading to biofuel production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Genetic engineering of algae to improve their harvesting properties to reduce the cost of algal harvesting from open-pond bioreactors for commercial-scale biofuel/biodiesel production Screening new algal strains with improved lipid

  8. Algal Biofuels | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels NREL is developing technologies and helping prepare a new generation workforce to enable the commercialization of algal biofuels. Photo of bright green algae in flasks in fluid inside a lit, metallic grow chamber. We are focused on understanding the current cost for algal biofuels production and using that information to identify and develop cost reduction strategies. Our work is distributed across the entire value chain from production strain identification to biofuel and bioproducts

  9. Antonella Amore | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antonella Amore Postdoctoral Researcher Antonella.Amore@nrel.gov | 303-275-4399 Research Interests Second generation bioethanol production Lignocellulose conversion into high-added-value products Development and study of new ligninases, cellulases, and hemicellulases, from both fungi and bacteria Recombinant heterologous expression of wild-type and mutant (random mutants/site-directed mutants) (hemi)cellulolytic enzymes Study of the structure-function relationships in (hemi)cellulolytic enzymes

  10. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D with University of California San Diego Results in First Algae Surfboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil-fuel derived polyurethane products may not be in demand in the coming years thanks to algae researchers. A joint research and development investment from the Energy Departments Bioenergy...

  12. LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIES OF BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK AND ENHANCED SOIL QUALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture can simultaneously address global food, feed, fiber, and energy challenges provided our soil, water, and air resources are not compromised in doing so. As we embark on the 19th Triennial Conference of the International Soil and Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO), I am pleased to proclaim that our members are well poised to lead these endeavors because of our comprehensive understanding of soil, water, agricultural and bio-systems engineering processes. The concept of landscape management, as an approach for integrating multiple bioenergy feedstock sources, including biomass residuals, into current crop production systems, is used as the focal point to show how these ever-increasing global challenges can be met in a sustainable manner. Starting with the 2005 Billion Ton Study (BTS) goals, research and technology transfer activities leading to the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Revised Billion Ton Study (BT2) and development of a residue management tool to guide sustainable crop residue harvest will be reviewed. Multi-location USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team research and on-going partnerships between public and private sector groups will be shared to show the development of landscape management strategies that can simultaneously address the multiple factors that must be balanced to meet the global challenges. Effective landscape management strategies recognize the importance of nature’s diversity and strive to emulate those conditions to sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. To illustrate those services, the soil quality impact of harvesting crop residues are presented to show how careful, comprehensive monitoring of soil, water and air resources must be an integral part of sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems. Preliminary analyses suggest that to sustain soil resources within the U.S. Corn Belt, corn (Zea mays L.) stover should not be harvested if average grain yields are less than 11 Mg ha-1 (175 bu ac-1) unless more intensive landscape management practices are implemented. Furthermore, although non-irrigated corn grain yields east and west of the primary Corn Belt may not consistently achieve the 11 Mg ha-1 yield levels, corn can still be part of an overall landscape approach for sustainable feedstock production. Another option for producers with consistently high yields (> 12.6 Mg ha-1 or 200 bu ac-1) that may enable them to sustainably harvest even more stover is to decrease their tillage intensity which will reduce fuel use, preserve rhizosphere carbon, and/or help maintain soil structure and soil quality benefits often attributed to no-till production systems. In conclusion, I challenge all ISTRO scientists to critically ask if your research is contributing to improved soil and crop management strategies that effectively address the complexity associated with sustainable food, feed, fiber and fuel production throughout the world.

  13. Section 2, Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and algal production and harvesting and different objectives ... resources, dedicated energy crops 1 , and select MSW ... past 2017 are a linear interpolation of costs ...

  14. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Densified Large Square Bale Format | Department of Energy abstract

  15. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Densified Large Square Bale Format | Department of Energy abstract_1

  16. Cover crops for erosion control in bioenergy hardwood plantations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with complete competition control. Small berms were built to direct runoff to a sediment fence installed at the down slope ends of each plot. Soil erosion is measured by...

  17. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Porter, William C. 1 ; Rosenstiel, Todd N. 2 ; Guenther, Alex 3 ; Lamarque, Jean-Francois 4 ; Barsanti, Kelley 2 + Show Author Affiliations Portland State Univ., ...

  18. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bioenergy Technologies Office

    2015-03-25

    This fact sheet summarizes key accomplishments and successes of the Bioenergy Technologies Office in 2014.

  19. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Abengoa Bioenergy Integrated Biorefinery for Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol, Power, and Heat PDF icon ibr_commercial_abengoa.pdf More Documents & Publications Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC ABENGOA BIOENERGY 2014 DOE Biomass Program Integrated Biorefinery Project Comprehensive Project Review

  20. Eric Tan | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tan Eric Tan Senior Research Engineer, Biorefinery Analysis Team Eric.Tan@nrel.gov | 303-384-7933 Research Interests Conceptual process design, economics, and sustainability for conversion of biomass to biofuels and chemicals Renewable and sustainable energy Green engineering Carbon nano-structures, fuel cell, hydrogen production, kinetic modeling, and heterogeneous catalysis Affiliated Research Programs Thermochemical Conversion Platform Analysis Biochemical Conversion Platform Analysis

  1. Biomass Characterization | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization NREL provides high-quality analytical characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products, a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. woman working with sampling equipment in a lab Capabilities man looking at test tubes containing clear, amber liquid Standard Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedures We maintain a library of analytical methods for biomass characterization available for downloading. View the Biomass Compositional Analysis Lab

  2. David Robichaud | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robichaud David Robichaud Senior Thermochemical Conversion Scientist David.Robichaud@nrel.gov | 303-384-7790 Research Interests Production of premium fuels and chemicals from biomass pyrolysis Computational modeling Chemical mechanisms of catalytic surfaces Affiliated Research Programs Computational Pyrolysis Consortium (PI) Catalytic Pyrolysis Science (collaborator) Areas of Expertise Thermochemical conversion sciences Gas kinetics and mechanisms Gasification Pyrolysis Catalytic fast pyrolysis

  3. Jacob Kruger | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jacob Kruger Jacob Kruger Research Engineer Jacob.Kruger@nrel.gov | 303-275-4081 Research Interests Algal growth systems targeting high-efficiency production of biomass Valorization of low-cost algal biomass Catalytic biomass fractionation and depolymerization of biopolymers (especially lignin, polysaccharides, and proteins) Catalytic upgrading of bio-derived intermediates Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 2011 B.A., Chemistry, Hamline

  4. Hui Wei | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hui Wei Hui Wei Research Scientist Hui.Wei@nrel.gov | 303-384-6620 Research Interests Genetic modification of plants with glycoside hydrolase and biocatalyst overexpression to increase the biomass pretreatability and digestibility Genetic engineering of yeast and bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels Biomaterials and biomanufacturing Affiliated Research Programs Targeted Microbial Development Advanced concepts for producing hydrocarbons, 2015-present Targeted Conversion Research

  5. Wei Xiong | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xiong Wei Xiong Director's Postdoctoral Fellow Wei.Xiong@nrel.gov | 303-384-7965 Research Interests Production of fuels and value-added chemicals from photosynthetic microorganisms Fermentative metabolism Advanced metabolic analysis and synthetic biology Areas of Expertise Metabolomics, lipidomics, and fluxomics Mass spectrometry-based metabolite analysis Isotope tracer analysis and flux modeling Molecular biology and biochemistry of cyanobacteria Education Ph.D., Biology, Tsinghua University,

  6. Ryan Davis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Davis Ryan Davis Senior Engineer Ryan.Davis@nrel.gov | 303-384-7879 Research Interests Ryan Davis is a process research engineer in the Biorefinery Analysis Section. His main focus is on techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for biomass conversion technology pathways, primarily to hydrocarbon biofuel products. Currently Davis coordinates TEA modeling and analysis efforts for biochemical conversion strategies via lignocellulosic sugars as well as algal biomass

  7. Tao Dong | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister

  8. Min Zhang | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Min Zhang Min Zhang Scientist V Min.Zhang@nrel.gov | 303-384-7753 Research Interests Using a systems biology approach to identify, analyze, and engineer pathways involved in bacterial, yeast, and fungal hydrocarbon and biochemical production Biological upgrading of sugars Directed microbial conversion/consolidated bioprocessing Pentose sugar utilization Hydrolysate toxicity Affiliated Research Programs Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Intermediates from Zymomonas mobilis (PI) Targeted Microbial

  9. Christopher Scarlata | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christopher Scarlata Christopher Scarlata Senior Engineer Christopher.Scarlata@nrel.gov | 303-384-6883 Research Interests Biological and catalytic production of fuels and chemicals from biomass Impacts of the economy and fossil fuels on renewable energy and bioproduct markets Process economics Affiliated Research Programs Process Design, Modeling, and Economics Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars Biomass Compositional Analysis Bioproduct Market Analysis Biopower Feasibility Studies

  10. Bioenergetics | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergetics NREL works at the molecular and cellular level to understand and optimize microbial production of biofuels and bioproducts. We are developing biological hydrogen technologies, and working to understand the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and the development of microbial systems. four flask beakers containing green algae set in bins surrounded by light and attached to sensors, hoses, and valves Photosynthetic Energy Transduction Woman working with a bioreactor

  11. Bioenergy Impacts … Greenhouse Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model to develop non-food biofuels from agricultural residues, forestry trimmings, energy crops, and algae that ...

  12. Daniel J. Schell | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Schell Daniel J. Schell Manager, BioProcess Integration R&D Dan.Schell@nrel.gov | 303-384-6869 Research Interests Daniel J. Schell is manager of the BioProcess Integration R&D section of the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and currently leads a multidisciplinary team of engineers and pilot plant technicians. Schell has more than 30 years of research experience in bio-based conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and has extensive expertise in

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - The DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office eere.energy.gov Bioenergy Technologies Office - Jonathan Male Director July 24, 2014 http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/ bioenergy-technologies-office 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office EERE Organization Chart Assistant Secretary David Danielson Office of Transportation Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) Office of Renewable Power Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) Wind &

  14. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels November 10, 2014 - 2:50pm Addthis DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office is developing military-grade biofuels DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office is developing military-grade biofuels Happy Veteran's Day from EERE! Our Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is helping the U.S. military increase the nation's #energy security, reduce

  15. Preparing the Next Generation of Bioenergy Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparing the Next Generation of Bioenergy Leaders Preparing the Next Generation of Bioenergy Leaders March 31, 2015 - 5:12pm Addthis Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Deputy Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office Engaging and supporting the next generation of renewable energy researchers and innovators is one of the important roles the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) plays in advancing bioenergy and biofuels. BETO provides numerous resources from biomass basics to

  16. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) co-hosted the Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015, in Washington, D.C. BECCS brought together experts in bioenergy, power generation, and transmission and distribution infrastructure from industry, academia,

  17. Laurentian Bioenergy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berguson, William Evan; Buchman, Daniel; Rack, Jim; Gallagher, Tom; McMahon, Bernard; Hedke, Dale

    2015-03-30

    Work performed under this contract involves development of forest management guidelines related to removal of forest harvest residues from forested sites and brushlands in Minnesota, assessments of biomass availability from forests and brushlands and logistics and equipment associated with handling woody biomass with emphasis on evaluation of a trailer-mounted bundling system. Also, work on hybrid poplar breeding, field testing and yield analysis is included. Evaluation of the production of aspen and red pine along with opportunities to procure woody biomass through thinning operations in red pine is described. Finally, an assessment of issues related to increasing biomass usage at the Laurentian Energy Authority generation facilities is discussed.

  18. Global and regional potential for bioenergy from agricultural and forestry residue biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Smith, Steven J.

    2010-02-11

    As co-products, agricultural and forestry residues represent a potential low cost, low carbon, source for bioenergy. A method is developed method for estimating the maximum sustainable amount of energy potentially available from agricultural and forestry residues by converting crop production statistics into associated residue, while allocating some of this resource to remain on the field to mitigate erosion and maintain soil nutrients. Currently, we estimate that the world produces residue biomass that could be sustainably harvested and converted into over 50 EJ yr-1 of energy. The top three countries where this resource is estimated to be most abundant are currently net energy importers: China, the United States (US), and India. The global potential from residue biomass is estimated to increase to approximately 80-95 EJ yr-1 by mid- to late- century, depending on physical assumptions such as of future crop yields and the amount of residue sustainably harvestable. The future market for biomass residues was simulated using the Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems Mini Climate Assessment Model (ObjECTS MiniCAM). Utilization of residue biomass as an energy source is projected for the next century under different climate policy scenarios. Total global use of residue biomass is estimated to increase to 70-100 EJ yr-1 by mid- to late- century in a central case, depending on the presence of a climate policy and the economics of harvesting, aggregating, and transporting residue. Much of this potential is in developing regions of the world, including China, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and India.

  19. Bioenergy `96: Partnerships to develop and apply biomass technologies. Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The conference proceedings consist of two volumes of papers detailing numerous issues related to biomass energy production and use. An author and keyword index are provided in the proceedings. A total of 143 papers were selected for the database. Papers were selected from the following areas from Volume 1: feedstock production, harvest, storage, and delivery; the DOE biomass power program; technical, economic, and policy barriers and incentives; new developments in biomass combustion; advancements in biomass gasification; liquid fuels production and use; and case studies of bioenergy projects. From Volume 2, subtopics selected included: bioenergy systems for distributed generation; assessment and use of biomass wastes; non-technical barriers to bioenergy implementation; improving commercial viability through integrated systems; and anaerobic digestion.

  20. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  1. 2013 Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office's Peer Review meeting.

  2. Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    00PM EDT Online The Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar will be held Wednesday, September 2, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET. Standard...

  3. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar 1:00PM to 2:00PM EDT 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 American Energy and...

  4. Bioenergy Impacts … Non-Food

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the cost of producing biofuel from non-food sources (such as corn stalks, grasses, and ... Biofuel from non-food sources is becoming cheaper to produce BIOENERGY IMPACTS To learn ...

  5. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic A team of five freshmen from Williamsburg High School for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, New York-designed an infographic on the...

  6. Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 12–14, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its ninth annual conference—Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation. Partnering with the Clean Energy Research and Education Foundation (CEREF), this year's conference will focus on opportunities to grow future feedstock supplies and break through technology barriers to achieve a stronger bioeconomy.

  7. Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Save the date: July 12–14 for Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation! This year, the conference is in July—same place, different month! Hear directly from leading bioenergy experts from the public and private sectors. You will hear from government agency officials, academic researchers, and members of Congress, industry, and the national laboratories. Click below to add it to your Outlook Calendar!

  8. Bioenergy 2015 Confirmed Speakers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Confirmed Speakers Bioenergy 2015 Confirmed Speakers The following are confirmed speakers for Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape, which will be held on June 23-24, 2015, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.: Confirmed Keynote Speakers Mark Brodziski, Director of the Rural Business-Cooperative Services Energy Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S.

  9. Explore Bioenergy Technology Careers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technology Careers Explore Bioenergy Technology Careers Energy from abundant, renewable, domestic biomass can reduce U.S. dependence on oil, lower impacts on climate, and stimulate jobs and economic growth. Energy from abundant, renewable, domestic biomass can reduce U.S. dependence on oil, lower impacts on climate, and stimulate jobs and economic growth. Feedstocks Feedstocks Farmers Seasonal workers Tree farm workers Mechanical engineers Harvesting equipment mechanics Equipment

  10. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectivesreducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  11. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... modeling, statistical mechanical and coarse-grained ... of ammonia-based pretreatment strategies for ... chemicals using completely novel molecular pathways and ...

  12. Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy.

  13. Fact Sheet: Bioenergy Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Working Group Fact Sheet: Bioenergy Working Group A fact sheet detailling the group launched at the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19th and 20th, ...

  14. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom PDF icon...

  15. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks Breakout Session 2D-Building Market ...

  16. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 23–24, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conference—Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014 Update This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. ...

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2016 This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. It ...

  19. Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy and the RSB Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting Misconceptions Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB Barbara Bramble, Senior Director for International Wildlife Conservation at National Wildlife Federation and Chair of Board of Directors for the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials PDF icon bramble_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Biobased Chemicals Landscape in 2015: What's the Role of

  20. Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Report | Department of Energy Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office's second Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop, held from June 24-26, 2014, in Argonne, Illinois. PDF icon

  1. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting

  2. BETO Announces Bioenergy Technologies Incubator FOA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Incubator FOA BETO Announces Bioenergy Technologies Incubator FOA February 25, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has released a new $10 million funding opportunity announcement (FOA) to support innovative technologies and solutions that could help achieve bioenergy development goals, but are not significantly represented in the Bioenergy Technology Office's (BETO's) existing multi-year program plans or current research and

  3. NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application - News Releases | NREL NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping Application September 28, 2010 BioEnergy Atlas, a Web portal that provides access to two bioenergy analysis and mapping tools, was released today by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The visualization screening tools, BioPower and BioFuels Atlas, allow users to layer related bioenergy data onto a single map to gather information on biomass feedstocks,

  4. Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Intro

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar | Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Intro Webinar Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Intro Webinar Introduction to the Biomass Program at the Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy webinar. PDF icon obp_educational_opportunities_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry:

  5. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is committed to developing the resources, technologies, and systems needed to support a thriving bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and advances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO's Sustainability Technology Area proactively identifies and addresses issues that affect the scale-up potential, public acceptance,

  6. International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources | Department of Energy International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Breakout Session 3C-Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy: Leveraging U.S. Government Resources Cora Dickson, Senior International Trade Specialist, Office of Energy and Environmental Industries,

  7. Report Explains How Bioenergy Supports Global Sustainability Goals |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Report Explains How Bioenergy Supports Global Sustainability Goals Report Explains How Bioenergy Supports Global Sustainability Goals May 4, 2015 - 12:47pm Addthis Agave sisilana growing in East Africa. Image courtesy of Jeff Cameron. Agave sisilana growing in East Africa. Image courtesy of Jeff Cameron. Willow to the rescue - combining bioenergy with waste treatment. Image courtesy of Par Aronsson. Willow to the rescue - combining bioenergy with waste treatment. Image

  8. Sandia Energy - Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Partnership Capabilities JBEI News News & Events Research & Capabilities...

  9. Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Develop Innovative Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy 0 Million to Develop Innovative Bioenergy Technologies Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Develop Innovative Bioenergy Technologies February 20, 2015 - 1:23pm Addthis The Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) announces the selection of seven projects across the country to receive up to $10 million to support innovative technologies and solutions to help advance bioenergy development. These projects will support BETO's work to

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report PDF icon beto_2014_annual_report.pdf More Documents & Publications November 2013 News Blast August 2014 Monthly News Blast Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

  11. Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - ORNL | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - ORNL ORNL presentation about the educational opportunities in bioenergy at the lab. PDF icon ornl_opportunities_bioenergy.pdf More Documents & Publications PHEV Engine Control and Energy Management Strategy Ensuring Project Success - The Fundamental Art of Managing the Interfaces Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

  12. State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States on Issues, Opportunities, and Options for Advancing Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrnett, D. S.; Mulholland, D.; Zinsmeister, E.; Doris, E.; Milbrandt, A.; Robichaud. R.; Stanley, R.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-09-01

    One renewable energy option that states frequently consider to meet their clean energy goals is the use of biomass resources to develop bioenergy. Bioenergy includes bioheat, biopower, biofuels, and bioproducts. This document provides an overview of biomass feedstocks, basic information about biomass conversion technologies, and a discussion of benefits and challenges of bioenergy options. The Primer includes a step-wise framework, resources, and tools for determining the availability of feedstocks, assessing potential markets for biomass, and identifying opportunities for action at the state level. Each chapter contains a list of selected resources and tools that states can use to explore topics in further detail.

  13. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil prices topped $70 per barrel (bbl) and catastrophic hurricanes in the Gulf Coast shut down a significant fraction of U.S. refinery capacity. The following year, oil approached $80 per bbl due to supply concerns, as well as continued political tensions in the Middle East. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was enacted in December of that year. By the end of December 2007, oil prices surpassed $100 per bbl for the first time, and by mid-summer 2008, prices approached $150 per bbl because of supply concerns, speculation, and weakness of the U.S. dollar. As fast as they skyrocketed, oil prices fell, and by the end of 2008, oil prices dropped below $50 per bbl, falling even more a month later due to the global economic recession. In 2009 and 2010, oil prices began to increase again as a result of a weak U.S. dollar and the rebounding of world economies.

  14. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-15

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  15. Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Alton, Anita Jean; Andrews, Shirley H; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn; Casey, Denise; Martin, Sheryl A; Mills, Marissa; Nylander, Kim; Wyrick, Judy M; Drell, Dr. Daniel; Weatherwax, Sharlene; Carruthers, Julie

    2006-08-01

    In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is only a first step. Other advances include the growing number of high-throughput techniques for protein production and characterization; a range of new instrumentation for observing proteins and other cell constituents; the rapid growth of commercially available reagents for protein production; a new generation of high-intensity light sources that provide precision imaging on the nanoscale and allow observation of molecular interactions in ultrafast time intervals; major advances in computational capability; and the continually increasing numbers of these instruments and technologies within the national laboratory infrastructure, at universities, and in private industry. All these developments expand our ability to elucidate mechanisms present in living cells, but much more remains to be done. The Centers are designed to accomplish GTL program objectives more rapidly, more effectively, and at reduced cost by concentrating appropriate technologies and scientific expertise, from genome sequence to an integrated systems understanding of the pathways and internal structures of microbes and plants most relevant to developing bioenergy compounds. The Centers will seek to understand the principles underlying the structural and functional design of selected microbial, plant, and molecular systems. This will be accomplished by building technological pathways linking the genome-determined components in an organism with bioenergy-relevant cellular systems that can be characterized sufficiently to generate realistic options for biofuel development. In addition, especially in addressing what are believed to be nearer-term approaches to renewable energy (e.g., producing cellulosic ethanol cost-effectively and energy-efficiently), the Center research team must understand in depth the current industrial-level roadblocks and bottlenecks (see section, GTL's Vision for Biological Energy Alternatives, below). For the Centers, and indeed the entire BER effort, to be successful, Center research must be integrated with individual investigator research, and coordination of activities, from DNA sequencing to high-throughput protein development and characterization.

  16. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 5: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape Jim Spaeth, Program Manager and Conference Chair of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, invites you to attend Bioenergy 2015 in Washington, D.C., June 23-24. June 23-24, 2015 Bioenergy 2015 Logo Walter E. Washington Convention Center 801 Mt. Vernon Place, NW Washington, D.C. 20001 On June 23-24, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office

  17. DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers October 1, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis DOE Bioenergy Research Center Investment Tops $400 Million WASHINGTON, DC-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has invested nearly $30 million in end-of-fiscal-year (2007) funds to accelerate the start-up of its three new Bioenergy Research Centers, bringing total DOE Bioenergy Research Center investment

  18. Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology & Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ninth annual Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy will be held from December 7–9, 2014, in San Diego, California, at the Westin Gaslamp Quarter. Bringing together representatives from various countries all around the Pacific Rim, this event will focus on the growth of the industrial biotechnology and bioenergy sectors in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Glenn Doyle, BETO's Deployment & Demonstration Technology Manager, will be moderating and speaking at a session on entitled "Utilizing Strategic Partnerships to Grow Your Business" on December 9.

  19. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar Slides about the new Bioenergy KDF PDF icon october2013_kdf_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Intro Webinar Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview Biomass 2013: Welcome

  20. Social Aspects of Bioenergy Sustainability Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luchner, Sarah; Johnson, Kristen; Lindauer, Alicia; McKinnon, Taryn; Broad, Max

    2013-05-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office held a workshop on “Social Aspects of Bioenergy” on April 24, 2012, in Washington, D.C., and convened a webinar on this topic on May 8, 2012. The findings and recommendations from the workshop and webinar are compiled in this report.

  1. Bioenergy Upcoming Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom...

  2. CropEnergies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: CropEnergies Place: Mannheim, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip: 68165 Sector: Biofuels Product: A German biofuels company focused on bioethanol production for use as...

  3. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014—United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, J. Richard; Lamers, Patrick; Roni, Mohammad S.; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Heath, Brendi

    2015-01-01

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy's Genomics: GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-08-01

    The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission and goals.

  5. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Bioenergy Technologies Office Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research October 24, 2013 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Office Overview and KDF Introduction: Alison Goss Eng, Ph.D. Operations Supervisor Acting Program Manager for Feedstocks Bioenergy Technologies Office * KDF Demonstration: Aaron Myers Geospatial Systems Architect Oak Ridge National Lab Presenters 3 | Bioenergy

  6. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 10, 2015 BioenergizeME Office Hours Integrating Bioenergy into the 9 th__ 12 th Grade Classroom Alexis Martin Knauss Fellow Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy Shannon Zaret Contractor, The Hannon Group Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda 1. Overview Of Energy Literacy 2. Overview of Next Generation Science Standards 3. Bioenergy Basics 5. Incorporation of Bioenergy into the Classroom 4. 2016 BioenergizeME

  7. Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce ...

  8. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities | Department of Energy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores opportunities for alternative CHP fuels. PDF icon CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities (November 2007) More Documents & Publications CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants Barriers to CHP with

  9. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National Conference |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National Conference Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National Conference December 17, 2014 - 4:14pm Addthis The paper and poster presentation "Bioenergy KDF: Enabling Spatiotemporal Data Synthesis and Research Collaboration" was awarded second place for best paper at the ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems, held November 4-7 in Dallas,

  10. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) establishes partnerships with key public and private stakeholders to develop and demonstrate technologies for producing cost-competitive advanced biofuels from non-food biomass resources, including cellulosic biomass, algae, and wet waste (e.g. biosolids).

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Notice of Intent for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower | Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Notice of Intent for the Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Notice of Intent for the Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower April 15, 2016 - 6:54pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) intends to issue, on behalf of the Bioenergy Technologies

  12. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Innovative Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy to Issue Funding Opportunity for Innovative Bioenergy Technologies Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Innovative Bioenergy Technologies June 17, 2015 - 3:41pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy announces its intent to issue, on behalf of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) targeting innovative technologies and solutions to help advance

  13. NREL: News - Director of National Bioenergy Center Named

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director of National Bioenergy Center Named Thursday December 12, 2002 Golden, CO. - Michael Pacheco has accepted the position of director of the National Bioenergy Center (NBC). The center was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in November 2000 and is based in the department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo. The virtual center is the focal point for technology development and information about bioenergy in the United States, giving industry a one-stop

  14. Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow June 10, 2014 - 2:50pm Addthis Imagine Tomorrow participants Pavan Kumar (from left), Isaak Nanneman, Ethan Perrin, Andrew Wang and Oisin Doherty were selected by the Bioenergy Technologies Office to present their idea at the Biomass 2014 conference next month. The student team from Redmond, Washington, was chosen for their idea

  15. Incorporating Bioenergy in Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two: Agricultural Landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negri, M. Cristina; Ssegane, H.

    2015-08-01

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted two workshops on Incorporating Bioenergy in Sustainable Landscape Designs with Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories in 2014. The second workshop focused on agricultural landscapes and took place in Argonne, IL from June 24—26, 2014. The workshop brought together experts to discuss how landscape design can contribute to the deployment and assessment of sustainable bioenergy. This report summarizes the discussions that occurred at this particular workshop.

  16. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review Logistics, Costs, and GHG of Co-firing with 20% Biomass May 23, 2013 Technology Area Review: Heat and Power Principal Investigators: J.L. Male, R.D. Boardman Organization: PNNL, INL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Goal Statement & Project Overview History:

  17. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    KS | Department of Energy 07: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS August 20, 2010 EIS-0407: Final Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas October 6, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas

  18. Energy Department Selects Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Federal Funding | Department of Energy Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million in Federal Funding Energy Department Selects Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million in Federal Funding June 26, 2007 - 2:08pm Addthis Basic Genomics Research Furthers President Bush's Plan to Reduce Gasoline Usage 20 Percent in Ten Year WASHINGTON, DC - U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will invest up to $375 million in three new Bioenergy

  19. Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Launch of New and Improved KDF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The relaunched Bioenergy KDF supports the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry by providing unique value for researchers, private industry, policymakers, and the public.

  20. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  1. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan, March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Office portfolio is organized according to the biomass-to- bioenergy supply chain-from ... Section 3: Office Portfolio Management......

  3. Joint BioEnergy Institute (Other) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    JOINT BIOENERGY INSTITUTE; JBEI; GENOMICS; SYSTEMS BIOLOGY; SUGAR; FUEL SYNTHESIS; SWITCH GRASS Word Cloud More Like This Multimedia File size NAView Multimedia View Multimedia

  4. BioEnergy of Colorado LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy of Colorado LLC Address: 4875 National Western Drive Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80216 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels...

  5. BioEnergy International LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy International LLC Address: 1 Pinehill Drive Place: Quincy, Massachusetts Zip: 02169 Region: Greater Boston Area...

  6. Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon obpeducationalopportunitieswebinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Sustainability for the ...

  7. "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... INNOVATION 7 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Omnibus Language for FY 2015: Focus on Waste ... government can undertake to overcome barriers to a robust biogas industry in the ...

  8. Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a variety of data sets, publications, and collaboration and ... geospatial data; and browse the site's collection of ... Recognized at National Conference National Bioenergy Day ...

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability ...

  10. State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... interconnection requirements for smaller bioenergy ... Total 6.922 Quadrillion Btu Renewable 7% Coal 22% Natural Gas ... (DOE) estimates that the land resources of the United ...

  11. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores ...

  12. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants There are important issues to consider when selecting ...

  13. GREET Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Life Cycle Analysis and Key Issues for Woody Feedstocks Michael Wang Systems Assessment Section Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Biomass 2014 ...

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... state of the science, research needs, tools, and methodologies for implementing landscape designs for bioenergy sys- tems across the supply chain and across sustainability metrics. ...

  15. BETO Hosts Roundtable Discussion on Bioenergy with 4-H Youth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Addthis Related Articles Imagine Tomorrow participants Pavan Kumar (from left), Isaak Nanneman, Ethan Perrin, Andrew Wang and Oisin Doherty were selected by the Bioenergy ...

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Southeast United States Bioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sustainability researchers an opportunity to see cutting-edge field research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) firsthand. ...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of ...

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathways for Algal Biofuels Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal ...

  19. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources AgencyCompany...

  20. Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural...

  1. Nexus BioEnergy Developing Enhanced Organic Waste Recycling Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy, originally used the Techportal to search out promising biogas technologies. ... inventors of a low water use anaerobic digester technology specially developed for the ...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... term possibility for producing transportation fuels from biomass. Currently, the Bioenergy Technologies Offce has a pyrolysis perfor- mance goal of 3 per gallon of hydrocarbon ...

  3. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda Bioenergy 2015 Agenda Below is an agenda overview of the Bioenergy 2015 schedule of events. A more detailed agenda with session descriptions and speakers (as they become available) is also available. Tuesday, June 23, 2015 7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration 8:00 a.m.-8:15 a.m. Welcome Keynote 8:15 a.m.-8:30 a.m. Congressional Keynote(s) 8:30 a.m.-8:40 a.m. Introductory Keynote 8:40 a.m.-9:00 a.m. BETO Keynote 9:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Plenary I: Policy and Market Overview 10:30

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office April Monthly News Blast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2014 BETO Announces Seventh Annual Conference- Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its seventh annual conference, Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy, on July 29-30, 2014, in Washington, D.C. As in past years, the conference will bring together top government officials, members of Congress, industry leaders, and other experts to continue the ongoing dialogue about critical challenges and key

  5. Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Bioprocess Research Lieve.Laurens@nrel.gov | 303-384-6196 Research Interests Dynamic biochemical composition of bioenergy-relevant biomass Coproduct development from primary algal biomass components Biofuel precursor behavior during biomass conversion processes Algae-derived green crude valorization High-throughput screening technologies for compositional analysis of microbial biomass Standardization of algal biomass compositional

  6. Edward W. Jennings | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ed is the lead in the pilot plant fermentation area for the DuPont cooperative research and development agreement campaign that included experimental production work along with ...

  7. Bioenergy Impacts … Cellulosic Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for its cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Farmers earned additional revenue from selling their leftover corn husks, stalks, and leaves to the POET-DSM biorefinery for production of ...

  8. Jesse E. Hensley | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jesse E. Hensley Jesse E. Hensley Supervisor - Catalysis Research & Engineering Jesse.Hensley@nrel.gov | 303-384-7914 Research Interests Production of premium fuels and chemicals from gasified biomass Low temperature hydrodeoxygenation Advanced equipment and laboratory design Membrane separations Production of Premium Fuels and Chemicals from Gasified Biomass Plant materials contain complex chemical structures (see for instance Dr. Gregg Beckham's discussion of lignin), but through thermal

  9. Michael S. Talmadge | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Talmadge Michael S. Talmadge Senior Process Engineer, Biorefinery Analysis Michael.Talmadge@nrel.gov | 303-275-4632 Areas of Expertise Michael S. Talmadge has 15 years of experience in fuel production technologies with the first 10 years of his career spent in petroleum production and refining process development with ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company and Valero Energy Corporation. Since joining the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Talmadge has supported the development

  10. Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 23–24, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its eighth annual conference—Bioenergy 2015: Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape. Co-hosted with the Clean Energy Research and Education Foundation (CEREF), this year's conference will focus on opportunities and challenges in our current highly dynamic energy ecosystem.

  11. Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - NREL | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy - NREL NREL presentation about the educational opportunities at the lab. PDF icon nrel_opportunities_bioenergy.pdf More Documents & Publications Powerpoint on STEM Programs EERE Resources for Undergraduate Students Department of Energy Research Opportunities for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

  12. Growing and Sustaining Communities with Bioenergy- Text-Alt Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From Vero Beach, Florida, to Hugoton, Kansas, to Emmetsburg, Iowa, cellulosic ethanol biorefineries have had major impacts on communities and their residents. In other areas, bioenergy has significant potential to transform current and establish new industry. This short video illustrates how biorefineries and other bioenergy developments can benefit citizens, businesses, and whole communities, helping America’s rural economies grow and thrive.

  13. DOE Perspectives on Sustainable Bioenergy Landscapes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Bioenergy Landscapes DOE Perspectives on Sustainable Bioenergy Landscapes This presentation was given on November 19, 2014, by Kristen Johnson at the Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference. PDF icon johnson_ glbw_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Final Report - Grow Solar Wisconsin Team HIA ZERH Judge Bios Quadrennial Energy Review: Scope, Goals, Vision, Approach, Outreach

  14. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #23, April-June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-08-01

    April to June, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  15. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #20, July-September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    July to September, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  16. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #25, October - December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-01-01

    October to December, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  17. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #15, April - June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2007-07-01

    July quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Platform Integration Project.

  18. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #22, January - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    January to March, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  19. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-10-01

    July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  20. FOA for the Demonstration of an Integrated Biorefinery System: Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FOA for the Demonstration of an Integrated Biorefinery System: Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC.

  1. Nicholas J. Grundl | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicholas J. Grundl Process Engineer Nicholas.Grundl@nrel.gov | 303-275-3228 Research Interests Application of numerical methods to process problems Fuel and chemical production from biomass feedstocks Biochemical conversion of feedstocks Affiliated Research Programs Algal biofuels techno-economic analysis (contributor) Biochemical platform analysis (contributor) Thermochemical platform analysis (contributor) Education B.S., Chemical and Biological Engineering (special emphasis on biochemistry

  2. Photosynthetic Energy Transduction | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photosynthetic Energy Transduction We focus on understanding how the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems is converted to stored chemical products through various electron transfer processes and pathways in both cyanobacteria and algae. four flask beakers containing green algae set in bins surrounded by light and attached to sensors, hoses, and valves Full Publications List An Illustration in three sections with an image of a quarter moon with an arrow indicating a movement to

  3. Jennifer N. Markham | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jennifer N. Markham Jennifer N. Markham Engineer I, Biorefinery Process Engineer Jennifer.Markham@nrel.gov | 303-275-4154 Research Interests Techno-economic analysis Algae cultivation and separation Biomass conversion to fuels and higher values products Affiliated Research Programs Process Design, Modeling, and Economics Areas of Expertise Aspen Plus Process Modeling Algae cultivation Anaerobic digestion Hydrocarbon separation Ethylene oligomerization Excel economic modeling Discounted cash flow

  4. Robert S. Nelson | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Nelson Robert S. Nelson Scientist II Robert.Nelson@nrel.gov | 303-275-3112 Areas of Expertise Robert S. Nelson has extensive experience working in academic and biopharmaceutical laboratories, developing analytical methods and processes for the production of recombinant proteins. His current work is focused on the biological conversion of lignocellulose to advanced biofuels and other bioproducts. He enjoys finding novel applications of biotechnology to solve problems. Education B.S.,

  5. Mary J. Biddy | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Biddy Mary J. Biddy Strategic Analysis Platform Lead, Senior Research Engineer Mary.Biddy@nrel.gov | 303-384-7904 Research Interests The economic, social, and sustainability effects of the emerging bioeconomy Bioproducts market and technology development-understanding and identifying barriers and critical needs Utilization of advanced modeling approaches to investigate integrated and optimized biorefinery technologies and platforms Process design and economic analysis Production of premium

  6. David A. Sievers | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Sievers David A. Sievers Senior R&D Engineer David.Sievers@nrel.gov | 303-384-7748 Research Interests Thermochemical pretreatment residence time distribution measurement and control Solid-liquid separation of a wide variety of biomass intermediate slurries Continuous enzymatic hydrolysis (reactive separations) Sugar fractionation and concentration Co-product recovery and purification Specialized instrumentation Affiliated Research Programs Separations Development and Application

  7. David K. Johnson | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. Johnson David K. Johnson Project Lead, Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars David.Johnson@nrel.gov | 303-384-6263 Research Interests Production of premium fuels and chemicals from biomass components Hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived components High performance size exclusion chromatography of biomass-derived components Areas of Expertise Electrochemistry Biomass composition and analysis Biomass pretreatment Biomass pyrolysis oil fractionation and analysis Lignin chemistry High-temperature and

  8. Asad H. Sahir | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Asad H. Sahir Asad H. Sahir Postdoctoral Researcher-Chemical Process Engineer, Biorefinery Analysis and Exploratory Research Asad.Sahir@nrel.gov | 303-275-3060 Research Interests Production of transportation fuels from biomass through thermochemical routes Integration of biofuels into existing petroleum refinery infrastructure (blending, refinery planning and unit operation modeling) Combustion and gasification of fuels Carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) Modeling of reactors

  9. Sheila Grady-McBride | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sheila Grady-McBride Sheila Grady-McBride Business Support II, Administrative Associate Sheila.Grady-Mcbride@nrel.gov | 303-384-6220 Areas of Expertise Sheila Grady-McBride joined the National Bioenergy Center at the end of June 2012 as a research support assistant supporting the Thermochemical Group. Prior to joining the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Grady-McBride most recently worked at The Beck Group as a project assistant. Before that she worked for 12 years at GE Access as an

  10. Excellence in Bioenergy Innovation- A Presentation of 2015 R&D 100 Award Winning Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excellence in Bioenergy Innovation-A Presentation of 2015 R&D 100 Award Winning Projects January 21, 2016 Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda * Introduction and BETO Overview - Erica Qiao, BCS, Incorporated * Excellence in Bioenergy Innovation-A Presentation of 2015 R&D 100 Award Winning Projects - Dr. Jianping Yu, National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Douglas Elliott, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 | Bioenergy Technologies Office

  11. Department of Energy-funded Bioenergy Research Centers File 500th Invention

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disclosure | Department of Energy Energy-funded Bioenergy Research Centers File 500th Invention Disclosure Department of Energy-funded Bioenergy Research Centers File 500th Invention Disclosure March 7, 2016 - 2:47pm Addthis News release from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 3, 2016-Three U.S. Department of Energy-funded research centers - the BioEnergy Science Center (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), the Great Lakes Bioenergy

  12. Symbiosis Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase Bioenergy Crop Production Agenda Symbiosis Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic ...

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions … an important trait for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions an important trait for biomass production of bioenergy crops? Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions an important trait for biomass ...

  14. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs are providing the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use (see sidebar, Bridging the Gap from Fundamental Biology to Industrial Innovation for Bioenergy, p. 6). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations - the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast - with partners across the nation (see U.S. map, DOE Bioenergy Research Centers and Partners, on back cover). DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California; DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

  16. BioenergyKDF: Enabling Spatiotemporal Data Synthesis and Research Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Aaron T; Movva, Sunil; Karthik, Rajasekar; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; White, Devin A; Thomas, Neil; Chase, Adrian S Z

    2014-01-01

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (BioenergyKDF) is a scalable, web-based collaborative environment for scientists working on bioenergy related research in which the connections between data, literature, and models can be explored and more clearly understood. The fully-operational and deployed system, built on multiple open source libraries and architectures, stores contributions from the community of practice and makes them easy to find, but that is just its base functionality. The BioenergyKDF provides a national spatiotemporal decision support capability that enables data sharing, analysis, modeling, and visualization as well as fosters the development and management of the U.S. bioenergy infrastructure, which is an essential component of the national energy infrastructure. The BioenergyKDF is built on a flexible, customizable platform that can be extended to support the requirements of any user community especially those that work with spatiotemporal data. While there are several community data-sharing software platforms available, some developed and distributed by national governments, none of them have the full suite of capabilities available in BioenergyKDF. For example, this component-based platform and database independent architecture allows it to be quickly deployed to existing infrastructure and to connect to existing data repositories (spatial or otherwise). As new data, analysis, and features are added; the BioenergyKDF will help lead research and support decisions concerning bioenergy into the future, but will also enable the development and growth of additional communities of practice both inside and outside of the Department of Energy. These communities will be able to leverage the substantial investment the agency has made in the KDF platform to quickly stand up systems that are customized to their data and research needs.

  17. Using The Corngrass1 Gene To Enhance The Biofuel Properties Of Crop Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah; Chuck, George

    2015-10-29

    The development of novel plant germplasm is vital to addressing our increasing bioenergy demands. The major hurdle to digesting plant biomass is the complex structure of the cell walls, the substrate of fermentation. Plant cell walls are inaccessible matrices of macromolecules that are polymerized with lignin, making fermentation difficult. Overcoming this hurdle is a major goal toward developing usable bioenergy crop plants. Our project seeks to enhance the biofuel properties of perennial grass species using the Corngrass1 (Cg1) gene and its targets. Dominant maize Cg1 mutants produce increased biomass by continuously initiating extra axillary meristems and leaves. We cloned Cg1 and showed that its phenotype is caused by over expression of a unique miR156 microRNA gene that negatively regulates SPL transcription factors. We transferred the Cg1 phenotype to other plants by expressing the gene behind constitutive promoters in four different species, including the monocots, Brachypodium and switchgrass, and dicots, Arabidopsis and poplar. All transformants displayed a similar range of phenotypes, including increased biomass from extended leaf production, and increased vegetative branching. Field grown switchgrass transformants showed that overall lignin content was reduced, the ratio of glucans to xylans was increased, and surprisingly, that starch levels were greatly increased. The goals of this project are to control the tissue and temporal expression of Cg1 by using different promoters to drive its expression, elucidate the function of the SPL targets of Cg1 by generating gain and loss of function alleles, and isolate downstream targets of select SPL genes using deep sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation. We believe it is possible to control biomass accumulation, cell wall properties, and sugar levels through manipulation of either the Cg1 gene and/or its SPL targets.

  18. Seizing our Bioenergy Opportunities in a Changing Energy Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Bioenergy Technologies Office, we’re working with public and private partners to develop an industry of advanced biofuels and bioproducts from non-food biomass sources that is commercially...

  19. BioEnergy of America Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    America Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy of America Inc Address: 30 Executive Avenue Place: Edison, New Jersey Zip: 08817 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into an agricultural system," is set to be published in September 2015 in the journal, Biomass and Bioenergy. Watch a short video about their research. The team, led by Dr. ...

  1. Test Your Energy Knowledge with Our Bioenergy Quiz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We are very excited to announce our first ever bioenergy quiz—an online, interactive tool that’s both enlightening and entertaining! Interested in participating? Just click the link in the photo above and let the game begin.

  2. "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Introductory presentation by Jonathan Male, U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Director, at the Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters Workshop held March 18–19, 2015.

  3. Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar will be held Wednesday, September 2, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET. Standard application questions regarding...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algal lipid upgrading is one of eight priority pathways chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. These pathways were down-selected from an initial list of 18.

  5. Energy Department Selects Three Bioenergy Research Centers for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The establishment of the bioenergy research centers culminates a six-year effort by DOE's Office of Science to lay the foundation for breakthroughs in systems biology for the ...

  6. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants There are important issues to consider when selecting a CHP technology, such as size, emissions, location of maintenance personnel, and efficiency. This document summarizes the following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell. PDF icon CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and

  7. USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research August 9, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Aug. 9, 2006 - Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly awarded nine grants totaling $5.7 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel

  8. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment | Department of Energy in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment May 9, 2014 - 12:01pm Addthis API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena Biorefinery. Photo: Alex Wisniewski API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena Biorefinery. Photo: Alex Wisniewski Christy Sterner Technology

  9. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9th-12th Grade Classroom | Department of Energy Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom PDF icon bioenergize_me_ngss_20151210.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2016 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2016 Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: March 2016 This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. It identifies the research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities the Office will focus on over the next five years and outlines why these activities are important to meeting the energy and sustainability challenges facing the nation. This MYPP is

  11. AUDIT REPORT Office of Science's Bioenergy Research Centers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bioenergy Research Centers OAI-M-16-01 October 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 22, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF SCIENCE FROM: April G. Stephenson Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report: "Office of Science's Bioenergy Research Centers" BACKGROUND In September 2007, Office of Science's

  12. Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transfer | Department of Energy Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 24, 2015 - 10:57am Addthis The Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) recently won a 2015 Excellence in Technology Transfer Award for developing an innovative process that uses heat and pressure to convert whole algae into biocrude oil in just minutes-much faster than

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Competition | Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University Energy Competition Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University Energy Competition May 27, 2014 - 9:39am Addthis Washington State University is hosting the Imagine Tomorrow competition to challenge high school students to explore new ways to support the transition to alternative energy sources. The competition, held on May 30-June 1, 2014, asks students to work together in

  14. Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Large-Scale Production of Marine Microalgae for Fuel and Feeds March 24, 2015 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley ...

  15. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  16. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY14 Budget At-a-Glance Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance, a publication of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of ...

  18. D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SE1 2RE Product: London-based JV between BP and D1 oils focusing on the...

  19. National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2011-2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    Winter 2011-2012 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: 34th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals; feasibility of NIR spectroscopy-based rapid feedstock reactive screening; demonstrating integrated pilot-scale biomass conversion. The Biochemical Process Integration Task focuses on integrating the processing steps in enzyme-based lignocellulose conversion technology. This project supports the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to foster development, demonstration, and deployment of 'biochemical platform' biorefineries that economically produce ethanol or other fuels, as well as commodity sugars and a variety of other chemical products, from renewable lignocellulosic biomass.

  20. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #12, July-September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2006-10-01

    Volume 12 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  1. EERE Success Story-Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Announces Launch of New and Improved KDF | Department of Energy Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Launch of New and Improved KDF EERE Success Story-Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office Announces Launch of New and Improved KDF January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis In September 2013, the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) launched a revamped, easier-to-use version of the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework. Initially

  2. Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic | Department of Energy Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic September 24, 2015 - 10:21am Addthis A team of high school students designed this infographic about cellulosic ethanol. View the entire infographic from the <a href="http://energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergizeme-infographic-challenge-cellulosic-ethanol">Bioenergy Technologies Office

  3. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #13, October-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Volume 13 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

  4. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #21, October - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-01-01

    October to December, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center?s Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  5. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #10, January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    Volume 10 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  6. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #14, January - March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2007-04-01

    Volume 14 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

  7. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #9, October-December 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Volume 9 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  8. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2008-04-01

    January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  9. National Bioenergy Center Sugar Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #11, April-June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2006-07-01

    Volume 11 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Sugar Platform Integration Project.

  10. Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Centers | Department of Energy Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers Energy Department Announces Five-Year Renewal of Funding for Bioenergy Research Centers April 4, 2013 - 1:48pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it would fund its three Bioenergy Research Centers for an additional five-year period, subject to continued congressional appropriations. The three Centers -including the BioEnergy

  11. Small-Scale Bioenergy Alternatives for Industry, Farm, and Institutions : A User`s Perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folk, Richard

    1991-12-31

    This report presents research on biomass as an energy source. Topics include: bioenergy development and application; bioenergy combustion technology; and bioenergy from agricultural, forest, and urban resources. There are a total of 57 individual reports included. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  12. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.

  13. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) wasmore » employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.« less

  14. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

  15. Webinar: Bioenergy -Is It Good for the Climate? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy -Is It Good for the Climate? Webinar: Bioenergy -Is It Good for the Climate? April 21, 2016 10:00AM to 11:00AM EDT Online As part of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Internal Webinar Series, the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites you to join a webinar on Thursday, April 21, 2016, at 10 a.m. Eastern Time. During the webinar, participants will learn about the climate benefits on bioenergy, and how it can achieve a net carbon reduction of CO2

  16. Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security The New Mexico Consortium expects to complete the 27,000 square foot laboratory and office facility next spring. May 22, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email Los Alamos, N.M., May 22, 2012 - U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony marking

  17. Advantages and limitations of exergy indicators to assess sustainability of bioenergy and biobased materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maes, Dries Van Passel, Steven

    2014-02-15

    Innovative bioenergy projects show a growing diversity in biomass pathways, transformation technologies and end-products, leading to complex new processes. Existing energy-based indicators are not designed to include multiple impacts and are too constrained to assess the sustainability of these processes. Alternatively, indicators based on exergy, a measure of “qualitative energy”, could allow a more holistic view. Exergy is increasingly applied in analyses of both technical and biological processes. But sustainability assessments including exergy calculations, are not very common and are not generally applicable to all types of impact. Hence it is important to frame the use of exergy for inclusion in a sustainability assessment. This paper reviews the potentials and the limitations of exergy calculations, and presents solutions for coherent aggregation with other metrics. The resulting approach is illustrated in a case study. Within the context of sustainability assessment of bioenergy, exergy is a suitable metric for the impacts that require an ecocentric interpretation, and it allows aggregation on a physical basis. The use of exergy is limited to a measurement of material and energy exchanges with the sun, biosphere and lithosphere. Exchanges involving services or human choices are to be measured in different metrics. This combination provides a more inclusive and objective sustainability assessment, especially compared to standard energy- or carbon-based indicators. Future applications of this approach in different situations are required to clarify the potential of exergy-based indicators in a sustainability context. -- Highlights: • Innovative bioenergy projects require more advanced sustainability assessments to incorporate all environmental impacts. • Exergy-based indicators provide solutions for objective and robust measurements. • The use of exergy in a sustainability assessment is limited to material exchanges, excluding exchanges with society. • The combination of exergy-based indicators with other indicators is very appropriate. • But this is only rarely applied.

  18. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  19. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  20. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurementsmore » of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.« less