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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (Genomics and Bioenergy)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

Rokhsar, Daniel

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance Henrik Vibeenergy stored in plant biomass. The papers in this volumefeedstocks development and biomass deconstruction. Keywords

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies #12;Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies By André of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels

4

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-9086-2 The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): DevelopingThe mission of the Joint BioEnergy Institute is to advanceJ. D. Keasling Joint BioEnergy Institute, 5885 Hollis St. ,

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JD (2009) Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases.JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomassthe next-generation of biofuels— liquid fuels derived from

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NREL: Biomass Research - National Bioenergy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Bioenergy Center National Bioenergy Center The National Bioenergy Center (NBC) was established in October 2000 to support the science and technology goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office. Headquartered at NREL, this virtual center unifies DOE's efforts to advance technology for producing renewable transportation fuels from biomass. A primary goal is to demonstrate the production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol by 2012. Collaborating with industrial, academic, and other governmental research, development, and commercialization efforts is central to achieving this goal. Mission The National Bioenergy Center's mission is to foster capability to catalyze the replacement of petroleum with transportation fuels from biomass by delivering innovative, cost-effective biofuels solutions.

7

Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource assessment – do we have enough biomass? Techno-economic analysis – can biofuels be produced at competitive prices? • Integrated biorefineries – what is being funded at DOE and what are future plans?

Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels; Zia Haq

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

13September 2011 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13September 2011 2010 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative- tonnage bioenergy crop on a commercial scale and convert it into an advanced biofuel (gasoline) in a pilot the biofuels production goals of the United States while helping to alleviate constraints on food and feed

9

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Supply for Bioenergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Supply for Bioenergy and Bioproducts Project Summary Full Title: Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton...

10

Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsÆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

11

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments 2009 Lead lignocellulosic "drop-in" biofuels. "Drop-in" means they are compatible with the existing petroleum refining and distribution infrastructure. With this project Texas can become a leader in biofuels production

12

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

13

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of biomass and biofuels technologies available for licensing ...

14

Nutrient use efficiency in bioenergy cropping systems: Critical research questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x giganteus. Biomass Bioenergy 12:21-24. Christian, D.G. ,for-biofuels systems. Biomass Bioenergy Gentry, L.E. , F.E.cynosuroides. Biomass Bioenergy 12:419-428. Brejda, J.J.

Brouder, Sylvie; Volenec, Jeffrey J; Turco, Ronald; Smith, Douglas R; Ejeta, Gebisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biofuels produced from biomass provide a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biomass is an inexpensive, readily available and renewable resource.

16

II. Biofuels & Bioenergy Harnessing the metabolic power of microbes and the renewable carbon resevoir of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II. Biofuels & Bioenergy Harnessing the metabolic power of microbes and the renewable carbon, and artistic elements in building the Biotech Expo poster entries. Online Resources on Biofuels & Bioenergy of Agriculture: Bioenergy & Biofuels http://riley.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php?info_center=8&tax_level=3

Hammock, Bruce D.

17

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels...

18

Biomass and Biofuels Success Stories - Energy Innovation ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Success Stories These success stories highlight some of the effective licensing and partnership activity between laboratories and ...

19

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Biomass and Biofuels Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation ...

20

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here ... The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production, Version 2.0.sustainability concepts in biofuel supply chain management:of switchgrass-for-biofuel systems. Biomass & Bioenergy,

Morrow, III, William R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Biomass Feedstocks  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is defined as any renewable, biological material that can be used directly as a fuel, or converted to another form of fuel or energy product. Biomass feedstocks are the...

24

Switchgrass for Forage and Bioenergy: I. Effects of Nitrogen Rate and Harvest System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuel systems. Biomass and Bioenergy 30:198-206. Muir JP,systems. Biomass and Bioenergy 19: 281-286. Sanderson MA,whether for forage or bioenergy) is defining how crop

Kering, Maru K; Biermacher, Jon T; Cook, Billy J; Guretzky, John A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development

26

Focus Area 1 - Biomass Formation and Modification : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Modification BESC biomass formation and modification research involves working directly with two potential bioenergy crops (switchgrass and Populus) to develop...

27

SEE ALSO SIDEBARS: RECOURCES SOLARRESOURCES BIOMASS & BIOFUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

373 SEE ALSO SIDEBARS: RECOURCES · SOLARRESOURCES · BIOMASS & BIOFUELS Engineered and Artificial Biomass remains a key energy source for several billion people living in developing countries, and the production of liquid biofuels for transportation is growing rapidly. However, both traditional biomass energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

28

Bioenergy market competition for biomass: A system dynamics review of current policies  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the United States and abroad to increase the use of biomass as an energy source due to environmental and energy security benefits. In the United States, the biofuel and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and different agencies and have different drivers, which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets based on varying policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry, as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand for biomass in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from export dominance.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert Jeffers

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Downstream processing of microalgal biomass for biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis documents the work carried out investigating the downstream processing of algal biomass for biofuel production. A life cycle assessment was conducted on a… (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

31

Hawai'i Bioenergy Master Plan Green Jobs, Biofuels Development, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hawai'i Bioenergy Master Plan Green Jobs, Biofuels Development, and Hawaii's Labor Market associated with biofuels in Hawai'i. In particular, it discusses how a potential biofuels industry might policy makers and leaders consider how best to support biofuels. One major labor market question

32

LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs  

SciTech Connect

LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

Olivares, Jose A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Min S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse-gas flux for bioenergy crop- ping systems. EcolMediterranean region. Biomass Bioenergy [CalClim] Californiafor biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:198–206. Heaton E,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsÆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Production collection includes 100 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but six datasets and 16 models are listed.

35

Bioenergy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy Los Alamos developing next-generation of biofuels from renewable resources Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce such costs by more than 90%. Overview of Research and Highlights The next-generation of biofuels are being developed at Los Alamos. Made from renewable resources, biofuels could yield reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Los Alamos scientists are * working to bring cellulosic ethanol (made from the inedible parts of plants, instead of corn) and algae-based fuels to the marketplace in ways that make them economically competitive with fossil fuels and prevent a strain on valuable food

36

Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada Biomass-Bioenergy Report May 31, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change Solutions;2 Table of Contents 1. Policy Setting 2. Biomass Volumes 2.1. Woody Biomass 2.1.1. Annual Residue Production 2.1.2. Pulp Chips 2.1.3. Existing Hog Fuel Piles 2.1.4. Forest Floor Biomass 2.2. Agricultural

37

Bioenergy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy Bioenergy Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Richard Sayre Senior Scientist Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Los Alamos developing next-generation of biofuels from renewable resources Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae,

38

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy. BiomassStates. In selecting biofuel crops, a balance must be struckdegree of risk that a biofuel crop (including cultivars and

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bio

40

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biorefineries producing biofuels from development are toUse of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases green- ductionCalifornia biomass and biofuels production potential. Final

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biomass and Biofuels: Technology and Economic Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on biomass and biofuels technology and economics presented at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, May 23, 2007.

Aden, A

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

C3 BioEnergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product C3 BioEnergy is an early-stage biofuels technology company. Plans to make propane, propylene, and hydrogen from renewable biomass resources. References C3 BioEnergy1...

43

Oil in biomass: a step-change for bioenergy production?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help meet the rapidly growing demand for biofuels, scientists and policy makers envision that a variety of agricultural, municipal, and forest-derived feedstocks will be used to produce “second-generation” biofuels. Oil in biomass: a step-change for bio

44

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

2012 Bioenergy Action Plan Prepared by the Bioenergy Interagency Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's diverse biomass resources for conversion to "low-carbon" biofuels, biogas, and renewable electricity; 2, biomass, biogas, biomethane, biorefinery, biogenic, Bioenergy Action Plan, renewable; biomass residues and biogas. Current bioenergy production in California includes: 33 biomass plants that generate a combined

46

Secretary Moniz Speaks at Biomass 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass 2013 Secretary Moniz Speaks at Biomass 2013 Addthis Speakers Secretary Ernest Moniz Duration 22:43 Topic Biofuels Bioenergy Biological Science...

47

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative...

48

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Procedures for Microalgal Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Procedures for Microalgal Biofuels Analysis Standard Procedures for Microalgal Biofuels Analysis Capabilities in Microalgal Analysis NREL's Algal Biofuels Research team can work with you to analyze the chemical composition of algae as a biomass feedstock. NREL develops laboratory analytical procedures (LAPs) for analyzing microalgal biofuels. These procedures help scientists and analysts understand more about the chemical composition of algae as a feedstock to convert to biofuels. For more procedures, see the biomass characterization LAPs. Laboratory Analytical Procedures NREL wrote these analytical procedures to help the research community analyze algae. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures Download Procedure This procedure guides the integration of LAPs to measure algal biomass

49

Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

50

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

51

Biomass Energy Program Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

window for the most recent grant opportunity closes November 26, 2012.''''' The Michigan Biomass Energy Program (MBEP) provides funding for state bioenergy and biofuels projects...

52

How can land-use modelling tools inform bioenergy policies?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation biofuels are the follow-up of 2nd generation biofuels, from the same raw material up to H2, renewable, biofuels and biorefinery. Bioenergy is the chemical energy contained in organic materials production. Biofuels are biomass materials directly used as solid fuel or converted into liquid or gaseous

DeLucia, Evan H.

53

Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individuals data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Distribution collection includes 59 items, of which 21 are listed as datasets and five as models.

54

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Research into producing microalgal biofuels for transportation has been revitalized at NREL. Because algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for a number of transportation fuels-biodiesel, "green" diesel and gasoline, and jet fuel-NREL has developed strong capabilities in producing biofuels from microalgae. Through standard procedures for microalgal biofuels analysis, NREL helps scientists and researchers understand more about the chemical composition of algae. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the microalgae-to-biofuels conversion process. NREL's capabilities in microalgal biofuels R&D include: Why is algal research important? Algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for transportation fuels.

55

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Biomass and Bioenergy 26 (2004) 6169  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Biomass and Bioenergy 26 (2004) 61­69 National renewable energy policy and local opposition in the UK: the failed development of a biomass electricity plant March 2003; accepted 2 April 2003 Abstract Biomass energy developments in the UK are supported

Heinke, Dietmar

56

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the energy supply. The sustainable use of biomass can reduceBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioprod- ucts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply.supply, renewabil- ity of this resource, sustainability of production and utilization practices, feasibility of advanced technologies for converting biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Projects Microalgal Biofuels Projects A photo of a man in a white lab coat holding a glass flask that contains a small amount of clear green liquid. An NREL researcher analyzes algae samples for oil content using the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter. NREL's microalgal biofuels projects focus on determining the feasibility and economic capability of employing algae as a cost-effective feedstock for fuel production. NREL researchers pioneered developing microalgal biofuels by leading the U.S. Department of Energy Aquatic Species Program from 1979 to 1996. Among NREL's RD&D projects in converting microalgae to biofuels are: Development of Algal Strains NREL and Chevron Corp. are collaborating to develop techniques to improve the production of liquid transportation fuels using microalgae. The

58

MODEL BASED BIOMASS SYSTEM DESIGN OF FEEDSTOCK SUPPLY SYSTEMS FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Engineering feedstock supply systems that deliver affordable, high-quality biomass remains a challenge for the emerging bioenergy industry. Cellulosic biomass is geographically distributed and has diverse physical and chemical properties. Because of this feedstock supply systems that deliver cellulosic biomass resources to biorefineries require integration of a broad set of engineered unit operations. These unit operations include harvest and collection, storage, preprocessing, and transportation processes. Design decisions for each feedstock supply system unit operation impact the engineering design and performance of the other system elements. These interdependencies are further complicated by spatial and temporal variances such as climate conditions and biomass characteristics. This paper develops an integrated model that couples a SQL-based data management engine and systems dynamics models to design and evaluate biomass feedstock supply systems. The integrated model, called the Biomass Logistics Model (BLM), includes a suite of databases that provide 1) engineering performance data for hundreds of equipment systems, 2) spatially explicit labor cost datasets, and 3) local tax and regulation data. The BLM analytic engine is built in the systems dynamics software package PowersimTM. The BLM is designed to work with thermochemical and biochemical based biofuel conversion platforms and accommodates a range of cellulosic biomass types (i.e., herbaceous residues, short- rotation woody and herbaceous energy crops, woody residues, algae, etc.). The BLM simulates the flow of biomass through the entire supply chain, tracking changes in feedstock characteristics (i.e., moisture content, dry matter, ash content, and dry bulk density) as influenced by the various operations in the supply chain. By accounting for all of the equipment that comes into contact with biomass from the point of harvest to the throat of the conversion facility and the change in characteristics, the BLM evaluates economic performance of the engineered system, as well as determining energy consumption and green house gas performance of the design. This paper presents a BLM case study delivering corn stover to produce cellulosic ethanol. The case study utilizes the BLM to model the performance of several feedstock supply system designs. The case study also explores the impact of temporal variations in climate conditions to test the sensitivity of the engineering designs. Results from the case study show that under certain conditions corn stover can be delivered to the cellulosic ethanol biorefinery for $35/dry ton.

David J. Muth, Jr.; Jacob J. Jacobson; Kenneth M. Bryden

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Bioenergy News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioenergy News Bioenergy News Bioenergy News RSS August 30, 2011 USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation WASHINGTON, Aug. August 10, 2011 Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. June 10, 2011 Department of Energy Announces up to $36 Million to Support the Development

60

Biomass Conversion Task IV 1987 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a major, renewable energy resource through out the world, and extensive research is being conducted by many countries on bioenergy technologies. In an effort to improve communications and cooperation in the area of biomass energy, several nations have agreed to a cooperative program of work under the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Three areas of major importance have been identified including Short Rotation Forestry, Conventional Forestry, and Biomass Conversion. This document describes the 1987 Program of Work for cooperative activities in the area of Biomass Conversion. The background of the cooperation and descriptions of specific conversion projects are presented. Details of activity funding are also provided. 3 tabs.

Stevens, D.J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass can be produced every year without affecting food supply,Biomass as feedstock for bioenergy and bioproducts industry: the technical feasibility of a billion-ton annual supply.Biomass as a feedstock for a bioenergy and bioproducts industry: thetechnical feasibility of a billion-ton annual supply.

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

IEA Bioenergy Task 42 on Biorefineries: Co-production of fuels, chemicals, power and materials from biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from biomass IEA Bioenergy Task 42 ­ Countries Report Final Francesco Cherubini, Gerfried Jungmeier and Materials from Biomass (www.biorefinery.nl/ieabioenergy-task42). IEA Bioenergy is a collaborative network a new and very broad biomass-related field, with a very large application potential, and deals

63

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid...

64

Definition: Bioenergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy Bioenergy Energy produced from organic materials from plants or animals.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Bioenergy is renewable energy made available from materials derived from biological sources. Biomass is any organic material which has stored sunlight in the form of chemical energy. As a fuel it may include wood, wood waste, straw, manure, sugarcane, and many other byproducts from a variety of agricultural processes. By 2010, there was 35GW of globally installed bioenergy capacity for electricity generation, of which 7GW was in the United States. In its most narrow sense it is a synonym to biofuel, which is fuel derived from biological sources. In its broader sense it includes biomass, the biological material used as a biofuel, as well as the

65

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Project Locations Biofuels Project Locations BlueFire Ethanol Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Mecca, CA) Poet Biochemical Corn Cob/Corn Fiber (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Biochemical Woody Biomass- Ag Residues (Grand Junction, CO) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Forage Sorghum, Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa Biochemica Agricultural Residue (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage Thermochemical Woody Biomass - Mill Residues (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels Thermochemical Woody Waste (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center Biochemical Various (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes Biochemical Various (Davis, CA) Genencor Biochemical Various (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp Biochemical Various (San Diego, CA)

66

Bioenergy News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioenergy News Bioenergy News Bioenergy News RSS August 1, 2013 Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs During remarks at the Energy Department's Biomass 2013 annual conference, Secretary Moniz highlighted the important role biofuels play in the Administration's Climate Action Plan. July 31, 2013 Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Groundbreaking Project Deploys Technology Developed Through Early Energy Department R&D Investments July 1, 2013 Energy Department Announces Investment to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels Following last week's rollout of President Obama's plan to cut carbon pollution, the Energy Department today announced four research and development projects to bring next generation biofuels on line faster and

67

Videos from the DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC): Redefining the Frontiers of Bioenergy  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Bioenergy is energy derived from biomass. Biofuel is formed from biomass, and can be used to power greener vehicles and herald more efficient energy production. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) set a renewable fuel standard of 36 billion gallons of biofuel processed annually by 2022, with 16 billion gallons coming from cellulosic feedstock such as switchgrass and poplar. To reach this goal, the Department of Energy (DOE) set up three Bioenergy Research Centers in September 2007. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is researching methods to easily break down cell walls of switchgrass and poplar to form biofuel, as well as researching enzymes and microbes that will do the breaking down of the plant material. By modifying the genome of the biomass, BESC can form a more populous, easily broken down feedstock that will grow easily and be available for use. By modifying the genome of the microbes, the process of breaking down the biomass into biofuel will be expedited and simplified at the same time [Copied with editing from http://bioenergycenter.org/what-is-bioenergy/]. BESC presentation videos include: Bioenergy Conversion and the BioEnergy Science Center: An Introduction to the Challenges in Making Cellulosic Biofuels • Lignin Biosynthesis and Its Manipulation for the Development of Dedicated Bioenergy Crops • Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology • The Clostridium Thermocellum Cellulosome: A Molecular Machine for Cellulose Degradation • Biobutanol from Biomass • Applied Photosynthesis: Putting Photosystem I to Work • Plant Genome Structure and Evolution as Tools for the Improvement of Biomass Crops •\tCool C4 Photosynthesis. Miscanthus -- A Means to Achieve Large Sustainable Supplies of Bioenergy Feedstock without Impacts on Food Production • Second Generation Pentose Utilizing Yeast Strains • Biomass to Hydrogen Gas at 100 Degrees Celsius • Light Harvesting for Algal Biofuels. The Center also provides a photo gallery, fact sheets, and other media-rich information.

68

State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States on Issues, Opportunities, and Options for Advancing Bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

One renewable energy option that states frequently consider to meet their clean energy goals is the use of biomass resources to develop bioenergy. Bioenergy includes bioheat, biopower, biofuels, and bioproducts. This document provides an overview of biomass feedstocks, basic information about biomass conversion technologies, and a discussion of benefits and challenges of bioenergy options. The Primer includes a step-wise framework, resources, and tools for determining the availability of feedstocks, assessing potential markets for biomass, and identifying opportunities for action at the state level. Each chapter contains a list of selected resources and tools that states can use to explore topics in further detail.

Byrnett, D. S.; Mulholland, D.; Zinsmeister, E.; Doris, E.; Milbrandt, A.; Robichaud. R.; Stanley, R.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Biomass Energy Program Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants < Back Eligibility Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source U.S. Department of Energy's State Energy Program (SEP) State Michigan Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by solicitation; check website for each solicitation's details Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation '''''The application window for the most recent grant opportunity closed November 26, 2012.''''' The Michigan Biomass Energy Program (MBEP) provides funding for state bioenergy and biofuels projects on a regular basis. Funding categories typically include biofuels and bioenergy education, biofuels

71

Pretreatment Methods for Biomass Conversion into Biofuels ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass using an acid catalyst to produce sugars has been known for decades but can be ...

72

Biocatalysis and Bioenergy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An up-to-date overview of diverse findings and accomplishments in biocatalysis and bioenergy. Biocatalysis and Bioenergy Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Hardback Books Biofuels - Bioproducts John Wiley and Sons An up-to-date overview of div

73

Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at biomasse er en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RisÞ har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slÄr fast, at biomasse er en ligesÄ vÊrdifuld skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. Der er ikke noget nyt i at bruge biomasse til energi' er et spÞrgsmÄl om at udnytte ny teknologi til at gÞre energi fra biomasse endnu mere rentabel og

74

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Biomass 2013: How the Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multimedia Webinars Databases Analytical Tools Glossary Student & Educator Resources State & Regional Resources Conferences & Meetings Conferences Biomass 2013 Biomass 2012...

75

Making Biofuel Renewable: Sustainable Phosphorus Recovery from Microbial Biomass McKay Gifford and Paul Westerhoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Biofuel Renewable: Sustainable Phosphorus Recovery from Microbial Biomass McKay Gifford, BioresourceTechnology, 102(2), 1697-1703. Biomass Composition Biofuel Processing Anion Exchange Microwave depletion indicate that future energy must come from biofuel. Biodiesel from photosynthetic microorganisms

Hall, Sharon J.

76

Bioenergy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce such costs by more than 90%. Overview of Research and...

77

Biomass Conversion Task IV 1986-1988 Program of Work. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a major, renewable energy resource throughout much of the world, and extensive research is being conducted on bioenergy technologies. In an effort to improve communications and cooperation in the area of biomass energy, several countries have agreed to a cooperative program of work under the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Three areas of major importance have been identified including Short Rotation Forestry, Conventional Forestry, and Biomass Conversion. This document describes a Program of Work for cooperative activities in the area of Biomass Conversion. The background of the cooperation and general descriptions of specific conversion projects are presented. Details of activity funding are also provided. Finally, individual Activity Plans for specific cooperative activities are attached for reference. These plans describe projected work for the period 1986 to 1988.

Stevens, D.J.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Improving Biomass Yields: High Biomass, Low Input Dedicated Energy Crops to Enable a Full Scale Bioenergy Industry  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ceres is developing bigger and better grasses for use in biofuels. The bigger the grass yield, the more biomass, and more biomass means more biofuel per acre. Using biotechnology, Ceres is developing grasses that will grow bigger with less fertilizer than current grass varieties. Hardier, higher-yielding grass also requires less land to grow and can be planted in areas where other crops can’t grow instead of in prime agricultural land. Ceres is conducting multi-year trials in Arizona, Texas, Tennessee, and Georgia which have already resulted in grass yields with as much as 50% more biomass than yields from current grass varieties.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bioenergy Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES AT-A-GLANCE Bioenergy Technologies supports targeted research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) activities to progress sustainable, nationwide production of advanced biofuels that will displace a share of petroleum-derived fuels, mitigate climate change, create American jobs, and increase U.S. energy security. What We Do Bioenergy Technologies employs an integrated, cross- cutting RDD&D strategy to develop commercially viable biomass utilization technologies. The office makes strategic investments in the following areas:  Feedstock Infrastructure advances a sustainable, secure, reliable, and affordable biomass feedstock supply for the U.S. bioenergy industry.  Conversion R&D identifies and develops viable

80

EERE: Bioenergy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

biorefinery in the distance and an airplane flying overhead Photo of tractor harvesting biomass feedstock Photo of a traditional three stone open fire Bioenergy uses materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Focus Area 2 - Biomass Deconstruction and Conversion : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deconstruction and Conversion BESC research in biomass deconstruction and conversion targets CBP by studying model organisms and thermophilic anaerobes to understand novel...

82

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Key Publications Newsletter Project Fact Sheets Biomass Basics Multimedia Webinars Databases Analytical Tools Glossary Student & Educator...

83

From Biomass to Biofuels: NREL Leads the Way  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure covers how biofuels can help meet future needs for transportation fuels, how biofuels are produced, U.S. potential for biofuels, and NREL's approach to efficient affordable biofuels.

Not Available

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Methods for the economical production of biofuel from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for producing a biofuel are provided. Also provided are biocatalysts that convert a feedstock to a biofuel.

Hawkins, Andrew C; Glassner, David A; Buelter, Thomas; Wade, James; Meinhold, Peter; Peters, Matthew W; Gruber, Patrick R; Evanko, William A; Aristidou, Aristos A; Landwehr, Marco

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for metabolic engineering of waxes and hydrocarbon biofuels Reinhard Jetter1,2,* and Ljerka Kunst1 biosynthetic pathways can be used in metabolic engineering of plants for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels

Kunst, Ljerka

86

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne stergrd, Ris National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne �stergÄrd, RisÞ National Laboratory in the Agricultural Outlook from OECD-FAO, these predictions may be misleading and biomass may increase more rapidly Biomass and waste Hydro Nuclear Gas Oil Coal Fig 1 Total primary energy supply3 · The transport sector

87

d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi -et nyt dansk vkstomrde 1 Har forbrnding og forgasning af biomasse en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomasse en fremtid ? Charles Nielsen Elsam A/S #12;d. 11. dec. 2003 Moderne bioenergi - et nyt dansk · AfgrÊnsning og perspektiv · Den energipolitiske vision · Road-map pÄ biomasse · DrivkrÊftene pÄ kort sigt · Biomasse - organisk fraktion af affald samt overskud fra land- og skovbrug · Nationalt og internationalt

88

eMagazine : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Research Centers - An overview of the Science The Science Behind Cheaper Biofuels a Bioenergy Ecosystem - BESC partnerships translate R&D into biofuels High-Speed...

89

Supergen Biomass and Bioenergy Consortium Theme 6 Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ethanol and biodiesel) dispensed through existing petroleum retail stations. Alternative and renewable ................................................................................................................................................... 23 Biodiesel/Renewable Diesel (BiomassBased Diesels (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline) or any blend level in between. Biodiesel also is being

90

Biofuels Atlas (United States) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Atlas (United States) Biofuels Atlas (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biofuels Atlas (United States) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: maps.nrel.gov/biomass Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/biofuels-atlas-united-states,http://c Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Biofuels Atlas is an interactive map that allows users to compare biomass feedstocks and biofuels by location. Users may select from and apply biomass data layers to a map as well as query and download biofuels and feedstock data. The state zoom function summarizes state energy use and infrastructure for traditional and bioenergy power, fuels, and resources. The tool also calculates the biofuels potential for a given area.

91

Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

As David Rotman states in his article on biofuels, the conversion of biomass to liquid fuel is energy intensive--just like the conversion of coal or any other solid fuel to liquid fuel. That implies that the quantity of liquid fuel from biomass and the carbon dioxide released in the production process strongly depend upon the energy source used in the conversion process. Each year, the United States could produce about 1.3 billion tons of renewable biomass for use as fuel. Burning it would release about as much energy as burning 10 million barrels of diesel fuel per day. If converted to ethanol, the biomass would have the energy value of about five million barrels of diesel fuel per day. The remainder of the energy would be used by the biomass-to-liquids conversion plant. If a nuclear reactor or other energy source provides the energy for the biomass-to-liquids plants, the equivalent of over 12 million barrels of diesel fuel can be produced per day. If our goal is to end oil imports and avoid greenhouse-gas releases, we must combine biomass and nuclear energy to maximize biofuels production.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Watershed Perspective on Bioenergy Sustainability Participant Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encompasses research projects at all points along the bioenergy supply chains. As an ecosystem ecologist who and developing supply chain models of cellulosic ethanol production. hilliardmr@ornl.gov Ice, George NCASI 541 of biomass/biofuels in forests, looking at nutrient cyclinc and effects on soil and water. mbadams

93

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, 16 number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles and biomass/biofuel 22 burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic 23

Dickerson, Russell R.

94

Biomass conversion Task 4 1988 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For biomass to meet its potential as an energy resource, conversion processes must be available which are both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Conversion can include direct production of heat and electricity as well as production of intermediate gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels. While many biomass conversion processes are commercially available at present, others are still in the conceptual stage. Additional research and development activities on these advanced concepts will be necessary to fully use biomass resources. Ongoing research on biomass conversion processes is being conducted by many nations throughout the world. In an effort to coordinate this research and improve information exchange, several countries have agreed to a cooperative effort through the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Under this Agreement, Task IV deals specifically with biomass conversion topics. The cooperative activities consists of information exchange and coordination of national research programs on specific topics. The activities address biomass conversion in a systematic manner, dealing with the pretreatment of biomass prior to conversion, the subsequent conversion of the biomass to intermediate fuels or end-product energy, and then the environmental aspects of the conversion process. This document provides an outline of cooperative work to be performed in 1988. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Stevens, D.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Biomass conversion Task 4 1988 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement  

SciTech Connect

For biomass to meet its potential as an energy resource, conversion processes must be available which are both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Conversion can include direct production of heat and electricity as well as production of intermediate gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels. While many biomass conversion processes are commercially available at present, others are still in the conceptual stage. Additional research and development activities on these advanced concepts will be necessary to fully use biomass resources. Ongoing research on biomass conversion processes is being conducted by many nations throughout the world. In an effort to coordinate this research and improve information exchange, several countries have agreed to a cooperative effort through the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Under this Agreement, Task IV deals specifically with biomass conversion topics. The cooperative activities consists of information exchange and coordination of national research programs on specific topics. The activities address biomass conversion in a systematic manner, dealing with the pretreatment of biomass prior to conversion, the subsequent conversion of the biomass to intermediate fuels or end-product energy, and then the environmental aspects of the conversion process. This document provides an outline of cooperative work to be performed in 1988. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Stevens, D.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center's Video Channel on Vimeo  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) is one of three bioenergy science centers funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science. The centers pursue research supporting high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. GLBRC's mission is to perform basic research that generates technology to convert cellulosic biomass to ethanol and other advanced biofuels. The Vimeo channel for GLBRC has 22 videos as of May 2012.

97

Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools September 30, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis A researcher loads a biomass sample into spinning ring cup. Argonne National Laboratory has launched two online tools that assess the resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory A researcher loads a biomass sample into spinning ring cup. Argonne National Laboratory has launched two online tools that assess the resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable

98

Webinars from EERE's Biomass Program - 2010 to present  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

EERE’s Biomass Program makes available presentation slides and audio files from its webinar series dating back to September of 2010. The series covers many of the Program's activities and features "Hot Topics" discussions relevant to the development of renewable fuels, power, and products from biomass resources. Titles include: 1) The Promise and Challenges of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels; 2) Advanced Biofuels Research Pathways; 3) Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework; 4) Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities; 5) Transforming Biomass into Feedstock; 6) The U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry; 7) Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Roadmapping Workshop Webinar; 8) Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy; 9) Assessing Impacts of Bioenergy Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability.

99

Definition: Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Biofuels Biomass converted to liquid or gaseous fuels such as ethanol, methanol, hydrogen and methane; primarily used for transportation. A form of bioenergy.[1][2][3][4] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Liquid fuels and blending components produced from biomass (plant) feedstocks, used primarily for transportation., Bio fuels are liquid fuels that are produced of plant material or herbal remains., No reegle definition available Related Terms Bioenergy, Biomass, Ethanol, Biodiesel, energy, fossil fuels, fuel cell References ↑ http://www.nrel.gov/biomass/glossary.html ↑ http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/energy-environment/biofuels/index.html?scp=1&sq=biomass&st=Search ↑ http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy00osti/25876.pdf

100

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biofuels Impact Study2010 Biofuel Impact Study Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oregon has abundant human and natural capital that can contribute significantly to the State’s energy future. Our biomass resources have the potential to contribute to future energy needs while encouraging job creation and economic opportunities in rural Oregon. The Governor and the Oregon State Legislature have made significant commitments and investments towards realizing the full potential that bioenergy has for Oregon. Oregon has led the nation with policies that promote the use of biomass for fuel and energy production. State agencies, non-profits and the private sector are working hard to deliver this commitment of job creation, energy savings, and energy independence for Oregon businesses and residents. This is the first periodic report issued to the Legislature that assesses the impact of the State’s biofuel program. The report includes a summary of current incentives and policies that support biofuels, statistics about jobs at Oregon’s bioenergy facilities, and a description of the status of the bioenergy and biofuels industries in Oregon. More data is necessary to truly evaluate the impacts of Oregon’s bioenergy incentives to the health of the bioenergy industry and the creation of jobs. Several state agencies are working to collect some of these data, which will provide a clearer picture of the industry at the time of our next report to the Legislature. Biomass heating facility at the Harney Hospital in Burns, OR

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France Introduction Renewable energy sources such as biomass and biofuels are increasingly being seen as important of biofuels on the final consumption of energy in transport should be 10%. The long-term target is to reduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel resources. Bio- mass Bioenergy 27:613 20. Parker N,Strategic assessment of bioenergy development in the west:as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioprod- ucts Industry: The

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

World Biofuels Assessment; Worldwide Biomass Potential: Technology Characterizations (Milestone Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Milestone report prepared by NREL to estimate the worldwide potential to produce and transport ethanol and other biofuels.

Bain, R. L.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainability Sustainability Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Center for BioEnergy Sustainability Name Center for BioEnergy Sustainability Agency/Company /Organization Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps Website http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/c References Center for BioEnergy Sustainability[1] Abstract The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability, or CBES, is a Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a focus on dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability, or CBES, is a Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a focus on "dealing with the environmental impacts

106

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood 50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply

107

Terranova Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Terranova Bioenergy LLC Place Larkspur, California Zip 94939 Sector Biofuels Product California-based project developer and consultant in the field of biofuels....

108

Agave Transcriptomes and microbiomes for bioenergy research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a biofuel feedstock. GCB Bioenergy 3, 68–78, (2011). [2]in Agave tequilana. GCB Bioenergy 3, 25–36, (2011). [4]and microbiomes for bioenergy research Stephen Gross 1,2 ,

Gross, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cessing. Annually, biofuel production from these resourcesFeedstock potential of biofuel production and raised ques-part of a study of biofuel production in the western United

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increasing competi- tion for biofuel feedstocks will occurbiomass resources for energy and biofuel. California Energypro- cessing. Annually, biofuel production from these

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Biofuel News, Winter 1998, Vol. 2, No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This issue of Biofuels News contains two articles. The first focuses on the art and science of bioenergy project financing using the example of three companies planning biomass-to-ethanol plants. The second highlights the objectives and activities of the five Regional Biomass Energy Programs (RBEP) within the US DOE.

Woodward, S.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive analyses are conducted of the holistic farm production-harvesting-transporting-pre-refinery storage supply chain paradigm which represents the totality of important issues affecting the conversion facility front-gate costs of delivered biomass feedstocks. Targeting the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area, mathematical programming in the form of a cost-minimization linear programming model(Sorghasaurus) is used to assess the financial and economic logistics costs for supplying a hypothetical 30-million gallon conversion facility with high-energy sorghum (HES) and switchgrass (SG) cellulosic biomass feedstock for a 12-month period on a sustainable basis. A corporate biomass feedstock farming entity business organization structure is assumed. Because SG acreage was constrained in the analysis, both HES and SG are in the optimal baseline solution, with the logistics supply chain costs (to the front gate of the conversion facility) totaling $53.60 million on 36,845 acres of HES and 37,225 acres of SG (total farm acreage is 187,760 acres, including HES rotation acres), i.e., $723.67 per harvested acre, $1.7867 per gallon of biofuel produced not including any conversion costs, and $134.01 per dry ton of the requisite 400,000 tons of biomass feedstock. Several sensitivity scenario analyses were conducted, revealing a potential range in these estimates of $84.75-$261.52 per dry ton of biomass feedstock and $1.1300-$3.4870 per gallon of biofuel. These results are predicated on simultaneous consideration of capital and operating costs, trafficable days, timing of operations, machinery and labor constraints, and seasonal harvested biomass feedstock yield relationships. The enhanced accuracy of a comprehensive, detailed analysis as opposed to simplistic approach of extrapolating from crop enterprise budgets are demonstrated. It appears, with the current state of technology, it is uneconomical to produce cellulosic biomass feedstocks in the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area. That is, the costs estimated in this research for delivering biomass feedstocks to the frontgate of a cellulosic facility are much higher than the $35 per ton the Department of Energy suggests is needed. The several sensitivity scenarios evaluated in this thesis research provides insights in regards to needed degrees of advancements required to enhance the potential economic competitiveness of biomass feedstock logistics in this area.

McLaughlin, Will

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Review on Biomass Densification Systems to Develop Uniform Feedstock Commodities for Bioenergy Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing uniformly formatted, densified feedstock from lignocellulosic biomass is of interest to achieve consistent physical properties like size and shape, bulk and unit density, and durability, which significantly influence storage, transportation and handling characteristics, and, by extension, feedstock cost and quality. A variety of densification systems are considered for producing a uniform format feedstock commodity for bioenergy applications, including (a) baler, (b) pellet mill, (c) cuber, (d) screw extruder, (e) briquette press, (f) roller press, (g) tablet press, and (g) agglomerator. Each of these systems has varying impacts on feedstock chemical and physical properties, and energy consumption. This review discusses the suitability of these densification systems for biomass feedstocks and the impact these systems have on specific energy consumption and end product quality. For example, a briquette press is more flexible in terms of feedstock variables where higher moisture content and larger particles are acceptable for making good quality briquettes; or among different densification systems, a screw press consumes the most energy because it not only compresses but also shears and mixes the material. Pretreatment options like preheating, grinding, steam explosion, torrefaction, and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) can also help to reduce specific energy consumption during densification and improve binding characteristics. Binding behavior can also be improved by adding natural binders, such as proteins, or commercial binders, such as lignosulphonates. The quality of the densified biomass for both domestic and international markets is evaluated using PFI (United States Standard) or CEN (European Standard).

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has the potential to be used as a cellulosic feedstock for ethanol production due to its diversity and wide adaptation to many different climates. With a wide range of diversity, this crop could be tailored specifically for use as a feedstock for ethanol production. Other factors such as water use efficiency, drought tolerance, yield potential, composition, and established production systems also make sorghum a logical choice as a feedstock for bioenergy production. The objectives of this study were to better understand the biomass potential of different types of sorghum that may be used for energy production, and determine the composition of these sorghums over the season to better understand biomass yield and composition over time. Six commercial sorghum cultivars or hybrids that represent sorghum types from grain to energy were evaluated near College Station, Texas during the 2008 and 2009 cropping years. An optimal harvest window (defined by maximum yield) was established for all genotypes, and significant variation was seen among the genotypes for fresh and dry biomass production. The later maturity genotypes, including the photo-period sensitive and modified photo-period sensitive type sorghums, produced the highest yields (up to 24 dry Mg/ha). Compositional analysis using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIR) for lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose was performed on a dry matter basis for the optimal harvest window for each genotype. Significant differences were seen in 2009 between the genotypes for lignin, hemicellulose, cellulose, ash and protein; with the earlier genotypes having higher percentage of lignin, and the later genotypes having lower percentages of lignin. Genotype x Environment interactions were also seen, and show the significance that rainfall can have. Based on this research, grain sorghum could be harvested first, followed by photo-period insensitive forage varieties, then moderately photo-period sensitive forage varieties followed by dedicated bioenergy sorghums (that are full photo-period sensitive), allowing for a more constant supply of feedstock to processing plants. Sweet sorghums would also allow the end user to obtain biomass when needed, however these types of sorghum may be much better suited to a different end application (i.e. crushing the stalks to obtain the juice).

Borden, Dustin Ross

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biomass Program Outreach and Communication The Bioenergy Feedstock Information Network (BFIN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after earmarks for bioenergy R&D by the Department of Energy has declined yearly for the last several

116

Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

miscanthus and switchgrass for bioenergy in Illinois.Biomass and Bioenergy, 32(6):482–493, June 2008. [Peterson. Integrating bioenergy into computable general

Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Integrated Biorefineries  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

transportation fuels, chemicals, and heat and power. Biofuels Infrastructure moves the fuel from a biorefining plant to the pump. Bioenergy is used to power today's vehicles. A...

118

Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: esa.un.org/un-energy/pdf/susdev.Biofuels.FAO.pdf References: Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers[1] "In this publication, UN-Energy seeks to structure an approach to the current discussion on bioenergy, it is the contribution of the UN system to the issues that need further attention, analysis and valuation, so that

119

Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

120

UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, People and Policy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Implementation, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/biogenic_emissions.html Cost: Free References: EPA, 40 CFR Part 60[1] Tailoring Rule[2] Biogenic Emissions[3] The 'EPA Climate Change - Green House Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide

122

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business Insights industry survey respondents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business proportion of world fuel/demand will biofuels and biomass account for by 2017? Source: The Biofuels Market the market. However, these will clearly affect the global fuel market. · Biomass: Food or fuel? Increased

123

Sequencing of Multiple Clostridial Genomes Related to Biomass Conversion and Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Modern methods to develop microbe-based biomass conversion processes require a system-level understanding of the microbes involved. Clostridium species have long been recognized as ideal candidates for processes involving biomass conversion and production of various biofuels and other industrial products. To expand the knowledge base for clostridial species relevant to current biofuel production efforts, we have sequenced the genomes of 20 species spanning multiple genera. The majority of species sequenced fall within the class III cellulosome-encoding Clostridium and the class V saccharolytic Thermoanaerobacteraceae. Species were chosen based on representation in the experimental literature as model organisms, ability to degrade cellulosic biomass either by free enzymes or by cellulosomes, ability to rapidly ferment hexose and pentose sugars to ethanol, and ability to ferment synthesis gas to ethanol. The sequenced strains significantly increase the number of noncommensal/nonpathogenic clostridial species and provide a key foundation for future studies of biomass conversion, cellulosome composition, and clostridial systems biology.

Hemme, Christopher [University of Oklahoma; Mouttaki, Housna [University of Oklahoma; Lee, Yong-Jin [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Henrissat, Bernard [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; HE, Qiang [ORNL; Lawson, Paul A. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tanner, Ralph S. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Wiegel, Juergen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Fields, Dr. Matthew Wayne [Montana State University; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Stevenson, Bradley S. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; McInerney, Michael J. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Dong, Hailiang [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Xing, Defeng [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology; Ren, Nanqi [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology; Wang, Aijie [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology; Ding, Shi-You [National Energy Renewable Laboratory; Himmel, Michael E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Taghavi, Safiyh [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)/U.S. Department of Energy; Van Der Lelie, Daniel [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Rubin, Edward M. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

Rokhsar, Daniel

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analyzing the design and management of biomass-to-biorefinery supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioenergy has been recognized as an important source of energy that will reduce nation's dependency on petroleum, and have a positive impact on the economy, environment, and society. Production of bioenergy is expected to increase. As a result, we foresee ... Keywords: Biofuel, Biomass, Mixed integer program, Supply-chain design, Supply-chain management

Sandra D. Ek?io?lu; Ambarish Acharya; Liam E. Leightley; Sumesh Arora

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Guangxi Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guangxi Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Guangxi Funan Bioenergy Co Ltd Place Guangxi Autonomous Region, China Sector Biomass Product Guangxi-based biomass...

127

Genome-Enabled Advancement of Biomass to Biofuel Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Without these achievements, an industrially significant process for biomass fermentation to ethanol would not be economically possible. The development of a fermentation process with economic return on investment can be successfully developed with the technical learning achieved

Patrick O'Mullan, PhD

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNL’s capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

129

Biological research survey for the efficient conversion of biomass to biofuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this four-week late start LDRD was to assess the current status of science and technology with regard to the production of biofuels. The main focus was on production of biodiesel from nonpetroleum sources, mainly vegetable oils and algae, and production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. One goal was to assess the major technological hurdles for economic production of biofuels for these two approaches. Another goal was to compare the challenges and potential benefits of the two approaches. A third goal was to determine areas of research where Sandia's unique technical capabilities can have a particularly strong impact in these technologies.

Kent, Michael Stuart; Andrews, Katherine M. (Computational Biosciences)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biological research survey for the efficient conversion of biomass to biofuels.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this four-week late start LDRD was to assess the current status of science and technology with regard to the production of biofuels. The main focus was on production of biodiesel from nonpetroleum sources, mainly vegetable oils and algae, and production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. One goal was to assess the major technological hurdles for economic production of biofuels for these two approaches. Another goal was to compare the challenges and potential benefits of the two approaches. A third goal was to determine areas of research where Sandia's unique technical capabilities can have a particularly strong impact in these technologies.

Kent, Michael Stuart; Andrews, Katherine M. (Computational Biosciences)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Bioenergy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Blog Bioenergy Blog RSS December 16, 2013 The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference The Energy Department is working to cut the cost of biofuel production by supporting advanced development and demonstration facilities throughout the country that enable researchers to fully examine their efforts on a large scale without having to maintain an expensive pilot plant. November 6, 2013 National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

132

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if financing and commercial biorefineries producing biofuelsVOLUME 63 , NUMBER 4 in biorefineries may have difficulty

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tersus BioEnergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tersus BioEnergy Tersus BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name Tersus BioEnergy Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 5PT Sector Bioenergy, Biomass Product Subsidiary of Tersus Energy. Tersus BioEnergy invests in companies developing biofuel and biomass and waste technologies. Typical investment size USD 500,000-USD 5m Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

134

Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics was conducted using ArcGIS with the Network Analyst extension and model builder. A square grid methodology was used to determine biomass availability of corn stover and bioenergy sorghum in Texas. The SWAT model was used to quantify soil erosion losses in surface runoff caused by sorghum residue removal for bioenergy production in the Oso Creek Watershed in Nueces County. The model simulated the removal of 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent residue removal. The WEPS model was used to quantify wind erosion soil loss caused by corn stover removal in Dallam County. Nine simulations were run estimating soil loss for corn stover removal rates of 0 percent to 50 percent. The results of the SWAT and WEPS analyses were compared to the NRCS tolerable soil loss limit of 5 tons/acre/year for both study areas. The GIS analysis determined the optimum route distances between mobile unit sites were 2.07 to 58.02 km for corn and 1.95 to 60.36 km for sorghum. The optimum routes from the mobile pyrolysis sites and the closest refineries were 49.50 to 187.18 km for corn and 7.00 to 220.11 km for sorghum. These results were used as input to a separate bioenergy economic model. The SWAT analysis found that maximum soil loss (1.24 tons/acre) occurred during the final year of the simulation where 100 percent of the sorghum residue was removed. The WEPS analysis determined that at 30 percent removal the amount of soil loss starts to increase exponentially with increasing residue removal and exceeds the tolerable soil loss limit. Limited harvesting of biomass for bioenergy production will be required to protect crop and soil productivity ensuring a sustainable biomass source.

Bumguardner, Marisa

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Collaborative/California Energy Commission/CEC- 500-Biomass Collaborative/California Energy Commission/CEC- 500-fornia Biomass Collaborative/California Energy Com- mission/

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A roadmap for the develop- ment of biomass in California.California Biomass Collaborative/California EnergyCombustion properties of biomass. Fuel Process Tech- nol 54:

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy Development Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Biomass, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.fao.org/docrep/013/ Country Thailand UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy Development[1] Abstract "The Government of Thailand, through its Alternative Energy Development Plan, has set a target to increase biofuel production to five billion

138

Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Switchgrass biomass and chemical composition for biofuel in eastern Canada  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is one of several warm-season grasses that have been identified as potential biomass crops in North America. A two-year field study was conducted, on a free-draining sandy clay loam (St. Bernard, Typic Hapludalf), to characterize the growth and evaluate changes in biomass accumulation and composition of switchgrass at Montreal, QC. Three cultivars, Cave-in-Rock, Pathfinder, and Sunburst, were grown in solid stands in a randomized complete block design. Canopy height, dry matter (DM) accumulation and chemical composition were monitored biweekly throughout the growing season. Average maximum canopy heights were 192.5 cm for Cave-in-Rock, 169.9 for Pathfinder, and 177.8 for Sunburst. The respective end-of-season DM yields were 12.2, 11.5, and 10.6 Mg/ha. Biomass production among cultivars appeared to be related to time of maturation. Nitrogen concentration of DM decreased curvilinearly from 25 g/kg at the beginning of the season to 5 g/kg DM at season's end. Both acid-detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral-detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations increased to a maximum early in the season, after which no changes were detected. The average maximum values of ADF and NDF were, respectively, 647.6 and 849.0 g/kg DM for Cave-in-Rock, 669.1 and 865.2 for Pathfinder, and 661.8 and 860.9 for Sunburst. Changes in canopy height, DM accumulation, and chemical composition could all be described by predictive regression equations. These results indicate that switchgrass has potential as a biomass crop in a short-season environment.

Madakadze, I.C.; Stewart, K.; Peterson, P.R.; Coulman, B.E.; Smith, D.L.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fact Sheets : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheets DOE Mission Focus: BioFuels US Department of Energy's Genomic Science Program DOE BioEnergy Science Center - fact sheet - 2011 DOE BioEnergy Science Center - fact sheet...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Switchgrass for Forage and Bioenergy: II. Effects of P and K fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. Biomass and Bioenergy 30:198-206. Fixen, PE. 2007.and persistence under bioenergy harvest systems in thebiomass yields for bioenergy purposes have typically been

Guretzky, John A; Kering, Maru K; Biermacher, Jon T; Cook, Billy J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Genome-Enabled Advancement of Biomass to Biofuel Technology  

SciTech Connect

Unlike Saccharomyces and even E. coli, the fundamental microbiology and biochemistry of Clostridium phytofermentans was largely unknown. The genus Clostridia is quite diverse and general methods to manipulate and characterize them often need to be developed. As anaerobes, they often donù��t behave the way more classically studied microbes will in fermentation processes. The results from these studies have allowed: 1) A fundamental understanding of the fermentation cycle in C. phytofermentans 2) Requirements to maximize ethanol yield in a fermentation process 3) An understanding of the critical growth and nutritional parameters required to ferment biomass to ethanol 4) Identification of key targets or genes to modify in order increase or improve any of the key traits of C. phytofermentans 5) The development of a genetic system to transform and manipulate the microbe Without these achievements, an industrially significant process for biomass fermentation to ethanol would not be economically possible. The development of a fermentation process with economic return on investment can be successfully developed with the technical learning achieved

Patrick O' Mullan, PhD

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass....

144

Biofuels News: Fall 2000; Volume 3, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

Newsletter for DOE Biofuels Program. Articles on recent DOE grants and contracts under Bioenergy Initiative and related programs; also on creation of National Bioenergy Center at NREL.

Brown, H.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Economic Impacts of Expanded Woody Biomass Utilization on the Bioenergy and Forest Products Industries in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decentralised production of electricity, heat and cooling, and biofuels, thus supporting the diversification demonstrated impact, involving multipliers such as associations of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers to biofuels are expected to support the implementation of the RES Directive and the proposed revised Fuel

Florida, University of

146

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to develop more sustainable energy sources is furthermorefor developing sustainable and renewable energy sources. For

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HScheller@lbl.gov S. Singh Sandia National Laboratories,National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories work

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium Afor Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium byConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California biomass power sector. Above this price, the modelprices below $1.50 per gge, electric- ity markets provide demand for the lowest-cost biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More August 9, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis See how organic materials are used to create biofuels, reducing dependence on foreign oil and creating jobs. Fuels made from organic materials, or biomass, could replace much of the oil we import to power our nation's transportation systems and industries. That's why the Energy Department is working with partners to identify and develop economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable feedstocks for biofuels production here in the United States. For more information on biomass feedstocks from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Bioenergy Technologies Office website. Read the text version of this video. Addthis Related Articles

151

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cropland. Biomass and Bioenergy 28: 347-54 Lubowski RN,Panicum virgatum) as a bioenergy feedstock in the UnitedStates. Biomass and Bioenergy 28: 515-35 Nelson RG, Walsh M,

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oils) Producer gas Synthesis gas (syngas) Substitute natural gas (SNG) Hydrogen Biochemical Biosolids Physiochemical Densified biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Guofu Bioenergy Science & Technology Co Ltd Place Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100101 Sector Biomass...

156

Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

Doust, Andrew, N.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy Basics: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biofuels Photo of a woman in goggles handling a...

158

Available Technologies: Mixed Bioenergy Feedstock ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Biomass pretreatment to extract 6C sugars from mixed feedstocks for . Lignocellulosic biofuel production; High value ...

159

Transgenic perennial biofuel feedstocks and strategies for bioconfinem...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

current availability of bioenergy feed- stocks are a major problem in next-generation biofuels. There are global economic, political and environmental pressures to increase biofuel...

160

EERE: Sustainable Transportation - Bioenergy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ponds used for large-scale algae biomass production. Vehicles Bioenergy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Photo of a commercial airplane in the sky. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

162

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane derived from anaerobic digestion of biomass. † TWh =is often considered for anaerobic digestion, ethanol fermen-as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas (

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change. as long as cellulosic feedstock costs, Science 319:cellulosic biomass conversion processes should operate at efficiencies approaching 50%, implying that a $10 per ton increment in feedstock

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbaceous crops for bioenergy. Biomass Bioenerg 14:317–24.Non-native species and bioenergy: Are we cultivating theniche estimates for bioenergy crops and invasive species of

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and widespread use of high ethanol blends in flexible-fuel vehicles.

Vimmerstedt, L. J.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Sorghum bioenergy genotypes, genes and pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) is the fifth most economically important cereal grown worldwide and is a source of food, feed, fiber and fuel. Sorghum, a C4 grass and a close relative to sugarcane, is adapted to hot, dry adverse environments and this plant is a potentially important bioenergy crop for Texas. The diversity of the twelve high biomass sorghum genotypes was analyzed using 50 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers with genome coverage. The accumulation of biomass during sorghum development was studied in BTx623, an elite grain sorghum genotype. Genetic similarity analysis showed that the twelve high biomass genotypes were quite diverse and different from most current grain sorghum genotypes. The ratio of leaf/stem biomass accumulation was higher early in the vegetative phase during rapid canopy development and lower later in this phase when stem growth rate increased. This resulted in an increasing ratio of stem to leaf dry weight during development. Numerous cellulose sythase genes have been putatively identified in the sorghum genome. The relative level of Ces5 RNA in leaves decreased during vegetative phase of development by ~32 fold. There was no change in the relative abundance of Ces5 RNA in stems. Also there was no change in the relative abundance of Ces3 RNA in either stem or leaves during the vegetative stage. The knowledge gained in this study may contribute to the development of sorghum bioenergy hybrids that accumulate more biomass and that are modified in composition to make them more amenable to biofuels production.

Plews, Ian Kenneth

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

%22Trojan Horse%22 strategy for deconstruction of biomass for biofuels production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of renewable biofuels to displace fossil fuels currently consumed in the transportation sector is a pressing multiagency national priority (DOE/USDA/EERE). Currently, nearly all fuel ethanol is produced from corn-derived starch. Dedicated 'energy crops' and agricultural waste are preferred long-term solutions for renewable, cheap, and globally available biofuels as they avoid some of the market pressures and secondary greenhouse gas emission challenges currently facing corn ethanol. These sources of lignocellulosic biomass are converted to fermentable sugars using a variety of chemical and thermochemical pretreatments, which disrupt cellulose and lignin cross-links, allowing exogenously added recombinant microbial enzymes to more efficiently hydrolyze the cellulose for 'deconstruction' into glucose. This process is plagued with inefficiencies, primarily due to the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, mass transfer issues during deconstruction, and low activity of recombinant deconstruction enzymes. Costs are also high due to the requirement for enzymes and reagents, and energy-intensive cumbersome pretreatment steps. One potential solution to these problems is found in synthetic biology-engineered plants that self-produce a suite of cellulase enzymes. Deconstruction can then be integrated into a one-step process, thereby increasing efficiency (cellulose-cellulase mass-transfer rates) and reducing costs. The unique aspects of our approach are the rationally engineered enzymes which become Trojan horses during pretreatment conditions. During this study we rationally engineered Cazy enzymes and then integrated them into plant cells by multiple transformation techniques. The regenerated plants were assayed for first expression of these messages and then for the resulting proteins. The plants were then subjected to consolidated bioprocessing and characterized in detail. Our results and possible implications of this work on developing dedicated energy crops and their advantage in a consolidated bioprocessing system.

Simmons, Blake Alexander; Sinclair, Michael B.; Yu, Eizadora; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Hadi, Masood Z.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels.switchgrass, and wood; Biodiesel production using soybean

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels technology. Traditionally, for ethanol production corn starch and sugarcane were used as raw materials (

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Bioenergy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation » Bioenergy Transportation » Bioenergy Bioenergy EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. Image of a passenger airplane flying, with blue sky above and clouds below. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds research, development, and demonstration to help develop sustainable and cost-competitive biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. For biofuels, DOE has lowered the cost of non-food-based ethanol by more than $6 per gallon since 2001, and it is now

173

Bioenergy Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioenergy Technology Ltd Place East Sussex, United Kingdom Zip TN22 5RU Sector Biomass Product Firm dedicated to the use...

174

EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Technologies Office Search Bioenergy Technologies Office Search Search Help Bioenergy Technologies Office HOME ABOUT THE PROGRAM RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Bioenergy Technologies Office Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on Digg Find More places to share EERE: Bioenergy Technologies Office Home Page on AddThis.com... Biomass is a clean, renewable energy source that can help to significantly

175

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost adds approxi- mately $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) torealize costs ranging from $0.05 to $0.07 per kWh. Where on-costs from biomass currently range from $0.06 to $0.10 per kWh

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy crops. The investments are part of a broader effort by the Obama...

177

Alterra Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alterra Bioenergy LLC Alterra Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Alterra Bioenergy LLC Place Macon, Georgia Sector Biofuels Product Manufacturer and distributor of biofuels. References Alterra Bioenergy LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Alterra Bioenergy LLC is a company located in Macon, Georgia . References ↑ "Alterra Bioenergy LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Alterra_Bioenergy_LLC&oldid=342070" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

178

Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy SHARE Fundamental and Applied Bioenergy Steven Brown (left) and Shihui Yang have developed a microbial strain with an improved ability to convert wood products to biofuel as part of research within the DOE BioEnergy Science Center.Source: ORNL News article ORNL researchers are investigating the biological mechanisms underlying production of biofuels so that those mechanisms can be improved and used to develop a new generation of efficient bioenergy strategies that will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and help curb carbon emissions. Fundamental and applied bioenergy research at ORNL includes studies conducted within the BioEnergy Science Center and the following research areas: Bioconversion Science and Technology Plant-Microbe Interfaces

179

G K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

G K Bioenergy Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name G.K.Bioenergy Pvt. Ltd. Place Namakkal District, India Zip 637 109 Sector Biomass Product Tamil Nadu-based biomass project...

180

Hestia BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hestia BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Hestia BioEnergy LLC Place New York, New York Zip 11378 Sector Biomass Product Hestia builds, operates and owns biomass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Midwestern Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwestern Biofuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwestern Biofuels LLC Place South Shore, Kentucky Zip 41175 Sector Biomass Product Kentucky-based biomass energy pellet...

182

Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

Kszos, L.A.

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Review of Sorghum Production Practices: Applications for Bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

Sorghum has great potential as an annual energy crop. While primarily grown for its grain, sorghum can also be grown for animal feed and sugar. Sorghum is morphologically diverse, with grain sorghum being of relatively short stature and grown for grain, while forage and sweet sorghums are tall and grown primarily for their biomass. Under water-limited conditions sorghum is reliably more productive than corn. While a relatively minor crop in the United States (about 2% of planted cropland), sorghum is important in Africa and parts of Asia. While sorghum is a relatively efficient user of water, it biomass potential is limited by available moisture. The following exhaustive literature review of sorghum production practices was developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to document the current state of knowledge regarding sorghum production and, based on this, suggest areas of research needed to develop sorghum as a commercial bioenergy feedstock. This work began as part of the China Biofuels Project sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program to communicate technical information regarding bioenergy feedstocks to government and industry partners in China, but will be utilized in a variety of programs in which evaluation of sorghum for bioenergy is needed. This report can also be used as a basis for data (yield, water use, etc.) for US and international bioenergy feedstock supply modeling efforts.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Selecting Metrics for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Key decisions about land-use practices and dynamics in biofuel systems affect the long-term sustainability of biofuels. Choices about what crops are grown and how are they planted, fertilized, and harvested determine the effects of biofuels on native plant diversity, competition with food crops, and water and air quality. Those decisions also affect economic viability since the distance that biofuels must be transported has a large effect on the market cost of biofuels. The components of a landscape approach include environmental and socioeconomic conditions and the bioenergy features [type of fuel, plants species, management practices (e.g., fertilizer and pesticide applications), type and location of production facilities] and ecological and biogeochemical feedbacks. Significantly, while water (availability and quality) emerges as one of the most limiting factors to sustainability of bioenergy feedstocks, the linkage between water and bioenergy choices for land use and management on medium and large scales is poorly quantified. Metrics that quantify environmental and socioeconomic changes in land use and landscape dynamics provide a way to measure and communicate the influence of alternative bioenergy choices on water quality and other components of the environment. Cultivation of switchgrass could have both positive and negative environmental effects, depending on where it is planted and what vegetation it replaces. Among the most important environmental effects are changes in the flow regimes of streams (peak storm flows, base flows during the growing season) and changes in stream water quality (sediment, nutrients, and pesticides). Unfortunately, there have been few controlled studies that provide sufficient data to evaluate the hydrological and water quality impacts of conversion to switchgrass. In particular, there is a need for experimental studies that use the small watershed approach to evaluate the effects of growing a perennial plant as a biomass crop. Small watershed studies have been used for several decades to identify effects of vegetation type, disturbance, and land use and agriculture practices on hydrology and water quality. An ideal experimental design to determine the effects of conversion to switchgrass on surface water hydrology and quality would involve (1) small catchment (5-20 ha) drained by a perennial or ephemeral stream, (2) crop treatments including conversion from row crops to switchgrass; pasture to switchgrass (other likely scenarios); controls (no change in vegetation), (3) treatments to compare different levels of fertilization and pesticide application, (4) riparian treatments to compare riparian buffers with alternative cover types, and a treatment with no buffer, and (5) 3-4 replicates of each treatment or BACI (before-after, control-intervention) design for unreplicated treatments (ideally with several years of measurements prior to the imposition of treatments for BACI design). Hydrologic measurements would include soil moisture patterns with depth and over time; nitrogen and phosphorus chemistry; soil solution chemistry - major anions and cations, inorganic and organic forms of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus; precipitation amount and chemical deposition; stream discharge; and streamwater chemistry. These water quality metrics would need to be put into context of the other environmental and social conditions that are altered by growth of bioenergy feedstocks. These conditions include farm profits and yield of food and fuel, carbon storage and release, and a variety of ecosystem services such as enhanced biodiversity and pollinator services. Innovations in landscape design for bioenergy feedstocks take into account environmental and socioeconomic dynamics and consequences with consideration of alternative bioenergy regimes and policies. The ideal design would be scale-sensitive so that economic, social, and environmental constraints can be measured via metrics applicable at relevant scales. To develop a landscape design, land managers must consider (1) what are the environmental im

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shapouri, “Supply and Social Cost Estimates for Biomass fromBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply,

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy Basics: Biofuel Conversion Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biofuel Conversion Processes The conversion of...

188

Value of Distributed Preprocessing of Biomass Feedstocks to a Bioenergy Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system and the front-end of a biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass into a suitable feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many variables such as equipment cost and efficiency, and feedstock moisture content, particle size, bulk density, compressibility, and flowability affect the location and implementation of this unit operation. Previous conceptual designs show this operation to be located at the front-end of the biorefinery. However, data are presented that show distributed preprocessing at the field-side or in a fixed preprocessing facility can provide significant cost benefits by producing a higher value feedstock with improved handling, transporting, and merchandising potential. In addition, data supporting the preferential deconstruction of feedstock materials due to their bio-composite structure identifies the potential for significant improvements in equipment efficiencies and compositional quality upgrades. Theses data are collected from full-scale low and high capacity hammermill grinders with various screen sizes. Multiple feedstock varieties with a range of moisture values were used in the preprocessing tests. The comparative values of the different grinding configurations, feedstock varieties, and moisture levels are assessed through post-grinding analysis of the different particle fractions separated with a medium-scale forage particle separator and a Rototap separator. The results show that distributed preprocessing produces a material that has bulk flowable properties and fractionation benefits that can improve the ease of transporting, handling and conveying the material to the biorefinery and improve the biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes.

Christopher T Wright

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The role of biomass in California's hydrogen economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scaling. Biomass and Bioenergy 13, Jenkins, B.M. , Bakker-western Canada. Biomass and Bioenergy 24, 445–464. Larson,optimum size. Biomass and Bioenergy 31, 137–144. De La Torre

Parker, Nathan C; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluidised bed biomass gasifier, Fuel, 2007, 86, 1417-1429.utilizing a down draft gasifier, Biomass and Bioenergy,fixed bed and fluidized bed gasifier, Biomass and Bioenergy,

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health Los Alamos scientists are developing science and technology to improve pathogen detection, create better therapeutics, and anticipate-even prevent-epidemics and pandemics. Bioenergy» Environmental Microbiology» Proteins» Biosecurity and Health» Genomics and Systems Biology» Algal vats Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce such costs by more than 90%. Overview Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory

192

Local and Remote Climate Impacts from Expansion of Woody Biomass for Bioenergy Feedstock in the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many efforts have been taken to find energy alternatives to reduce anthropogenic influences on climate. Recent studies have shown that using land for bioenergy plantations may be more cost effective and provide a greater potential for CO2 ...

Lisa N. Murphy; William J. Riley; William D. Collins

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Our Partners : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GO About Research Resources Education Industry Redefining the Frontiers of Bioenergy Research About Current Openings Our Partners People Who's Who Research Biomass Formation...

194

BESC Research : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GO About Research Resources Education Industry Redefining the Frontiers of Bioenergy Research Biomass Formation Deconstruction and Conversion Enabling Technologies BESC Research...

195

Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

Wallace Tyner

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels August 11, 2011 - 3:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- A team of researchers at the Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) have pinpointed the exact, single gene that controls ethanol production capacity in a microorganism. This discovery could be the missing link in developing biomass crops that produce higher concentrations of ethanol at lower costs. "The Department of Energy relies on the scientific discoveries of its labs and research centers to improve the production of clean energy sources," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "This discovery is an important step in developing biomass crops that could increase yield of

197

Biofuel Policies and Indirect Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Union sees the expansion of biomass production for bioenergy as one of the components of its strategy to replace fossil energy sources by non-fossil renewable sources. However, the target of 10 % renewables in the transport sector by 2020 set in the Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (EU-RED) has been widely criticised. Due to an increase in biomass demand for feedstocks for biofuel production and a continuously high demand of the food and feed sector, the demand for land to be used for both food and production and bioenergy is expected to increase globally (see e.g. Hertl et al. 2008, Haberl et al. 2011). Considering that already today deforestation for agricultural expansion and for conversion into pasture, but also forest degradation, infrastructure development, destructive logging and fires cause nearly 20 % of global GHG emissions (UN-REDD 2009), the contribution of biofuels to climate mitigation is at least questionable. To ensure that biofuels contribute to GHG emission savings and that their overall sustainability is maintained, the EU-RED has put forward a sustainability regulation in

Ruth Delzeit; Mareike Lange

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

199

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a… (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sorghum improvement as biofuel feedstock: juice yield, sugar content and lignocellulosic biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is listed as one of the potential feedstock sources for biofuel production. While sorghum grain can be fermented into ethanol… (more)

Godoy, Jayfred Gaham Villegas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Bioenergy and Sustainable Development?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of raw materials). Rather than provide subsidies (other than for the poorest households), a range reserved 1543-5938/07/1121-0131$20.00 Key Words biodiesel, bioethanol, biofuels, biomass, clean energy greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For large- scale commercial biofuels to contribute to sustainable development

Bensel, Terrence G.

203

NREL: Biomass Research - Richard L. Bain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard L. Bain Richard L. Bain Photo of Richard Bain Richard Bain is a Principal Engineer in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He has worked at NREL since 1990 and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He is a lead researcher in the area of production of transportation fuels and hydrogen via thermochemical conversion of biomass; technical advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on biofuels demonstrations; and Task Leader for the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Annex Biomass Gasification Task. Dr. Bain manages biomass gasification research activities for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program at NREL and coordinates support to the USDA for

204

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.the plant cell wall for bioenergy. Oxford: Blackwell Pub. ;the Plant Cell Wall for Bioenergy. Wiley-Blackwell; 2008.

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State ­ Biofuel feedstock · CO2 addition may: ­ Improve nutrient uptake ­ Accelerate treatment ­ Decrease algae of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work

Tullos, Desiree

206

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable (item 2) Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean Earth Sciences

207

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas Inc agency thereof. #12;1 RSB Certification Readiness Study: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii

208

DOE Bioenergy Center Special Issue. The Bioenergy Sciences Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy Center Special Issue. The Bioenergy Sciences Center (BESC) Richard A. Dixon Published online: 22 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Keywords Bioenergy centers . United States Department of Energy . Biomass recalcitrance . High-throughput screening . Plant transformation This issue of BioEnergy Research is the first of three special issues to feature work from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Centers. In June 2006, the DOE's Genomes to Life Program published a report, entitled "Breaking the biological barriers to cellulosic ethanol: a joint research agenda," that outlined research areas requir- ing significant investment in order to meet the target of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012. Words were converted to action in June 2007 when Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced the establishment of

209

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cellulosic biomass: an update. Curr.Opin.Biotechnol.16:Stokes, and D. C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as a feedstock for a2002. Energy production from biomass (part 1): overview of

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States. Biomass & Bioenergy, 2005. 28(6): p. 515-535.Kszos, L.A. , et al. , Bioenergy Feedstock Developmentenergy policy. Biomass & Bioenergy, 2007. 31(6): p. 416-425.

Morrow, III, William R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

References Brown, R. C. 2003. Bio renewable Resources:RIVERSIDE Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic BiomassTHE THESIS Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Research to Advance the Bioenergy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower to enhance energy security, reduce greenhouse gas emissions the design of plants that are readily converted into biofuels. Projections of potential future biomass are exam- ining various biofuels and their impact on engine performance, emission controls, general vehicle

213

Energy Basics: Biofuel Conversion Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from the EERE Bioenergy Technologies Office. Thermochemical Conversion Processes Heat energy and chemical catalysts can be used to break down biomass into intermediate compounds...

214

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power  Economic Feasibility Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power rates..……………………. ……31  UCSD Biomass to Power ? Feasibility 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: tech-action.org/Perspectives/BioenergyIndia.pdf Country: India Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Asia Coordinates: 20.593684°, 78.96288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":20.593684,"lon":78.96288,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Bioenergy in Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a versatile, abundant, and renewable energy resource used widely throughout the world. It is perhaps the most common energy resource in developing countries, used primarily for cooking and heating. While industrialized and newly developing nations have turned to fossil fuels to support economic growth, some are returning to biomass as a means of preserving their depleting natural resources, reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels, strengthening agricultural industries, or reducing environmental pollution. A number of technological advancements, particularly in converting biomass into electricity or alcohol transporation fuels, have triggered this reassessment of biomass as a significant energy resource. The writers report on research and development taking place worldwide, with a focus on work being done in Hawaii. They also assess the technical and economic feasibility of adapting bioenergy technology elsewhere, with particular attention directed at the potential of alcohol fuels for transporation applications and the need to develop bioenergy crops as a precursor to expanded alcohol fuel use and renewable electricity generation.

Overend, R. P.; Kinoshita, C. M.; Antal, M. J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Bioenergy in transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a versatile, abundant, and renewable energy resource used widely throughout the world. It is perhaps the most common energy resource in developing countries, used primarily for cooking and heating. While industrialized and newly developing nations have turned to fossil fuels to support economic growth, some are returning to biomass as a means of preserving their depleting natural resources, reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels, strengthening agricultural industries, or reducing environmental pollution. A number of technological advancements, particularly in converting biomass into electricity or alcohol transportation fuels, have triggered this reassessment of biomass as a significant energy resource. The writers report on research and development taking place worldwide, with a focus on work being done in Hawaii. They also assess the technical and economic feasibility of adapting bioenergy technology elsewhere, with particular attention directed at the potential of alcohol fuels for transportation applications and the need to develop bioenergy crops as a precursor to expanded alcohol fuel use and renewable electricity generation.

Overend, R.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Kinoshita, C.M.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of biomass to biofuels has been the subject ofdiesel transport fuels with biofuels by 2010 [4]. Owing tobelieved that future biofuels will, by necessity, originate

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

220

Creative Discovery Museum : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Creative Discovery Museum The Creative Discovery Museum BESC reaches thousands of students with 'Farming for Fuels' lessons The DOE BioEnergy Science Center and the Creative Discovery Museum in Chattanooga, TN, have developed a set of hands-on lesson plans on BioFuels aimed at students in fourth, fifth and sixth grades. These "Farming for Fuels" lessons educate students about the carbon cycle, the use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate for the production of biofuels and the technical and economic obstacles to a bio-based fuel economy. The nationally expanded outreach program has now reached more than 60,000 students, teachers and parents by partnering with museums and centers in Tennessee, Georgia, Texas, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, New York and Arizona. To extend use of the lessons to the general public we have assembled

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Carbon Footprint of Bioenergy Sorghum Production in Central Texas: Production Implications on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Cycling, and Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced interest in biofuel production has renewed interest in bioenergy crop production within the United States. Agriculture’s role in biofuel production is critical because it has the potential to supply renewable energy while minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, agronomic management practices influence direct and indirect GHG emissions, and both can have a significant impact on biofuel production efficiency. Our overall objective was to determine the carbon (C) footprint of bioenergy sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) production in central Texas. Specifically, we determined the impacts of crop rotation, nitrogen (N) fertilization, and residue return on direct and indirect GHG emissions, theoretical biofuel yield, C pools, and life cycle GHG emissions from bioenergy sorghum production in 2010 and 2011. An experiment established in 2008 near College Station, TX to quantify the impacts of crop management practices on bioenergy sorghum yield and soil properties was utilized, and included two crop rotations (sorghum-sorghum or corn-sorghum), two fertilization levels (0 or 280 kg N ha^(-1) annually), and two residue return rates (0 or 50% biomass residue returned) to assess management impacts on sorghum production, C cycling, and life cycle GHGs. Corn production was poor under moderate drought conditions, while bioenergy sorghum produced relatively large yields under both moderate and severe drought conditions. Nitrogen addition increased crop yields, and rotated sorghum had higher yield than monoculture sorghum. Fluxes of CO_(2) and N_(2)O were higher than those reported in literature and highest soil fluxes were frequently observed following precipitation events during the growing season. Residue return increased cumulative CO_(2) emissions and N fertilization increased N_(2)O emissions. Residue return also increased soil microbial biomass-C, an important indicator of soil quality. Continuous sorghum significantly increased soil organic C (SOC) concentrations near the soil surface and at two depths below 30 cm. Analysis of change in SOC across time to estimate net CO_(2) emissions to the atmosphere revealed bioenergy sorghum production accrued high amounts of SOC annually. Most treatments accrued more than 4 Mg C ha^(-1) yr^(-1) from 2008 to 2012, which indicated great potential for C sequestration and offsetting GHG emissions. Life cycle GHG emissions (as g CO_(2)-eq MJ^(-1)) were all negative due to high SOC increases each year and indicated all bioenergy sorghum production treatments sequestered atmospheric CO_(2) per unit of theoretical energy provided. Despite its relatively low production efficiency, rotated sorghum with N addition and residue return was selected as the ideal bioenergy sorghum production scenario due to a number of sustainability factors. Bioenergy sorghum may offer great benefit as a high-yielding biofuel feedstock with minimal impacts to net GHG emissions.

Storlien, Joseph Orgean

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science  

SciTech Connect

Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies,

None

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies,

None

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Production of phenols and biofuels by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil called fast pyrolysis, whereby biomass particles are heated in the absence of oxygen, vapourized to become manufacturing centers for Pyrolysis Oil, and those with extensive reserves of low-cost biomass can

Tang, Juming

225

Biofuel Conversion Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers...

226

JGI - DOE Bioenergy Research Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Bioenergy Research Centers DOE Bioenergy Research Centers DOE JGI performs sequencing on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Research Centers. The Centers are intended to accelerate basic research in the development of cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels, advancing the federal initiative that seeks to reduce U.S. gasoline consumption by 20% within 10 years through increased efficiency and diversification of clean energy sources. The three Centers are located in geographically distinct areas and use different plants both for laboratory research and for improving feedstock crops. DOE BioEnergy Science Center led by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This center will focus on the resistance of plant fiber to breakdown into sugars and is studying the potential energy crops

227

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels June 25, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell INEOS Bio -- one of the 17 global companies of the chemicals company INEOS -- is on schedule to begin construction this fall on the new Indian River BioEnergy Center near Vero Beach, Florida. The INEOS facility -- which was formerly a grapefruit processing plant for Ocean Spray -- will produce nearly eight million gallons of bioethanol per year from renewable biomass including yard, wood and vegetable waste. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Department of Energy awarded cost-share grants to 19 integrated biorefinery projects throughout the country. INEOS Bio was selected to for a matching grant of up to $50 million, which will fund the construction for the new center.

228

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

229

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 6/17/2005 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of value may be deducted for purposes of calculating Compensating Tax due Provider New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in determining the amount of

230

Transportation Biofuels in the USA Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual SupplyBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply”,

Eggert, Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Transportation Biofuels in the US A Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual SupplyBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply”,

Eggert, Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

United Biofuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Biofuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name United Biofuels Inc Place Plover, Wisconsin Zip 54467 Sector Biomass Product Wisconsin-based manufacturer and distributor of...

233

The Performance Of Clostridium Phytofermentans For Biofuels Production From Lignocellulosic Biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative transportation fuel with the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. Source-separated organic waste… (more)

Percy, Benjamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Pyrolysis of biomass and biorefinery residual materials for production of advanced biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work carried out throughout this project has helped to further advance the area of biomass pyrolysis for the production of bio-oil. During the early… (more)

Melligan, Fergus J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Nanostructured materials and their role as heterogeneous catalysts in the conversion of biomass to biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prior to the discovery of inexpensive and readily available fossil fuels, the world relied heavily on biomass to provide its energy needs. Due to a… (more)

Cadigan, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy andpotential annual supply of cellulosic biomass is estimated

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants November 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy today announced projects selected for more than $24 million in grants to research and develop technologies to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. Of the $24.4 million announced today, DOE plans to invest up to $4.9 million with USDA contributing up to $19.5 million. Advanced biofuels produced through this funding are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent compared to fossil fuels. "The selected projects will help make bioenergy production from renewable

238

DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants November 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy today announced projects selected for more than $24 million in grants to research and develop technologies to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. Of the $24.4 million announced today, DOE plans to invest up to $4.9 million with USDA contributing up to $19.5 million. Advanced biofuels produced through this funding are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent compared to fossil fuels. "The selected projects will help make bioenergy production from renewable

239

NREL: Biomass Research - Alexandre Chapeaux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biofuels with industrial partners. Alex's research areas of interest are: Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation...

240

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability Storey. 2011. Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Ecological KL, et al. Global Agro-ecosystem Model System for Analysis of Sustainable Biofuel Production Under

242

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy Department to Host Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C Energy Department to Host Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C July 9, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - On July 10-11, the U.S. Department of Energy will host its fifth annual conference, Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy. Biomass 2012 will bring together hundreds of diverse stakeholders in the public and private sectors to discuss the latest advances in bioenergy technology, policy news and financing strategies. As part of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department is working in partnership with industry and other federal agencies to catalyze breakthroughs in innovative biofuel technologies and

244

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstocks – namely the conversion of biomass hydrolysates (monosaccharides) to target

Fortman, J. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstocks – namely the conversion of biomass hydrolysates (monosaccharides) to target

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Research : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research 2011 Biotechnology Industry Organization Annual Convention Plenary Session Basic Biomass info Biofuels: Bringing Biological Solutions to Energy Challenges How Cellulosic...

248

Bioenergy KDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navigation Navigation Home Sign-In Contact Us Register Search this site: Search Connect: Bioenergy Library Map Tools & Apps Overview The Bioenergy KDF supports the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry by providing access to a variety of data sets, publications, and collaboration and mapping tools that support bioenergy research, analysis, and decision making. In the KDF, users can search for information, contribute data, and use the tools and map interface to synthesize, analyze, and visualize information in a spatially integrated manner. Read more and watch a short walkthrough video lease note: The KDF works best in the Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox browsers. What Would You Like to Do? CONTRIBUTE DATA Fill out the contribute form to add data sets and other types of

249

Bioenergy Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference http://energy.gov/eere/articles/lab-your-gas-tank-4-bioenergy-testing-facilities-are-making-difference bioenergy-testing-facilities-are-making-difference" class="title-link">From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference

250

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry.to Fermentable Sugar. GCB Bioenergy 2009; 1: 51-61. Himmel

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an energy crop. Biomass & Bioenergy, 17, 305-314. Avallone,model SECRETS. Biomass & Bioenergy, 26, 221-227. DeLuchi,1627. Lemus, R. , Lal, R. , 2005. Bioenergy crops and carbon

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

Moriarty, K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science  

SciTech Connect

Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs are providing the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use (see sidebar, Bridging the Gap from Fundamental Biology to Industrial Innovation for Bioenergy, p. 6). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations - the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast - with partners across the nation (see U.S. map, DOE Bioenergy Research Centers and Partners, on back cover). DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California; DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Explore Bioenergy Technology Careers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioenergy Technology Careers Bioenergy Technology Careers Explore Bioenergy Technology Careers About Bioenergy Technologies Office Energy from abundant, renewable, domestic biomass can reduce U.S. dependence on oil, lower impacts on climate, and stimulate jobs and economic growth. Photo of a woman tending to plants in a lab. What jobs are available? Feedstocks Farmers Seasonal workers Tree farm workers Mechanical engineers Harvesting equipment mechanics Equipment production workers Chemical engineers Chemical application specialists Chemical production workers Biochemists Aquaculture technicians Agricultural engineers Genetic engineers and scientists Storage facility operators Conversion Microbiologists Clean room technicians Industrial engineers Chemical & mechanical engineers Plant operators

255

Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

Pienkos, P. T.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Deconst of lignocell biomass to fuels and chems, 2011.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH02CH06-Chundawat CH02CH06-Chundawat ARI 27 January 2011 20:20 R E V I E W S I N A D V A N C E Deconstruction of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Shishir P. S. Chundawat, 1,2,∗ Gregg T. Beckham, 3,4,6,7,∗ Michael E. Himmel, 5,8 and Bruce E. Dale 1,2 1 Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, East Lansing, Michigan 48824; email: chundawa@msu.edu 2 Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 3 National Bioenergy Center, 4 National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, and 5 Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401; email: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov 6 Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 7 Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80309 8 Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

257

Bioenergy News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs http://energy.gov/articles/secretary-moniz-announces-new-biofuels-projects-drive-cost-reductions-technological biofuels-projects-drive-cost-reductions-technological" class="title-link">Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs

258

New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development DOE Response based on contributions from Office of Biomass Program; Argonne National, Hill, Tilman, Polasky and Hawthorne study ("Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt") claims

Minnesota, University of

259

USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative January 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) today announced up to $25 million in funding for research and development of technologies and processes to produce biofuels, bioenergy, and high-value biobased products, subject to annual appropriations. "These projects will be among many Obama Administration investments that will help strengthen our economy and address the climate crisis. A robust biofuels industry - focused on the next generation of biofuels - is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing our addiction to

260

USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative January 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) today announced up to $25 million in funding for research and development of technologies and processes to produce biofuels, bioenergy, and high-value biobased products, subject to annual appropriations. "These projects will be among many Obama Administration investments that will help strengthen our economy and address the climate crisis. A robust biofuels industry - focused on the next generation of biofuels - is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing our addiction to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (BCCL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (BCAL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying &...

264

Biofuels and bio-products derived from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEED Biofuels and bio- products derived from lignocellulosic biomass (plant materials) are part improve the energy and carbon efficiencies of biofuels production from a barrel of biomass using chemical and thermal catalytic mechanisms. The Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels IMPACT

Pittendrigh, Barry

265

Convergence of Agriculture and Energy: II. Producing Cellulosic Biomass for Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35-50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on geographical factors such as biomass species, yield, location, climate, local economy, as well as the types of systems used for harvesting, collection, preprocessing, and transportation. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence the selection of pioneer biorefinery locations, and these same factors will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Due to geographic variability and complex distributed supply system dynamics, estimating feedstock costs and supplies has been a major source of uncertainty.

Steven L. Fales; Wallace W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers 30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers October 1, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis DOE Bioenergy Research Center Investment Tops $400 Million WASHINGTON, DC-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has invested nearly $30 million in end-of-fiscal-year (2007) funds to accelerate the start-up of its three new Bioenergy Research Centers, bringing total DOE Bioenergy Research Center investment to over $400 million. The three DOE Bioenergy Research Centers-located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Madison, Wisconsin; and near Berkeley, California-selected by DOE this June, bring together multidisciplinary teams of leading scientists to advance research needed to make cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels

267

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Focus Area: Other Biofuels Topics: Training Material Website: www.fao.org/bioenergy/foodsecurity/befsci/en/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/bioenergy-and-food-security-criteria- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This website-created by the Bioenergy and food Security project of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)-provides policymakers and practitioners a set of criteria, indicators, good practices, and policy options for sustainable bioenergy production to

268

Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is only a first step. Other advances include the growing number of high-throughput techniques for protein production and characterization; a range of new instrumentation for observing proteins and other cell constituents; the rapid growth of commercially available reagents for protein production; a new generation of high-intensity light sources that provide precision imaging on the nanoscale and allow observation of molecular interactions in ultrafast time intervals; major advances in computational capability; and the continually increasing numbers of these instruments and technologies within the national laboratory infrastructure, at universities, and in private industry. All these developments expand our ability to elucidate mechanisms present in living cells, but much more remains to be done. The Centers are designed to accomplish GTL program objectives more rapidly, more effectively, and at reduced cost by concentrating appropriate technologies and scientific expertise, from genome sequence to an integrated systems understanding of the pathways and internal structures of microbes and plants most relevant to developing bioenergy compounds. The Centers will seek to understand the principles underlying the structural and functional design of selected microbial, plant, and molecular systems. This will be accomplished by building technological pathways linking the genome-determined components in an organism with bioenergy-relevant cellular systems that can be characterized sufficiently to generate realistic options for biofuel development. In addition, especially in addressing what are believed to be nearer-term approaches to renewable energy (e.g., producing cellulosic ethanol cost-effectively and energy-efficiently), the Center research team must understand in depth the current industrial-level roadblocks and bottlenecks (see section, GTL's Vision for Biological Energy Alternatives, below). For the Centers, and indeed the entire BER effort, to be successful, Center research must be integrated with individual investigator research, and coordination of activities,

Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL; Drell, Dr. Daniel [Office of Science, Department of Energy; Weatherwax, Sharlene [U.S. Department of Energy; Carruthers, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper  

SciTech Connect

In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is only a first step. Other advances include the growing number of high-throughput techniques for protein production and characterization; a range of new instrumentation for observing proteins and other cell constituents; the rapid growth of commercially available reagents for protein production; a new generation of high-intensity light sources that provide precision imaging on the nanoscale and allow observation of molecular interactions in ultrafast time intervals; major advances in computational capability; and the continually increasing numbers of these instruments and technologies within the national laboratory infrastructure, at universities, and in private industry. All these developments expand our ability to elucidate mechanisms present in living cells, but much more remains to be done. The Centers are designed to accomplish GTL program objectives more rapidly, more effectively, and at reduced cost by concentrating appropriate technologies and scientific expertise, from genome sequence to an integrated systems understanding of the pathways and internal structures of microbes and plants most relevant to developing bioenergy compounds. The Centers will seek to understand the principles underlying the structural and functional design of selected microbial, plant, and molecular systems. This will be accomplished by building technological pathways linking the genome-determined components in an organism with bioenergy-relevant cellular systems that can be characterized sufficiently to generate realistic options for biofuel development. In addition, especially in addressing what are believed to be nearer-term approaches to renewable energy (e.g., producing cellulosic ethanol cost-effectively and energy-efficiently), the Center research team must understand in depth the current industrial-level roadblocks and bottlenecks (see section, GTL's Vision for Biological Energy Alternatives, below). For the Centers, and indeed the entire BER effort, to be successful, Center research must be integrated with individual investigator research, and coordina

Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL; Drell, Dr. Daniel [Office of Science, Department of Energy; Weatherwax, Sharlene [U.S. Department of Energy; Carruthers, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamate conjugates: Implications for sustainable biomass and biofuel production  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxycinnamic acids constitute a large class of phenylpropanoid metabolites that are distributed ubiquitously in terrestrial plants. They occur most frequently as esters, amides or glycosides within the cytosol, the particular subcellular compartments such as the vacuole or the cell wall. Hydroxycinnamate conjugates play a vital role in the plant's growth and development and in its defense responses against biotic- and abiotic-stresses. Furthermore, the incorporation of hydroxycinnamate conjugates into the cell wall is a major factor attenuating the wall's biodegradability. Understanding the biosyntheses of hydroxycinnamate conjugates and its molecular regulation may well facilitate the sustainable production of cell wall biomass, and the efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials. This paper reviews our current molecular and biochemical understandings on the formation of several classes of hydroxycinnamate esters and amides, including the soluble conjugates and the 'wall-bound' phenolics. It also discusses the emerging biotechnological applications in manipulating hydroxycinnamates to improve the degradability of the cell wall biomass and enhance the production of valuable chemicals and biomaterials.

Liu C. J.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) today jointly announced up to $33 million in funding for research and development of technologies and processes to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products, subject to annual appropriations. These projects will support the Obama Administration's comprehensive energy strategy of increasing the nation's energy, economic and national security by reducing our reliance on foreign oil and reducing greenhouse gases. "These projects will help advance the production of biofuels and related

273

Evaluation of Microbial Communities from Extreme Environments as Inocula in a Carboxylate Platform for Biofuel Production from Cellulosic Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The carboxylate biofuels platform (CBP) involves the conversion of cellulosic biomass into carboxylate salts by a mixed microbial community. Chemical engineering approaches to convert these salts to a variety of fuels (diesel, gasoline, jet fuel) are well established. However, prior to initiation of this project, little was known about the influence of inoculum source on platform performance. The studies in this dissertation test the hypothesis that microbial communities from particular environments in nature (e.g. saline and/or thermal sediments) are pre-adapted to similar industrial process conditions and, therefore, exhibit superior performances. We screened an extensive collection of sediment samples from extreme environments across a wide geographic range to identify and characterize microbial communities with superior performances in the CBP. I sought to identify aspects of soil chemistry associated with superior CBP fermentation performance. We showed that CBP productivity was influenced by both fermentation conditions and inocula, thus is clearly reasonable to expect both can be optimized to target desired outcomes. Also, we learned that fermentation performance is not as simple as finding one soil parameter that leads to increases in all performance parameters. Rather, there are complex multivariate relationships that are likely indicative of trade-offs associated within the microbial communities. An analysis of targeted locus pyrosequence data for communities with superior performances in the fermentations provides clear associations between particular bacterial taxa and particular performance parameters. Further, I compared microbial community compositions across three different process screen technologies employed in research to understand and optimize CBP fermentations. Finally, we assembled and characterized an isolate library generated from a systematic culture approach. Based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, I estimated operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and inferred a phylogeny of the OTUs. This isolate library will serve as a tool for future studies of assembled communities and bacterial adaptations useful within the CBP fermentations. Taken together the tools and results developed in this dissertation provide for refined hypotheses for optimizing inoculum identification, community composition, and process conditions for this important second generation biofuel platform.

Cope, Julia Lee

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

AN OVERVIEW OF BIOFUELS PROCESS DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH CAROLINA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Carolina Bio-Energy Research Collaborative is working together on the development and demonstration of technology options for the production of bio-fuels using renewable non-food crops and biomass resources that are available or could be made available in abundance in the southeastern United States. This collaboration consists of Arborgen LLC, Clemson University, Savannah River National Laboratory, and South Carolina State University, with support from Dyadic, Fagen Engineering, Renewed World Energies, and Spinx. Thus far, most work has centered on development of a fermentation-based process to convert switchgrass into ethanol, with the concomitant generation of a purified lignin stream. The process is not feed-specific, and the work scope has recently expanded to include sweet sorghum and wood. In parallel, the Collaborative is also working on developing an economical path to produce oils and fuels from algae. The Collaborative envisions an integrated bio-fuels process that can accept multiple feedstocks, shares common equipment, and that produces multiple product streams. The Collaborative is not the only group working on bio-energy in South Carolina, and other companies are involved in producing biomass derived energy products at an industrial scale.

Sherman, S.; French, T.

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publications. 25 5 Bioenergy Overview Biopower, or biomass power, is the use of biomass to generate electricity. Biopower system technologies include direct-firing,...

276

Kent BioEnergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kent BioEnergy Kent BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent BioEnergy Address 11125 Flintkote Avenue Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Sector Biofuels Product Technologies that use algae in biofuel production, water pollution remediation, CO2 absorption, etc Website http://www.kentbioenergy.com/ Coordinates 32.904312°, -117.231255° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.904312,"lon":-117.231255,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels (Redirected from - Biofuels) Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

278

The Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Biofuels from Algae Algae Biomass Summit San Francisco, CA November 15, 2007 Philip T. Pienkos, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center NREL/PR-510-42414 The Biodiesel Dilemma Triglycerides (TAGs) from current oilseed crops and waste oils cannot come close to meeting U.S. diesel demand (60+ billion gal/yr) * The entire U.S. soybean crop could provide approximately 2.5 billion gallons per year. * Estimated world-wide production of biodiesel would only yield 13 billion gallons per year. * This much agricultural productivity cannot possibly be diverted from the food supply. * TAGs also represent an attractive feedstock for biopetrochemicals meaning less would be available for transportation fuel. Alternative sources of TAGs are needed!

279

BioEnergy Science Center Media Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Research Centers DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI)...

280

Available Technologies: Enhanced Ionic Liquid Biomass ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Lignocellulosic biofuel production; Biomass pretreatment; Sugar production; Materials and processes using recovered lignin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Basics: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The biomass-derived ethyl or methyl esters can be blended with conventional diesel fuel or used as a neat fuel (100% biodiesel). Learn more about biodiesel basics. Biofuel...

282

Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass. Most biofuels are used for transportation, but some are used as fuels to produce electricity. The expanded use of biofuels offers an array of benefits for our energy security, economic growth, and environment. Current biofuels research focuses on new forms of biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, and on biofuels conversion processes. Ethanol Ethanol-an alcohol-is made primarily from the starch in corn grain. It is most commonly used as an additive to petroleum-based fuels to reduce toxic air emissions and increase octane. Today, roughly half of the gasoline sold in the United States includes 5%-10% ethanol.

283

Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Funding for Biomass Research and New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative March 22, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the Administration's all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced up to $35 million over three years to support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) - a joint program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Energy Department (DOE) - will help develop economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

284

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, carbon-rich fossil fuels, primarily oil, coal, and natural gas, provide 85% of the energy consumed in the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become rapidly depleted. Fossil fuel use increases CO{sub 2} emissions and raises the risk of global warming. The high energy content of liquid hydrocarbon fuels makes them the preferred energy source for all modes of transportation. In the U.S. alone, transportation consumes >13.8 million barrels of oil per day and generates 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year. This release of greenhouse gases has spurred research into alternative, nonfossil energy sources. Among the options (nuclear, concentrated solar thermal, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, solar, and biomass), only biomass has the potential to provide a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource that can be converted into carbon-neutral transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped resource (estimated at more than a billion tons per year) of plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable, domestic source of liquid fuels. Well-established processes convert the starch content of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal, while plant cell walls (lignocellulose) represent a huge untapped source of energy. Plant-derived biomass contains cellulose, which is more difficult to convert to sugars; hemicellulose, which contains a diversity of carbohydrates that have to be efficiently degraded by microorganisms to fuels; and lignin, which is recalcitrant to degradation and prevents cost-effective fermentation. The development of cost-effective and energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuels is hampered by significant roadblocks, including the lack of specifically developed energy crops, the difficulty in separating biomass components, low activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and integrate JBEI's scientific program.

Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

A spreadsheet-based model for teaching the agronomic, economic, and environmental aspects of bioenergy cropping systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess and compare the economic and environmental sustainability of newly emerging bioenergy cropping systems, students need a comprehensive computer-based tool for cataloging attributes of various proposed bioenergy feedstock crops. We have ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Biofuel crop, Teaching model

Kurt D. Thelen; Juan Gao; John Hoben; Leilei Qian; Christopher Saffron; Katherine Withers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Bioenergy FAQs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

can I use it? 2. Does ethanol require more energy to produce than it delivers as a fuel? 3. How does biofuels production affect food and feed demand and costs? 4. What is...

287

Developing bioenergy fuels: Biopower fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful development of biomass crops requires unique cooperation between researchers and members of the energy, agriculture, forestry, and environmental communities. DOE's Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program provides a mechanism to integrate the efforts of this diverse group. The federal government must continue to share risks (costs of growing, harvesting, storing, and supplying energy crops) for early adopters of energy crop technology and biomass energy producers.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in funding for research and development of technologies and processes to produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products, subject to annual appropriations. These...

289

Bioenergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bioenergy: Energy produced from organic materials from plants or animals. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle 1 This article...

290

Challenges for deploying dedicated, large-scale, bioenergy systems in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the next quarter-century, global demand for energy is expected to increase more than 25%, while some analysts are predicting that output of petroleum will soon peak. This reality of increasing demand in the face of diminishing fossil supplies is spurring interest in renewable energy sources. An array of biomass-for-bioenergy resources has been proposed, with perennial, lignocellulosic feedstocks showing the greatest potential. Assessment of potential biomass energy resources is difficult, however, as uncertainties over available land and crop yields swing reported estimates from 35 to 1135 EJ/year. In the USA, it has been suggested that more than 1 billion tonnes (910 million Mg) of biomass could be sustainably harvested, but these estimates are dependent on continued gains in plant productivity, nutrient use efficiency and soil and water conservation. Variables of population growth and increased standards of living will also affect the availability of land for these energy-producing endeavours. Several biofuel sources have been identified to include waste streams, microalgae and woody biomass plantations. With herbaceousbased systems, much effort is currently being given to corn and other starch or grain crops that can be readily converted to ethanol. While these crops may serve to jumpstart the biofuel

John H. Fike; David J. Parrish; Jeffrey Alwang; John S. Cundiff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transportation Biofuels in the USA Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12): p. Koplow, D. , Biofuels – At What Cost? : GovernmentResulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop Sponsored byN. , Growing Energy: How biofuels can help end America's oil

Eggert, Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 26(2):J Somerville C. 2007. Biofuels. Curr Biol 17(4):R115–9.biomass characteristics for biofuels. Curr Opin Biotechnol

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Transportation Biofuels in the US A Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12): p. Koplow, D. , Biofuels – At What Cost? : GovernmentResulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop Sponsored byN. , Growing Energy: How biofuels can help end America's oil

Eggert, Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol (Boardman, OR) BlueFire Ethanol (Corona, CA) POET (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Innovations (Commerce City, CO) ICM (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes (Davis, CA) Genencor (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp (San Diego, CA) Dupont (Wilmington, DE) Mascoma (Lebanon, NH) Cargill Inc (Minneapolis, MN) Regional Partnerships South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD Cornell University, Ithaca, NY University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

295

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

296

NREL: Learning - Biofuels Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Basics Biofuels Basics Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player This video provides an overview of NREL research on converting biomass to liquid fuels. Text Version Unlike other renewable energy sources, biomass can be converted directly into liquid fuels, called "biofuels," to help meet transportation fuel needs. The two most common types of biofuels in use today are ethanol and biodiesel. Ethanol is an alcohol, the same as in beer and wine (although ethanol used as a fuel is modified to make it undrinkable). It is most commonly made by fermenting any biomass high in carbohydrates through a process similar to beer brewing. Today, ethanol is made from starches and sugars, but NREL scientists are developing technology to allow it to be made from cellulose

297

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

298

Bioenergy plants in the United States and China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

181 (2011) 621- 622 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Plant Science j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / p l a n t s c i Editorial Bioenergy plants in the United States and China The emerging bio-economies of the US and China hinge on the development of dedicated bioenergy feedstocks that will increase the production of next-generation biofuels and bioproducts. While biofuels might have less eventual importance than bioproducts, transportation needs for both countries require increasingly more biofuels to be produced in the coming decades. The US Renewable Fuels Standard mandate 136 billion litres of biofuels by 2022. Nearly 80 billion litres are required to be "advanced biofuels," generally regarded as fuels from non-corn and soybean feedstocks. Because

299

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Accelerating Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Partnerships (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) algal biofuels research capabilities and partnership opportunities. NREL is accelerating algal biofuels commercialization through: (1) Advances in applied biology; (2) Algal strain development; (3) Development of fuel conversion pathways; (4) Techno-economic analysis; and (5) Development of high-throughput lipid analysis methodologies. NREL scientists and engineers are addressing challenges across the algal biofuels value chain, including algal biology, cultivation, harvesting and extraction, and fuel conversion. Through partnerships, NREL can share knowledge and capabilities in the following areas: (1) Algal Biology - A fundamental understanding of algal biology is key to developing cost-effective algal biofuels processes. NREL scientists are experts in the isolation and characterization of microalgal species. They are identifying genes and pathways involved in biofuel production. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput, non-destructive technique for assessing lipid production in microalgae. (2) Cultivation - NREL researchers study algal growth capabilities and perform compositional analysis of algal biomass. Laboratory-scale photobioreactors and 1-m2 open raceway ponds in an on-site greenhouse allow for year-round cultivation of algae under a variety of conditions. A bioenergy-focused algal strain collection is being established at NREL, and our laboratory houses a cryopreservation system for long-term maintenance of algal cultures and preservation of intellectual property. (3) Harvesting and Extraction - NREL is investigating cost-effective harvesting and extraction methods suitable for a variety of species and conditions. Areas of expertise include cell wall analysis and deconstruction and identification and utilization of co-products. (4) Fuel Conversion - NREL's excellent capabilities and facilities for biochemical and thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels are being applied to algal biofuels processes. Analysts are also testing algal fuel properties to measure energy content and ensure compatibility with existing fueling infrastructure. (5) Cross-Cutting Analysis - NREL scientists and engineers are conducting rigorous techno-economic analyses of algal biofuels processes. In addition, they are performing a full life cycle assessment of the entire algae-to-biofuels process.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biofuels – Biomass Feedstock  

:  INL’s process enables an agricultural combine to separate multiple products , e.g. agricultural residue, grain, etc. in a single pass across a ...

302

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Identify Cellulosic Biomass, Pretreatments, and EnzymeFundamental Factors Affecting Biomass Enzymatic Reactivity.U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

145. Wyman C, Huber G: Biomass and America's energy futuredevelopment of leading biomass pretreatment technologies.U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Billion-ton update: Biomass supply for a bioenergy andfor Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the UnitedUtilization of biomass for the supply of energy carriers,

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy 101: Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Biofuels Energy 101: Biofuels August 16, 2013 - 12:11pm Addthis Learn how biomass is converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels to power our cars, trucks,...

308

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a biomass for biofuel production and some of its economiceconomic viability of biofuel production is the efficiencybiofuel; metabolic engineering; China Abstract Cassava is ranking as fifth among crops in global starch production.

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development June 11, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a combined total of up to $18 million will be available for research and development of biomass-based products, biofuels, bioenergy and related processes. USDA and DOE are issuing these grant solicitations for several types of projects aimed at increasing the availability of alternative and renewable fuels, which will help further President Bush's bold energy initiatives, including Twenty in Ten. The Twenty in Ten Initiative promotes greater energy security through increased efficiency and diversification of energy sources. USDA

310

U.S. Bioenergy Statistics | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Bioenergy Statistics U.S. Bioenergy Statistics Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data U.S. Bioenergy Statistics Dataset Summary Description The U.S. Bioenergy Statistics are a source of information on biofuels intended to present a picture of the renewable energy industry and its relationship to agriculture. Where appropriate, data are presented in both a calendar year and the relevant marketing year timeframe to increase utility to feedstock-oriented users. The statistics highlight the factors that influence the demand for agricultural feedstocks for biofuels production; for instance, numerous tables emphasize the relationship between energy and commodity markets.

311

NREL-United States/Brazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-United States/Brazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop NREL-United States/Brazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL-United States/Brazil Bioenergy Technical Workshop Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Resource Type: Workshop, Training materials User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/international/ Country: Brazil South America Coordinates: -14.235004°, -51.92528° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-14.235004,"lon":-51.92528,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

313

Images / Graphics : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images / Graphics Images / Graphics Cellulosic Biofuel Production Steps and Biological Research Challenges Cellulosic Biofuel Production Steps and Biological Research Challenges This figure depicts some key processing steps in an artistñ€(tm)s conception of a future large-scale facility for transforming cellulosic biomass (plant fibers) into biofuels. Three areas where focused biological research can lead to much lower costs and increased productivity include developing crops dedicated to biofuel production (see step 1), engineering enzymes that deconstruct cellulosic biomass (see steps 2 and 3), and engineering microbes and developing new microbial enzyme systems for industrial-scale conversion of biomass sugars into ethanol and other biofuels or bioproducts (see step 4). Biological research challenges

314

NREL: Biomass Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than 15,000 votes. September 28, 2010 NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping Application BioEnergy Atlas, a Web portal that provides access to two...

315

Biofuels News--Winter 2001, Vol. 4, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Newsletter for the DOE Biofuels Program. Articles on collaborative projects with USDA, and OIT. Contains an interview with Doug Kaempf, co-director of the National Biobased Products and Bioenergy Coordination Office.

Tuttle, J.H.

2001-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Small-Scale Bioenergy Alternatives for Industry, Farm, and Institutions : A User`s Perspective.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research on biomass as an energy source. Topics include: bioenergy development and application; bioenergy combustion technology; and bioenergy from agricultural, forest, and urban resources. There are a total of 57 individual reports included. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

Folk, Richard [ed.] [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Forest Products

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as biomass crops for biofuel production also possess prop-candidate species for biofuel production are taxonomicallyof switching from food production crops to biofuel feedstock

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Sustainable liquid biofuels from biomass: The writingscandidates for refining into biofuels also possess qualitiesin the production of biofuels from agricultural feed- stocks

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. , 26(of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450. Yang, B. ,cost cellulosic ethanol. Biofuels, Bioprod. Biorefin. , 2(

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

useful as biomass crops for biofuel production also possesscandidate species for biofuel production are taxonomicallyDeleterious effects Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol),

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain: DistributedBiomassProcessingfor SustainableBiofuelsandAnimalFeeds Supplying adequate cellulosic biomass to biorefineries is emerging as a crucial issue in biofuel systems. We addresss this problem by pretreating cellulosic biomass using the ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) process

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

322

DOE to Invest $250 Million in New Bioenergy Centers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$250 Million in New Bioenergy Centers $250 Million in New Bioenergy Centers DOE to Invest $250 Million in New Bioenergy Centers August 2, 2006 - 4:48pm Addthis Basic Genomics Research on the Development of Biofuels to be Accelerated JOLIET, IL - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE will spend $250 million to establish and operate two new Bioenergy Research Centers to accelerate basic research on the development of cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels. The Secretary made the announcement with Congressman Jerry Weller (IL-11th), local officials and biofuels stakeholders during a visit to Channahon, IL. "This is an important step toward our goal of replacing 30 percent of transportation fuels with biofuels by 2030," Secretary Bodman said. "The

323

Switchgrass for Forage and Bioenergy: II. Effects of P and K fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass feedstock production system for cellulosic biofuels.feedstock to be grown across the U.S. for cellulosic ethanol

Guretzky, John A; Kering, Maru K; Biermacher, Jon T; Cook, Billy J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Chemical analysis and reactivity of biomass pyrolysis products. Application to the development of carbon-neutral biofuels and chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation the pyrolytic conversion of biomass into chemicals and fuels was investigated from the analytical point of view. The study was focused on… (more)

Torri, Cristian and#60;1982and#62

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4/11/2011 1 Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy Production from Natural: Urban Wood Residue:Urban Wood Residue: Woody Biomass for Woody Biomass for BioenergyBioenergy TreeJustification Contrasting Woody Biomass Recovery DataContrasting Woody Biomass Recovery Data Regional Analysis

Gray, Matthew

326

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Stories of Discovery & Innovation From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Enlarge Photo Image by Eric Steen, JBEI Once E. coli have secreted oil, they sequester themselves from the droplets as shown by this optical image, thereby facilitating oil recovery. Currently, biochemical processing of cellulosic biomass requires costly enzymes for sugar liberation. By giving the E. coli the capacity to ferment both cellulose and hemicellulose without the 03.28.11 From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass A microbe that can produce an advanced biofuel directly from biomass was developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy

327

Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels November 2, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center received Recovery Act funding from DOE Center studies carbon cycling, water quality and greenhouse gas emissions in biofuel cropping systems Research could significantly shorten time to harvest perennial crops for biofuels The Michigan State University professor of crop and soil sciences leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center's sustainability research."Our aim is to provide the knowledge needed to deploy biofuel cropping systems that are both profitable and environmentally sustainable," says Phil Robertson. Biofuel sustainability is a major research theme of the Great Lakes

328

Advanced Biofuels Workshop - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Senior Analyst, Office of Biomass Program, Department of Energy . zia.haq@ee.doe.gov . 202-586-2869 . Commercialization of Cellulosic Biofuels . Paul ...

329

Frontline BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frontline BioEnergy LLC Frontline BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Frontline BioEnergy LLC Place Ames, Iowa Zip 50010 Sector Bioenergy, Biomass Product Frontline BioEnergy Inc develops and installs gasification systems and individual equipment to convert biomass into valuable products. Coordinates 30.053389°, -94.742269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.053389,"lon":-94.742269,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and grasses (Gramineae) for bioethanol produc- tion. Theseof wide interest for bioethanol production. Editor’s note:Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol), bioenergy: Alternative

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

USDA-DOE Make Available $4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

woody plant tissue, specifically lignocellulosic materials, for bioenergy and biofuels. Developing lignocellulosic crops for energy fuels could use less intensive production...

332

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initiative   West Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power Enxco, Inc.   Dr.  Matt Summer, West Biofuels, LLC  • Gene Taylor, West Biofuels, LLC   Table of Contents  Executive 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Sustainability  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overview Financial Opportunities Publications Contact Us Sustainability The Bioenergy Technologies Office's activities are guided by a commitment to environmental, economic,...

334

Radiant and thermal energy transport in planktonic and benthic algae systems for sustainable biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofuel production from microalgal biomass offers a clean and sustainable liquid fuel alternative to fossil fuels. In addition, algae cultivation is advantageous over traditional biofuel… (more)

Murphy, Thomas Eugene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Solarvest BioEnergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solarvest BioEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name Solarvest BioEnergy Place Bloomington, Indiana Zip 3057 Sector Bioenergy, Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product Solarvest BioEnergy's...

336

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004). "Optimizing Forest Biomass Exploitation for Energyat a Regional Level." Biomass and Bioenergy, 26(1), 15-25.Energy Crop Feedstock." Biomass and Bioenergy, 18(4), 309-

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004). "Optimizing Forest Biomass Exploitation for Energyat a Regional Level." Biomass and Bioenergy, 26(1), 15-25.Energy Crop Feedstock." Biomass and Bioenergy, 18(4), 309-

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ris Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only in biomass conversion, combined with signifi- cant changes in energy markets, have stimulated this trend should continue to develop gasification and fuel cell conversion systems based on biomass. Conversion

339

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in facilities such as those producing electricity from anaerobic...

340

Legislating Biofuels in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Legislating Biofuels in the United States Wendy Clark National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA 2008 SAE Biofuels Specifications and Performance Symposium July 7-9, 2008, Paris NREL PR-540 Legislate Biofuels? · Plentiful U.S. biomass resources: energy crops, agricultural and forestry residues

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

342

Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Name Nishant Bioenergy P Ltd Address Sector 18-D, Chandigarh Place Chandigarh Zip 160018 Sector Bioenergy Product Biomass Fuel Pellet and Biomass Pellet Fired Cook Stove for institutional use Stock Symbol Stove Earth Stove Year founded 1999 Number of employees 1-10 Company Type For Profit Phone number 09815609301 Website http://www.nishantbioenergy.co Coordinates 30.7347851°, 76.7884713° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.7347851,"lon":76.7884713,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

NREL: Biomass Research - Justin B. Sluiter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Justin B. Sluiter Justin Sluiter is a biomass analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Bioenergy Center. Justin started at NREL in 1996 working on a lignin...

344

NREL: Biomass Research - Ryan M. Ness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ryan M. Ness Ryan Ness is a research technician with the National Bioenergy Center Biomass Analysis Group at NREL. Ryan has been with NREL since 2007. Ryan's primary...

345

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on land, water, and materials used in their production. Local land-use impacts occur where biofuel of a vehicle battery, but if lithium prices were to double or triple, the lithium raw material cost could for Bioenergy at Different Scales," Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining 5 (2011): 361­374. 16. This material

Knowles, David William

346

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact August 11, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture have awarded 10 grants totaling $12.2 million to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy crops. The investments are part of a broader effort by the Obama administration to develop domestic renewable energy and advanced biofuels, providing a more secure future for America's energy needs and creating new opportunities for the American farming industry. "Biofuels, along with other advanced vehicle technologies, hold the

347

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact August 11, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture have awarded 10 grants totaling $12.2 million to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy crops. The investments are part of a broader effort by the Obama administration to develop domestic renewable energy and advanced biofuels, providing a more secure future for America's energy needs and creating new opportunities for the American farming industry. "Biofuels, along with other advanced vehicle technologies, hold the

348

Assessing Available Woody Plant Biomass on Rangelands with Lidar and Multispectral Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of biofuels are produced from corn and grain. The drawback to these sources of biofuels is the vast amount of cultivated land needed to produce substantial amounts of biofuel, potentially increasing the price of food and livestock products. Mesquite trees, a type of woody plant, are a proven source of bioenergy feedstock found on semi-arid lands. The overall objectives of this study were to develop algorithms for determining woody plant biomass on rangelands in Texas at plot-level using terrestrial lidar and at the local scale by integrating reference biomass and multispectral imagery. Terrestrial lidar offers a more efficient method for estimating biomass than traditional field measurements. Variables from the terrestrial lidar point cloud were compared to ground measurements of biomass to find a best fitting regression model. Two processing methods were investigated for analyzing the lidar point cloud data, namely: 1) percentile height statistics and 2) a height bin approach. Regression models were developed for variables obtained through each processing technique for estimating woody plant, above-ground biomass. Regression models were able to explain 81 percent and 77 percent of the variance associated with the aboveground biomass using percentile height statistics and height bins, respectively. The aboveground biomass map was generated by using the cokriging interpolation method with NDVI and ground biomass data. According to cross-validation, ordinary cokriging estimated biomass accurately (R^2 = 0.99). The results of this study revealed that terrestrial lidar can be used to accurately and efficiently estimate the aboveground biomass of mesquite trees in a semi-arid environment at plot level. Moreover, spatial interpolation techniques proved useful in scaling up biomass estimates to local scale.

Ku, Nian-Wei

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: Theof Biobased Polymers and Bioenergy,” Journal of IndustrialTransport: Analysis of Bioenergy Transport Chains Using

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable energy provide critical data for the development of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been used for simulating bioenergy crops including herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). Although it lacks the complexity of other bioenergy crop models, the environmental productivity index (EPI) is the only model used to estimate biomass production of CAM (Agave and Opuntia) plants. Except for the EPI model, all models include representations of leaf area dynamics, phenology, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few models simulate soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle dynamics, making them especially useful for assessing the environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the large-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. The rapid increase in use of models for energy crop simulation is encouraging; however, detailed information on the influence of climate, soils, and crop management practices on biomass production is scarce. Thus considerable work remains regarding the parameterization and validation of process-based models for bioenergy crops; generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation; and implementation of an integrated framework for efficient, high-resolution simulations of biomass production for use in planning sustainable bioenergy systems.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xuesong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miguez, Fernando [Iowa State University; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Bioenergy Ecosystem - ORNL Review Vol. 44, No. 3, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Magazine Search Magazine Go Features Next Article Previous Article Comments Home Clyde Thurman A Bioenergy Ecosystem BESC partnerships translate R&D into biofuels Paul Gilna, director of the BioEnergy Science Center at ORNL, is a man on a mission. In fact his entire organization is working under a Department of Energy mandate to focus the world's leading scientific minds and resources on revolutionizing bioenergy production. When the center was created in 2007, this innovative partnership of national laboratories, a private research foundation, universities and industries set out to break down the barriers to developing viable and affordable biofuel alternatives to petroleum-based fuels from plants that do not compete with food crops, such as switchgrass or poplar trees. Four years into a five-year mission, they

352

Chapter 34: Catalysts and Sorbents for Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Renewable Biofuels-Material Development Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: (1) Introduction, (2) Catalysts for Catalytic Pyrolysis and Bio-Oil Upgrading, (3) High Temperature Sorbents for Syngas Clean Up, (4) Conditioning Biomass Derived Syngas, (5) Catalysts for Synthesis of Ethanol and Higher Alcohols from Syngas, (6) Summary, and (7) Acknowledgments.

Cheah, S.; Czernik, S.; Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Hensley, J. E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy 101: Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Energy 101: Biofuels August 16, 2013 - 12:11pm Addthis Learn how biomass is converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels to power our cars, trucks, planes, and trains. Biomass is an organic renewable energy source that includes materials such as agriculture and forest residues, energy crops, and algae. Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy and its national laboratories are finding new, more efficient ways to convert biomass into biofuels that can take the place of conventional fuels like gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. This edition of Energy 101 shows how biomass is broken down and refined into sustainable biofuels via biochemical and thermochemical processes. For more information on biofuels from the Office of Energy Efficiency and

354

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy andU.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy andBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply.

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce America's Reliance on Imported Oil USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce America's Reliance on Imported Oil May 5, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's comprehensive plan to address rising gas prices, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a total of $47 million to fund eight research and development projects that will support the production of biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products from a variety of biomass sources. These investments in clean, sustainable transportation fuels will help reduce U.S. oil imports, support economic development in rural America, create clean energy jobs for U.S. workers, and protect

356

U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative April 15, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, April 15, 2011- To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to $30 million over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

357

USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce America's Reliance on Imported Oil USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to Reduce America's Reliance on Imported Oil May 5, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's comprehensive plan to address rising gas prices, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a total of $47 million to fund eight research and development projects that will support the production of biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products from a variety of biomass sources. These investments in clean, sustainable transportation fuels will help reduce U.S. oil imports, support economic development in rural America, create clean energy jobs for U.S. workers, and protect

358

Constraints to bio-energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable, domestic, cost-effective and publicly acceptable energy alternatives. Among these are the bioconversion technologies. To date bio-energy research has been directed toward the mechanics of the conversion processes and technical assessment of the environmental impacts. However, there are other obstacles to overcome before biomass can be converted to more useful forms of energy that fit existing need. Barriers to bio-energy resource application in the US are identified. In addition, examples from several agricultural regions serve to illustrate site-specific resource problems.

Parsons, V.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Biofuels News - Spring 2002, Vol. 5, No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofuels News is a quarterly publication produced by the Department of Energy's Biofuels Program. This issue contains information on DOE's Enzyme Sugar Platform Project, the Enzyme Sugar Project's stage-gate review, the Biomass R&D Advisory Committee's recommendations for biofuels development, and biofuels and homeland security.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Drop-In Biofuels to Drop-In Biofuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Drop-In Biofuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Drop-In Biofuels Drop-in biofuels are hydrocarbon fuels substantially similar to gasoline, diesel, or jet fuels. These fuels can be made from a variety of biomass feedstocks including crop residues, woody biomass, dedicated energy crops,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Department Selects Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million in Federal Funding Energy Department Selects Three Bioenergy Research Centers for $375 Million in Federal Funding June 26, 2007 - 2:08pm Addthis Basic Genomics Research Furthers President Bush's Plan to Reduce Gasoline Usage 20 Percent in Ten Year WASHINGTON, DC - U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will invest up to $375 million in three new Bioenergy Research Centers that will be located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Madison, Wisconsin; and near Berkeley, California. The Centers are intended to accelerate basic research in the development of cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels, advancing President Bush's Twenty in Ten Initiative, which seeks to reduce U.S. gasoline consumption by 20 percent

362

Breaking the ties that bind: New hope for biomass fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

viable process for making biofuels from cellulosic biomass," adds Langan, director of the biofuels project. Funding for the project comes from Laboratory-Directed Research and...

363

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Breaking Biomass Better, DOE JGI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12, 2010 Breaking Biomass Better: DOE JGI Sequences Wood Decaying Fungus to Advance Biofuels Prospects WALNUT CREEK, CA-One of the challenges in making cellulosic biofuels...

364

Online Toolkit Fosters Bioenergy Innovation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toolkit Fosters Bioenergy Innovation Toolkit Fosters Bioenergy Innovation Online Toolkit Fosters Bioenergy Innovation January 21, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Learn more about the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework, an online data sharing and mapping toolkit. Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What will the project do? The $241 million loan guarantee for Diamond Green Diesel, funding which will support the construction of a facility that will nearly triple the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically. The online data sharing and mapping toolkit provides the extensive data, analysis, and visualization tools to monitor the bioenergy industry. Yesterday, Secretary Chu announced a $241 million loan guarantee for Diamond Green Diesel, funding which will support the construction of a

365

Department of Energy Offers Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Commitment for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Commitment for a $133.9 Million Loan Guarantee Department of Energy Offers Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Commitment for a $133.9 Million Loan Guarantee August 19, 2011 - 11:15am Addthis Groundbreaking Cellulosic Ethanol Project Expected to Create Over 300 Jobs and Build Nation's Capacity for Cellulosic Ethanol Production Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $133.9 million loan guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC (ABBK) to support the development of a commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant. ABBK's parent company and project sponsor, Abengoa Bioenergy US Holding, Inc., estimates the project will create approximately 300 construction jobs and 65 permanent

366

Smithfield Bioenergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smithfield Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Name Smithfield Bioenergy Place Smithfield, Virginia Zip 23430 Product Biodiesel producer based in Virgina References Smithfield...

367

Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet national goals for biofuels production, there are going to be large increases in acreage planted to dedicated biofuels crops. These acreages may be in perennial grasses, annual crops, short rotation woody crops, or other types of vegetation and may involve use of existing cropland, marginal lands, abandoned lands or conversion of forest land. The establishment of bioenergy crops will affect ecological processes and their interactions and thus have an influence on ecosystem services provided by the lands on which these crops are grown. The regional-scale effects of bioenergy choices on ecosystem services need special attention because they often have been neglected yet can affect the ecological, social and economic aspects of sustainability. A regional-scale perspective provides the opportunity to make more informed choices about crop selection and management, particularly with regard to water quality and quantity issues, and also about other aspects of ecological, social, and economic sustainability. We give special attention to cellulosic feedstocks because of the opportunities they provide. Adopting an adaptive management approach for biofuels feedstock production planning will be possible to a certain extent if there is adequate monitoring data on the effects of changes in land use. Effects on water resources are used as an example and existing understanding of water resource effects are analyzed in detail. Current results indicate that there may be water quality improvements coupled with some decreases in available water for downstream uses.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Lowrance, Richard [USDA-ARS Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, Tifton, Georgia; Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Payments to someone by E-mail Payments to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Production Payments Through the Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels (Section 9005),

369

Advanced Biofuels Workshop  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 1, 2012 August 1, 2012 In Attendance U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 Adam Sieminski EIA Terry Higgins Hart Downstream Energy Services Peter Ryus RSB Services Foundation Zia Haq DOE Robert Kozak Atlantic Biomass Conversion Leticia Phillips UNICA/Brazillian Sugarecane Industry Assoc. Paul Kamp Leifmark, LLC/Inbicon Biomass Steve Gerber Fiberight Joanne Ivancic Advanced Biofuels USA John G. Cowie Agenda 2020 Technology Alliance Jeff Hazle American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Bryan Just American Petroleum Institute Barry Bernfeld Bunge Global Agribusiness Michael Corbin CLF Partners International LLC Paul Grabowski DOE, Office of Biomass Program

370

Bioenergy KDF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bioenergy KDF Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy KDF Agency/Company /Organization: US Department of Energy Office of Biomass Program Partner: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Presentation, Publications, Technical report, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: bioenergykdf.net Web Application Link: bioenergykdf.net Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Coordinates: 36.00941332491°, -84.270080532879° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.00941332491,"lon":-84.270080532879,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for lignocellulosic biorefineries. Biomass & Bioenergy,be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries William R. Morrow,is to highlight the risks biorefineries may face in drought

Morrow, III, William R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Methodology for assessment of biofuel resources in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is described for assessing the potential of biofuel production and utilization in developing countries. The approach combines biomass resource assessment to identify appropriate biofuel options for developing countries. 4 references.

Harper, J.P.; Antonopolous, A.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biomass & Bioenergy, 2010, 34(7), 923-930, doi:10.1016/j.biombioe.2010.01.039. EEEnnneeerrrgggyyy rrreeeqqquuuiiirrreeemmmeeennnttt fffooorrr fffiiinnneee gggrrriiinnndddiiinnnggg ooofff tttooorrrrrreeefffiiieeeddd wwwooooooddd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and `farmed wood' for electricity, heat and combined heat and power production (EC JRC, 2009). All of the life wood waste SRC chips Straw SRC chips SRC pellets Cofiring Biomass power plant Domestic boiler kgCO2per vary significantly ­ from about 10kgCO2e per MWh for waste products such as waste wood and MDF, up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES  

SciTech Connect

While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or ĂąÂ?Â?clearing houseĂąÂ? for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass utilization is one solution to our nation’s addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nation’s reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with, or even replace, petroleum and other fossil fuels in the near future. It is a primary domestic, sustainable, renewable energy resource that can supply liquid transportation fuels, chemicals, and energy that are currently produced from fossil sources, and it is a sustainable resource for a hydrogen-based economy in the future.

Zygarlicke, C.J.; Schmidt, D.D.; Olson, E.S.; Leroux, K.M.; Wocken, C.A.; Aulich, T.A.; WIlliams, K.D.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flambeau River Biofuels Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Flambeau River Biofuels Place Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector Biomass Product A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC that plans to develop a Fischer Tropsch diesel project in Park Falls, Wisconsin that will process residual wood biomass from forest and agricultural sources. References Flambeau River Biofuels[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flambeau River Biofuels is a company located in Park Falls, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Flambeau River Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flambeau_River_Biofuels&oldid=345407" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

377

Interactions of Lignin and Hemicellulose and Effects on Biomass Deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. billion-ton update: biomass supply for a bioenergy andA very large cellulosic biomass supply will be critical tosupply, as well as exposure to feedstock market risks (2-4). To date, lignocellulosic biomass

Li, Hongjia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Summary of the January 2010 Forum Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CEBS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to use of biofuels today. It is often assumed that the regrowth of the crop following harvest of biomass commitment periods, thresholds, or emissions trading. The result is that biofuels may not be "carbon neutral

379

The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu Duration 1:46 Topic Biofuels Bioenergy Credit Energy Department Video SECRETARY STEVEN CHU: This is a photograph of a perennial grass called miscanthus. It was grown without irrigation, without fertilizer. And in the autumn, you just shave it off. You use that to convert it to ethanol. The amount of ethanol in this particular plot of land outside the University of Illinois produces 15 times more ethanol than a similar plot of land if you grew corn, and the energy inputs are far less. So we need to develop methods in order to use these grassy, woody substances and also agricultural waste - wheat straw, rice straw, corn

380

Winning the Biofuel Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Future Biofuel Future Winning the Biofuel Future March 7, 2011 - 4:44pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy Today, the Department announced that a research team at our BioEnergy Science Center achieved yet another advance in the drive toward next generation biofuels: using a microbe to convert plant matter directly into isobutanol. Isobutanol can be burned in regular car engines with a heat value higher than ethanol and similar to gasoline. This is part of a broad portfolio of work the Department is doing to reduce America's dependence on foreign oil and create new economic opportunities for rural America. This announcement is yet another sign of the rapid progress we are making in developing the next generation of biofuels that can help reduce our oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Use of U.S. wind and biofuels on the rise - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biomass—biofuels, wood, and organic waste—is the largest single source of renewable fuel in the United States. However, when the types of biomass are ...

382

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies - in a global perspective Erik Steen Jensen Bioenergy and biomass Biosystems Department RisÞ National Laboratory Denmark #12;Biomass - a local resource, slaughterhouse waste. #12;Biomass characteristics · Biomass is a storable energy carrier, unlike electricity

383

#LabChat Recap: The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels #LabChat Recap: The Future of Biofuels September 27, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #LabChat: The Future of Biofuels Brian Pfleger, a synthetic biologist and metabolic engineer from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, stepped into the #LabChat to answer questions about his work developing advanced biofuels. Moderating the #LabChat was John Greenler, director of education and outreach for the center. Storified by Energy Department · Thu, Sep 27 2012 14:48:51 Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center is one of three Energy Department facilities not only trying to develop the next generation of biofuels, but rather, trying to develop a new generation of biofuels. They are

384

NREL: News - NREL Names New Executives to Lead Bioenergy, Bioscience and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

113 113 NREL Names New Executives to Lead Bioenergy, Bioscience and Energy Systems Integration Facility April 12, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently made three key hires to lead research centers. NREL has named Tom Foust, a nine-year NREL veteran, as its National Bioenergy Center Director; David Post as the Center Director for the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF); and Rich Greene as Biosciences Center Director. Tom Foust to Head National Bioenergy Center For the past three years, Foust has been Executive Director of the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), responsible for leading 18 biofuels organizations in a $50-million-dollar project to develop advanced "drop-in" replacement biofuels. He replaces Mike Cleary who retired in

385

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid pretreatment of biomass. Biotechnol. Bioeng. Symp. 15,that limit enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Appl. Biochem.hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450.

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1.tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning, J.Eleuterio (2005), A review of biomass burning emissions part

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRELFS-2700-58559 | July 2013 Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs Highlights in Science Two biomass-degrading enzyme systems that work in very...

389

Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas, biomass, or biogas. Water use and emissions canBiofuels produce methane-rich biogas that is used to meet

Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Producing biofuels from cellulosic materials, such as corn stalks, wood chips, and other biomass, requires the use of ...

391

Development of a novel algae biofilm photobioreactor for biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert carbon dioxide and sunlight into biomass that can be used for biofuel production. Although they are usually cultivated in… (more)

Ozkan, Altan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Biofuel impacts on water.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors Global Energy Systems team conducted a joint biofuels systems analysis project from March to November 2008. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, implications, limitations, and enablers of large-scale production of biofuels. 90 billion gallons of ethanol (the energy equivalent of approximately 60 billion gallons of gasoline) per year by 2030 was chosen as the book-end target to understand an aggressive deployment. Since previous studies have addressed the potential of biomass but not the supply chain rollout needed to achieve large production targets, the focus of this study was on a comprehensive systems understanding the evolution of the full supply chain and key interdependencies over time. The supply chain components examined in this study included agricultural land use changes, production of biomass feedstocks, storage and transportation of these feedstocks, construction of conversion plants, conversion of feedstocks to ethanol at these plants, transportation of ethanol and blending with gasoline, and distribution to retail outlets. To support this analysis, we developed a 'Seed to Station' system dynamics model (Biofuels Deployment Model - BDM) to explore the feasibility of meeting specified ethanol production targets. The focus of this report is water and its linkage to broad scale biofuel deployment.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS  

SciTech Connect

Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient expression efficiency. Throughout these analyses, using plasmids with the hygromycin selectable marker, it was determined that 1.5 mg l-1 hygromycin was the optimal dose for genetic transformation of foxtail millet. In contrast, the nptII selectable marker appeared to yield many escapes. Three methods of transformation were employed in an attempt to produce stable transformants. An in planta transformation experiment, similar to the floral dip method used in Arabidopsis, which utilized a red fluorescent protein pporRFP from coral Porites porites and the hygromycin selectable marker, was tested using immature inflorescences. Although several plants were PCR positive using endpoint and Real-Time PCR and there was transient expression using pporRFP and GUS reporters, no plants were positive on Southern blot. Dipping in Agrobacterium may damage the anther or the pistil because seed production was significantly reduced. Agrobacterium transformation using embryogenic calli was also tested. Although hundreds of plants were regenerated from selection, none were positive using PCR. The third method was to wound germinated seeds with an Agrobacterium coated needle, but none of the plants were PCR positive. Although the Yugu1 genotype was recalcitrant to genetic transformation, several avenues of future research should be considered for foxtail millet. Calli from different foxtail millet genotypes should be screened and selected for regeneration potential, and some genotypes may be more amenable to transformation. Additional selectable markers should also be tested as hygromycin appears to be too stringent and there are too many escapes with nptII. This project has provided training for the following personnel: Dr. Xinlu Chen (postdoc), Xiaomei Liu (postdoc), Jayashree Desai (postdoc) and Kyle Berk (Undergraduate researcher). Conference presentations and peer-reviewed journal articles partly supported by this grant includes the following: 1. Baxter H., Equi R., Chen X, Berk K. and Zale J. Establishing Efficient in vitro Protocols For Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L. cv. Yu

Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Rapid determination of sugar content in biomass hydrolysates using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels and Environmental Biotechnology Biotechnology and Bioengineering Biofuels and Environmental Biotechnology Biotechnology and Bioengineering DOI 10.1002/bit.24741 Rapid determination of sugar content in biomass hydrolysates using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy † Erica Gjersing*, Renee M. Happs, Robert W. Sykes, Crissa Doeppke, and Mark F. Davis National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401 *Address correspondence to: Erica.Gjersing@nrel.gov; phone: 303-384-7984; fax: 303-384- 6363 Key Words: hydrolysate, Partial Least Squares, 1H NMR, PLS regression † This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to

395

Press Releases: BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009: Mascoma Corporation today announced that the company has made major research advances in consolidated bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP avoids the need for the costly production of cellulase enzymes by using engineered microorganisms that produce cellulases and ethanol at high yield in a single step. "This is a true breakthrough that takes us much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State University's Dr. Bruce Dale, who is also Editor of the journal Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefineries. "Many had thought that CBP was years or even decades away,

396

ABENGOA BIOENERGY The Global Biotech Ethanol Company 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fossil fuels. But the biomass ­ the raw materials ­ have to be both sustainable and economically viable Michele Stanley studies which microalgae are most appropriate as a biofuel crop ­ here in the culture into organic molecules such as sugars and lipids (oils), which we can extract and use to produce biofuels like

Reich, Peter B.

397

Microsoft Word - biofuels1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA CONTACT Larisa Brass MEDIA CONTACT Larisa Brass Communications and External Relations (865) 574-4163 (865) 385-5271 cell ORNL- le d te am win s DOE b io e n e r g y ce nt er OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 26, 2007 - A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory has won an award from the Department of Energy for a $125 million bioenergy research center that will seek new ways to produce biofuels. Funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science, the DOE Bioenergy Science Center will be located on the ORNL campus in a new facility funded by the state and owned by the University of Tennessee. The center will employ the interdisciplinary expertise of the team's partners in biology, engineering and agricultural science and commercialization to develop processes for converting plants including switchgrass

398

Indicators for assessing socioeconomic sustainability of bioenergy systems: A short list of practical measures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indicators are needed to assess both socioeconomic and environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators can help to identify and quantify the sustainability attributes of bioenergy options. We identify 16 socioeconomic indicators that fall into the categories of social well-being, energy security, trade, profitability, resource conservation, and social acceptability. The suite of indicators is predicated on the existence of basic institutional frameworks to provide governance, legal, regulatory and enforcement services. Indicators were selected to be practical, sensitive to stresses, unambiguous, anticipatory, predictive, calibrated with known variability, and sufficient when considered collectively. The utility of each indicator, methods for its measurement, and applications appropriate for the context of particular bioenergy systems are described along with future research needs. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major socioeconomic effects of the full supply chain for bioenergy, including feedstock production and logistics, conversion to biofuels, biofuel logistics and biofuel end uses. Ten of those 16 indicators are proposed to be the minimum list of practical measures of socioeconomic aspects of bioenergy sustainability. Coupled with locally-prioritized environmental indicators, we propose that these socioeconomic indicators can provide a basis to quantify and evaluate sustainability of bioenergy systems across many regions in which they will be deployed.

Davis, Maggie R [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

 The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass.  The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

400

Kai BioEnergy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kai BioEnergy Corporation Kai BioEnergy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Kai BioEnergy Corporation Place Del Mar, California Zip 92014 Sector Biofuels Product Developing technologies to produce biodiesel from algae Website http://www.kaibioenergy.com/ Coordinates 32.964294°, -117.265191° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.964294,"lon":-117.265191,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BESC Affiliate Program : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affiliate Program Affiliate Program The BioEnergy Science Center has among its goals the effective, coordinated commercialization of appropriate technologies through formation of start-up ventures as well as licensing to corporate entities pursuing biofuels development. The effective translation of BESC research results into applications testing and potential deployment is an implicit part of reaching DOE's bioenergy goals. Toward this end, we are offering companies and universities the opportunity to become BESC Affiliates and receive the following benefits: An invitation to participate in all bio-energy related training, summer courses, symposia, and seminars hosted by or connected with BESC Notification of all publications resulting from BESC sponsored research, as well as timely information about BESC news

402

Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioEnergy LLC BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60603 Sector Efficiency Product Chicago-based company dedicated to optimising biofuel production through management, energy efficiency, and operational improvements. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

Biofuels International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels International Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels International Place Indiana Sector Biofuels Product Pittsburgh based biofuels project developer presently...

404

High-Yielding Method for Converting Biomass to Fermentable ...  

Inventors: Ronald Raines, Joseph Binder Lignocellulosic biomass is a very desirable feedstock for biofuel production. If the fermentation process for ...

405

Integrating and Piloting Lignocellulose Biomass Conversion Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on NREL's integrated biomass conversion capabilities. Presented at the 2009 Advanced Biofuels Workshop in Denver, CO, Cellulosic Ethanol session.

Schell, D. J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Agency/Company /Organization Overseas Development Institute Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.odi.org.uk/resource Country Uganda, India Eastern Africa, Southern Asia References Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities[1] Summary "This report presents findings from a research study in Uganda and India looking at the opportunities that carbon offset projects offer for poor

407

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

SciTech Connect

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Biofuel Co-Firing - Field Demonstration Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofuel is a renewable fuel that is derived from biomass. A broad category of biofuels was investigated to identify candidate fuels that would reduce the local dependence on fossil fuels, particularly low-sulfur fuel oil (LSFO). The biofuel selected for evaluation was crude palm oil grown in Malaysia under rigorous sustainability standards established by the Roundtable for Sustainability of Palm Oil. The evaluation culminated in a full-scale demonstration conducted by Hawaiian Electric Company and the El...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

World Biofuels Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over the next two decades, provided policymakers stay the course with their policy goals. This project relied on a scenario-based analysis to study global biofuel markets. Scenarios were designed to evaluate the impact of different policy proposals and market conditions. World biofuel supply for selected scenarios is shown in Figure 1. The reference case total biofuel production increases from 12 billion gallons of ethanol equivalent in 2005 to 54 billion gallons in 2020 and 83 billion gallons in 2030. The scenarios analyzed show volumes ranging from 46 to 64 billion gallons in 2020, and from about 72 to about 100 billion gallons in 2030. The highest production worldwide occurs in the scenario with high feedstock availability combined with high oil prices and more rapid improvements in cellulosic biofuel conversion technologies. The lowest global production is found in the scenario with low feedstock availability, low oil prices and slower technology progress.

Alfstad,T.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A model for the vacuum pyrolysis of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is a significant renewable energy source and much research is currently being done to enable the production of biofuels and chemicals from biomass. This… (more)

Rabe, Richardt Coenraad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy 101 | Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 | Biofuels 101 | Biofuels Energy 101 | Biofuels July 25, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Biofuels are a key part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy. To reduce our dependence on imported oil we need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to develop every available source of American energy. This includes investments in clean, renewable biofuels. So what exactly is biofuel? It's clean, renewable fuel produced from biomass -- organic material such as plants, residue from agriculture, and even algae. At the Energy Department, we are taking a number of steps to develop the next generation of biofuels - including our joint announcement today with

413

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Biofuel Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:31pm Addthis The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers are also exploring photobiological conversion processes. Biochemical Conversion Processes In biochemical conversion processes, enzymes and microorganisms are used as biocatalysts to convert biomass or biomass-derived compounds into desirable products. Cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes break down the carbohydrate fractions of biomass to five- and six-carbon sugars in a process known as hydrolysis. Yeast and bacteria then ferment the sugars into products such as ethanol. Biotechnology advances are expected to lead to dramatic

415

Importance of bioenergy markets for the development of the global energy system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 508 EJ in 2009 [1]. In order to reach climate targets and create low-carbon economies, biomass is expected to play a pivotal role. While the future resource potential of biomass may be significant and the global trade of bioenergy is rapidly expanding, biomass is currently only playing a minor role

Recanati, Catherine

416

08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Lau, Jane [JBEI

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Borgford BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borgford BioEnergy LLC Borgford BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Borgford BioEnergy LLC Place Colville, Washington State Zip 99114 Sector Biomass Product Washington-based developer of biomass-to-energy projects. Coordinates 48.54657°, -117.904754° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.54657,"lon":-117.904754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Did U Know? : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Did U Know? Did U Know? Common U.S. agricultural products specifically grown for biofuel production include switchgrass and soybeans. Can you really drive a car off grass instead of gas? Yes! Switch grass is a common, warm-season grass that can be an environmentally friendly biofuel and alternative to traditional gasoline. How cool is that! Humans have used biomass fuels for heating and cooking since the discovery of fire. Biofuel is any liquid fuel derived from biological material such as trees, agricultural wastes, crops, or even grass. Biofuel can be produced from any carbon source that can be replenished rapidly, such as plants. Biomass refers to living and recently dead biological matter that can be used as fuel or for industrial production. Biofuel is considered a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels.from lignocellulosic biomass (Blanch et al. , 2008): long-in the degradation of biomass. RESULTS NIMS analysis of

Reindl, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a potential source of renewable energy are making available critical information for the development, validation, and use of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been developed and validated for herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops adapted to arid lands. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane as plant function types at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). A model of biomass production in CAM plants has been developed (EPI), but lacks the sophistication of the other models. Except for CAM plants, all the models include representations of leaf area dynamics, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few of the models are capable of simulating soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle processes, making them especially useful for assessing environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the field-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. Similar to other process-based models, simulations are challenged by computing and data management issues and an integrated framework for model testing and inter-comparison is needed. Considerable work remains concerning the development of models for unconventional bioenergy crops like CAM plants, generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation, and development of an integrated framework for efficient execution of large-scale simulations for use in planning regional to global sustainable bioenergy production systems.

Surendran Nair, Sujith; Kang, Shujiang; Zhang, Xuesong; Miguez, Fernando; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Post, W. M.; Dietze, Michael; Lynd, Lee R.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Anelia Milbrandt and Caroline Uriarte Produced under direction of the United States Agency for International Development by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement AEG-P-00-00003-00; Work for Others Agreement number 3010543; Task Numbers WFE2.1012, WFE2.1013, and WFE2.1014. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56456 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Anelia Milbrandt and Caroline Uriarte

424

African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Jump to: navigation, search Name African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Agency/Company /Organization African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Compnay (ABREC) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Website http://www.bidc-ebid.com/en/fo Country Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa References African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF)[1]

425

Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux  

SciTech Connect

Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol mass concentrations in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol mass concentrations in the United States 1 2: Aerosols, Wildfires, Biomass burning, Biofuel, Air quality, Visibility Index terms: 1 #12;Abstract.1 2 3 4 burning (summer wildfires, other fires, residential biofuel, and industrial biofuel) to seasonal

Jacob, Daniel J.

427

D o s s i e r Second and Third Generation Biofuels: Towards Sustainbility and Competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D o s s i e r Second and Third Generation Biofuels: Towards Sustainbility and Competitiveness the Hemicellulosic Fraction of Biomass into Biofuel F. Ben Chaabane and R. Marchal IFP Energies nouvelles the Hemicellulosic Fraction of Biomass into Biofuel -- Hemicelluloses are polymers composed mainly of C5 sugars

Recanati, Catherine

428

Biofuel Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices,  global  warming  and  renewable   resources  continue  to  grow,  so  has  scientific  discovery  into  agricultural  biomass  

Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be citedLIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may belifecycle analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biofuel Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As concerns regarding increasing energy prices, global warming and renewable resources continue to grow, so has scientific discovery into agricultural biomass conversion. Plant Biomass Conversion addresses both the development of plant biomass and conversion technology, in addition to issues surrounding biomass conversion, such as the affect on water resources and soil sustainability. This book also offers a brief overview of the current status of the industry and examples of production plants being used in current biomass conversion efforts.

Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel; Holmes, Brad; Simmons, Blake; Blanch, Harvey

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

FACT SHEET: BIOENERGY WORKING GROUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2010 , 2010 1 FACT SHEET: BIOENERGY WORKING GROUP At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched a Bioenergy Working Group, which will advance the deployment of bioenergy technologies by implementing recommendations of the Technology Action Plan on Bioenergy Technologies that was released by the Major Economies Forum Global Partnership in December 2009. The Working Group will work in close cooperation with the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP), which is co-chaired by Brazil and Italy. Initial key activities of the Working Group include: 1. Global Bioenergy Atlas: The Working Group will combine and build upon existing databases of sustainably-developed bioenergy potential around the globe and make it available in an open web-

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Tax Deduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Tax Deduction The cost of purchasing qualified biomass feedstocks to be processed into

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives The Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP; Section 9010) provides financial

434

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills December 13, 2011 - 4:12pm Addthis Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Neil Rossmeissl General Engineer What does this project do? Breathes new life into shuttered factories and mills. Saves and creates jobs. Despite Americans' voracious appetite for paper products -- a staggering 700 pounds per person annually -- America's pulp and paper industry has been struggling as of late due to competition from countries where

435

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills December 13, 2011 - 4:12pm Addthis Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Neil Rossmeissl General Engineer What does this project do? Breathes new life into shuttered factories and mills. Saves and creates jobs. Despite Americans' voracious appetite for paper products -- a staggering 700 pounds per person annually -- America's pulp and paper industry has been struggling as of late due to competition from countries where

436

National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

438

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Projects Biofuels Projects NREL biofuels projects help overcome technical barriers and expand markets for renewable, biodegradable vehicle fuels. These new liquid fuels include higher-level ethanol blends, butanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel, and other biomass-derived fuels. NREL's biofuels research and development helps improve engine efficiency, reduce polluting emissions, and improve U.S. energy security by reducing petroleum dependency. Biofuels for Diesel Engines NREL's diesel biofuels research and development focuses on developing fuel quality standards and demonstrating compatibility with engines and emission control systems. Highly efficient heavy-duty diesel truck engines are the primary power source for global transportation of freight. Light-duty diesel-fueled passenger vehicles have much higher fuel economy than

439

NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden knowledge of plant cell wall structures and identify ideal pretreatment of plant material. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and BioEnergy Science Center combined different microscopic imaging methods to gain a greater understanding of the relationships between biomass cell wall structure and enzyme digestibility. This breakthrough could lead to optimizing sugar yields and lowering the costs of making biofuels. Using the new approach, NREL researchers discovered the localization of the enzymes responsible for deconstruction of the cell wall polymers and the effects of enzyme action on the cell wall. Unlike traditional composition analysis, the new methods allow access to

440

Georgia's 8th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8th congressional district Alterra Bioenergy Alterra Bioenergy LLC Biomass Energy Services Inc Middle Georgia Biofuels Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgi...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power process will utilize  gasification technology provided by is  pioneering the gasification technology that has been 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

NREL: Biomass Research - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the key to moving advanced biofuel technologies into the market. Explore NREL's biomass projects for examples of stakeholder partnerships. We provide opportunities to...

443

Available Technologies: Microsystems for Biomass Treatment ...  

For biofuel technology to advance, tailored research tools are needed to quickly and accurately evaluate the efficacy of biomass pretreatment options. ...

444

National Bioenergy Center: Laying the Foundation for Biorefineries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fact sheet explaining the National Bioenergy Center and its programs to stakeholders and visitors: An inclusive center without walls applying resources of the U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory System to advance technology for producing fuels, chemicals, materials, and power from biomass. National Bioenergy Center expertise, capabilities, facilities, and technologies can be made available to you through cooperative research and development agreements, work-for-others agreements, licenses, and other collaborative business arrangements. Please contact us about the research and development work you want to do.

Not Available

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An agent-based simulation model for the market diffusion of a second generation biofuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Second generation biofuels are widely considered a promising energy alternative to conventional (fossil) fuels. Although they will not completely replace fossil fuels (e.g., due to the limited availability of biomass), these high-quality biofuels can ...

Elmar Kiesling; Markus Günther; Christian Stummer; Lea M. Wakolbinger

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

BIOFUELS 3D Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BIOFUEL Database. NIST Home. BIOFUEL 3-D Structures ( Help / Contact / Rate Our Product and Services / NIST privacy policy ). Search: ...

447

Press Releases: BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases Chu presents energy research, development vision to senators U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu testified at a U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing March 5. During his testimony, Chu presented his vision for energy research and development at the... Source: Checkbiotech (Trade), March 11, 2009 Keywords Matched: Oak Ridge National Country: Switzerland Region: SourceType: News Laboratory: ORNL Feed Source: Meltwater Chu presents energy research, development vision to senators: An example, Chu said, is the current biofuels research underway at the three BioEnergy Research Centers located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn.; the University of Wisconsin in Madison; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. March 10, 2009

448

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dioxide,” Biomass and Bioenergy 13: 333-343 (1997). P.BiofuelsBiomass and Bioenergy, in press, doi:10.1016/j.Greenhouse Gas Balnaces of Bioenergy Systems in Comparison

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Geek-Up[10.01.10] -- Mapping Bioenergy and Magnetic Vector Potential, New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0.01.10] -- Mapping Bioenergy and Magnetic Vector 0.01.10] -- Mapping Bioenergy and Magnetic Vector Potential, New Atmosphere-Monitoring Tools and "Sour" Gas Streams Geek-Up[10.01.10] -- Mapping Bioenergy and Magnetic Vector Potential, New Atmosphere-Monitoring Tools and "Sour" Gas Streams October 1, 2010 - 3:33pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs This week, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced the launch of an online portal for energy geeks and "cartophiles" alike. NREL's BioEnergy Atlas encompasses two analysis and mapping tools - BioPower and BioFuels. These tools can summarize state-by-state energy use and infrastructure for traditional and bioenery power, fuels and resources

450

Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa May 7, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from corn harvests into renewable biofuels could help America produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels in the upcoming decade. Addthis Related Articles NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough

451

Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Addthis Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More (Text Version) Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More video. The words "Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More" appear onscreen, followed by video of oil wells and oil tankers. Shots of various modes of transportation, including cars and planes. Nearly a billion dollars a day. That's how much we spend on oil imports in the U.S. - oil that powers our nation's transportation systems and industries. Shots of crops being harvested and processed. The words "Biofuels - Made from biomass" appear onscreen along with several vials of different biomass feedstocks, including corn fibers, peanut shells, and switchgrass.

452

U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Office Of Biomass Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Jonathan L. Male May 27, 2010 Biomass Program * Make cellulosic ethanol cost competitive, at a modeled cost for mature technology of $1.76/gallon by 2017 * Help create an environment conducive to maximizing production and use of biofuels- 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels per year by 2022 (EISA) Feedstocks Biofuels Infrastructure Integrated Biorefineries Conversion Develop and transform our renewable and abundant, non-food, biomass resources into sustainable, cost-competitive, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower. Focus on targeted research, development, and demonstration * Through public and private partnerships * Deploy in integrated biorefineries

453

Development of a Web-based woody biomass energy expert system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Woody biomass is evolving as a potential bioenergy feedstock at an industrial scale to provide the required supply for industries relying on these resources at… (more)

Dhungana, Sabina.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Biomass: solar energy from farms and forests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass as an energy source is discussed. Thermochemical and biological conversion methods are presented. Bioenergy in use today and in the future is reported. Some current research programs are summarized. (DC)

Grace, A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

456

Biomass Project Developing a portfolio of sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Biomass Project Field Day Developing a portfolio of sustainable bioenergy feedstock information View the project webpage at http://goo.gl/uUFyv For questions about the Landscape Biomass Field register at http://www.aep.iastate.edu/biomass by July 25, 2012.Thank you! #12;FEEL Uthe Farm Agronomy Farm

Beresnev, Igor

457

Biomass Project Developing a portfolio of sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Biomass Project Field Day Developing a portfolio of sustainable bioenergy feedstock information View the project webpage at http://goo.gl/uUFyv For questions about the Landscape Biomass Field Please enter the farm on the west side off of Unicorn Ave near the "Landscape Biomass Project

Moore, Lisa Schulte

458

The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ? or â??mixed methodâ? research methodology was employed for each case study.

Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

459

National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Summer 2011 (Newsletter)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer 2011 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: evaluating new analytical techniques for measuring soluble sugars in the liquid portion of biomass hydrolysates, and measurement of the fraction of insoluble solids in biomass slurries.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #27, April - June 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

April-June, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding performance of alternative process configurations for producing ethanol from biomass; investigating Karl Fischer Titration for measuring water content of pretreated biomass slurries.

Schell, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Image Gallery : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GO About Research Resources Education Industry Redefining the Frontiers of Bioenergy Research Publications BESC Wiki (internal only) BESC Knowledgbase Biofacts BioEnergy Science...

462

Biosciences Division: Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm) DOE Logo Search BIO ... Search Argonne Home > BIO home > Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm) BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications...

463

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available ...  

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available for Licensing Established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2007, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research ...

464

Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools September 30, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis A researcher...

465

Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a new generation of efficient bioenergy strategies that will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and help curb carbon emissions. Fundamental and applied bioenergy research at...

466

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crops High-tonnage Sorghum (Annual) Long canopy duration Drought tolerant High biomass accumulation (expect >15­20 tons/acre) Sweet Sorghum (Annual) High sugar content Drought tolerant Medium biomass accumulation (5­10 tons/acre) Energy Canes (Perennial) Subtropical production High water demand High biomass

467

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in...

468

Northeast Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Biofuels Place United Kingdom Sector Biofuels Product Northeast biofuels is a cluster of companies and organisations...

469

Rusni Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rusni Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Rusni Biofuels Place Andhra Pradesh, India Sector Biofuels Product Rusni Biofuels India (P) Ltd.,we are specialized in sales of...

470

ECCO Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECCO Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name ECCO Biofuels Place Texas Sector Biofuels Product ECCO Biofuels manufactures biodiesel production facilities as well as produces...

471

Border Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Border Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Border Biofuels Place Melrose, United Kingdom Zip TD6 OSG Sector Biofuels Product Biofuels business which went into administration...

472

BioEnergy International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioEnergy International LLC BioEnergy International LLC Address 1 Pinehill Drive Place Quincy, Massachusetts Zip 02169 Sector Biofuels Product Development and commercialization of next generation biorefineries Website http://www.bioenergyllc.com/ Coordinates 42.228468°, -71.027593° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.228468,"lon":-71.027593,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

473

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Agenda for Sept 10-11 workshop in Oak Ridge, TN Sustainability of Bioenergy Systems: Cradle to Grave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smith (EPA) Design of Sustainable Biofuel Supply Chains · Ozge Kaplan (EPA) - Emerging Biomass Production § 3 in 5 · Chris Impellitteri (EPA) - Biofuels:Water Resources, Reuse and Energy · Virginia Dale Analysis of Ecological Effects of Biofuels Crops § Questions and discussion · 3:00 Break · 3:30 Reconvene o

476

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

477

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

478

State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is an attractive alternative as a feedstock for the production of renewable chemicals and fuels. Get Expertise Researcher Susan Hanson Inorganic Isotope & Actinide Chem Email Researcher Ruilian Wu Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Researcher Louis "Pete" Silks Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Vanadium is an inexpensive, earth-abundant metal that is well suited for promoting oxidations in air. Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is

480

Energy 101: Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Energy 101: Biofuels Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy: 101 Biofuels video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Biofuels." Time-lapse shot of airport traffic, followed by various shots of cars, trucks, airplanes, and trains in motion. We all know that it takes a lot of fuel to keep our country running, right? Cars, trucks, planes, trains... Shots of rural landscapes, followed by a shot of a biorefinery. What if we could develop a homegrown, renewable source for those fuels? Well, good news - we already are! Montage of biorefinery shots and shots of various feedstocks and harvesting. We can create clean, renewable transportation fuels from plants, trees, and a range of other organic materials - in other words, biomass. Shots of various feedstocks, followed by various laboratory and biorefinery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bioenergy biofuels biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms o