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Sample records for bingham simon fraser

  1. Simon Edelman

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Simon Edelman is Chief Creative Officer for the U.S. Department of Energy. He works with the digital content team to to develop, create, and expand visual content that tells the story of the Energy...

  2. PP-11-2 Fraser Papers Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -2 Fraser Papers Inc PP-11-2 Fraser Papers Inc Presidential permit authorizing Fraser Papers Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the...

  3. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho SUMMARY DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of...

  4. Bingham County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aberdeen, Idaho Atomic City, Idaho Basalt, Idaho Blackfoot, Idaho Firth, Idaho Fort Hall, Idaho Shelley, Idaho Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBinghamCo...

  5. EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOEs Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho.

  6. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Counties, Idaho | Department of Energy 0: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho Summary DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon

  7. Randy Fraser receives NNSA 2014 Security Professional of the Year award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA 2014 Security Professional of the Year award Randy Fraser receives NNSA 2014 Security Professional of the Year award Fraser is program manager for Los Alamos' Strategic Security Infrastructure Program April 2, 2015 Randy Fraser Randy Fraser Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "It is both an honor and privilege to be recognized by our NNSA customer with this award," said Fraser. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 2, 2015-Randy

  8. OSTIblog Posts by Kristin Bingham | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Kristin Bingham Kristin Bingham's picture Former Information Program Specialist Search Technology Developed by DOE Wins NIH Challenge NLM Plus Published on Nov 23, 2011 WebLib, a start-up company which won a Department of Energy (DOE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, managed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), has just won a celebrated Challenge.gov contest using technology developed for DOE. Read more... World

  9. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions You are...

  10. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 2, 2015-Randy Fraser of Los Alamos National Laboratory's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Randy Fraser receives NNSA 2014 Security Professional of the Year award April 2, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 2, 2015-Randy Fraser of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Security, Safeguards and Emergency Response Directorate received a 2014 National Nuclear Security Administration Security Professional of the Year award. "I am extremely honored to have the privilege of presenting these amazing individuals with the Bradley A. Peterson Federal and Contractor Security Professional of the Year

  11. Final Remediation Report for the K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (643-1G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morganstern, M.

    2002-06-18

    The K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (K BPOP) Building Number 643-1G, is situated immediately south and outside the K-Reactor fence line and is approximately 400 feet in length and 60 feet in width. For the K BPOP operable unit, the Land Use Control (LUC) objectives are to prevent contact, removal, or excavation of buried waste in the area and to preclude residential use of the area.

  12. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story June 16, 2011 - 6:05pm Addthis Tony Simon Tony Simon Rob Penney Senior Energy Engineer, WSU Energy Program How does it work? Assessments are performed by one of 26 local teams of engineering faculty and students. Assessments include a site visit where students take engineering measurements as a basis for

  13. Claire M. Fraser, 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Claire M. Fraser, 2002 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's Claire M. Fraser, 2002 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For her

  14. Extension of Chern-Simons forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konitopoulos, Spyros; Savvidy, George

    2014-06-15

    We investigate metric independent, gauge invariant, and closed forms in the generalized Yang-Mills (YM) theory. These forms are polynomial on the corresponding fields strength tensors curvature forms and are analogous to the Pontryagin-Chern densities in the YM gauge theory. The corresponding secondary characteristic classes have been expressed in integral form in analogy with the Chern-Simons form. Because they are not unique, the secondary forms can be dramatically simplified by the addition of properly chosen differentials of one-step-lower-order forms. Their gauge variation can also be found yielding the potential anomalies in the gauge field theory.

  15. Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions The WZW functional in D=4 can be derived directly from the Chern-Simons functional of a compactified D=5 gauge theory and the boundary fermions it supplants. A simple pedagogical model based on U(1) gauge groups illustrates how this works. A bulk-boundary system with the fermions eliminated manifestly

  16. Dirac matrices for Chern-Simons gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurieta, Fernando; Ramirez, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2012-10-06

    A genuine gauge theory for the Poincare, de Sitter or anti-de Sitter algebras can be constructed in (2n- 1)-dimensional spacetime by means of the Chern-Simons form, yielding a gravitational theory that differs from General Relativity but shares many of its properties, such as second order field equations for the metric. The particular form of the Lagrangian is determined by a rank n, symmetric tensor invariant under the relevant algebra. In practice, the calculation of this invariant tensor can be reduced to the computation of the trace of the symmetrized product of n Dirac Gamma matrices {Gamma}{sub ab} in 2n-dimensional spacetime. While straightforward in principle, this calculation can become extremely cumbersome in practice. For large enough n, existing computer algebra packages take an inordinate long time to produce the answer or plainly fail having used up all available memory. In this talk we show that the general formula for the trace of the symmetrized product of 2n Gamma matrices {Gamma}{sub ab} can be written as a certain sum over the integer partitions s of n, with every term being multiplied by a numerical cofficient {alpha}{sub s}. We then give a general algorithm that computes the {alpha}-coefficients as the solution of a linear system of equations generated by evaluating the general formula for different sets of tensors B{sup ab} with random numerical entries. A recurrence relation between different coefficients is shown to hold and is used in a second, 'minimal' algorithm to greatly speed up the computations. Runtime of the minimal algorithm stays below 1 min on a typical desktop computer for up to n = 25, which easily covers all foreseeable applications of the trace formula.

  17. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Authors: Hill, Christopher T. ; Zachos, Cosmas K. Publication Date: 2008-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1151584 Report Number(s): ANL-HEP-PR-08-8 arXiv eprint number arXiv:0802.1672 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal Article Research Org: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL),

  18. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    In this article we describe the relation between the Chern-Simons gauge theory partition function and the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional as the Lagrangian. We show that the partition functions obtained using these two Lagrangians agree, and we identify the semiclassical formula for the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional.

  19. Simon Teat | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Simon Teat Previous Next List Simon Teat Simon Teat Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Email: sjteat [at] lbl.gov Phone: 510-486-4457 EFRC research: Within the CGS, the Teat group is developing environmental synchrotron-based crystallography methods to study MOFs in the presence of gasses. EFRC publications: Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian-Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou,

  20. Topological fermionic string representation for Chern-Simons non-Abelian gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botelho, L.C.L. )

    1990-05-15

    We show that loop wave equations in non-Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory are exactly solved by a conformally invariant topological fermionic string theory.

  1. Cory Simon | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industrially relevant mixture of xenon and krypton. EFRC Publications Simon, Cory M.; Mercado, Rocio; Schnell, Sondre; Smit, Berend; and Haranczyk, Maciej. What Are the Best...

  2. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. II. Mapping tori of tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    We compute the semiclassical formulas for the partition functions obtained using two different Lagrangians: the Chern-Simons functional and the symplectic action functional.

  3. Wind flow in the Fraser Valley as measured by a pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, L.D.; Banta, R.M.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Vancouver, British Columbia metropolitan area, with a population close to 1.5 million people, experiences high levels of tropospheric ozone during the summer months. The transport of pollution, including tropospheric ozone, in the Vancouver area, is influenced by a local land/sea breeze circulation, the valley flows associated with the Lower Fraser River Valley to the east of the city, and the complex terrain to the north and northeast of the city. In July and August of 1993, an experiment was conducted in the Vancouver area to assess the distribution and transport of tropospheric ozone. Wind flow and aerosol measurements were obtained with a pulsed CO(sub 2) Doppler lidar and wind fields and their interactions with the complex terrain were mapped. The combination of Doppler lidar measurements of wind velocity and backscattered signal intensity, obtained simultaneously, will help identify wind flow patterns that enhanced the transport of urban pollution from the city of Vancouver to the Lower Fraser River Valley, and the possible recirculation of these pollutants back into Vancouver.

  4. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  5. Simon Teat | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; Teat, Simon J.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; and Zhou, Hong-Cai. A Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-organic...

  6. Proposed Plan for the R-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pits (643-8G, -9G, -10G) and R-Area Unknown Pits No.1, No.2, No.3 (RUNK-1, -2, -3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundy, S.

    2002-07-31

    The purpose of this proposed plan is to describe the preferred remedial alternative for the R-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pits (R BPOPs) and the R-Area Unknowns (RUNKs) operable unit (OU) and to provide for public involvement in the decision-making process.

  7. DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest.

  8. Null geodesics and shadow of a rotating black hole in extended Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarilla, Leonardo; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Giribet, Gaston

    2010-06-15

    The Chern-Simons modification to general relativity in four dimensions consists of adding to the Einstein-Hilbert term a scalar field that couples to the first-class Pontryagin density. In this theory, which has attracted considerable attention recently, the Schwarzschild metric persists as an exact solution, and this is why this model resists several observational constraints. In contrast, the spinning black hole solution of the theory is not given by the Kerr metric but by a modification of it, so far only known for slow rotation and small coupling constant. In the present paper, we show that, in this approximation, the null geodesic equation can be integrated, and this allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole. We discuss how, in addition to the angular momentum of the solution, the coupling to the Chern-Simons term deforms the shape of the shadow.

  9. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... - Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University Williford, Kenneth H. (Kenneth H. Williford) - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at ...

  10. Effect of VSR invariant Chern-Simons Lagrangian on photon polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayak, Alekha C.; Verma, Ravindra K.; Jain, Pankaj

    2015-07-21

    We propose a generalization of the Chern-Simons (CS) Lagrangian which is invariant under the SIM(2) transformations but not under the full Lorentz group. The generalized lagrangian is also invariant under a SIM(2) gauge transformation. We study the effect of such a term on radiation propagating over cosmological distances. We find that the dominant effect of this term is to produce circular polarization as radiation propagates through space. We use the circular polarization data from distant radio sources in order to impose a limit on this term.

  11. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z?0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2}?0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  12. Couplings between Chern-Simons gravities and 2p-branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskovic, Olivera; Zanelli, Jorge

    2009-08-15

    The interaction between Chern-Simons (CS) theories and localized external sources (2p-branes) is analyzed. This interaction generalizes the minimal coupling between a point charge (0-brane) and a gauge connection. The external currents that define the 2p branes are covariantly constant (D-2p-1)-forms coupled to (2p-1) CS forms. The general expression for the sources--charged with respect to the corresponding gauge algebra--is presented, focusing on two special cases: 0-branes and (D-3)-branes. In any dimension, 0-branes are constructed as topological defects produced by a surface deficit of (D-2)-sphere in anti-de Sitter space, and they are not constant curvature spaces for D>3. They correspond to dimensionally continued black holes with negative mass. On the other hand, in the case of CS (super) gravities, the (D-3)-branes are naked conical singularities (topological defects) obtained by identification of points with a Killing vector. In 2+1 dimensions, extremal spinning branes of this type are Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield states. Stable (D-3)-branes are shown to exist also in higher dimensions, as well. Classical field equations are also discussed, and in the presence of sources there is a large number of inequivalent and disconnected sectors in solution space.

  13. CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2005-09-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  14. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of ‘t Hooft’s large Nmore » expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.« less

  15. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of t Hoofts large N expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.

  16. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( ؆ · Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phasemore » of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.« less

  17. Bingham Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group owns majority Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Alliant...

  18. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for springsummer Chinook...

  19. Bingham-Caribou Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification Coordinates: 43.071647552759, -112.24770507812 Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS...

  20. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Dashtgard, Shahin (Shahin Dashtgard) - Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University Datta-Gupta, Akhil (Akhil Datta-Gupta) - ...

  1. Randy Fraser receives NNSA 2014 Security Professional of the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    honored to have the privilege of presenting these amazing individuals with the Bradley A. Peterson Federal and Contractor Security Professional of the Year Awards for...

  2. Simon Property Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2009 Link to project...

  3. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Simon White

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  4. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 2, 2015-Randy Fraser of Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    honored to have the privilege of presenting these amazing individuals with the Bradley A. Peterson Federal and Contractor Security Professional of the Year Awards for...

  5. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Bahrami, Majid (Majid Bahrami) - School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University Ban, Xuegang "Jeff" (Xuegang "Jeff" Ban) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Barkan, Christopher P.L. (Christopher P.L. Barkan) -

  6. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domain structures and mesoscopic phase transition in relaxor ferroelectrics A.L. Kholkin,1 A. N. Morozovska,2 D. A. Kiselev,1 I.K. Bdikin,1 B.J. Rodriguez,3 P. Wu,4 A.A. Bokov,5 Z.-G. Ye,5 B. Dkhil,6 L.-Q. Chen,4 M. Kosec,7 S. V. Kalinin8 1University of Aveiro, Portugal, 2National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 3University College Dublin, Ireland 4Pennsylvania State University, 5Simon Fraser University, Canada, 6Ecole Centrale Paris, 7Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia, 8Oak Ridge National

  7. Cosmology on the Beach - Simon White, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  8. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins Simon, Horst D. 59 BASIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ACIDS; CALIFORNIA; CHAINS; CHEMISTRY; DISEASES; FIBROSIS; FORECASTING; GENETICS; OPTIMIZATION; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; PROTEINS; QUEUES; SHAPE; SIMULATION PROTEIN STRUCTURE...

  9. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instead, he's continuing to challenge himself -- and finding great success -- by working ... But really, when it comes down to it, I'm putting my skills to work and love my job" ...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Horst Simon.BitstoBuidings2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... on metrics http:www.thegreengrid.orgggcontent Energy Star Program http:... From Peter Kogge, DARPA gg , Exascale Study ... and the power costs will still be ...

  11. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John Simon, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interests include development of low-cost III-V solar cells, high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells, III-V semiconductor epitaxy, and development of novel semiconductor...

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at SIRTA Haeffelin, Martial Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Chepfer, Helene IPSL LMD, France Protat, A. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Morille, Y. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Madey, Richard ; Semenov, Andrei ; Taylor, Simon ; Aghalaryan, Aram ; Crouse, Erick ... Madey, Richard ; Semenov, Andrei ; Taylor, Simon ; Aghalaryan, Aram ; Crouse, Erick ...

  14. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  15. Somerset County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Somerset County, Maine Anson, Maine Athens, Maine Bingham, Maine Brighton, Maine Cambridge, Maine Canaan, Maine Caratunk, Maine Central Somerset, Maine Cornville, Maine...

  16. Fayette County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Fayette County, Illinois Bingham, Illinois Brownstown, Illinois Farina, Illinois Ramsey, Illinois St. Elmo, Illinois St. Peter, Illinois Vandalia, Illinois Retrieved from...

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Remarkable Encomium for WorldWideScience.org by Kristin Bingham on Fri, Feb 26, 2010 ... databases simultaneously and freely access high quality, authoritative information ...

  18. Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt061_ti_bingham_2011

  19. About the Deputy Director: Short Scientific Biography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon Horst Simon is an internationally recognized expert in computer science and applied mathematics and the Deputy Director of Lawrence Berkeley...

  20. Experimental Characterization | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Characterization Previous Next List CraigBrown Craig Brown Jeff Kortright Jeffrey Kortright Queen Wendy Queen HewlittAugust2013 Jeffrey Reimer Simon Teat Simon Teat...

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y., Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Mtorologie Dynamique, Palaiseau, France (a), University of California at Santa Barbara, USA (b) Institut Pierre Simon...

  2. ALSNews Vol. 294

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to thank our outgoing members for their service and their involvement: Elke Arenholz, Tony van Buuren (past chair), Alessandra Lanzara, and Simon Morton. Simon, however, will...

  3. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simon (Simon Allen) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Allen, Stewart (Stewart Allen) - Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology ...

  4. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Simon (Simon Allen) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Allen, Stewart (Stewart Allen) - Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology ...

  5. Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    phenomena. Authors Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs and D. Wilson Published Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, 1987 Report...

  6. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    R. Dickerson, D. Etheridge, J. Feichter, P. Fraser, R. Friedl, J. Fuglestvedt, M. Gauss, L. Grenfell, A. Grbler, N. Harris, D. Hauglustaine, L. Horowitz, C. Jackman, D....

  7. A 200 kyr Pleistocene Lacustrine Record from the Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetism and Paleomagnetism Authors Linda Donohoo-Hurley, John W. Geissman, Peter J. Fawcett, Tim Wawrzyniec and Fraser E. Goff Conference New Mexico Geological Society...

  8. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extending to the AET-4 well near Jemez Springs. References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser E. Goff, Dan Miles, Al Waibel, Chandler Swanberg (1988) Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature...

  9. Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sheets, yet have thus far been largely undocumented. Authors Lisa Shevenell and Fraser Goff Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1995 DOI Not Provided...

  10. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extending to the AET-4 well near Jemez Springs. References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser E. Goff, Dan Miles, Al Waibel, Chandler Swanberg (1988) Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature...

  11. Geochemical Data for 95 Thermal and Nonthermal Waters of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Tamsin McCormick, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale A. Counce and Charles O. Grigsby Published...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    material to write exploration activity summary. References Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sammy Garcia, Roland C. Hagan (1986) Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations...

  13. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    through the isotopically lighter volcanic rocks of the caldera fill. Authors Fraser Goff, Harold A. Wollenberg, D. C. Brookins and Ronald W. Kistler Published Journal Journal...

  14. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and geologic deposits are indicated on the map. (MHR) Cartographers Fraser E. Goff and J. N. Gardner Published Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, 1980 DOI Not Provided...

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not controlled by mineral equilibrium. References Art F White, Nancy J Chuma, Fraser E. Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal...

  16. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal...

  17. Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the southern and western Valles caldera region. Authors Lisa Shevenell, Fraser E. Goff, Dan Miles, Al Waibel and Chandler Swanberg Published Los Alamos National Laboratory,...

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not controlled by mineral equilibrium. References Art F White, Nancy J Chuma, Fraser E. Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal...

  19. Geologic Map of the Valles Caldera | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    new geochronologic data and recent refinements to nomenclature. Cartographers Fraser E. Goff, Jamie N. Gardner, Steven L. Reneau, Shari A. Kelley, Kirt A. Kempter and John R....

  20. ESR Dating of Quartz Phenocrysts in the El Cajete and Battleship...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    obtaining ages of units in other Quaternary volcanic areas. Authors Shin Toyoda, Fraser Goff, Sumiko Ikeda and Motoji Ikeya Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal...

  1. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not controlled by mineral equilibrium. References Art F White, Nancy J Chuma, Fraser E. Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal...

  2. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have occurred in the volcanic fields history. Authors Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sammy Garcia and Roland C. Hagan Published Journal Journal of Geophysical Research,...

  3. Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not controlled by mineral equilibrium. References Art F White, Nancy J Chuma, Fraser E. Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal...

  4. Fluid Inclusion Evidence for Rapid Formation of the Vapor-Dominated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geohydrology and not just from simple boiling. Authors Masakatsu Sasada and Fraser E. Goff Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1995 DOI Not Provided...

  5. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the hydrothermal outflow plume issuing from the western margin of the Valles caldera (Goff et al., 1988). References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser E. Goff, Dan Miles, Al Waibel,...

  6. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors John A. Musgrave, Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Patricio E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Gary Luedemann, Sammy Garcia,...

  7. 2013 Workshops

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    Can Diffuse X-Ray Scattering Reveal Protein Dynamics? Nicholas Sauter, Paul Adams (PBD-LBNL), James Fraser (UCSF), and Michael Wall (LANL) Location: 15-300* (Wednesday...

  8. Proposal Study Panels

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    2014, are Jeff Abramson, University of California, Los Angeles Greg Bowman, Johns Hopkins University Russ Doolittle, University of California, San Diego James Fraser,...

  9. CX-003235: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adolfson-Feleding Property (Lavaside Property) PurchaseCX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 07/22/2010Location(s): Bingham County, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. Ethanol 2000 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol 2000 Place: Bingham lake, Minnesota Zip: 56118 Product: Farmer-owned bioethanol producer References: Ethanol 20001 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I020-2012-0017-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX CX at Bingham-Caribou Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration CX for...

  12. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    M. NA Weber, Sally A. NA Becker, Melanie NE Morgan, Kelly NE Lyles, Monica D. OE Moore, Sharon M. OR Bingham, Kristin L. SC Nance, Deborah L SC Oyler, Dean E. SC Mayes,...

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Technology Developed by DOE Wins NIH Challenge by Kristin Bingham 23 Nov, 2011 in Science Communications NLM Plus WebLib, a start-up company which won a Department of Energy ...

  14. Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon tiarravt061_bingham_2010

  15. Experimental Characterization | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean

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    Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Experimental Characterization Previous Next List CraigBrown Craig Brown Jeff Kortright Jeffrey Kortright Queen Wendy Queen HewlittAugust2013 Jeffrey Reimer Simon Teat Simon Teat

  16. Selected Recent Publications and Presentations

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    Tim Mattson, Alice Koniges, Simon McIntosh-Smith, Portable Programs for Heterogeneous ... Tim Mattson, Alice Koniges, Simon McIntosh-Smith, OpenCL: A Hands-on Introduction, SC14 ...

  17. Indiana's 5th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

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    Alliance Indianapolis Power Light National Renewables Cooperative Organization NRCO Simon Property Group Utility Companies in Indiana's 5th congressional district...

  18. Deputy-Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deputy-Director Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board Directorate Staff Org Chart ⇒ Navigate Section Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board Directorate Staff Org Chart Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon horst-simon Horst Simon is an internationally recognized expert in computer science and applied mathematics and the Deputy Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Simon joined Berkeley Lab in early 1996 as director of the newly

  19. Pressure Temperature Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  20. Neutron Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  1. Self Potential At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  2. Caliper Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  3. Gamma Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  4. Resistivity Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico (VC-1) Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico...

  5. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, New Mexico Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico John...

  6. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Dennis L. Nielson, M. Lemieux, P. Snow, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave and J. Moore Conference IAVCEI General Assembly; Santa Fe, NM; 06251989...

  7. Scientific Drilling at Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones are apparently separated by a region of tightly sealed rock. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Dennis L. Nielson, Jamie N. Gardner, Jeffrey B. Hulen, Peter Lysne, Lisa Shevenell and...

  8. Cooling History of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico Using ESR Dating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the above ages. Authors K. Ogoh, Shin Toyoda, Sumiko Ikeda, Motoji Ikeya and Fraser E. Goff Published Journal Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 1993 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  9. Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 36Cl- as a tracer isotope in geothermal systems. References F.M. Phillips, Fraser E. Goff, Francois D. Vuataz, H.W. Bentley, H.E. Gove (1984) 36Cl as a tracer in geothermal...

  10. Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanics are < 100,000 years. Authors Usha Rao, U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng and Fraser E. Goff Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1996 DOI Not Provided...

  11. Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    m of tuff were cut by the ancestral Jemez River in 105 yr or less. Authors Fraser E. Goff and Lisa Shevenell Published Journal Geological Society of America Bulletin, 1987 DOI...

  12. Isotope Geochemistry of Thermal and Nonthermal Waters in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    above the magmatic heat source of the caldera. Authors Francois D. Vuataz and Fraser E. Goff Published Journal Journal of Geophysical Research, 1986 DOI 10.1029JB091iB02p01835...

  13. 36Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the use of chlorine-36 as a geothermal tracer. Authors F.M. Phillips, Fraser E. Goff, Francois D. Vuataz, H.W. Bentley and H.E. Gove Published Journal Geophysical Research...

  14. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that they can be as old as 106 years and display episodic behavior. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Jamie N. Gardner, Francois D. Vuataz and Charles O. Grigsby Published...

  15. LBL-25807

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 1. J.S. Fraser et al., "Photocathodes in Accelerator Applications," Proc. 19S7 IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference, IEEE Cat. No. S7CH.2387- 9, 1705 (March, 1987). 2. K . T . ...

  16. O:ELECTRICFRASERPP-11-2.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order No. 12038 on October 1, 1977. PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT FRASER PAPERS INC. ORDER NO. PP-11-2 I. BACKGROUND The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has...

  17. MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test of Wave Energy Technologies Moored Floating WET EnGen: Regular and Irregular Waves. TR-2009-13, Fraser Winsor and Emile Baddour, June 2009. Date Submitted 1082010 << Return...

  18. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda This page may be updated as needed - please check back. Agenda Click here for pdf Monday, April 29 Workshop Registration: 1700-1900 (Main level, near Tewa Bay 1 Meeting Room) Christy Archuleta Pam Valdez Randy Fraser Dan Beach Tuesday, April 30 Welcome: 0700-0800 (Tewa Bay 1 Meeting Room) Charlie McMillan Juan Griego Introduction Mike Lansing Mike Duvall NMSSUP Phase II Project Overview Mike Lansing Ty Troutman Transition / Readiness Verification: Goals and Objectives Randy Fraser

  19. Video: Recovery Act by the Numbers | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act by the Numbers Video: Recovery Act by the Numbers February 17, 2016 - 11:30am Addthis Watch this video to learn how the Recovery Act helped jumpstart America's clean energy economy. | Video by Simon Edelman and graphics by Carly Wilkins, Energy Department. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Simon Edelman Simon Edelman Chief Creative Officer Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer MORE ON THE RECOVERY ACT MAP: Learn about the impact

  20. Watch Energy Highlights from the 2016 State of the Union | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2016 State of the Union Watch Energy Highlights from the 2016 State of the Union January 13, 2016 - 3:19pm Addthis Watch the Energy highlights from President Obama's final State of the Union delivered January 12, 2016. | Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. Simon Edelman Simon Edelman Chief Creative Officer Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs From climate change to wind and solar power to electric vehicles, President Obama touched

  1. Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois April 1, 2011 EA-1795: Final Environmental...

  2. Nanoscale coherent intergrowths in a crystal ofLa?.?Ca?...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 ; Tranquada, John M. 1 ; Billinge, Simon J. L. 2 + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL),...

  3. Search for: kondo effect | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Interferometers Dias Da Silva, Luis G ; Sandler, Nancy ; Simon, Pascal ; ... K. ; Bauer, E. D. ; Ronning, F. ; Thompson, J. D. ; De Souza, N. R. ; et al We ...

  4. Sudip Dosanjh: Select Publications

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    of International Conference on Parallel Programming - ParCo 2013, ( March 26, 2014) 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux,...

  5. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES FORUM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Director, Energy Accounts 14 Craig, Jack R. Savannah River Site Site Manager 15 Daniel, Anamary Inspection Experts, Inc. Vice President 16 DeSimone, Michael SCI...

  6. Underground and Ventilation System

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    on NMED environmental monitoring - Dr. Martin Simon * Audience Questions * In house * Internet * Closing Comments - Joe Franco 2 UPDATE ON CBFO AND WIPP ACTIVITIES Joe Franco, CBFO...

  7. Colorado State University Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Colorado State University Address Daryl B. Simons Building, Engineering Research Center, 1320 Campus...

  8. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  9. Indiana's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indianapolis Power Light Megawatt Energy Systems Simon Property Group Solarvest BioEnergy Utility Companies in Indiana's 4th congressional district Indianapolis Power & Light...

  10. S.Van der Meer tribute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Plusieurs intervenants rendent hommage à Simon Van der Meer né en 1925 à La Haye NL et prix nobel de physique en 1984

  11. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Public Meeting Agenda - Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simon, Chair, Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board 8:20 am Meeting Overview * Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 am EM Program Update * Mark Whitney, Acting Assistant...

  12. Underground and Ventilation System

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    Results - Dr. Martin Simon & Susan Lucas Kamat * Closing Comments - Joe Franco * Audience Questions * One question at a time please OVERVIEW OF RECOVERY ACTIVITIES Joe...

  13. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Battistelli, Elia S. ; Bond, J.Richard ; Brown, Ben ; Burger, Bryce ; Chervenak, Jay ; Das, Sudeep ; Devlin, Mark J. ; Dicker, Simon R. ; Doriese, W.Bertrand ; Dunkley,...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ThesisDissertation ... ; Goodman, Simon L. ; Arnaout, M. Amin ; Merck) ; Harvard-Med) November 2015 Death Domain ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Universal solvent restructuring induced by colloidal nanoparticles Zobel, Mirijam ; Neder, Reinhard B. ; Kimber, Simon A.J. ; ESRF) January 2015 Room-temperature sol-gel synthesis ...

  16. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted...

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    other evolving group. less Authors: Hruschka, Daniel J. 1 ; Branford, Simon 2 ; Smith, Eric D. 3 ; Wilkins, Jon 4 ; Meade, Andrew 2 ; Pagel, Mark 5 ; Bhattacharya,...

  17. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pete Osborne, Dave Adler, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts, Jim Ethridge Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah River Harold Simon ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lax, Simon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis...

  19. Working with NREL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Siemens Solar Simon Property Group Sinton Consulting Inc SkyFuel Inc Skyline Solar SmartDwell Solar Systems Solarex Solargenix Energy Solarmer Energy Solasta Solexel...

  20. What Are the Best Materials to Separate a Xenon/Krypton Mixture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Best Materials to Separate a XenonKrypton Mixture? Previous Next List Simon, Cory M.; Mercado, Rocio; Schnell, Sondre; Smit, Berend; and Haranczyk, Maciej. What Are the Best...

  1. Notes and Action Items

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    Rick Kendall, Tom Kitchens, Horst Simon SubCommittee on Visualization and Graphics Software Responsibility: JN Leboeuf, Judy Giarrusso, Steve Jardin, and Steve Lau Actions:...

  2. SSRL HEADLINES June 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Russ Chianelli (UTEP), the panel included Franz Himpsel (Univ. of Wisconsin), Bennett Larson (ORNL), Simon Mochrie (Yale Univ.), Cyrus Safinya (UCSB), Sarah Tolbert (UCLA) and Don...

  3. NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations

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    ... in the experimental hall furthest from the reactors. ... In-Advance Computing for Fast Scientific Discovery", ... Herczeg Simon, Variable Sodium Absorption in a ...

  4. Thermal Conductivity in Nanocrystalline Ceria Thin Films (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Marat Khafizov ; In-Wook Park ; Aleksandr Chernatynskiy ; Lingfeng He ; Jianliang Lin ; John J. Moore ; David Swank ; Thomas Lillo ; Simon R. Phillpot ; Anter El-Azab ; ...

  5. Harmonizing Technological Innovation and End-of-Life Strategy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mangold & R. Simon 2015 Pearson Economics 2013 7 Launch Growth Maturity Decline Time Revenue Product Life Span Technology Pulse Estimated U.S. consumer electronic sales 1980 to...

  6. Berkeley Lab Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program

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    At the 2015 ACME summit: From left, Horst Simon (LBNL), Trish Damkroger (LLNL), John Turner (ORNL), Peg Folta (LLNL), David Skinner (LBNL), Dona Crawford (LLNL), Jeff Roberts...

  7. Nanoscale coherent intergrowthlike defects in a crystal ofLa1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 ; Shi, Xiaoya 1 ; Li, Qiang 1 ; Zhong, Ruidan 1 ; Schneeloch, John A. 1 ; Gu, Genda 1 ; Tranquada, John M. 1 ; Billinge, Simon J. L. 2 + Show Author...

  8. mom_sc99

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    between NERSC and GFDL R. Pacanowski, V. Balaji, S. Griffles, J. Shelton, B. Ross Geophyisical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory R.K Owen, H. Anand, S. Luzmoor, H. Simon...

  9. January 28, 2015 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory Simon (Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, UC Berkeley) Screening the Nanoporous Materials Genome for XenonKrypton Separations using Machine Learning...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - TWPICE_SAlexander.ppt

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    with Radiosondes Preliminary Results Simon Alexander & Toshitaka Tsuda Kyoto University Japan Radiosonde Launch Sites * Radiosondes launched every three hours except Darwin (six...

  11. Miguel I. Gonzalez | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

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    Miguel I.; Lee, Jason S.; Gygi, David; Howe, Joshua D.; Lee, Kyuho; Darwish, Tamim A.; Michael, James; Peterson, Vanessa K; Teat, Simon J.; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B.;...

  12. Presentations

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    Horst Simon | Scheduled for Monday, November 18, 2002 at the Marriot Inner Harbor Hotel West Ballroom, in Baltimore, Maryland. The meeting will coincide with SC2002, the...

  13. OrgChart-151218a.pptx

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    of WI Simone Raugei, PNNL Governance Board Doug Ray, PNNL Bruce Garrett, PNNL Michael Thompson, PNNL Morris Bullock, Director Aaron Appel, Deputy Director Center for Molecular...

  14. UNIRIB Publications: 2006 Bibliography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C.R. Bingham, I.G. Draby, G. Drafta, C. Goodin, C.J. Gross, J.H. Hamilton, A.A. Hecht, J.K. Hwang, D.T. Joss, A. Krogul, W. Krolas, K. Lagergran, K. Li, M.N. Tantawy, J....

  15. Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System | NREL Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System In this video, NREL researchers Gary Jorgenson and Carl Bingham discuss the NREL-developed, ultra-accelerated weathering system and its ability to revolutionize the weathering industry

  16. Potential Hydraulic Modelling Errors Associated with Rheological Data Extrapolation in Laminar Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadday, Martin A., Jr.

    1997-03-20

    The potential errors associated with the modelling of flows of non-Newtonian slurries through pipes, due to inadequate rheological models and extrapolation outside of the ranges of data bases, are demonstrated. The behaviors of both dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids with yield stresses, and the errors associated with treating them as Bingham plastics, are investigated.

  17. Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt061_ti_bingham_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program

  18. Presidential Permits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presidential Permits Presidential Permits Below is a listing of all the presidential permits grouped by Canada and Mexico. View the Presidental Permits - Mexico View the Presidential Permits - Canada PRESIDENTIAL PERMITS - CANADA BACK TO TOP Docket No. Company Date Issued PP-6 Puget Sound Energy 04/28/81 PP-10 BPA 10/27/45 PP-10-1 BPA 11/30/65 PP-11-2 Fraser Papers 02/29/99 PP-11 Fraser Papers (Rescinded in PP-366) 11/18/10 PP-12 Maine 12/05/63 PP-13 NiMo Hogansburg 01/31/48 PP-18 Glacier

  19. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-04-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water.

  20. Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography Authors: Bingham, Philip R [1] ; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [1] ; Datskos, Panos G [1] ; Graham, David E [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1240578 DOE Contract Number: AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Electronic Imaging, San Francisco, CA, USA, 20160214, 20160214

  1. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond World digial Library Topic World Wide Information: The Other Side of the Coin by Kristin Bingham 29 Mar, 2011 in Products and Content Much has been written in this blog about WorldWideScience.org. As regular readers well know, it is a global gateway to scientific and technical databases conceived, developed, and operated by the US Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Related Topics: Enrico Fermi,

  2. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond history of science Topic World Wide Information: The Other Side of the Coin by Kristin Bingham 29 Mar, 2011 in Products and Content Much has been written in this blog about WorldWideScience.org. As regular readers well know, it is a global gateway to scientific and technical databases conceived, developed, and operated by the US Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Related Topics: Enrico Fermi,

  3. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond NLMplus Topic Search Technology Developed by DOE Wins NIH Challenge by Kristin Bingham 23 Nov, 2011 in Science Communications NLM Plus WebLib, a start-up company which won a Department of Energy (DOE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, managed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), has just won a celebrated Challenge.gov contest using technology developed for DOE. Related Topics: apps, DOE Green

  4. Development of a Solar-Thermal ZnO/Zn Water-Splitting Thermochemical Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of a Solar-thermal ZnO/Zn Water-splitting Thermochemical Cycle Final Report (DE-PS36-03GO93007 - Subcontract RF-05-SHGR-006) Alan W. Weimer (PI), Christopher Perkins, Paul Lichty, Hans Funke, Jeremy Zartman, and David Hirsch Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0424 Carl Bingham and Allan Lewandowski National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401-3393 Sophia Haussener and Aldo Steinfeld Department of

  5. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  6. NREL: Technology Transfer - Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System In this video, NREL researchers Gary Jorgenson and Carl Bingham discuss the NREL-developed ultra accelerated weathering system and its ability to revolutionize the weathering industry. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Credit: Fireside Production Learn more about the Ultra Accelerated Weathering System

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chupadera_FUSRAP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    New Mexico Chupadera Mesa, New Mexico, Site FUSRAP Site Chupadera Mesa Map Background-The Chupadera Mesa, New Mexico, Site was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) operations. History-The Chupadera Mesa Site is privately owned land northeast of the White Sands Missile Range and the city of Bingham

  8. EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Preliminary Environmental Assessment EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to fund the modification of an existing IDFG trout hatchery near Springfield, Idaho, to provide a facility that would be capable of rearing up to 1 million Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles. Modifications would include demolishing several existing structures,

  9. I I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... J. W. Nunziato, 5511 F. G. Blottner, 5512 R. H. Nilson, 5512 T. B. Lane, 5520 W. Herrrnann, 5530 R. A. LaFarge, 5631 G. J. SImons, 5640 R. J. Thompson, 5641 L. F. Shampine, 5642 . ...

  10. Inspiration of Music | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inspiration of Music Inspiration of Music November 8, 2011 - 5:34am Addthis Ernie Tucker Editor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory As Paul Simon began singing "Here Comes the...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Sean M. (1) Gilbert, Jack A. (1) Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad T. (1) Lax, Simon (1) Smith, Daniel (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have...

  12. Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Authors: Sitt, Simon ; Ecole Polytechnique Publication Date:...

  13. NUG 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9:15 Opening Remarks Horst Simon 9:30 Performance Evaluation Activites at NERSC Adrian Wong 10:00 Seaborg Code Scalability Project Richard Gerber 10:30 Green's function Monte...

  14. 2011 User Meeting Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nobumichi Tamura , Simon Teat (LBNL), and Oliver Tschauner (UNLV) 80-234* (Tues.) Soft X-Ray Characterization of Organic Devices and Energy Materials Harald Ade (NCSU) and Dean...

  15. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Berkeley Center for Structural Biology Office phone: (510) 495-2594 Cell: (510) 813-4148 fax: (510) 486-5664 Simon Morton...

  16. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-C. Dupont, M. Haeffelin Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace, Ecole Polytechnique, France The authors would like to thank the Office National d'Etudes et de Recherche en...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jeon, Sangyong (39) Gale, Charles (19) Schenke, Bjrn (7) Moore, Guy D. (5) Venugopalan, ... to QCD Huot, Simon C. ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Moore, Guy D. We compute the shear viscosity of ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Schenke, Bjoern (5) Turbide, Simon (5) Heinz, Ulrich (4) Majumder, Abhijit (4) Paquet, Jean-Franois (4) Moore, Guy D. (3) Young, Clint (3) Bass, Steffen A. (2) Bourque, Alex (2) ...

  19. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSF Sep 17 Yes Richard Saykally Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley OSF Sep 17-20 No John Shalf LBNL OSF Sep 17 No Horst Simon LBNL OSF Sep 17 Yes David Skinner LBLNERSC OSF...

  20. ALSNews Vol. 341

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology, Simon Morton has been a member of the Physical Biosciences Division, but he is now transitioning to work 60% time for the ALS....

  1. Presentation: QER Energy Topics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on QER Energy Topics (Energy Flows, Water Flows, and Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) prepared by: A.J. Simon, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  2. Summer interns present research findings in poster session | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Summer interns present research findings in poster session By Raphael Rosen August 31, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook New Jersey Assemblywoman Donna Simon Talks With SULI Intern Cara Bagley (Photo by Elle Starkman) New Jersey Assemblywoman Donna Simon Talks With SULI Intern Cara Bagley Gallery: Physicist Charles Skinner and Intern Amanda Lewis (Photo by Elle Starkman) Physicist Charles Skinner and Intern Amanda Lewis Interns Matthew Lotocki, Zack

  3. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the

  4. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transmission, Distribution and Plants -- Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy R S T U V W X Y Z Quan, Xiaowei (Xiaowei Quan) - NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center, University of Colorado at Boulder Quartly, Graham (Graham Quartly) - National Oceanography Centre Southampton Queenborough, Simon A. (Simon A. Queenborough) - National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis,

  5. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Research Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Team Morris Bullock Morris Bullock Director Aaron Appel Aaron Appel Deputy Director Dan DuBois Dan DuBois Scientific Advisor Monte L. Helm Monte L. Helm Mike Mock Mike Mock Molly O'Hagan Molly O'Hagan Simone Raugei Simone Raugei Eric Wiedner Eric Wiedner Collaborators Sharon Hammes-Schiffer Sharon Hammes-Schiffer University of Illinois Jim Mayer Jim Mayer Yale University Shannon Stahl Shannon Stahl University of Wisconsin - Madison Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis Home Scientific

  6. Human Resources at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Careers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Main contacts in Human Resources for recruitment and hiring: Jennifer Brizel Recruitment & Staffing Group Leader 925-422-9388 brizel1@llnl.gov Teri Kobayashi Senior Staffing Specialist 925-422-9050 kobayashi3@llnl.gov Daphne Simons Recruitment and Staffing Coordinator 925-422-7511 simons3@llnl.gov Careers

  7. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of NERSC Address Horst Simon Director, NERSC Division Bill Kramer Director, High Performance Computing Department NERSC Accomplishments in 1996 Horst Simon - 1/28/97 http://www.nersc.gov/research/whitepaper/whitepaper.html NERSC Mission Statement Provide reliable, high quality, state of the art computing resources and client support in a timely manner-- independent of client location--while wisely advancing the state of computational and computer science. Major Milestones Feb 96 Four NERSC

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yi Liu Liu Staff Scientist, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis YLiu@lbl.gov 510.486.6287 personal website Biography Yi Liu is a Staff Scientist in the Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Facility. He obtained a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2004 from the University of California, Los Angeles under the direction of Sir. J. Fraser Stoddart. After his postdoctoral research with Professor K. Barry Sharpless at the Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, he joined the Foundry in 2006 as an independent

  9. PP-118 Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc PP-118 Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc Presidential permit authorizing Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-118 Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc More Documents & Publications EA-118 Hill County Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-11-2 Fraser Papers Inc PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company

  10. Carbon Cycling Dynamics in Response to Pine Beetle Infection and Climate Variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monson, Russell K.

    2015-01-26

    We originally proposed to study and discover the changes that have occurred in soil carbon pools, as a result of tree mortality due to beetle infection, and the ease by which those pools release CO2 to the atmosphere in mountain forests in the Western US. We studied forest plots at two sites the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site and the Fraser Experimental Forest site, both in Colorado.

  11. UNIRIB Publications: 2009 Bibliography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Bibliography These citations provide bibliographical information about articles published by University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium staff in 2009. Stewardship publications Nuclear Structure Studies with Radioactive Ion Beams in the Mass A=80 Region, A. Galindo-Uribarri, E. Padilla-Rodal, J.C. Batchelder, J.R. Beene, C. Bingham, K.B. Lagergren, P.E. Mueller, D.C. Radford, D.W. Stracener, J.P. Urrego-Blanco, R.L. Varner, and C.-H. Yu, presented at the 20th International Conference

  12. Rheology of petroleum coke-water slurry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, M.; Mall, B.K.; Mukherjee, A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper reports the results of the studies carried out on the optimization of particle size distribution, the theological characteristics and stability of highly loaded petroleum coke-water slurry using three additives. The solids loading achieved in the slurries were in the range of 65% to 75.6% depending on the additives used. Slurry viscosity varied between 267 to 424 mPas at 128 s{sup -1} shear rate. The petroleum coke-water slurries exhibited pseudoplastic characteristics with yield tending towards Bingham plastic as the solids loading progressively increased.

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond contribution to international discovery: WorldWideScience.org by Kristin Bingham on Thu, Apr 3, 2008 On June 22, 2007, OSTI opened WorldWideScience.org, a global science gateway, to the public. WorldWideScience.org was an ambitious undertaking and OSTI was the perfect organization to take on the technical, administrative, and organizational challenges to take a powerful idea and bring it to fruition. WorldWideScience.org is a

  14. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Search Technology Developed by DOE Wins NIH Challenge by Kristin Bingham on Wed, Nov 23, 2011 NLM Plus WebLib, a start-up company which won a Department of Energy (DOE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, managed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), has just won a celebrated Challenge.gov contest using technology developed for DOE. To start from the beginning, a DOE Small Business Innovation

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond dod Topic Impact of Basic Research on Innovation by Kristin Bingham 01 Jun, 2009 in Personal Perspectives The development of MP3 technologies illustrates the unexpected benefits of basic research. In 1965, a hand-sized storage and playback device that would hold 15,000 recorded songs was the stuff of science fiction. Even simple hand-held calculators were rare and expensive at that time. Related Topics: dod, doe, nih, nist, nsf,

  16. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond nsf Topic Impact of Basic Research on Innovation by Kristin Bingham 01 Jun, 2009 in Personal Perspectives The development of MP3 technologies illustrates the unexpected benefits of basic research. In 1965, a hand-sized storage and playback device that would hold 15,000 recorded songs was the stuff of science fiction. Even simple hand-held calculators were rare and expensive at that time. Related Topics: dod, doe, nih, nist, nsf,

  17. Technical Session II Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    II Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session II Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Detector R&D at LBNL (Denes) .pdf file (6.2MB) GaAs Detector (Durbin) .pdf file (450KB) Advanced Neutron Detectors (Smith) .pdf file (818KB) Neutron Imaging System (Bingham) .pdf file (1.1MB)

  18. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond on Innovation by Kristin Bingham on Mon, Jun 1, 2009 The development of MP3 technologies illustrates the unexpected benefits of basic research. In 1965, a hand-sized storage and playback device that would hold 15,000 recorded songs was the stuff of science fiction. Even simple hand-held calculators were rare and expensive at that time. Research funded by the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, the National

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Naming the First World Wide Science Gateway by Kristin Bingham on Fri, Nov 16, 2007 In 2005, the idea of creating a global science gateway for the web was conceived at OSTI. It would make the best collections of scientific information from nations around the world act as if they were a single enormous collection. It would be searchable via a single query, and it would be available at no cost to anyone anywhere with web access. In the

  20. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2002-10-08

    In this report, the thrust areas include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Chupadera Mesa, NM Alternate Name(s): None Location: Approximately 28 miles northeast of the Trinity nuclear test site on the White Sands Missile Range, Northeast of Bingham, New Mexico NM.04-5 Historical Operations: Received the deposition of longer-lived radionuclides in the fallout from the nuclear test, primarily cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-239, cobalt-60, and europium-155. NM.04-2 NM.04-5 Eligibility Determination: No further

  2. Absence of higher order corrections to the non-Abelian topological mass term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, F. T.; Das, Ashok; Frenkel, J.

    2001-04-15

    We study the Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory systematically in an effort to generalize the Coleman-Hill result to the non-Abelian case. We show that, while the Chern-Simons coefficient is in general gauge dependent in a non-Abelian theory, it takes on a physical meaning in the axial gauge. Using the non-Abelian Ward identities as well as the analyticity of the amplitudes in the momentum variables, we show that, in the axial gauge, the Chern-Simons coefficient does not receive any quantum correction beyond one loop. This allows us to deduce that the ratio 4{pi}m/g{sup 2} is unrenormalized, in a non-Abelian theory, beyond one loop in any infrared safe gauge. This is the appropriate generalization of the Coleman-Hill result to non-Abelian theories. Various other interesting properties of the theory are also discussed.

  3. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  4. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda Energy Research Scientific Computing Users Group (ERSUG) Schedule April 6, 1998 Monday April 6, 1998 Berkeley Lab - Perseverance Hall Time Scheduled Event Speaker / Session Leader 08:00 Continental Breakfast 08:30 Welcome Ricky Kendall 08:35 View From Washington Tom Kitchens 08:55 New NERSC Staff Introductions Horst Simon 09:00 NERSC Research Efforts (Leverage to the NERSC Program) Horst Simon 09:30 Strategic Computing Initiative Bill McCurdy 10:00 ERCAP Changes Tom Kitchens 10:20

  5. Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal-Organic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Jeremiah J. Gassensmith, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Ronald A. Smaldone, Ross S. Forgan, Youssry Y. Botros, Omar M. Yaghi, and J. Fraser Stoddart, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133 (39), pp 15312-15315 DOI: 10.1021/ja206525x Abstract Image Abstract: The efficient capture and storage of gaseous CO2 is a pressing

  6. Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List William Morris, Boris Volosskiy, Selcuk Demir, Felipe Gándara, Psaras L. McGrier, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Duilio Cascio, J. Fraser Stoddart, and Omar M. Yaghi, Inorg. Chem., 2012, 51 (12), pp 6443-6445 DOI: 10.1021/ic300825s Abstract Image Abstract: Three new metal-organic

  7. Summer 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3158 H H D ow Simon H uang ( Goldman g roup) June 15 1:30pm 3158 H H D ow Jimmy Chen (Phillips g roup) July 6 1:30pm 3158 H H D ow Sung J oo K im ( Pan g roup) July 20 1:30pm 3150...

  8. August 28, 2013 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome August 28, 2013 Previous Next List Joseph Chen (Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Eng., UC Berkeley) NMR Relaxometry of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Rapid Surface Area Screening Cory Simon (Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Eng., UC Berkeley) Insights for Optimizing Materials for Methane Storage

  9. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Samtaney PPPL, Princeton University OSF Oct. 2-3 Yes Yukiko Sekine DOE OSF Oct. 2-3 No John Shalf NERSC OSF Oct. 2-3 No Horst Simon LBNL OSF Oct. 2-3 Yes David Skinner NERSC OSF...

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.

    2011-08-04

    In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by the Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work discussed in this report (Phase III) address the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. The objective of the demonstrations performed in Phase III was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using 1/22{sup nd} scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative. The batch transfers were made by pumping the simulants from the Mixing Demonstration Tank (MDT) to six Receipt Tanks (RTs), and the consistency in the amount of seed particles in each batch was compared. Tests were conducted with non-Newtonian cohesive simulants with Bingham yield stress ranging from 0.3 Pa to 7 Pa. Kaolin clay and 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles were used for all the non-Newtonian simulants. To specifically determine the role of the yield stress on mixing and batch transfer, tests were conducted with a Newtonian mixture of glycerol and water with at viscosity of 6.2 cP that was selected to match the Bingham consistency (high shear rate viscosity) of the higher yield stress kaolin slurries. The water/glycerol mixtures used the same 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles. For the transfer demonstrations in Phase III, the mixer jet pumps were operated either at 10.0 gpm (28 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.63 ft{sup 2}/s) or 8.0 gpm (22.4 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.504 ft{sup 2}/s). All batch transfers from the MDT to the RTs were made at 0.58 gpm (MDT suction velocity 3.95 ft/s). The demonstrations that used simulants that ranged from 1.6 Pa to 7 Pa yield stress had the most successful batch transfer of solids to the RTs in terms of the total quantity of seed particles transferred. Testing suggest that when mixing water/seed particles and transferring, water provides the least desired batch transfer of solids based on the total quantity transferred. For the water tests, large dead zones of solids formed in the MDT and fewer solids get transferred to the RTs. For simulants with a yield stress of 0.3 Pa and below, the batch transfer behavior in terms of total transfer of seed particles was slightly higher than water test results. The testing did show somewhat more batch-to-batch variation in the transfer of seed particles with the slurries in comparison to water. A comparison of batch transfers with the kaolin slurries that had Bingham consistencies (viscosities) that wernearly the same as the Newtonian glycerol/water mixtures showed that the kaolin slurries with Bingham yield stresses of 1.6 and 7 Pa gave better batch transfer of seed particles based on the total quantities transferred. Overall, the batch transfer testing results show that testing with water is conservative, since using a simulant with a yield stress and/or elevated viscosity always resulted in a better total transfer of solids.

  11. Rheology of petroleum coke-water slurry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, M.; Mall, B.K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, S.K.; Verma, S.K.; Narasimhan, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the studies carried out on the optimization of particle size distribution, the rheological characteristics and stability of highly loaded petroleum coke-water slurry using three additives. The solids loading achieved in the slurries were in the range of 65% to 75.6% depending on the additives used. Slurry viscosity varied between 267 to 424 mPas at 128 s{sup {minus}} shear rate. The petroleum coke-water slurries exhibited pseudoplastic characteristics with yield tending towards Bingham plastic as the solids loading progressively increased. The effect of addition of petroleum coke to the extent of 25% in coal-water slurry prepared from low ash Ledo coal of Makum field in Assam was also examined. The slurry containing coal-petroleum coke blend showed better stability, having shelf life of 7 days as compared to 5 days in the case of petroleum coke-water slurry.

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters were essentially the same for the salt grout without admixture. When Daratard 17 was added, the Bingham Plastic yield stress increased for the 10 minute mix. The simulant salt used in this task had similar physical properties of the Tank 50 3Q13 salt grout and is recommended for future use, if the salt solution in Tank 50 does not change. The design basis physical properties used to size the pumps and mixers at SPF were obtained from DPST-85-312. The grouts characterized in this report are bounded by the design basis density and Bingham Plastic yield stress. The opposite is true for the plastic viscosity. Steady state pressure drop calculations were performed for the design basis values using the flow rate for the clean cap and salt grouts and they bound the pressure drop of the grouts characterized in this report. A comparison of the lab prepared samples to PI ProcessBook data, specifically average pressure drop, indicate that the lab prepared samples are more viscous in nature than what is processed in the facility. This difference could be due to the applied shear rates which could be lower in the lab as compared to the facility and that fact the SPF added flush water, making this comparison more difficult. A perfunctory review of the PI ProcessBook data was discussed. It may be possible that the frequency that the distributed control system alters the grout pump speed to maintain grout hopper volume can negatively affect the efficiency of the grout pump.

  13. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    2001-05-29

    This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  14. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  15. Simulant Development for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Mixing and Waste Feed Delivery Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Tran, Diana N.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2012-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Projection manages the River Protection Project, which has the mission to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms (Certa et al. 2011). Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) is responsible for a primary objective of this mission which is to retrieve and transfer tank waste to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). A mixing and sampling program with four separate demonstrations is currently being conducted to support this objective and also to support activities in a plan for addressing safety concerns identified by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board related to the ability of the WTP to mix, sample, and transfer fast settling particles. Previous studies have documented the objectives, criteria, and selection of non-radioactive simulants for these four demonstrations. The identified simulants include Newtonian suspending liquids with densities and viscosities that span the range expected in waste feed tanks. The identified simulants also include non-Newtonian slurries with Bingham yield stress values that span a range that is expected to bound the Bingham yield stress in the feed delivery tanks. The previous studies identified candidate materials for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian suspending fluids, but did not provide specific recipes for obtaining the target properties and information was not available to evaluate the compatibility of the fluids and particles or the potential for salt precipitation at lower temperatures. The purpose of this study is to prepare small batches of simulants in advance of the demonstrations to determine specific simulant recipes, to evaluate the compatibility of the liquids and particles, and to determine if the simulants are stable for the potential range of test temperatures. The objective of the testing, which is focused primarily on the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, is to determine the composition of simulant materials that give the desired density and viscosity or rheological parameters.

  16. Spatially Modulated Phase in the Holographic Description of Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2011-02-11

    We present a string theory construction of a gravity dual of a spatially modulated phase. Our earlier work shows that the Chern-Simons term in the five-dimensional Maxwell theory destabilizes the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes in anti-de Sitter space if the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently high. In this Letter, we show that a similar instability is realized on the world volume of 8-branes in the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the quark-gluon plasma phase. Our result suggests a new spatially modulated phase in quark-gluon plasma when the baryon density is above 0.8N{sub f} fm{sup -3} at temperature 150 MeV.

  17. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

  18. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

  19. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Powering Africa Summit in Washington, D.C.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- As Delivered | Department of Energy Well, thank you, Simon, for welcoming me to this important meeting that follows on a whole series of important meetings that we and the President have hosted over the last year with regard to Power Africa and some broader issues relating to African development. Let me start by clearly reinforcing President Obama's ongoing strong commitment and recognition that the health and prosperity of really hundreds of millions depends on our ability to help break

  20. NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Celebrates 40 Years of Supercomputing NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront DOE supercomputing facility has been supporting broad-based scientific research since 1974 January 29, 2014 Contact: Kathy Kincade, KKincade@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2124 horstsimon2013 Horst Simon This year, the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is celebrating yet another milestone: its 40th anniversary. Since its founding in 1974, NERSC has become the

  1. NUG 1998

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG 1998 Dates April 8 & 9, 1998 Location Lawrence Berkeley National Lab NERSC's Web Site Presentations Agenda Energy Research Scientific Computing Users Group (ERSUG) Schedule April 6, 1998 Monday April 6, 1998 Berkeley Lab - Perseverance Hall Time Scheduled Event Speaker / Session Leader 08:00 Continental Breakfast 08:30 Welcome Ricky Kendall 08:35 View From Washington Tom Kitchens 08:55 New NERSC Staff Introductions Horst Simon 09:00 NERSC Research Efforts (Leverage to the NERSC Program)

  2. fe0001547 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1547 Recovery Act: CO2 Capture From Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone Reservoir Email Page email Print This Page print Performer: Archer Daniels Midland Corporation (ADM) fe0001547 ADM's Agricultural Processing and Biofuels Plant, Decatur, IL. Website: Archer Daniels Midland Corporation (ADM) Award Number: FE0001547 Project Duration: 11/16/2009 - 09/30/2017 Total Award Value: $207,942,199.00 DOE Share: $141,405,945.00 Performer Share: $66,536,254.00 Technology

  3. EM SSAB Chairs Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call March 26, 2015 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell, Joni Grindstaff Idaho Lori McNamara Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Pete Osborne, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah River Harold Simon, Eleanor

  4. Selected Recent Publications and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Selected Recent Publications and Presentations Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2015 Tim Mattson, Alice Koniges, Simon McIntosh-Smith, Portable Programs for Heterogeneous Computing: A Hands-On Introduction, Tutorial, SC15, November 16, 2015, Hartmut Kaiser, Steven Brandt, Alice Koniges, Thomas Heller, Sameer Shende, Bryce Lelbach, Massivly Parallel Task-Based Programming with HPX, Tutorial, SC15, November 15, 2015, Alice Koniges, Jayashree Ajay Candadai, Hartmut Kaiser, Kevin Huck,

  5. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2010 [Events, Facility News] Abstracts Due January 15 for ISARS 2010 Bookmark and Share In June 2010, the 15th International Symposium for the Advancement of Boundary Layer Remote Sensing (ISARS 2010) will be hosted by Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Université de Versailles Saint- Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ), and Ecole Polytechnique (X). January 15 is the deadline for abstract submissions. This year's guest speakers are Dr. Michael Ashley, University of New South Wales, Australia, and

  6. Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System S. I. Gutman, (a) R. B. Chadwick, (b) and D. W. Wolf (c) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Simon Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Boulder, Colorado T. Van Hove and C. Rocken University Navstar Consortium Boulder, Colorado Background Water vapor is one of the most important constituents of the free atmosphere since it is the principal

  7. ALSNews Vol. 325

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Print 2011 ALS User Meeting Draws Record Numbers Siegfried S. Hecker regales the audience with stories from his visits to North Korea, working with plutonium. A record 461 people registered for the 2011 ALS User Meeting, packing the plenary sessions, workshops, and meals. Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon welcomed guests to the meeting, touching on the ominous challenge of data storage and processing. ALS Director Roger Falcone gave an in-depth overview of ALS progress and prospects,

  8. ALSNews Vol. 325

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALSNews Vol. 325 Print 2011 ALS User Meeting Draws Record Numbers Siegfried S. Hecker regales the audience with stories from his visits to North Korea, working with plutonium. A record 461 people registered for the 2011 ALS User Meeting, packing the plenary sessions, workshops, and meals. Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon welcomed guests to the meeting, touching on the ominous challenge of data storage and processing. ALS Director Roger Falcone gave an in-depth overview of ALS progress

  9. ALSNews Vol. 325

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALSNews Vol. 325 Print 2011 ALS User Meeting Draws Record Numbers Siegfried S. Hecker regales the audience with stories from his visits to North Korea, working with plutonium. A record 461 people registered for the 2011 ALS User Meeting, packing the plenary sessions, workshops, and meals. Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon welcomed guests to the meeting, touching on the ominous challenge of data storage and processing. ALS Director Roger Falcone gave an in-depth overview of ALS progress

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIRTA: A French Observation Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Haeffelin, M., Chepfer, H., Delaval, A., Drobinski, P., Protat, A., and Sauvage, L., Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Paris, France Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An observation site for atmospheric remote sensing (SIRTA) was put together in Palaiseau, France (20 km south of Paris), in 1999. This site hosts a suite of passive and active remote sensing instruments such as a 532 and 1064-nm

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanofabrication Synthesis Staff Stefano Cabrini Stefano Cabrini Facility Director scabrini@lbl.gov 510.486.7339 Deirdre Olynick Deirdre Olynick Staff Scientist dlolynick@lbl.gov 510.495.2893 Adam Schwartzberg Staff Engineer amschwartzberg@lbl.gov 510.495.2270 Scott Dhuey Principal Scientific Engineering Associate sddhuey@lbl.gov 510.486.4946 Simone Sassolini Senior Scientific Engineering Associate ssassolini@lbl.gov 510.486.4820 Michael Elowson Senior Research Technician melowson@lbl.gov

  12. 2014 Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2 Presentations 2014 Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on June 3- 4, 2014. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Simon Mo (Electric Power Group), Jim Thorp (VA Tech), Scott Ghiocel (RPI), Dave Schoenwald (Sandia) Session VI: Bharat Bhargava (Electric Power Group), Brett Amidan (PNNL), Philip Irminger (ORNL) PDF icon 2014

  13. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Detroit Economic Club -- As Prepared for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery | Department of Energy Detroit Economic Club -- As Prepared for Delivery Secretary Chu's Remarks at Detroit Economic Club -- As Prepared for Delivery January 11, 2012 - 9:30am Addthis Thank you, President Simon, for the introduction. I also want to thank the Detroit Economic Club for hosting me. For more than 75 years, the Detroit Economic Club has promoted thoughtful conversation on the important issues facing Michigan and our country, and I am pleased to be a part of that

  14. Reabsorption of Soft X-Ray Emission at High X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluences (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Reabsorption of Soft X-Ray Emission at High X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Fluences Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reabsorption of Soft X-Ray Emission at High X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Fluences Authors: Schreck, Simon ; Beye, Martin ; Sellberg, Jonas A. ; McQueen, Trevor ; Laksmono, Hartawan ; Kennedy, Brian ; Eckert, Sebastian ; Schlesinger, Daniel ; Nordlund, Dennis ; Ogasawara, Hirohito ; Sierra, Raymond G. ; Segtnan,

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag polypeptides

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag polypeptides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag polypeptides The present invention relates to mosaic HIV-1 group M Gag sequences and to a composition comprising same. Authors: Korber, Bette T ; Perkins, Simon ; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy ; Fischer, William M ; Theiler, James ; Letvin, Norman ; Haynes, Barton F ; Hahn, Beatrice H ; Yusim, Karina ;

  16. The Year of the Fuel Cell: Looking Back to Get Ahead | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Year of the Fuel Cell: Looking Back to Get Ahead The Year of the Fuel Cell: Looking Back to Get Ahead January 22, 2016 - 12:15pm Addthis Toyota's Mirai, Hyundai's Tucson, and Honda's Clarity, the first commercially available fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) in the United States. They are currently on display at the 2016 Washington Auto Show | Photos by Simon Edelman, Energy Department Toyota's Mirai, Hyundai's Tucson, and Honda's Clarity, the first commercially available fuel cell

  17. Developing Adnectins That Target SRC Co-Activator Binding to PXR: A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural Approach toward Understanding Promiscuity of PXR (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Developing Adnectins That Target SRC Co-Activator Binding to PXR: A Structural Approach toward Understanding Promiscuity of PXR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Developing Adnectins That Target SRC Co-Activator Binding to PXR: A Structural Approach toward Understanding Promiscuity of PXR Authors: Khan, Javed A. ; Camac, Daniel M. ; Low, Simon ; Tebben, Andrew J. ; Wensel, David L. ;

  18. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics We present a Landau-Ginzburg theory for a fractional quantized Hall nematic state and the transition to it from an isotropic fractional quantum Hall state. This justifies Lifshitz-Chern-Simons theory - which is shown to be its dual - on a more microscopic basis and enables us to compute a ground state

  19. Effects of Experimental Methods on the Measurements of a Nonlinear

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Effects of Experimental Methods on the Measurements of a Nonlinear Structure. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Experimental Methods on the Measurements of a Nonlinear Structure. Abstract not provided. Authors: Catalfamo, Simone [1] ; Smith, Scott A ; Morlock, Florian [1] ; Brake, Matthew Robert ; Reuss, Pascal [1] ; Schwingshackl, Christoph [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Stutgart) (Imperial) Publication Date: 2016-02-01 OSTI

  20. Universal solvent restructuring induced by colloidal nanoparticles (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Universal solvent restructuring induced by colloidal nanoparticles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal solvent restructuring induced by colloidal nanoparticles Authors: Zobel, Mirijam ; Neder, Reinhard B. ; Kimber, Simon A.J. [1] ; ESRF) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Nürnberg) ( Publication Date: 2015-01-15 OSTI Identifier: 1168535 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  1. silling2004session3.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Department 1 of 32 /home/sasilli/emu/salishan1/salishan1.frm Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Peridynamic Modeling of Structural Damage and Failure Stewart Silling Sandia National Laboratories sasilli@sandia.gov Simon Kahan Cray Inc. skahan@cray.com April 21, 2004 Computational Physics Department 2 of 32

  2. David Lee, Douglas Osheroff, Superfluidity, and Helium 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Lee, Douglas Osheroff, Superfluidity, and Helium 3 Resources with Additional Information David M. Lee and Douglas D. Osheroff received the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physics for 'their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3'. "In 1976, Lee shared with Richardson and Osheroff their earliest recognition for studies of superfluidity, the Simon Memorial Prize of the British Physical Society. The Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society followed for the trio in 1981. ... Douglas D. Osheroff

  3. Previous Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous ASCAC Members Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members ASCAC Members Bio Previous ASCAC Members Charges/Reports ASCAC Charter 2015 - signed .pdf file (134KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees ASCR Home Members Previous ASCAC Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Dr. F. Ronald Bailey Computer Sciences Corp. 591 Branciforte Ridge Santa Cruz, CA 95065 Dr. Horst D. Simon Director, Computational Research Division

  4. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darmon Chem Science 2015 cover page Increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation without increasing the overpotential: a bio-inspired iron molecular electrocatalyst with an outer coordination sphere proton relay March 5, 2015 | Author(s): Jonathan M. Darmon, Neeraj Kumar, Elliott B. Hulley, Charles J. Weiss, Simone Raugei, R. Morris Bullocka and Monte L. Helm* Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57, Richland, USA

  5. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics (Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics We present a Landau-Ginzburg theory for a fractional quantized Hall nematic state and the transition to it from an isotropic fractional quantum Hall state. This justifies Lifshitz-Chern-Simons theory - which is shown to be its dual - on a more microscopic basis and enables us to compute a ground state

  6. Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    towards robust metal-organic frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Kecheng Wang, Zhangwen Wei, Ying-Pin Chen, Cory M. Simon, Ravi K. Arvapally, Richard L. Martin, Mathieu Bosch, Tian-Fu Liu, Stephen Fordham, Daqiang Yuan, Mohammad A. Omary, Maciej Haranczyk, Berend Smit & Hong-Cai Zhou,

  7. Modeling Methane Adsorption in Interpenetrating Porous Polymer Networks |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Modeling Methane Adsorption in Interpenetrating Porous Polymer Networks Previous Next List Richard L. Martin, Mahdi Niknam Shahrak, Joseph A. Swisher, Cory M. Simon, Julian P. Sculley, Hong-Cai Zhou, Berend Smit, and Maciej Haranczyk, J. Phys. Chem. C 117, 20037-20042 (2013) DOI: 10.1021/jp406918d Abstract Image Abstract: Porous polymer networks (PPNs) are a class of porous materials of particular interest in a

  8. DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships February 17, 2016 HPC4mfgevent On February 17, DOE announced the first 10 new HPC4Mfg projects during an event at Berkeley Lab that included representatives from EERE, LLNL, Berkeley Lab and ORNL. From left to right are Robin Miles, LLNL; Horst Simon, LBNL; Peter Nugent, LBNL; Trish Damkroger, LLNL; Dona Crawford, LLNL; Mark Johnson, DOE EERE; Kathy Yelick, LBNL;

  9. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Light Source Data and Analysis Framework at NERSC Jack Deslippe, Shane Canon, Eli Dart, Abdelilah Essiari, Alexander Hexemer, Dula Parkinson, Simon Patton, Craig Tull + Many More The ALS Data Needs September 21, 2010 - NIST (MD) Light source data volumes are growing many times faster than Moore's law. ● Light source luminosity ● Detector resolution & rep-rates ● Sample automation BES user facilities serve 10,000 scientists and engineers every year. Mostly composed of many small

  10. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lax, Simon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Accepted Manuscript Published Article Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: to Update Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find Switch to Detail View for this search DOE PAGES Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Lax,

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sirca, Simon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  12. Microsoft Word - Final EA- ADM.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28 Final Environmental Assessment Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Area 1 Project "CO 2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone" Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois For U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DE-FE0001547 April 2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This report was prepared with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award No. DE-FE0001547 (Recovery Act - Industrial Carbon

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pang, Simon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  14. The Valence and Coordination of Ti in Olivine and Pyroxene in Ordinary and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enstatite Chondrites as a Function of Metamorphic Grade. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: The Valence and Coordination of Ti in Olivine and Pyroxene in Ordinary and Enstatite Chondrites as a Function of Metamorphic Grade. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Valence and Coordination of Ti in Olivine and Pyroxene in Ordinary and Enstatite Chondrites as a Function of Metamorphic Grade. Authors: Simon, S.B. ; Sutton, S.R. ; Grossman, L. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC)

  15. Towards a Holographic Marginal Fermi Liquid (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Towards a Holographic Marginal Fermi Liquid Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards a Holographic Marginal Fermi Liquid We present an infinite class of 2+1 dimensional field theories which, after coupling to semi-holographic fermions, exhibit strange metallic behavior in a suitable large N limit. These theories describe lattices of hypermultiplet defects interacting with parity-preserving supersymmetric Chern-Simons theories with U(N) x U(N) gauge groups at levels {+-}k.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - salishan_v2 [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Petascale Computing for Science Horst Simon Lenny Oliker, David Skinner, and Erich Strohmaier Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory The Salishan Conference on High-Speed Computing April 19, 2005 Outline * Science Driven Architecture * Performance on today's (2004 - 2005) platforms * Challenges with scaling to the Petaflop/s level * Two tools that can help: IPM and APEX/MAP Scientific Applications and Underlying Algorithms Drive Architectural Design * 50 Tflop/s - 100 Tflop/s sustained

  17. 2014 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blandine Jerome 2014 Previous Next List Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks Dawei Feng, Kecheng Wang, Zhangwen Wei, Ying-Pin Chen, Cory M. Simon, Ravi K. Arvapally, Richard L. Martin, Mathieu Bosch, Tian-Fu Liu, Stephen Fordham, Daqiang Yuan, Mohammad A. Omary, Maciej Haranczyk, Berend Smit ... Continue reading ... Jan 29, 2015 A Highly Stable Porphyrinic Zirconium Metal-Organic Framework with shp-a Topology

  18. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portfolio Standard & Utility Supplier Diversity Program Presented by: Rahmon O. Momoh Energy Advisor to Commissioner Timothy Simon TRIBAL LEADER FORUM: SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST December 19-20, 2011 SPA RESORT CASINO HOTEL IN PALM SPRINGS, CA 2 About the CPUC * The CPUC is the California state agency that regulates essential services including: o Electricity o Natural Gas o Telecommunications o Water o Rail and Transportation * Headquartered in San Francisco with offices in

  19. 2016 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit 2016 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Addthis Robotonist 1 of 16 Robotonist This robot helps scientists breed fast-growing strains of sorghum, an important bioenergy crop. It's part of the Transportation Energy Resources from Renewable Agriculture Phenotyping Reference Platform (TERRA-REF) project on display at the ARPA-E Innovation Summit. Image: Simon Edelman, Energy Department Date taken: 2016-02-29 17:17 Solar Charging Station 2 of 16 Solar Charging Station

  20. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Public Meeting Agenda - Spring SRS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting April 22-23, 2015 Doubletree, 2651 Perimeter Parkway, Augusta, Georgia 30909 Wednesday, April 22 8:00 am Welcome and Opening Remarks * David Borak, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer * Hardie Davis Jr., Mayor, City of Augusta * David Moody, Manager, Savannah River Site * Harold Simon, Chair, Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board 8:20 am Meeting Overview * Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 am EM Program Update * Mark Whitney,

  1. Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 16, 2016 - 10:38am Addthis Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. | Footage courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RES Americas. Kelly Yaker National Renewable Energy Laboratory How does it work? Researchers at NREL teamed with industry to study the flight patterns of two eagles. The data will help the companies develop systems to detect birds and prevent collisions with

  2. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Ms. Callahan Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Ms. Callahan 07-13-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Cynthia Blansett (COE) Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Simon Mahan (SWEA)

  3. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific User Facility | Department of Energy Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility March 20, 2014 - 3:11pm Addthis From left to right: Congressman Rogers, Senator Stabenow, Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy Dr. Michael Knotek, President Lou Anna Simon of Michigan State University, and Senator Levin break ground on the FRIB

  4. EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    26: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test DOE proposes to co-fund an $84,274,927 project located on property of the MGSC partner Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM). The overall objective of this project would be to demonstrate the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, to accept and retain approximately 1.1 million short tons

  5. EA-1828: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1828: Final Environmental Assessment Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Area 1 Project : CO2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois DOE prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) in a cooperative agreement with Archer Daniels

  6. EA-1828: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    28: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1828: Finding of No Significant Impact Carbon Dioxide Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mount Simon Sandstone Phase II Project in Decatur, Illinois Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment DOE determined that its proposed action-awarding a grant to Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) to demonstrate an integrated system of carbon dioxide capture in an industrial setting and geologic sequestration in a sandstone

  7. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  8. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made interpretation of the Mt. Simon and Knox sections difficult. The data quality also gradually decreased moving westward across the state. To meet evolving project objectives, in 2012 the seismic data was re-processed using different techniques to enhance the signal quality thereby rendering a more coherent seismic profile for interpreters. It is believed that the seismic degradation could be caused by shallow natural gas deposits and Quaternary sediments (which include abandoned river and stream channels, former ponds, and swamps with peat deposits) that may have complicated or changed the seismic wavelet. Where previously limited by seismic coverage, the seismic profiles have provided valuable subsurface information across central Illinois. Some of the interpretations based on this survey included, but are not limited to: - Stratigraphy generally gently dips to the east from Morgan to Douglas County. - The Knox Supergroup roughly maintains its thickness. There is little evidence for faulting in the Knox. However, at least one resolvable fault penetrates the entire Knox section. - The Eau Claire Formation, the primary seal for the Mt. Simon Sandstone, appears to be continuous across the entire seismic profile. - The Mt. Simon Sandstone thins towards the western edge of the basin. As a result, the highly porous lowermost Mt. Simon section is absent in the western part of the state. - Overall basement dip is from west to east. - Basement topography shows evidence of basement highs with on-lapping patterns by Mt. Simon sediments. - There is evidence of faults within the lower Mt. Simon Sandstone and basement rock that are contemporaneous with Mt. Simon Sandstone deposition. These faults are not active and do not penetrate the Eau Claire Shale. It is believed that these faults are associated with a possible failed rifting event 750 to 560 million years ago during the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia.

  9. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africas most successful mobile network operators, will talk about Mobile phones and Africa: a success story. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss Citizen Problem Solving. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africas most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continents population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Londons School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairmans Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greate

  10. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa?s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about ?Mobile phones and Africa: a success story?. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss ?Citizen Problem Solving?. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa?s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent?s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London?s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman?s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greatest probability of solution lies in the "long tail" of the function rather than in the head representing formally vetted 'experts.' Insight into a problem is often the intersection of training, experience, metaphor and provocation (think Archimedes). Examples of "citizens" outside a targeted field of expertise providing uniques solutions will illustrate the principles involved. Bio Dr. Alph Bingham is a pioneer in the field of open innovation and an advocate of collaborative approaches to research and development. He is co-founder, and former president and chief executive officer of InnoCentive Inc., a Web-based community that matches companies facing R&D; challenges with scientists who propose solutions. Through InnoCentive, a platform that leverages the ability to connect to a whole planet of people through the Internet, organizations can access individuals ? problem solvers ? who might never have been found. Alph spent more than 25 years with Eli Lilly and Company, and offers deep experience in pharmaceutical research and development, research acquisitions and collaborations, and R&D; strategic planning. During his career he was instrumental in creating and developing Eli Lilly's portfolio management process as well as establishing the divisions of Research Acquisitions, the Office of Alliance Management and e.Lilly, a business innovation unit, from which various other ventures were spun out that create the advantages of open and networked organizational structures, including: InnoCentive, YourEncore, Inc., Coalesix, Inc., Maaguzi, Inc., Indigo Biosystems, Seriosity, Chorus and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of InnoCentive, Inc., and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc.; the advisory boards of the Center for Collective Intelligence (MIT), and the Business Innovation Factory, as well as a member of the board of trustees of the Bankinter Foundation for Innovation in Madrid. He has lectured extensively at both national and international events and serves as a Visiting Scholar at the National Center for Supercomputing Application at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He is also the former chairman of the Board of Editors of the Research Technology Management Journal. Dr. Bingham was the recipient of the Economist's Fourth Annual Innovation Summit "Business Process Award" for InnoCentive. He was also named as one of Project Management Institute's "Power 50" leaders in October 2005. Dr. Bingham received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University.

  11. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  12. NERSC Scientists Contribute to SC14 Technical Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Scientists Contribute to SC14 Technical Program NERSC Scientists Contribute to SC14 Technical Program November 17, 2014 SC14logo3 Here's a look at the various talks, presentations, tutorials and demos that NERSC and other Berkeley Lab staff will be participating in during SC14: Invited Speaker Usable Exascale and Beyond Moore's Law, Horst Simon, Lab Directorate. 3:30-4:15 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, New Orleans Theater. Papers A Computation- And Communication-Optimal Parallel Direct 3-Body

  13. Submitting Organization Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Todd Bauer Sandia National Laboratories. P.O. Box 5800, MS 1077 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1077 USA Phone:: (505)-845-0086 Fax:: (505) 844-7833 tmbaue@sandia.gov Contact Person Glenn D. Kubiak, Director, Biological and Materials Sciences Center Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 969 Mail Stop 9405 Livermore, CA 94551-0969, USA Phone:: 925-294-3375 Fax:: 925-294-3403 kubiak@sandia.gov Joint Entry: Front Edge Technology, Inc. 13455 Brooks Drive Baldwin Park, CA 91706 Submitter Simon Nieh Front Edge

  14. Hamiltonian treatment of collapsing thin shells in Lanczos-Lovelock theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisostomo, Juan; Campo, Sergio del; Saavedra, Joel

    2004-09-15

    The Hamiltonian treatment for the collapse of thin shells for a family of Lanczos-Lovelock theories is studied. This formalism allows us to carry out a concise analysis of these theories. It is found that the black holes solution can be created by collapsing a thin shell. Naked singularities cannot be formed by this mechanism. Among the different Lanczos-Lovelock theories, the Chern-Simons theory corresponds to an exceptional case, because naked singularities can emerge from the collapse of a thin shell. This kind of theory does not possess a gravitational self-interaction analogous to the Newtonian case.

  15. An unprecedented blend of intense magnetic and X-ray laser pulses produces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surprising 3D effect | Argonne National Laboratory Members of the team that discovered a new 3D effect in a superconducting material gather at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy experimental station at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser: from left, Wei-Sheng Lee, Simon Gerber, Jun-Sik Lee, Hoyoung Jang, Hiroyuki Nojiri, Hiromasa Yasumura, and Diling Zhu. (Courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) (Click image to enlarge.) Members of the team that discovered a new 3D effect

  16. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report on Vectorization Application Review January 27, 1997 | Author(s): S.C. Jardin | Download File: Report-on-Vectorization-Application-Review.pdf | pdf | 93 KB State of NERSC address January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Horst SImon | Download File: State-of-NERSC-Address.pdf | pdf | 176 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s):

  17. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State of NERSC address January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Horst SImon | Download File: State-of-NERSC-Address.pdf | pdf | 176 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB The Scientific Computing Group January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Tammy Welcome |

  18. ALSNews Vol. 291

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 ALSNews Vol. 291 Print Wednesday, 24 September 2008 00:00 In This Issue Director's Update: Looking to the Future-A Renewed ALS Strategic Plan Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate UEC Corner: 2008 Users' Meeting; Washington DC Visit; Become a UEC Member Submit Your Publications as Soon as Possible! Operations Bulletin Board ALS Scientist Simon Morton Part of "First Light" Team at

  19. Haef_poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TOWARDS A GLOBAL CLIMATOLOGY OF OPTICALLY THIN CLOUDS DERIVED FROM NETWORKS OF GROUND-BASED LIDARS HAEFFELIN M. (1) , DUPONT J-C. (2) , KECKHUT P. (3) , MORILLE Y. (2) , NOËL V. (2) (1)Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace, Paris, FRANCE. (2) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Palaiseau, France (3) Service d'Aéronomie, Paris, France CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE (CNRS) Introduction Over 100 Lidar stations can be found around the globe. Only few are equipped with fully automated

  20. High Performance Computing Richard F. BARRETT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of Co-design in High Performance Computing Richard F. BARRETT a,1 , Shekhar BORKAR b , Sudip S. DOSANJH c , Simon D. HAMMOND a , Michael A. HEROUX a , X. Sharon HU d , Justin LUITJENS e , Steven G. PARKER e , John SHALF c , and Li TANG d a Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA b Intel Corporation c Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA d University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN, USA e Nvidia, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA Abstract. Preparations for Exascale

  1. Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_simon.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Diesel Update State-of-the-Art and Emergin Truck Engine Technologies Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and Non-Road

  2. Dimensional deconstruction and Wess-Zumino-Witten terms (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Dimensional deconstruction and Wess-Zumino-Witten terms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dimensional deconstruction and Wess-Zumino-Witten terms A new technique is developed for the derivation of the Wess-Zumino-Witten terms of gauged chiral lagrangians. We start in D = 5 with a pure (mesonless) Yang-Mills theory, which includes relevant gauge field Chern-Simons terms. The theory is then compactified, and the effective D = 4 lagrangian is derived using lattice

  3. Fall 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 1:30---2:30pm September 25 1100 Dow Matt Dejarld (Millunchick), Michael Kuo (Ku) October 16 MSE Conf. Simon Huang (Goldman), Brian Roberts (Ku) November 6 MSE Conf. Mike Abere (Yalisove), Jimmy Chen (Phillips) December 11 MSE Conf. Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis), Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected F ridays 1:30---2:30pm September 20 1100 Dow Vladimir Stoica (Clarke) October 18 1100 Dow Wei Liu (Uher) November 8

  4. Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2014 NERSC's 40th Anniversary Kicks Off with a Special User Group Meeting January 15, 2014 by Francesca Verdier Registration is now open for NUG 2014, the annual meeting of the NERSC Users' Group, Feb. 3-6, 2014. This year's NUG meeting is special, it kicks off NERSC's 40th anniversary celebration. The highlight of NUG 2014 is a two-day "Celebration of Science and Technology" featuring talks by Berkeley Lab's Horst Simon and Kathy Yelick, NERSC Director Sudip Dosanjh, prominent

  5. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda ERSUG Business Meeting Special Special Pre-ERSUG-meeting Training Day: Monday, January 27, 1997 ERSUG Meeting (Day 1) January 28th Tuesday, Perseverance Hall Time Topic Speaker 8:30 Pickup from Hotel 9:00 Welcome Klaus Berkner - Associate Laboratory Director, Berkeley Lab 9:10 Agenda Review Ricky Kendall 9:15 View from Washington Tom Kitchens 9:40 NERSC Accomplishments in 1996 Overview of NERSC at LBNL Horst Simon Bill Kramer 10:30 Break 10:40 Chair's Session a) review of action

  6. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda Agenda NERSC User Group Meeting, November 12, 2001 Note: all times are Mountain Time. 8:00- 8:30 Continental Breakfast 8:30- 8:45 Ryne Welcome / Introductions 8:45- 9:30 Kramer Overview: NERSC status report and plans for FY02 NERSC-3 status, user survey, mass storage, networking, elimination of clear text passwords in the near future 9:30-10:00 Simon NERSC Strategic Plan 10:00-10:15 Break 10:15-10:45 Miner, Report from Washington DC Polansky 10:45-11:15 Kramer NERSC-4 RFP

  7. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda November 18, 2002 in Baltimore Note: all times are Eastern Time. Time Speaker Topic 8:00- 8:30 Continental Breakfast 8:30- 8:45 Rob Ryne Welcome / Introductions 8:45- 9:30 Horst Simon Overview: NERSC status report and plans for FY03, NERSC-3 status, user survey, mass storage, big splash, budget issues 9:30-10:00 Cary Whitney NERSC-3 in production 10:00-10:30 Break 10:30-11:00 Walt Polansky Report from Washington DC 11:00-11:30 Brent Gorda NERSC 4 procurement and decision for NERSC

  8. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda May 29: NUG Business Meeting Agenda All times are Central Time (subtract 2 hours for Pacific Time; add 1 hour for Eastern Time). 9:00 Welcome, Introductions Doug Rotman 9:15 Opening Remarks Horst Simon 9:30 Performance Evaluation Activites at NERSC Adrian Wong 10:00 Seaborg Code Scalability Project Richard Gerber 10:30 Green's function Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Steven Pieper 10:45 Lattice QCD in Extreme Environments Don Sinclair 11:00 Break 11:15 Global Climate

  9. NERSC's 40th Anniversary Kicks Off with a Special User Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40th Anniversary Kicks Off with a Special User Group Meeting NERSC's 40th Anniversary Kicks Off with a Special User Group Meeting January 15, 2014 by Francesca Verdier Registration is now open for NUG 2014, the annual meeting of the NERSC Users' Group, Feb. 3-6, 2014. This year's NUG meeting is special, it kicks off NERSC's 40th anniversary celebration. The highlight of NUG 2014 is a two-day "Celebration of Science and Technology" featuring talks by Berkeley Lab's Horst Simon and Kathy

  10. Winter 2014 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 10:30---11:30am February 12 POD room Sung Joo Kim (Pan) March 19 POD room Matt DeJarld (Millunchick) Alan Teran (Phillips) April 16 POD room Mike Abere (Yalisove) Brian Roberts (Ku) May 21 POD room Simon Huang (Goldman) Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis) Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected M ondays 10:00---11:00am February 3 267B West Hall Gunho Kim (Pipe) March 10 267B West Hall Wonho Jeong (Reddy) Youngsang Kim

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOE PAGES Search Results Page 1 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Gilbert, Jack A" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Total Results16 Pub. Available Full TextPublicly Available Full Text16 Citation Only0 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Gilbert, Jack A. (15) Gibbons, Sean M. (4) Lax, Simon (3)

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Zobel, Mirijam" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything2 Electronic Full Text0 Citations2 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Neder, Reinhard B. (2) Zobel, Mirijam (2) Chatterjee, Haimantee (1) Kimber, Simon A.J. (1) Kolb, Ute

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Steinberg, Simon" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything5 Electronic Full Text0 Citations5 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject inorganic, organic, physical and analytical chemistry (2) monocrystals (2) rare earths (2) x-ray diffraction (2)

  14. A Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-Organic Framework | Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian-Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; Teat, Simon J.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; and Zhou, Hong-Cai. A Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-organic Framework. Chem. Sci., 6, 3926-3930 (2015). DOI: 10.1039/c5sc00916b

  15. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: What Has Changed Since 2011? Public Webinar 2015-03-04 Chapter Leads: A.J. Simon * Due to the large number of expected participants, the audio and video portions of this webinar will be a "one way" broadcast. Only the organizers and QTR authors will be allowed to speak. Webinar Logistics * Submit clarifying questions using the GoToWebinar control panel. Moderators will respond to as many questions as time allows. Substantial input regarding chapter content should be submitted by

  16. 2016 Washington Auto Show | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington Auto Show 2016 Washington Auto Show Addthis 1 of 20 Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz sits in the driver's seat of the all-electric Chevrolet Bolt at the Washington Auto Show. When it debuts on the road later this year, the Bolt will offer drivers about 200 miles of electric range. Image: Simon Edelman, Energy Department Date taken: 2016-01-21 09:45 2 of 20 The 2016 next-generation Chevrolet Volt builds on the success of its previous version, which was the first plug-in hybrid electric

  17. An Explainer: How "Grid Modernization" Could Improve Your Life |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy An Explainer: How "Grid Modernization" Could Improve Your Life An Explainer: How "Grid Modernization" Could Improve Your Life January 14, 2016 - 1:10pm Addthis Understanding how the grid works is the first step to understanding our grid modernization efforts. This new video breaks it down. | Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. Franklin (Lynn) Orr Franklin (Lynn) Orr Under Secretary for Science and Energy KEY FACTS U.S. Department of Energy

  18. Green Flag for a New Era in Green Racing | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flag for a New Era in Green Racing Green Flag for a New Era in Green Racing January 28, 2014 - 5:14pm Addthis Karl Simon (from left) the Environmental Protection Agency’s Director of Transportation and Climate Division for the Office of Transportation and Air Quality; Michael Carr, the Energy Department’s Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; and Scott Atherton, President of International Motor Sports Association; pose with the

  19. Move Over, 'American Idol'... | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Over, 'American Idol'... Move Over, 'American Idol'... May 26, 2011 - 11:24am Addthis Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs The votes have been counted. America has spoken. 
The five finalists were so outstanding that no one cared Simon Cowell wasn't part of the action. 
 No, I'm not talking about Scotty McCreery, though we congratulate him as well. I'm talking about yesterday's "People's Choice Award" winner of the Department of Energy's

  20. By the Numbers: 2015 at the Energy Department | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By the Numbers: 2015 at the Energy Department By the Numbers: 2015 at the Energy Department December 30, 2015 - 9:35am Addthis Watch some of the Energy Department's highlights from 2015. | Video by Simon Edelman and Carly Wilkins, Energy Department Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department was hard at work in 2015, and we've got the numbers to prove it. This year we were involved in two major international agreements: the historic

  1. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON,

  2. Effective field theory and integrability in two-dimensional Mott transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottesi, Federico L.; Zemba, Guillermo R.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Mott transition in 2d lattice fermion model. > 3D integrability out of 2D. > Effective field theory for Mott transition in 2d. > Double Chern-Simons. > d-Density waves. - Abstract: We study the Mott transition in a two-dimensional lattice spinless fermion model with nearest neighbors density-density interactions. By means of a two-dimensional Jordan-Wigner transformation, the model is mapped onto the lattice XXZ spin model, which is shown to possess a quantum group symmetry as a consequence of a recently found solution of the Zamolodchikov tetrahedron equation. A projection (from three to two space-time dimensions) property of the solution is used to identify the symmetry of the model at the Mott critical point as U{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex)xU{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex), with deformation parameter q = -1. Based on this result, the low-energy effective field theory for the model is obtained and shown to be a lattice double Chern-Simons theory with coupling constant k = 1 (with the standard normalization). By further employing the effective filed theory methods, we show that the Mott transition that arises is of topological nature, with vortices in an antiferromagnetic array and matter currents characterized by a d-density wave order parameter. We also analyze the behavior of the system upon weak coupling, and conclude that it undergoes a quantum gas-liquid transition which belongs to the Ising universality class.

  3. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for ???°Brix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  4. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  5. Conceptual Design of an Ultra-Dense Phase Injector and Feed System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Sprouse; Fred Widman; Alan Darby

    2006-03-30

    Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine technology to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. One key feature of the PWR concept is the use of an ultra-dense phase feed system to provide dry coal to the multi-element injector. This report describes the design of an ultra-dense phase multi-element injector and feed system for use on PWR gasifiers operating at pressures to 1,000 psia. For the design of this injector and feed system, the pulverized coal's Bingham fluid yield stress is approximately 11 Pascals (Pa) with a coefficient of rigidity of 10 centipoise (cp). These values are typical of earlier experimental testing conducted with dried pulverized coal below 18 wt% moisture -- see, e.g., Sprouse and Schuman (1983, 1986). Each individual injector element is designed for a coal flow rate between 3 and 4 tons/hr (0.76 to 1.0 kg/sec) at full flow conditions. Hence, a small 400 to 500 tons/day (4.2 to 5.25 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 6-element injector, a 1,500 tons/day (15.7 kg/sec) gasifier will require an 18-element injector and a 3,000 tons/day (31.5 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 36-element injector. These injectors and feed systems are capable of 'turn-down' below 50% of full-flow operation.

  6. Fluid dynamic studies for a simulated Melton Valley Storage Tank slurry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), are used for the collection and storage of remote-handled radioactive liquid wastes. These wastes, which were typically acidic when generated, were neutralized with the addition of sodium hydroxide to protect the storage tanks from corrosion, but this caused the transuranic and heavy metals to precipitate. These wastes will eventually need to be removed from the tanks for ultimate disposal. The objective of the research activities discussed in this report is to support the design of a pipeline transport system between the MVSTs and a treatment facility. Since the wastes in the MVSTs are highly radioactive, a surrogate slurry was developed for this study. Rheological properties of the simulated slurry were determined in a test loop in which the slurry was circulated through three pipeline viscometers of different diameters. Pressure drop data at varying flow rates were used to obtain shear stress and shear rate data. The data were analyzed, and the slurry rheological properties were analyzed by the Power Law model and the Bingham plastic model. The plastic viscosity and yield stress data obtained from the rheological tests were used as inputs for a piping design software package, and the pressure drops predicted by the software compared well with the pressure drop data obtained from the test loop. The minimum transport velocity was determine for the slurry by adding known nominal sizes of glass spheres to the slurry. However, it was shown that the surrogate slurry exhibited hindered settling, which may substantially decrease the minimum transport velocity. Therefore, it may be desired to perform additional tests with a surrogate with a lower concentration of suspended solids to determine the minimum transport velocity.

  7. A New Parameter to Assess Hydromechanical Effect in Single-hole Hydraulic Testing and Grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2007-09-01

    Grouting or filling of the open voids in fractured rock is done by introducing a fluid, a grout, through boreholes under pressure. The grout may be either a Newtonian fluid or a Bingham fluid. The penetration of the grout and the resulting pressure profile may give rise to hydromechanical effects, which depends on factors such as the fracture aperture, pressure at the borehole and the rheological properties of the grout. In this paper, we postulate that a new parameter, {angstrom}, which is the integral of the fluid pressure change in the fracture plane, is an appropriate measure to describe the change in fracture aperture volume due to a change in effective stress. In many cases, analytic expressions are available to calculate pressure profiles for relevant input data and the {angstrom} parameter. The approach is verified against a fully coupled hydromechanical simulator for the case of a Newtonian fluid. Results of the verification exercise show that the new approach is reasonable and that the {angstrom}-parameter is a good measure for the fracture volume change: i.e., the larger the {angstrom}-parameter, the larger the fracture volume change, in an almost linear fashion. To demonstrate the application of the approach, short duration hydraulic tests and constant pressure grouting are studied. Concluded is that using analytic expressions for penetration lengths and pressure profiles to calculate the {angstrom} parameter provides a possibility to describe a complex situation and compare, discuss and weigh the impact of hydromechanical couplings for different alternatives. Further, the analyses identify an effect of high-pressure grouting, where uncontrolled grouting of larger fractures and insufficient (or less-than-expected) sealing of finer fractures is a potential result.

  8. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. Y. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Hyun, S. [Mercer Univ., Macon, GA (United States)

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  9. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a -scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the -scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  10. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  11. Demonstration of Mixing and Transferring Settling Cohesive Slurry Simulants in the AY-102 Tank - 12323

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2012-07-01

    In support of Hanford's feed delivery of high level waste (HLW) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), pilot-scale testing and demonstrations with simulants containing cohesive particles were performed as a joint collaboration between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants, and the resulting non- Newtonian rheology, have on tank mixing and batch transfer of large and dense seed particles. The work addressed the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance in a pilot-scale system. Kaolin slurries with a range of wt% concentrations to vary the Bingham yield stress were used in all the non-Newtonian simulants. To study the effects of just increasing the liquid viscosity (no yield stress) on mixing and batch transfers, a glycerol/water mixture was used. Stainless steel 100 micron particles were used as seed particles due to their density and their contrasting color to the kaolin and glycerol. Testing results show that water always transfers less seed particles, and is conservative when compared to fluids with a higher yield stress and/or higher viscosity at the same mixing/transfer parameters. The impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties depends on the magnitude of the yield stress. A higher yield stress in the carrier fluid resulted in more seed particles being transferred to the RTs. A dimensional analysis highlighting the role of a yield stress (due to cohesive particle interactions) defined four regions of behavior and indicates how the results obtained in this study can be applied to the full-scale mixing behavior of a high level waste tank. The analysis indicates that the regions of behavior for full-scale mixing have been adequately represented by the current small-scale tests. (authors)

  12. Saltstone SDU6 Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si Y.; Hyun, Sinjae

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System Plan. The unit is a cylindrical disposal cell of 375 ft in diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has a minimum 30 million gallons of capacity. SRNL was requested to evaluate the impact of an increased grout placement height on the flow patterns radially spread on the floor and to determine whether grout quality is impacted by the height. The primary goals of the work are to develop the baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as a function of elevation of grout discharge port and grout rheology. Two transient grout models have been developed by taking a three-dimensional multiphase CFD approach to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor and to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation height of the discharge port and fresh grout properties. For the CFD modeling calculations, air-grout Volume of Fluid (VOF) method combined with Bingham plastic and time-dependent grout models were used for examining the impact of fluid spread performance for the initial baseline configurations and to evaluate the impact of grout pouring height on grout quality. The grout quality was estimated in terms of the air volume fraction for the grout layer formed on the SDU6 floor, resulting in the change of grout density. The study results should be considered as preliminary scoping analyses since benchmarking analysis is not included in this task scope. Transient analyses with the Bingham plastic model were performed with the FLUENTTM code on the high performance parallel computing platform in SRNL. The analysis coupled with a transient grout aging model was performed by using ANSYS-CFX code in the parallel computing platform in Mercer University. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local shear rates and flow patterns related to radial spread along the SDU floor can be used as a measure of grout performance and spatial dispersion affected by the grout height and viscosity. The 5 ft height baseline results show that when the 150 gpm grout flow with a 5 Pa yield stress and a 60 cp viscosity is poured down through a 3 inch discharge port, the grout is spread radially up to about 64 ft distance from the pouring center after 2 hours' pouring time. The air volume fraction of the grout layer is about 29% at 5 minutes' transient time, and it is reduced by about 9% in 2 hours' pouring time, resulting in the grout density consisting of about 80% grout and 20% air volume fractions. The sensitivity results show that when the discharge port is located at a higher position, a larger amount of air is trapped inside the layer formed below the discharge port at the early transient time of less than 30 minutes because of the higher impinging momentum of the grout flow on the floor, resulting in the formation of less smooth layer. The results clearly indicate that the radial spread for the 43 ft discharge port is about 10% faster than that of the 5 ft discharge port for the early transient period of 5 minutes. However, for the pouring time longer than half an hour, the discharge port height does not affect the radial distance spread on the disposal floor. When grout quality is related to grout volume fraction, the grout volume fraction for the 43 ft discharge port has lower volume fraction than the 5 ft discharge port for the transient period of the first 5 minutes. However, for the pouring time longer than half an hour, the discharge port height does not affect the grout volume fraction for the layer accumulated on the disposal floor. A modified Bingham plastic model coupled with time-dependent viscosity behavior was developed for conducting the initial scoping calculations to assess the impact of fluid residence time on radial

  13. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  14. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.

  15. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Adushita, Yasmin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from this project as well as two other separately funded projects: the United States Department of Energy-funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (IL-ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  16. 2010-2011 Working Groups website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010---2011 Inorganic P V Sept. 2 7 MSE c onf. r oom - 3 062A D ow Jamie P hillips l eading Oct. 1 8 POD r oom - 3 158 D ow Simon H uang ( Goldman) p resenting Nov. 1 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Sung J oo ( Pan) p resenting Nov. 1 5 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Andy M artin ( Mirecki---Millunchick) p resenting Dec. 1 3 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Larry A agesen ( Thornton) p resenting Feb. 1 3062A Dow ( MSE c onf), 9 :30am Jamie P hillip's g roup p resenting Feb. 2 2 3158 D ow ( POD r

  17. Topologically Massive Yang-Mills field on the Null-Plane: A Hamilton-Jacobi approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertin, M. C.; Pimentel, B. M.; Valcarcel, C. E.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2010-11-12

    Non-abelian gauge theories are super-renormalizable in 2+1 dimensions and suffer from infrared divergences. These divergences can be avoided by adding a Chern-Simons term, i.e., building a Topologically Massive Theory. In this sense, we are interested in the study of the Topologically Massive Yang-Mills theory on the Null-Plane. Since this is a gauge theory, we need to analyze its constraint structure which is done with the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. We are able to find the complete set of Hamiltonian densities, and build the Generalized Brackets of the theory. With the GB we obtain a set of involutive Hamiltonian densities, generators of the evolution of the system.

  18. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS IN THE FIRST GALACTIC QUADRANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, Susanna C.; Jackson, James M.; Rathborne, Jill M.; Chambers, Edward T.; Simon, Robert E-mail: jackson@bu.edu E-mail: simonr@ph1.uni-koeln.de E-mail: chambers@ph1.uni-koeln.de

    2013-02-10

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are believed to host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation. Because O stars typically travel short distances over their lifetimes, if IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star formation then these cold, dense molecular clouds should be located in or near the spiral arms in the Galaxy. The Galactic distribution of a large sample of IRDCs should therefore provide information on Galactic structure. Moreover, determination of distances enables mass and luminosity calculations. We have observed a large sample of IRDC candidates in the first Galactic quadrant in the dense gas tracer CS (2-1) using the Mopra telescope in order to determine kinematic distances from the molecular line velocities. We find that the IRDCs are concentrated around a Galactocentric distance of {approx}4.5 kpc, agreeing with the results of Simon et al. This distribution is consistent with the location of the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm. The group of IRDCs near the Sun in the first quadrant detected in {sup 13}CO (1-0) in Simon et al. is not detected in the CS data. This discrepancy arises from the differences in the critical densities between the {sup 13}CO (1-0) and CS (2-1) lines. We determine that the Midcourse Space Experiment selected IRDCs are not a homogeneous population, and {sup 13}CO (1-0) traces a population of IRDCs with lower column densities and lower 1.1 mm flux densities in addition to more dense IRDCs detected in CS. Masses of the first quadrant IRDCs are calculated from {sup 13}CO (1-0) maps. We find a strong peak in the Galactocentric IRDC mass surface density distribution at R {sub Gal} {approx} 4.5 kpc.

  20. Post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry at the Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) is located on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Until 1992, the primary mission of the Y-12 Plant was the production and fabrication of nuclear weapons components. Activities associated with these functions included production of lithium compounds, recovery of enriched uranium from scrap material, and fabrication of uranium and other materials into finished parts for assemblies. The Kerr Hollow Quarry was used for waste disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive and shock-sensitive chemicals and compressed gas cylinders. These materials were packaged in various containers and sank under the water in the quarry due to their great weight. Disposal activities were terminated in November, 1988 due to a determination by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation that the quarry was subject to regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1993. Methods of closure for the quarry were reviewed, and actions were initiated to close the quarry in accordance with closure requirements for interim status surface impoundments specified in Tennessee Rules 1200-1-11-.05(7) and 1200-1-11-.05(11). As part of these actions, efforts were made to characterize the physical and chemical nature of wastes that had been disposed of in the quarry, and to remove any containers or debris that were put into the quarry during waste disposal activities. Closure certification reports (Fraser et al. 1993 and Dames and Moore 1993) document closure activities in detail. This report contains the post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry site.

  1. Book review of Dragonfly Genera of the New World. An Illustrated and Annotated Key to the Anisoptera. Garrison, R.W., N. Von Ellenrieder and J.A. Louton, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, MD. xi+368 pp. Hardback, ISBN 0-8018-8446-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannings, R.A.

    2007-03-15

    This superb book is the most important reference on the Order Odonata to appear since the 1999 publication of Philip Corbet's monumental work on the behavior and ecology of Odonata. In the context of specimen identification and faunistics, it is the most significant contribution in decades, for it opens a new door to the most diverse and least known dragonfly fauna on Earth, that of the Neotropical Region. The book treats the genera of all the New World dragonflies, but while the Nearctic Anisoptera (at least north of the Mexican border) is extensively summarized in many taxonomic and identification manuals (e.g., Needham et al. 2000), the Neotropical fauna remains rather poorly known. Much of it still is undescribed and taxonomic syntheses are few and far between. This is partly because of its huge diversity, the remoteness of much of the region, and the relative scarcity of specimens in collections. As T. W. Donnelly (2006) noted in a recent review of this book, the New World tropics have always been a challenge to biologists in many disciplines because the region was first colonized by the Spanish and Portuguese who largely lacked the tradition of natural history studies characteristic of the British, French, Dutch and Germans in Africa, India or Southeast Asia. In South America there simply was no F. C. Fraser to write an equivalent to his three volumes on the Odonata in The Fauna of British India. Borror (1945) was an early and wonderful resource for deciphering the genera of the large family Libellulidae in the Americas. Calvert's hard-to-find contributions on the Odonata (1902-1908) in the Biologia Centrali-Americana helped students of the Central American fauna; the updated equivalent by Foerster (2001) for Mesoamerican genera is also important. But as far as syntheses and overviews, that's about all there was - until now.

  2. MODELING ANALYSIS FOR GROUT HOPPER WASTE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2012-01-04

    The Saltstone facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout nuclear waste slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The primary objective of the work was to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet.

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.; Gauglitz, P.

    2012-01-03

    In support of Hanford's feed delivery of high level waste (HLW) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), pilot-scale testing and demonstrations with simulants containing cohesive particles were performed as a joint collaboration between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants, and the resulting non-Newtonian rheology, have on tank mixing and batch transfer of large and dense seed particles. The work addressed the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance in a pilot-scale system. Kaolin slurries with a range of wt% concentrations to vary the Bingham yield stress were used in all the non-Newtonian simulants. To study the effects of just increasing the liquid viscosity (no yield stress) on mixing and batch transfers, a glycerol/water mixture was used. Stainless steel 100 micron particles were used as seed particles due to their density and their contrasting color to the kaolin and glycerol. In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work addresses the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. This work is follow-on to the previous tasks 'Demonstration of Mixer Jet Pump Rotational Sensitivity on Mixing and Transfers of the AY-102 Tank' and 'Demonstration of Simulated Waste Transfers from Tank AY-102 to the Hanford Waste Treatment Facility'. The cohesive simulants were investigated and selected jointly by SRNL and PNNL and a white paper was written on this evaluation. The testing and demonstrations of cohesive simulants was a joint effort performed as collaboration between SRNL and PNNL staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using the 1/22nd scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. Seed particles are particles of contracting color added to mixing tank for visual inspection and an indicator of how well the contents of the tank are mixing. Also the seed particles serve as a measuring stick for how well the contents of the tank are transferred from the mixing tank during batch transfers. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative.

  4. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

  5. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

  6. Meson transition form factors in light-front holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Cao Fuguang; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2011-10-01

    We study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M}{gamma}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}{sup *}{yields}M using light-front holographic methods. The Chern-Simons action, which is a natural form in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, is required to describe the anomalous coupling of mesons to photons using holographic methods and leads directly to an expression for the photon-to-pion TFF for a class of confining models. Remarkably, the predicted pion TFF is identical to the leading order QCD result where the distribution amplitude has asymptotic form. The Chern-Simons form is local in AdS space and is thus somewhat limited in its predictability. It only retains the qq component of the pion wave function, and further, it projects out only the asymptotic form of the meson distribution amplitude. It is found that in order to describe simultaneously the decay process {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and the pion TFF at the asymptotic limit, a probability for the qq component of the pion wave function P{sub qq}=0.5 is required, thus giving indication that the contributions from higher Fock states in the pion light-front wave function need to be included in the analysis. The probability for the Fock state containing four quarks P{sub qqqq}{approx}10%, which follows from analyzing the hadron matrix elements for a dressed current model, agrees with the analysis of the pion elastic form factor using light-front holography including higher Fock components in the pion wave function. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons are also presented. The rapid growth of the pion TFF exhibited by the BABAR data at high Q{sup 2} is not compatible with the models discussed in this article, whereas the theoretical calculations are in agreement with the experimental data for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} TFFs.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  8. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-?tier international peer-?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-?term research in CCS-?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-?on, applied learning experiences.

  9. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  10. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  11. Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface. Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozley, Peter; Evans, James; Dewers, Thomas

    2014-10-31

    We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault-to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation reservoir/caprock interface in order to extend our work to a reservoir/caprock pair this is currently being assessed for long-term carbon storage. These analyses indicate that interface features similar to those observed at the Utah sites 3 were not observed. Although not directly related to our main study topic, one byproduct of our investigation is documentation of exceptionally high degrees of heterogeneity in the pore-size distribution of the Mount Simon Sandstone. This suggests that the unit has a greater-than-normal potential for residual trapping of supercritical CO2.

  12. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO?-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO?), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO? emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO?. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO? without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO?-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (91019860 kPa [13201430 psi] and 3242C [90 108F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO? as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this study suggests only limited potential for the release of United States Environmental Protection Agency regulated inorganic contaminants into potable water sources. Short-term core flood experiments further verify that the carbonate reactions occurring in Knox Group reservoir samples reach equilibrium rapidly. The core flood experiments also lend insight to pressure changes that may occur during CO? injection. The Maquoketa Shale experiments reveal that this rock is initially chemically reactive when in contact with CO? and brine. However, due to the conservative nature of silicate and clay reaction kinetics and the rapid equilibration of carbonate reactions that occur in the shale, these reactions would not present a significant risk to the competency of the shale as an effective seal rock.

  13. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauders affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant ?, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and YangMills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the YangMills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with Yorks integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the ChernSimons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: WheelerDeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauders program. WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  14. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 oC; however, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  15. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  16. Decaying vector dark matter as an explanation for the 3.5 keV line from galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Akbarieh, Amin Rezaei E-mail: am_rezaei@physics.sharif.ir

    2014-11-01

    We present a Vector Dark Matter (VDM) model that explains the 3.5 keV line recently observed in the XMM-Newton observatory data from galaxy clusters. In this model, dark matter is composed of two vector bosons, V and V', which couple to the photon through an effective generalized Chern-Simons coupling, g{sub V}. V' is slightly heavier than V with a mass splitting m{sub V'}m{sub V}?3.5 keV. The decay of V' to V and a photon gives rise to the 3.5 keV line. The production of V and V' takes place in the early universe within the freeze-in framework through the effective g{sub V} coupling when m{sub V'}

  17. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-07

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  18. An overview of biopulping consortia research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, M.; Lirk, T.K.

    1996-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a 8-year biopulping research effort conducted under the auspices of two biopulping consortia, involving the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, the Forest Products Laboratory, and the industry. Biopulping, defined as the fungal pretreatment of wood chips for pulping, is an environmentally benign process that saves at least 30% electrical energy during mechanical refining, and improves paper quality in a 2-week period during laboratory trials. A rapid method of evaluating the benefits of biopulping has been found using the Simons staining procedures. We have identified a white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora which is effective on both hardwood and softwood species. This fungus can perform biopulping effectively if chips are steamed using the atmospheric steam for a very short period of time prior to fungal inoculation. Also, one of the major costs during the scale-up of biopulping is inoculum production. To this end, we have reduced the amount of inoculum dramatically (from 3 kg to 0.25 g dry weight of fungus per ton of dry wood) by adding corn steep liquor to the mycelial suspension. Current research is focused on large-scale decontamination of chips and maintenance of suitable temperature, aeration and moisture in chip piles so that biopulping can become a successful industrial process.

  19. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  20. Basic-research foundations for public-education programs in energy conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margolin, J B; Misch, M R

    1980-09-01

    The processes whereby people make decisions about specific behavior, the forces that operate on these decisions, and the interaction of several decisions and their modifying effect upon each other are studied. An overview of the current approach to decision study and behavior-change studies is presented. Brief papers prepared by such experts as Maccoby, Tversky, Cialdine, Margolin, Simon, Heider, Festinger, and Lervin are presented. Methodological considerations are discussed. Task B focuses on the specific issue of the purchase of energy-efficient appliances. Task C investigates individual and small-group data-quantification techniques. Task D explains monitoring of ongoing energy-relevant consumer/purchaser surveys. A cost-benefit analysis is made and discussed in Task E of other public and private information programs designed to serve the public welfare. A number of useful findings are presented with the caveat that cost-benefit analysis is not a precise technique. The application of this study to the needs of the energy-conservation program is summarized. (MCW)

  1. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  2. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Marine Ecotoxicology Research Station; Long, E.R. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); MacDonald, D.D. [MacDonald Environmental Sciences Ltd., Ladysmith, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  4. Application of electro acoustics for dewatering pharmaceutical sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golla, P.S.; Johnson, H.W. ) Senthilnathan, P.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Application of electro acoustic principles for dewatering has been developed by Battelle Institute. The Department of Energy, Battelle Institute, and Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley, have jointly developed an Electro Acoustic Dewatering press (EAD press). The EAD press applies a combination of mechanical pressure, electrical current and ultrasonics. This press is utilized after conventional dewatering devices and can remove up to 50% water from filtered sludge cake at a fraction of the cost incurred in existing thermal drying devices. The dominant mechanism of sludge dewatering by EAD press is electro-osmosis due to the application of a direct current field. Electro-osmosis is caused by an electrical double layer of oppositely charged ions formed at the solid liquid interface, which is characterized by zeta potential. The ultrasonic fields help electro-osmosis by consolidation of the filter cake and by release of inaccessible liquid. The EAD press has been tested successfully on a variety of materials including apple pomace, corn gluten, sewage sludge, and coal fines. A three week long full scale trial was conducted successfully at a pharmaceutical industry to determine the application of this technology for dewatering waste activated sludge.

  5. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  6. Sauk structural elements and depositional response in Ohio and northern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coogan, A.H.; Peng, Shengfeng (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Three area structural elements were inherited from Precambrian events--the Rome Trough, Middle Run trough at the Grenville Line, and the Ohio platform on part of the more stable Grenville Province. They strongly influence the type of basal Sauk clastic and non-clastic deposits as documented from hundreds of wells in Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky. These elements and the topography resulting from erosion during the Lipalian Interval most directly influence sedimentation during the onlap phase of the basal Sauk Sequence. Clastic wedge-base deposits are the Mt. Simon, Rome'', and Eau Claire formations. Deposition of the middle Cambrian Conasauga Shale coincides with the maximum marine onlap and wedge middle position. Upper Sauk Sequence deposition of the Knox Group carbonate rocks (Cooper Ridge Dolomite, Beekmantown Dolomite) and their interbedded clastic units (Steam Corners and Rose Run formations) represents the shallowing upward, pulsating clastic depositional events which anticipate the differential uplift and erosion that occurred later during the Taconic Orogeny and Early Ordovician hiatus. New Taconic structural elements involve the uplift of the central Ohio platform on the western part of the Grenville Province along reactivated, pre-Grenville sutures identified by CoCorp seismic lines. Platform uplift exposes lower Knox rocks to erosion. Younger Knox rocks are preserved east of the fault line zone. The Appalachian Basin's western edge is marked at this time by the trend of the Rose Run and Beekmantown subcrop below the Knox Unconformity surface and by the edge of the high magnetic intensity basement.

  7. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with the FLUENT{trademark} codes. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet. The modeling results show that when the two-stage agitator consisting of a 45{sup o} pitched propeller and radial flat-plate blades is run at 140 rpm speed with 28 in diameter, the agitator provides an adequate stirring of the feed materials for a wide range of yield stresses (1 to 21 Pa) and the vortex system is shed into the remote region of the tank boundary by the blade passage in an efficient way. The results of this modeling study were used to develop the design guidelines for the agitator stirring and dispersion of the Saltstone feed materials in a hopper tank.

  8. Review Of Rheology Models For Hanford Waste Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-26

    The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste - waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ''One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant'' that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes. The equations described in Meacham's report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations; Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction; Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign; o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks; o Blends from the qualification tanks; Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation experience). As experience is ga

  9. Geological Carbon Sequestration Storage Resource Estimates for the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone, Illinois and Michigan Basins, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, David; Ellett, Kevin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Midwest of the United States is a primary target for potential geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations. The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the Cambro-Ordovician strata in the Illinois and Michigan Basins above the basal Mount Simon Sandstone since the Mount Simon is the subject of other investigations including a demonstration-scale injection at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project. The primary reservoir targets investigated in this study are the middle Ordovician St Peter Sandstone and the late Cambrian to early Ordovician Knox Group carbonates. The topic of this report is a regional-scale evaluation of the geologic storage resource potential of the St Peter Sandstone in both the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Multiple deterministic-based approaches were used in conjunction with the probabilistic-based storage efficiency factors published in the DOE methodology to estimate the carbon storage resource of the formation. Extensive data sets of core analyses and wireline logs were compiled to develop the necessary inputs for volumetric calculations. Results demonstrate how the range in uncertainty of storage resource estimates varies as a function of data availability and quality, and the underlying assumptions used in the different approaches. In the simplest approach, storage resource estimates were calculated from mapping the gross thickness of the formation and applying a single estimate of the effective mean porosity of the formation. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates ranging from 3.3 to 35.1 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 1.0 to 11.0 Gt in the Illinois Basin at the P10 and P90 probability level, respectively. The second approach involved consideration of the diagenetic history of the formation throughout the two basins and used depth-dependent functions of porosity to derive a more realistic spatially variable model of porosity rather than applying a single estimate of porosity throughout the entire potential reservoir domains. The second approach resulted in storage resource estimates of 3.0 to 31.6 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 0.6 to 6.1 Gt in the Illinois Basin. The third approach attempted to account for the local-scale variability in reservoir quality as a function of both porosity and permeability by using core and log analyses to calculate explicitly the net effective porosity at multiple well locations, and interpolate those results throughout the two basins. This approach resulted in storage resource estimates of 10.7 to 34.7 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 11.2 to 36.4 Gt in the Illinois Basin. A final approach used advanced reservoir characterization as the most sophisticated means to estimating storage resource by defining reservoir properties for multiple facies within the St Peter formation. This approach was limited to the Michigan Basin since the Illinois Basin data set did not have the requisite level of data quality and sampling density to support such an analysis. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates of 15.4 Gt to 50.1 Gt for the Michigan Basin. The observed variability in results from the four different approaches is evaluated in the context of data and methodological constraints, leading to the conclusion that the storage resource estimates from the first two approaches may be conservative, whereas the net porosity based approaches may over-estimate the resource.

  10. Modeling quasi-static poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2007-11-01

    Since the formulation of poroelasticity (Biot(1941)) and its reformulation (Rice & Cleary(1976)), there have been many efforts to solve the coupled system of equations. Perhaps because of the complexity of the governing equations, most of the work has been directed towards finding numerical solutions. For example, Lewis and co-workers published early papers (Lewis & Schrefler(1978); Lewis et al.(1991)Lewis, Schrefler, & Simoni) concerned with finite-element methods for computing consolidation, subsidence, and examining the importance of coupling. Other early work dealt with flow in a deformable fractured medium (Narasimhan & Witherspoon 1976); Noorishad et al.(1984)Noorishad, Tsang, & Witherspoon. This effort eventually evolved into a general numerical approach for modeling fluid flow and deformation (Rutqvist et al.(2002)Rutqvist, Wu, Tsang, & Bodvarsson). As a result of this and other work, numerous coupled, computer-based algorithms have emerged, typically falling into one of three categories: one-way coupling, loose coupling, and full coupling (Minkoff et al.(2003)Minkoff, Stone, Bryant, Peszynska, & Wheeler). In one-way coupling the fluid flow is modeled using a conventional numerical simulator and the resulting change in fluid pressures simply drives the deformation. In loosely coupled modeling distinct geomechanical and fluid flow simulators are run for a sequence of time steps and at the conclusion of each step information is passed between the simulators. In full coupling, the fluid flow and geomechanics equations are solved simultaneously at each time step (Lewis & Sukirman(1993); Lewis & Ghafouri(1997); Gutierrez & Lewis(2002)). One disadvantage of a purely numerical approach to solving the governing equations of poroelasticity is that it is not clear how the various parameters interact and influence the solution. Analytic solutions have an advantage in that respect; the relationship between the medium and fluid properties is clear from the form of the solution. Unfortunately, analytic solutions are only available for highly idealized conditions, such as a uniform (Rudnicki(1986)) or one-dimensional (Simon et al.(1984)Simon, Zienkiewicz, & Paul; Gajo & Mongiovi(1995); Wang & Kumpel(2003)) medium. In this paper I derive an asymptotic, semi-analytic solution for coupled deformation and flow. The approach is similar to trajectory- or ray-based methods used to model elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation (Aki & Richards(1980); Kline & Kay(1979); Kravtsov & Orlov(1990); Keller & Lewis(1995)) and, more recently, diffusive propagation (Virieux et al.(1994)Virieux, Flores-Luna, & Gibert; Vasco et al.(2000)Vasco, Karasaki, & Keers; Shapiro et al.(2002)Shapiro, Rothert, Rath, & Rindschwentner; Vasco(2007)). The asymptotic solution is valid in the presence of smoothly-varying, heterogeneous flow properties. The situation I am modeling is that of a formation with heterogeneous flow properties and uniform mechanical properties. The boundaries of the layer may vary arbitrary and can define discontinuities in both flow and mechanical properties. Thus, using the techniques presented here, it is possible to model a stack of irregular layers with differing mechanical properties. Within each layer the hydraulic conductivity and porosity can vary smoothly but with an arbitrarily large magnitude. The advantages of this approach are that it produces explicit, semi-analytic expressions for the arrival time and amplitude of the Biot slow and fast waves, expressions which are valid in a medium with heterogeneous properties. As shown here, the semi-analytic expressions provide insight into the nature of pressure and deformation signals recorded at an observation point. Finally, the technique requires considerably fewer computer resources than does a fully numerical treatment.

  11. Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, M. I.; Kim, U.-J.

    2002-02-26

    We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work to the human genome project has been recognized in the publication both by the international consortium and the NIH of a draft sequence of the human genome in Nature last year. Dr. Shizuya was acknowledged in the authorship of that landmark paper. Dr. Simon was also an author on the Venter/Adams Celera project sequencing the human genome that was published in Science last year.

  12. Evaluating the Suitability for CO2 Storage at the FutureGen 2.0 Site, Morgan County, Illinois, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Sullivan, E. C.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Kelley, Mark E.; White, Signe K.; Appriou, Delphine; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gerst, Jacqueline L.; Gupta, Neeraj; Horner, Jacob A.; McNeil, Caitlin; Moody, Mark A.; Rike, William M.; Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Zeller, Evan R.; Zhang, Z. F.; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Humphreys, Kenneth K.

    2013-08-05

    FutureGen 2.0 site will be the first near-zero emission power plant with fully integrated long-term storage in a deep, non-potable saline aquifer in the United States. The proposed FutureGen 2.0 CO2 storage site is located in northeast Morgan County, Illinois, U.S.A., forty-eight kilometres from the Meredosia Energy Center where a large-scale oxy-combustion demonstration will be conducted. The demonstration will involve > 90% carbon capture, which will produce more than one million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 per year. The CO2 will be compressed at the power plant and transported via pipeline to the storage site. To examine CO2 storage potential of the site, a 1,467m characterization well (FGA#1) was completed in December 2011. The target reservoir for CO2 storage is the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Elmhurst Sandstone Member of the lower Eau Claire Formation for a combined thickness of 176 m. Confining beds of the overlying Lombard and Proviso Members (upper Eau Claire Formation) reach a thickness of 126 m. Characterization of the target injection zone and the overlying confining zone was based on wellbore data, cores, and geophysical logs, along with surface geophysical (2-D seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity), and structural data collected during the initial stage of the project . Based on this geological model, 3D simulations of CO2 injection and redistribution were conducted using STOMP-CO2, a multiphase flow and transport simulator. After this characterization stage, it appears that the injection site is a suitable geologic system for CO2 sequestration and that the injection zone is sufficient to receive up to 33 MMT of CO2 at a rate of 1.1 MMT/yr. GHGT-11 conference

  13. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  14. CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

    2012-05-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin ?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

  15. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  16. Laboratory studies evaluating CO2 flood impact on the geomechanics of whole core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.

    2005-06-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the injected CO2 in these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. Migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals may help lead to the utilization of this sequestration methodology. Co-injection of a mineral reactant slurry, either with the CO2 or in separate, secondary injection wells, could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by providing the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates along the periphery of the injection plume. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry co-injection strategies, by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  17. Concrete Model Descriptions and Summary of Benchmark Studies for Blast Effects Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C; Kokko, E; Darnell, I; Dunn, T; Hagler, L; Leininger, L

    2005-07-21

    Concrete is perhaps one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. Engineers use it to build massive concrete dams, concrete waterways, highways, bridges, and even nuclear reactors. The advantages of using concrete is that it can be cast into any desired shape, it is durable, and very economical compared to structural steel. The disadvantages are its low tensile strength, low ductility, and low strength-to-weight ratio. Concrete is a composite material that consists of a coarse granular material, or aggregate, embedded in a hard matrix of material, or cement, which fills the gaps between the aggregates and binds them together. Concrete properties, however, vary widely. The properties depend on the choice of materials used and the proportions for a particular application, as well as differences in fabrication techniques. Table 1 provides a listing of typical engineering properties for structural concrete. Properties also depend on the level of concrete confinement, or hydrostatic pressure, the material is being subjected to. In general, concrete is rarely subjected to a single axial stress. The material may experience a combination of stresses all acting simultaneously. The behavior of concrete under these combined stresses are, however, extremely difficult to characterize. In addition to the type of loading, one must also consider the stress history of the material. Failure is determined not only by the ultimate stresses, but also by the rate of loading and the order in which these stresses were applied. The concrete model described herein accounts for this complex behavior of concrete. It was developed by Javier Malvar, Jim Wesevich, and John Crawford of Karagozian and Case, and Don Simon of Logicon RDA in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's programs. The model is an enhanced version of the Concrete/Geological Material Model 16 in the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D. The modifications that were made to the original model ensured that the material response followed experimental observations for standard uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial tests for both tension and compression type loading. A disadvantage of using this material model, however, is the overwhelming amount of input that is required from the user. Therefore, the goal of this report is to provide future users with the tools necessary for successfully using this model.

  18. SIMPLIFIED PREDICTIVE MODELS FOR CO2 SEQUESTRATION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH TOPICAL REPORT ON TASK #4 REDUCED-ORDER METHOD (ROM) BASED MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Jin, Larry; He, Jincong; Durlofsky, Louis

    2015-06-30

    Reduced-order models provide a means for greatly accelerating the detailed simulations that will be required to manage CO2 storage operations. In this work, we investigate the use of one such method, POD-TPWL, which has previously been shown to be effective in oil reservoir simulation problems. This method combines trajectory piecewise linearization (TPWL), in which the solution to a new (test) problem is represented through a linearization around the solution to a previously-simulated (training) problem, with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which enables solution states to be expressed in terms of a relatively small number of parameters. We describe the application of POD-TPWL for CO2-water systems simulated using a compositional procedure. Stanford’s Automatic Differentiation-based General Purpose Research Simulator (AD-GPRS) performs the full-order training simulations and provides the output (derivative matrices and system states) required by the POD-TPWL method. A new POD-TPWL capability introduced in this work is the use of horizontal injection wells that operate under rate (rather than bottom-hole pressure) control. Simulation results are presented for CO2 injection into a synthetic aquifer and into a simplified model of the Mount Simon formation. Test cases involve the use of time-varying well controls that differ from those used in training runs. Results of reasonable accuracy are consistently achieved for relevant well quantities. Runtime speedups of around a factor of 370 relative to full- order AD-GPRS simulations are achieved, though the preprocessing needed for POD-TPWL model construction corresponds to the computational requirements for about 2.3 full-order simulation runs. A preliminary treatment for POD-TPWL modeling in which test cases differ from training runs in terms of geological parameters (rather than well controls) is also presented. Results in this case involve only small differences between training and test runs, though they do demonstrate that the approach is able to capture basic solution trends. The impact of some of the detailed numerical treatments within the POD-TPWL formulation is considered in an Appendix. ii

  19. Maquoketa Shale Caprock Integrity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Knox Project objective is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambrian-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone (St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite) as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. The suitability of the St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite to serve as reservoirs for CO2 sequestration is discussed in separate reports. In this report the data gathered from the Knox project, the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration project (IL-ICCS) are used to make some conclusions about the suitability of the Maquoketa shale as a confining layer for CO2 sequestration. These conclusions are then upscaled to basin-wide inferences based on regional knowledge. Data and interpretations (stratigraphic, petrophysical, fractures, geochemical, risk, seismic) applicable to the Maquoketa Shale from the above mentioned projects was inventoried and summarized. Based on the analysis of these data and interpretations, the Maquoketa Shale is considered to be an effective caprock for a CO2 injection project in either the Potosi Dolomite or St. Peter Sandstone because it has a suitable thickness (~200ft. ~61m), advantageous petrophysical properties (low effective porosity and low permeability), favorable geomechanical properties, an absence of observable fractures and is regionally extensive. Because it is unlikely that CO2 would migrate upward through the Maquoketa Shale, CO2, impact to above lying fresh water aquifers is unlikely. Furthermore, the observations indicate that CO2 injected into the St. Peter Sandstone or Potosi Dolomite may never even migrate up into the Maquoketa Shale at a high enough concentrations or pressure to threaten the integrity of the caprock. Site specific conclusions were reached by unifying the data and conclusions from the IBDP, ICCS and the Knox projects. In the Illinois Basin, as one looks further away from these sites, the formation characteristics are expected to vary. The degree of how well this data can be extrapolated throughout the Basins (regionalized) is difficult to quantify because of the limited amount of data collected on the Maquoketa Shale away from IBDP, IL-ICCS and the Knox projects. Data gathered from the IBDP/IL-ICCS/Knox projects were used to make conclusions about the suitability of the Maquoketa shale as a confining layer for CO2 sequestration. This study indicates that the Maquoketa Shale would be a suitable caprock for a CO2 injection program in either the Potosi Dolomite or St. Peter Sandstone.

  20. Final Report for 3-year grant no. DE-FG05-85ER40226. Investigations in Elementary Particle Theory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2014-11-23

    The research interests of our three Co-PIs complement each other very well. Kephart works mainly on models of particle unification in four or higher dimensions, on aspects of gravity such as inflation, black-holes, and the very early Universe, and on applications of knot theory and topology to various physical systems (including gluon dynamics). Scherrer works mainly on aspects of the intermediate-aged Universe, including dark matter and dark energy, and particle physics in the early Universe. Weiler works mainly on neutrino physics, dark matter signatures, and extreme particle-astrophysics in the late Universe, including origins of the highest-energy cosmic-rays and gamma-rays, and the future potential of neutrino astrophysics. Kephart and Weiler have lately devoted some research attention to the LHC and its reach for probing physics beyond the Standard Model. During the 3-year funding period, our grant supported one postdoc (Chiu Man Ho) and partially supported two students, Peter Denton and Lingjun Fu. Chiu Man collaborated with all three of the Co-PIs during the 3-year funding period and published 16 refereed papers. Chiu Man has gone on to a postdoc with Steve Hsu at Michigan State University. Denton and Fu will both receive their PhDs during the 2014-15 academic year. The total number of our papers published in refereed journals by the three co-PIs during the period of this grant (2011-present) is 54. The total number of talks given by the group members during this time period, including seminars, colloquia, and conference presentations, is 47. Some details of the accomplishments of our DOE funded researchers during the grant period include Weiler being named a Simons Fellow in 2013. He presented an invited TEDx talk in 2012. His paper on closed timelike curves (2013) garnered a great deal of national publicity. Scherrers paper on the little rip (2011) fostered a new area of cosmological research, and the name little rip has now entered the lexicon of cosmology. His paper on anapole dark matter (2013) generated a great deal of interest in the community. Kephart was one of the co-organizers for a 5-month program on applications of topology to physics and biology, and a Visiting Fellow at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge, UK for the fall semester of 2012. His research there resulted in an extended publication on topologically stabilized closed QCD flux tube states.

  1. Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO{sub 2} Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, Brenda

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to expose and train multiple students in geological tools that are essential to reservoir characterization and geologic sequestration including but not limited to advanced petrological methods, mineralogical methods, and geochemical methods; core analysis, and geophysical well-log interpretation. These efforts have included training of multiple students through geologically based curriculum and research using advanced petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical methods. In whole, over the last 3+ years, this award has supported 5,828 hours of student research, supporting the work of several graduate and undergraduate students. They have all received training directly related to ongoing CO{sub 2} sequestration demonstrations. The students have all conducted original scientific research on topics related to understanding the importance of lithological, textural, and compositional variability in formations that are being targeted as CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs and seals. This research was linked to the Mount Simon Sandstone reservoir and overlying Eau Claire Formation seal in the Illinois Basin- a system where over one million tons of CO{sub 2} are actively being injected with the first large-scale demonstration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage in the U.S. Student projects focused specifically on 1) reservoir porosity characterization and evaluation, 2) petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical evidence of fluid-related diagenesis in the caprock, 3) textural changes in reservoir samples exposed to experimental CO{sub 2} + brine conditions, 4) controls on spatial heterogeneity in composition and texture in both the reservoir and seal, 5) the implications of small-scale fractures within the reservoir, and 6) petrographic and stable isotope analyses of carbonates in the seal to understand the burial history of the system. The student-led research associated with this project provided real-time and hands-on experience with a relevant CO{sub 2} system, provided relevant information to the regional partnerships who are working within these formations, and provides more broadly applicable understanding and method development for other carbon capture and storage systems.

  2. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6Gy (1.8cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8Gy administered with CBs (0.9cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if>45 pCR were registered (? error = 0.05; ? error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36months (range: 7-85months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very encouraging local control rate, with acceptable toxicity.

  3. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  4. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  5. Utilization of the St. Peter Sandstone in the Illinois Basin for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, Robert; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This project is part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under cooperative agreement DE-FE0002068 from 12/08/2009 through 9/31/2014. The study is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. This report evaluates the potential injectivity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data acquired through funding in this project as well as existing data from two additional, separately funded projects: the US DOE funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which received a phase two award from DOE. This study addresses the question of whether or not the St. Peter Sandstone may serve as a suitable target for CO2 sequestration at locations within the Illinois Basin where it lies at greater depths (below the underground source of drinking water (USDW)) than at the IBDP site. The work performed included numerous improvements to the existing St. Peter reservoir model created in 2010. Model size and spatial resolution were increased resulting in a 3 fold increase in the number of model cells. Seismic data was utilized to inform spatial porosity distribution and an extensive core database was used to develop porosity-permeability relationships. The analysis involved a Base Model representative of the St. Peter at in-situ conditions, followed by the creation of two hypothetical models at in-situ + 1,000 feet (ft.) (300 m) and in-situ + 2,000 ft. (600 m) depths through systematic depthdependent adjustment of the Base Model parameters. Properties for the depth shifted models were based on porosity versus depth relationship extracted from the core database followed by application of the porosity-permeability relationship. Each of the three resulting models were used as input to dynamic simulations with the single well injection target of 3.2 million tons per annum (MTPA) for 30 years using an appropriate fracture gradient based bottom hole pressure limit for each injection level. Modeling results are presented in terms of well bottomhole pressure (BHP), injection rate profiles, and three-dimensional (3D) saturation and differential pressure volumes at selected simulation times. Results suggest that the target CO2 injection rate of 3.2 MTPA may be achieved in the St. Peter Sandstone at in-situ conditions and at the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) depth using a single injector well. In the latter case the target injection rate is achieved after a ramp up period which is caused by multi-phase flow effects and thus subject to increased modeling uncertainty. Results confirm that the target rate may not be achieved at the in-situ +2,000 ft. (600 m) level even with multiple wells. These new modeling results for the in-situ case are more optimistic than previous modeling results. This difference is attributed to the difference in methods and data used to develop model permeability distributions. Recommendations for further work include restriction of modeling activity to the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) and shallower depth interval, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and refinement of porosity and permeability estimates through depth and area selective querying of the available core database. It is also suggested that further modeling efforts include scope for evaluating project performance in terms of metrics directly related to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Class VI permit requirements for the area of review (AoR) definition and post injection site closure monitoring.

  6. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  7. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  8. Envisioning an Ecologically Sustainable Campus At New England College

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula Amato; Gregory Palmer

    2010-09-30

    Appropriation funding for our project Ecologically Sustainable Campus - New England College (NH). 67.09. supported five environmental initiatives: (1) a wood pellet boiler for our Science Building, (2) solar hot water panels and systems for five campus buildings, (3) campus-wide energy lighting efficiency project, (4) new efficiency boiler system in Colby Residence Hall, and (5) energy efficient lighting system for the new artificial athletic turf field. (1) New England College purchased and installed a new wood pellet boiler in the Science Building. This new boiler serves as the primary heating source for this building. Our boiler was purchased through New England Wood Pellet, LLC, located in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. The boiler selected was a Swebo, P500. 300KW wood pellet boiler. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative include the installation of a wood pellet boiler system that is environmentally friendly, highly efficient, and represents a sustainable and renewable resource for New England College. This project was completed on December 15, 2010. (2) New England College purchased and installed solar hot water panels and systems for the Science Building, the Simon Center (student center), the H. Raymond Danforth Library, Gilmore Dining Hall, and Bridges Gymnasium. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLC, located in Weare, New Hampshire on this project. The solar panels are manufactured by Heat Transfer; the product is Heat Transfer 30-tube collector panels (Evacuated Tube Type) with stainless steel hardware. The interior equipment includes Super Stor Ultra stainless steel super insulated storage tank, Taco 009 Bronze circulator pump, Solar Relay Control Pack, and a Taco Thermal Expansion Tank. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative will allow the College to utilize the sun as an energy resource. These solar hot water panels and systems will alleviate our dependency on fossil fuel as our primary fuel resource and provide a reliable energy source that supplies the hot water needs for sanitation, dishwashing at our dining facilities, and shower facilities for our athletes. This project initiative was completed on June 30, 2010. (3) New England College has completed energy efficiency lighting projects throughout campus, which included upgrades and new systems throughout our buildings. This project also installed efficiency controls for the Lee Clement Arena and refrigeration equipment in the Gilmore Dining Hall. The College worked with Atlantic Energy Solutions, located in Foxboro, Massachusetts on our 50/50 energy efficiency lighting project and campus-wide audit. The actual implementation of the project was completed by D. Poole Electrical Services, located in Center Barnstead, New Hampshire. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative were to install energy efficient lighting systems throughout our campus buildings, which ultimately will provide New England College with a more efficient way to manage and control its energy use. This project initiative was completed on February 15, 2010. (4) New England College purchased and installed a high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall, which is the primary housing for our freshman. We purchased and installed two Buderus Boilers, model number G515/10 with two Riello Burners, model number RL 38/2. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLS, located in Weare, New Hampshire on the installation of this high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes for this initiative included the installation of a designed system of two boilers to provide redundancy for backup measures. This new system will provide New England College the flexibility to utilize just one smaller boiler to provide heat and hot water during non-peak periods thus continued reduction in energy use and our carbon footprint. This project initiative was completed on September 18, 2009. (5) New England College purchased and

  9. Risk Evaluation for CO2 Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup, Illinois Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, Ken; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO2 plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO2-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  10. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 20092014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional-scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO2 injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial-scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic-data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near-surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

  11. Risk Evaluation for CO{sub 2} Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-01-31

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO{sub 2} plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO{sub 2}-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  12. High Energy Density Physics and Applications with a State-of-the-Art Compact X-Pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat N

    2013-08-14

    Recent advances in technology has made possible to create matter with extremely high energy density (energy densities and pressure exceeding 1011 J/m3 and 1 Mbar respectively). The field is new and complex. The basic question for high energy density physics (HEDP) is how does matter behave under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, density and electromagnetic radiation? The conditions for studying HEDP are normally produced using high intensity short pulse laser, x-rays, particle beams and pulsed power z-pinches. Most of these installations occupy a large laboratory floor space and require a team consisting of a large number of scientists and engineers. This limits the number of experiments that can be performed to explore and understand the complex physics. A novel way of studying HEDP is with a compact x-pinch in university scale laboratory. The x-pinch is a configuration in which a pulsed current is passed through two or more wires placed between the electrodes making the shape of the letter X. Extreme conditions of magnetic field (> 200 MGauss for less than 1 ns), temperature (1 keV) and density (~ 1022 cm-3) are produced at the cross-point, where two wires make contact. Further, supersonic jets are produced on either side of the cross-point. The physics of the formation of the plasma at the cross-point is complex. It is not clear what role radiation plays in the formation of high energy density plasma (>> 1011 J/m3) at the cross-point. Nor it is understood how the supersonic jets are formed. Present numerical codes do not contain complex physics that can take into account some of these aspects. Indeed, a comprehensive experimental study could answer some of the questions, which are relevant to wide-ranging fields such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasmas, high intensity laser plasma interactions and radiation physics. The main aim of the proposal was to increase the fundamental understanding of high energy density physics and particularly address the key issues associated with x-pinches, which include radiation transport, energetic particle transport, supersonic jet formation, using state-of-the-art compact pulsed power drivers. All the primary objectives of the proposed work were met. These objectives include: Understanding of the fundamental physics of hot and dense plasma formation, implosion to less than 1 m size due to the radiation enhanced collapse and energetic electron heating, Study of the jet formation mechanism, which is of interest due to the astrophysical jets and deposition of energy by energetic electrons in jets, Characterization of an x-pinch as a point x-ray source for the phase contrast radiography of beryllium cryogenic targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments. The work carried out included a strong educational component involving both undergraduate and graduate students. Several undergraduate students from University of California San Diego participated in this project. A post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Simon Bott and two graduate students, David Haas and Erik Shipton contributed to every aspect of this project. The success of the project can be judged from the fact that fifteen peer-reviewed papers were published in high quality journals. In addition several presentations were made to a number of scientific meetings.

  13. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  14. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Executive Summary The Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) is managed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) and is led by the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. The project site is located on the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) property in Decatur, Illinois, and is a fully integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project that uses CO₂ captured from the ethanol-producing fermentation process at the ADM corn-processing plant (Finley et. al., 2013). IBDP has a goal of injecting one million tonnes of CO₂ into the basal sands of the Mt. Simon Sandstone over a three-year period. This is a multifaceted project, and this report details the planning and results of the drilling, completions, well testing, log data acquisition, and the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) aspects of the project. Three deep wells were planned for the IBDP: • The injection well: Injection Well #1 (CCS1); • The monitoring well (both in-zone and above seal): Verification Well #1 (VW1); and • The geophone monitoring well: Geophysical Monitoring Well #1 (GM1). The detailed plans for these wells are attached to the appendices of this document. The wells were drilled successfully with little deviation from the original plans. The biggest change from the plan to execution was the need to adjust for larger-than-expected loss of circulation in the Potosi section of the Knox Formation. The completions reports also attached to this document detail the well constructions as they were actually built. Injectivity testing was carried out, and the perforating plans were adjusted based on the results. Additional perforations and acidizing were performed as a result of the injectivity testing. The testing plans are detailed in this report along with the actual testing results. The injectivity testing results were used in the modeling and simulation efforts. Detailed HSE plans were developed and implemented during the planning and execution phases of the project. The implementation included an HSE Bridging Document, which served to unify the HSE policies of the project partners and key subcontractors. The HSE plan and actual HSE results are presented in this document. There were no recordable HSE incidents during the project. A detailed logging program was developed based on project needs. The log data were acquired in accordance with the plan, and both the plan and log results are presented in this report. Log data were heavily utilized by the research staff, modelers, reservoir engineers, and for technical and permitting efforts. 5 Several key lessons were learned during the project: • Safety in operations and execution is paramount and is only achieved through proper planning and behavior control. The certainty of this was reinforced through implementation of this lesson and the resultant flawless HSE performance during the project. • Losses of drilling fluid circulation were larger than anticipated within the Potosi Formation. Circulation was only recovered through cementing the loss zones. • When possible, minimizing complexity in permit requirements and well designs is preferable. • The size of the wells were outside of the standard experience and expertise typical within the basin, and therefore required substantial planning and ramp-up of contractors and partners to meet project objectives. • With multiple stakeholders and research partners, establishing objectives and requirements early and adhering to change request procedures throughout the project are critical to manage competing data and sampling objectives that may be detrimental to overall progress. The well construction and completion operations were successfully executed, with all wells built in a manner that achieved excellent wellbore integrity. Log planning involved a number of stakeholders and technical specialists. Data collection from logging, coring, and testing was excellent. Time and effort spent with the associated contractors and suppliers to develop a well plan beyond normal scope proved highly successful, resulting in a well-construction and completion project that surpassed expectations. The world-class HSE results also demonstrate the commitment of all stakeholders in the project. The details follow in the body of this document

  15. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013c, Property Modeling Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from this project as well as two other separately funded projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well #1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The intention was for 2.2 million tons per annum (2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the Task Error! Reference source not found., the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010") was re-run using a new injection scenario of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. The models size was insufficient to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case. In the preceding Task [1], the Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the Verification Well #2 (VW2) which was drilled in 2012. The porosity and permeability modeling was revised to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. In this Task, a new property modeling workflow was applied, where seismic inversion data guided the porosity mapping and geobody extraction. The static reservoir model was fully guided by PorosityCube interpretations and derivations coupled with petrophysical logs from three wells. The two main assumptions are: porosity features in the PorosityCube that correlate with lost circulation zones represent vugular zones, and that these vugular zones are laterally continuous. Extrapolation was done carefully to populate the vugular facies and their corresponding properties outside the seismic footprint up to the boundary of the 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km) model. Dynamic simulations were also run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013c. Reservoir simulation with the latest model gives a cumulative injection of 43 million tons (39 MT) in 30 years with a single well, which corresponds to 40% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first six months as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 1.8 million tons per annum (1.6 MTPA) in year 3 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. After, the injection rate declines gradually to 1.2 million tons per annum (1.1 MTPA) in year 18 and stays constant. This implies that a minimum of three (3) wells could be required in the Potosi to reach the injection target. The injectivity evaluated in this Task was higher compared to the preceding Task, since the current facies modeling (guided by the porosity map from the seismic inversion) indicated a higher density of vugs within the vugular zones. 5 As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. After 30 years of injection, the plume extends 13.7 mi (22 km) in E-W and 9.7 mi (16 km) in N-S directions. After injection finishes, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 60 years post-injection, the plume extends 14.2 mi (22.8 km) in E-W and 10 mi (16 km) in N-S directions, and remains constant as the remaining pressure gradient has become very low. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. The increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1,200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 10 psia (69 kPa) beyond 14 mi (23 km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The reservoir pressure declines rapidly during the first 30 years post injection and the initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after 100 years post-injection. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability and interconnectivity. The use of porosity mapping from seismic inversion might have reduced the uncertainty on the lateral vugs body distributions. However, major uncertainties on the Potosi vugs permeability remains. Therefore, injection test and pressure interference test among the wells could be considered to evaluate the local vugs permeability, extent, and interconnectivity. Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. Data acquisitions to characterize the fracture pressure gradient, the formation water properties, the relative permeability, and the capillary pressure could also be considered in order to allow a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi storage performance. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells and appropriate spacing to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  16. Potosi Reservoir Modeling; History and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO₂) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from two projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois, as well as data from the Illinois – Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (IL-ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well 1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for the Potosi Formation. The intention was for two million tonnes per annum (MTPA) of CO₂ to be injected for 20 years into the Potosi Formation. In 2013, updated reservoir models for the Cambrian Potosi Formation were evaluated. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the CCS1, VW1, and Verification Well 2 (VW2) wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from a larger 3D seismic survey, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The objective is to simulate the injection of CO₂ at a rate 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) for 30 years 106 million tons (96 MT total) into the Potosi Formation. The Potosi geomodeling efforts have evolved from using data from a single well in 2010 to the inclusion of data from three wells in 2013 which largely leverage the porosity and permeability logs plus knowledge of lost circulation zones. The first Potosi model (Potosi Geobody Model 2010) attempted to use the available seismic inversion data to inform the geomodel and predict vugular zones in advance of drilling VW1. Lost circulation zones in VW1 came in as the geologists predicted. The model was not implemented in subsequent simulation work. To date, reservoir models used for flow simulation work have relied predominately on Gaussian distributed properties (porosity and permeability) and have employed a single injection well. Potosi Model 2013b incorporated the new VW2 logs, and exhibited an extra level of sophistication by delineating the vugular intervals. This method added further realism that likely represents the best reservoir approximation to date. Where the 2010 reservoir models were 10 by 10 mi (16 by 16 km) in area, the 2013 models were expanded in size to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km). The latest reservoir simulations show that a minimum of four injectors might be required to meet target injection rates. Still, there is data that requires further scrutiny and modeling methodologies that require testing for the Potosi Formation. This work is currently ongoing, and the next phase of the reservoir modeling intends to implement valuable data like porosity derived from seismic inversion, seismically derived geobodies, or a combination of both to further define vugular zones and the porosity distribution within the Potosi Formation. Understanding the dual porosity, dual permeability character of the Potosi remains the greatest challenge in representing this formation. Further analysis of the FMI* fullbore formation microimager data may aid in assessing this uncertainty. The Potosi Formation is indeed an interesting formation, and recommendations to further characterize it are included in the following list: - Data acquisition to identify the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity could be considered to perform a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi Formation injectivity and capacity. This could be achieved by performing an injection test on a vugular interval to determine the vugs permeability, and an interference test between wells to evaluate the local vugs extent and interconnectivity. - A thorough study of the available FMI data may reveal specifics on estimating the vug to matrix ratio. This estimate could be used to further condition the porosity distribution. Porosity logs alone might underestimate the formation’s porosity associated with vugs. Porosity mapping derived from the seismic inversion could also be used in the succeeding task to characterize the lateral porosity distribution within the reservoir. This could involve the geobody methodology previously attempted in 2010. With or without seismic inversion porosity mapping, it is worth exploring whether increased lateral heterogeneity plays a significant role in Potosi injectivity. Investigations on vugular, dolomitic outcrops suggest that there may be significantly greater lateral heterogeneity than what has been modeled here. - The FMI data also reveals the presence of and helps describe open fractures. The presence of fractures will further enhance the formation’s permeability. The task of leveraging this data in the geomodeling effort still remains. Under the best of circumstances, this data describing open fractures may be combined with seismic attributes to delineate fracture corridors. Fracture modeling would certainly add another layer of sophistication to the model. Its contribution and applicability remain to be explored. - Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. - Currently there is no fracture gradient data available for the Potosi in the Decatur project area. The acquisition of the fracture pressure data could be considered to determine an appropriate maximum allowable bottomhole injection pressure. This would allow the evaluation of injectivity and the required number of wells in a more precise manner. - Special core analysis (SCAL) to determine the relative permeability and capillary pressure of the vugs and matrix could be considered to have a better estimation of the reservoir injectivity and plume extent. - Formation water sampling and analysis could be considered for the Potosi to estimate the water salinity and properties. A vertical flow performance evaluation could be considered for the succeeding task to determine the appropriate tubing size, the required injection tubing head pressure, and to investigate whether the corresponding well injection rate falls within the tubing erosional velocity limit. - A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  17. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was performed to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. Due to the major uncertainties on the vugs permeability, two models were built; the Pessimistic and Optimistic Cases. The Optimistic Case assumes vugs permeability of 9,000 mD, which is analog to the vugs permeability identified in the pressure fall off test of a waste water injector in the Tuscola site, approx. 40 miles (64.4km) away from the IBDP area. The Pessimistic Case assumes that the vugs permeability is equal to the log data, which does not take into account the permeability from secondary porosity. The probability of such case is deemed low and could be treated as the worst case scenario, since the contribution of secondary porosity to the permeability is neglected and the loss circulation events might correspond to a much higher permeability. It is considered important, however, to identify the range of possible reservoir performance since there are no rigorous data available for the vugs permeability. The Optimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.8 MTPA and cumulative injection of 26 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 27% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first year as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 0.8 MTPA in year 4 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. This implies that according to this preliminary model, a minimum of four (4) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. This result is lower than the injectivity estimated in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a (43 MT in 30 years), since the permeability model applied in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b is more conservative. This revision was deemed necessary to treat the uncertainty in a more appropriate manner. As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. For the Optimistic Case, the plume extends 17 miles (27.4km) in E-W and 14 miles (22.5km) in N-S directions after 30 years. After injection is completed, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 100 years post injection, the plume extends 20 miles (32.2km) in E-W and 15.5 miles (24.9km) in N-S directions. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. For the Optimistic Case, the increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 30 psia (206.8 kPa) beyond 14 miles (22.5km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after approximately 100 years post injection. The presence of matrix slows down the pressure dissipations. The Pessimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.2 MTPA and cumulative injection of 7 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 7% of the injection target. This implies that in the worst case scenario, a minimum of sixteen (16) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity. The different results indicated by the Optimistic and Pessimistic Cases signify the importance of vugs permeability characterization. Therefore, injection test and pressure interference test among the wells could be considered to evaluate the local vugs permeability, extent, and interconnectivity. Porosity mapping derived from the seismic inversion could also be used in the succeeding task to characterize the lateral porosity distribution within the reservoir. With or without seismic inversion porosity mapping, it is worth exploring whether increased lateral heterogeneity plays a significant role in Potosi injectivity. Investigations on vugular, dolomitic outcrops suggest that there may be significantly greater lateral heterogeneity than what has been modeled here. Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. Data acquisitions to characterize the fracture pressure gradient, the formation water properties, the relative permeability, and the capillary pressure could also be considered in order to allow a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi storage performance. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.