National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bin hamad al-attiyah

  1. Education City | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education City Education City November 15, 2005 - 2:44pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Let me begin by thanking my host for my visit to Qatar, His Excellency Abdullah Bin Hamad Al-Attiyah. It is truly a pleasure to be here with all of you at this very impressive facility. Two years ago, I traveled to Doha and visited Education City. I had the opportunity to see the first class that had entered the Weill-Cornell Medical School. It is amazing to come here two years

  2. hescore_2012_bins | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hescore2012bins.xlsx More Documents & Publications Energy Intensity Indicators Data NORTHEAST HOME HEATING OIL RESERVE TRIGGER MECHANISM DOE F 4200.34...

  3. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  4. Efficient binning for bitmap indices on high-cardinality attributes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2004-11-17

    Bitmap indexing is a common technique for indexing high-dimensional data in data warehouses and scientific applications. Though efficient for low-cardinality attributes, query processing can be rather costly for high-cardinality attributes due to the large storage requirements for the bitmap indices. Binning is a common technique for reducing storage costs of bitmap indices. This technique partitions the attribute values into a number of ranges, called bins, and uses bitmap vectors to represent bins (attribute ranges) rather than distinct values. Although binning may reduce storage costs, it may increase the access costs of queries that do not fall on exact bin boundaries (edge bins). For this kind of queries the original data values associated with edge bins must be accessed, in order to check them against the query constraints.In this paper we study the problem of finding optimal locations for the bin boundaries in order to minimize these access costs subject to storage constraints. We propose a dynamic programming algorithm for optimal partitioning of attribute values into bins that takes into account query access patterns as well as data distribution statistics. Mathematical analysis and experiments on real life data sets show that the optimal partitioning achieved by this algorithm can lead to a significant improvement in the access costs of bitmap indexing systems for high-cardinality attributes.

  5. Psychrometric Bin Analysis for Alternative Cooling Strategies in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; VanGeet, O.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Dean, J.; Kurnik, C.

    2011-01-01

    Data centers are significant energy users and require continuous cooling to maintain high levels of computing performance. The majority of data centers have direct-expansion cooling which typically accounts for approximately 50% of the energy usage of data centers. However, using typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) weather data and a simple psychometric bin analysis, alternative cooling strategies using a combination of economizer, evaporative, and supplemental DX cooling have been shown to be applicable in all climate zones in the United States. Average data center cooling energy savings across the U.S. was approximately 80%. Analysis of cooling energy savings is presented for various ASHRAE climate zones. The psychometric bin analysis is conducted for the ASHRAE recommended and allowable operating environment zones, as well as, a modified allowable operating environment. Control strategies are discussed. Finally, examples of energy efficient data centers using alternative cooling strategies are presented.

  6. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions You are ...

  7. Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Discusses plan, baselining, and modeling, for new light ...

  8. Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration effectively deer12_suresh.pdf (986.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine

  9. Constant-complexity stochastic simulation algorithm with optimal binning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanft, Kevin R.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2015-08-21

    At the molecular level, biochemical processes are governed by random interactions between reactant molecules, and the dynamics of such systems are inherently stochastic. When the copy numbers of reactants are large, a deterministic description is adequate, but when they are small, such systems are often modeled as continuous-time Markov jump processes that can be described by the chemical master equation. Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) generates exact trajectories of these systems, but the amount of computational work required for each step of the original SSA is proportional to the number of reaction channels, leading to computational complexity that scales linearly with the problem size. The original SSA is therefore inefficient for large problems, which has prompted the development of several alternative formulations with improved scaling properties. We describe an exact SSA that uses a table data structure with event time binning to achieve constant computational complexity with respect to the number of reaction channels for weakly coupled reaction networks. We present a novel adaptive binning strategy and discuss optimal algorithm parameters. We compare the computational efficiency of the algorithm to existing methods and demonstrate excellent scaling for large problems. This method is well suited for generating exact trajectories of large weakly coupled models, including those that can be described by the reaction-diffusion master equation that arises from spatially discretized reaction-diffusion processes.

  10. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential, proprietary, or otherwise restricted information. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine This presentation does not contain any confidential, ...

  12. US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research Progress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research Progress US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research Progress Describes how Tier 2 Bin 5 and US06 engine-out NOx levels were achieved and progress to meet Bin 2 through latest advances in lean NOx trap, diesel oxidation catalyst, and diesel particulate filter. deer08_cooper.pdf (398.7 KB) More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and

  13. EVALUATION OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE DESTRUCTIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSES FOR VALIDITY OF ORIGINAL 3013 CONTAINER BINNING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcclard, J.; Kessinger, G.

    2010-02-01

    The surveillance program for 3013 containers is based, in part, on the separation of containers into various bins related to potential container failure mechanisms. The containers are assigned to bins based on moisture content and pre-storage estimates of content chemistry. While moisture content is measured during the packaging of each container, chemistry estimates are made by using a combination of process knowledge, packaging data and prompt gamma analyses to establish the moisture and chloride/fluoride content of the materials. Packages with high moisture and chloride/fluoride contents receive more detailed surveillances than packages with less chloride/fluoride and/or moisture. Moisture verification measurements and chemical analyses performed during the surveillance program provided an opportunity to validate the binning process. Validation results demonstrated that the binning effort was generally successful in placing the containers in the appropriate bin for surveillance and analysis.

  14. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  15. Solid waste bin detection and classification using Dynamic Time Warping and MLP classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Hannan, M.A.; Basri, Hassan; Hussain, Aini; Arebey, Maher

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Solid waste bin level detection using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). • Gabor wavelet filter is used to extract the solid waste image features. • Multi-Layer Perceptron classifier network is used for bin image classification. • The classification performance evaluated by ROC curve analysis. - Abstract: The increasing requirement for Solid Waste Management (SWM) has become a significant challenge for municipal authorities. A number of integrated systems and methods have introduced to overcome this challenge. Many researchers have aimed to develop an ideal SWM system, including approaches involving software-based routing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Radio-frequency Identification (RFID), or sensor intelligent bins. Image processing solutions for the Solid Waste (SW) collection have also been developed; however, during capturing the bin image, it is challenging to position the camera for getting a bin area centralized image. As yet, there is no ideal system which can correctly estimate the amount of SW. This paper briefly discusses an efficient image processing solution to overcome these problems. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) was used for detecting and cropping the bin area and Gabor wavelet (GW) was introduced for feature extraction of the waste bin image. Image features were used to train the classifier. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) classifier was used to classify the waste bin level and estimate the amount of waste inside the bin. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to statistically evaluate classifier performance. The results of this developed system are comparable to previous image processing based system. The system demonstration using DTW with GW for feature extraction and an MLP classifier led to promising results with respect to the accuracy of waste level estimation (98.50%). The application can be used to optimize the routing of waste collection based on the estimated bin level.

  16. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    counting is avoided by dividing jet functions by matrix elements of soft Wilson lines. ... of the zero-bin subtraction and the soft Wilson line subtraction in the virtual two-loop ...

  17. Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of a new light truck, in-line 4-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine that will meet Tier 2, Bin 2 emissions and at least a 40% fuel economy benefit over the V-8 gasoline engine it could replace

  18. Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses plan, baselining, and modeling, for new light truck 4-cylinder turbocharged diesel meeting Tier 2, Bin 2 emissions and 40 percent better fuel economy than the V-8 gasoline engine it will replace

  19. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Idilbi; Thomas Mehen

    2007-11-01

    Calculations of collinear correlation functions in perturbative QCD and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) require a prescription for subtracting soft or zero-bin contributions in order to avoid double counting the contributions from soft modes. At leading order in $\\lambda$, where $\\lambda$ is the SCET expansion parameter, the zero-bin subtractions have been argued to be equivalent to convolution with soft Wilson lines. We give a proof of the factorization of naive collinear Wilson lines that is crucial for the derivation of the equivalence. We then check the equivalence by computing the non-Abelian two-loop mixed collinear-soft contribution to the jet function in the quark form factor. These results provide strong support for the equivalence, which can be used to give a nonperturbative definition of the zero-bin subtraction at lowest order in $\\lambda$.

  20. Challenges of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions Challenges of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_kuhn.pdf (407.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market

  1. Strategies for In-Cylinder Reductions to Reach Bin 2 and LEV III |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy In-Cylinder Reductions to Reach Bin 2 and LEV III Strategies for In-Cylinder Reductions to Reach Bin 2 and LEV III Optimized EGR and boost pressure under transient conditions lowers in-cylinder NOx for diesels and reduces pumping losses and improves knock resistance for gasoline engines. p-03_czarnowski.pdf (311.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Can Future Emissions Limits be Met with a Hybrid EGR System Alone? Control Strategy for a Dual Loop EGR System to Meet

  2. The BMW Approach to Tier2 Bin5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The BMW Approach to Tier2 Bin5 The BMW Approach to Tier2 Bin5 Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_mattes.pdf (4.8 MB) More Documents & Publications BMW Diesel Engines - Dynamic, Efficient and Clean BMW Diesel - Engine Concepts for Efficient Dynamics Optimization of

  3. LNT or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for TIER 2 BIN 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    passenger vehicles? | Department of Energy or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for TIER 2 BIN 5 passenger vehicles? LNT or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for TIER 2 BIN 5 passenger vehicles? Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_dorenkamp.pdf (6.78 MB) More Documents & Publications The BMW Approach to Tier2

  4. Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_bonadies.pdf (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG) On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer

  5. Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_bonadies.pdf (748.07 KB) More Documents & Publications Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions LNT + SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications: A

  6. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Fast, Jerome D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-30

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimation of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we developed an aerosol module, designated Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can represent these parameters explicitly by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 m to resolve both aerosol size (12 bins) and BC mixing state (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters from 1 to 40 nm are resolved using an additional 8 size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module was implemented in the WRF-chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. BC absorption enhancement by coating materials was about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement was estimated to be 10 20% over northern East Asia and 20 35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast was also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increased CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increased CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. Application of ATRAS to East Asia also showed that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depended strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA processes

  7. Taking Halo-Independent Dark Matter Methods Out of the Bin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2014-10-30

    We develop a new halo-independent strategy for analyzing emerging DM hints, utilizing the method of extended maximum likelihood. This approach does not require the binning of events, making it uniquely suited to the analysis of emerging DM direct detection hints. It determines a preferred envelope, at a given confidence level, for the DM velocity integral which best fits the data using all available information and can be used even in the case of a single anomalous scattering event. All of the halo-independent information from a direct detection result may then be presented in a single plot, allowing simple comparisons betweenmore » multiple experiments. This results in the halo-independent analogue of the usual mass and cross-section plots found in typical direct detection analyses, where limit curves may be compared with best-fit regions in halo-space. The method is straightforward to implement, using already-established techniques, and its utility is demonstrated through the first unbinned halo-independent comparison of the three anomalous events observed in the CDMS-Si detector with recent limits from the LUX experiment.« less

  8. bin.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Constrain Mechanisms of Ice Formation During the M-PACE IOP Ann Fridlind and Andy Ackerman, NASA GISS DOE ARM Science Team Meeting Albuquerque, New Mexico, 29 March 2006 Observations Image source: AVHRR, Pennsylvania State University M-PACE website Observations -20 -15 -10 -5 0 Temperature, C 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Altitude, m 0 1 2 3 4 Moisture, g/kg 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Altitude, m q v q v,sat q t Data source: Hans Verlinde, ARM Archive

  9. Two-state theory of binned photon statistics for a large class of waiting time distributions and its application to quantum dot blinking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkn-Kacs, Sndor

    2014-06-14

    A theoretical method is proposed for the calculation of the photon counting probability distribution during a bin time. Two-state fluorescence and steady excitation are assumed. A key feature is a kinetic scheme that allows for an extensive class of stochastic waiting time distribution functions, including power laws, expanded as a sum of weighted decaying exponentials. The solution is analytic in certain conditions, and an exact and simple expression is found for the integral contribution of bright and dark states. As an application for power law kinetics, theoretical results are compared with experimental intensity histograms from a number of blinking CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The histograms are consistent with distributions of intensity states around a bright and a dark maximum. A gap of states is also revealed in the more-or-less flat inter-peak region. The slope and to some extent the flatness of the inter-peak feature are found to be sensitive to the power-law exponents. Possible models consistent with these findings are discussed, such as the combination of multiple charging and fluctuating non-radiative channels or the multiple recombination center model. A fitting of the latter to experiment provides constraints on the interaction parameter between the recombination centers. Further extensions and applications of the photon counting theory are also discussed.

  10. Adaptation of the modified BoucWen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Knik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the BoucWen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superiorinferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anteriorposterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the BoucWen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearsons linear correlation coefficient between the abdomen, chest

  11. ScGaN alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy: Evidence for a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Constantin, Costel ; Al-Brithen, Hamad ; Haider, Muhammad B. ; Ingram, David ; Smith, Arthur R. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Condensed Matter and Surface Science ...

  12. Publisher's Note: ScGaN alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Constantin, Costel ; Al-Brithen, Hamad ; Haider, Muhammad B. ; Ingram, David ; Smith, Arthur R Publication Date: 2004-12-15 OSTI Identifier: 20662289 Resource Type: ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ingram, David (4) Donovan, Brian F. (3) Giri, Ashutosh (3) Smith, Arthur R. (3) ... Hamad ; Haider, Muhammad B. ; Ingram, David ; Smith, Arthur R No abstract prepared. ...

  14. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept. of Chemical and Material Engineering; Hamad, F.A.; Abu-Arabi, M. University of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design and ...

  15. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to be equivalent to convolution with soft Wilson lines. We give a proof of the factorization of naive collinear Wilson lines that is crucial for the derivation of the equivalence. ...

  16. Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development of a new light truck, in-line 4-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine that will ... Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins Next ...

  17. Materials Data on Ca3BiN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on U2BiN2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Hmelo, Bin Hu, Alamgir Karim, Martyn McLachlan, and Ron Jones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Interactions with "nontraditional" users Interactions with "nontraditional" users Next-generation capabilities Suggestions for workshopssymposia gg p y p ...

  20. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/usc.cgi?ACTION=RETRIEVE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Congressional findings and declaration of policy Congress finds and declares that wild free-roaming horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the...

  1. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace061ruth2011...

  2. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=106...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Sec. 324. Modification of membership of Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Council. Sec. 325. Extension of pilot program for sale of air pollution emission ...

  3. http://cemp.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cemp_stations.pl?stn=tono&prod=11

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    It is the intent of the CEMP to provide to the public accurate, near real-time monitoring data through this web site. However, it should be noted that these data are provisional ...

  4. Materials Data on Th2BiN2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  8. REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Lee Poe, Jr

    1998-10-01

    In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site data was weighted to develop the regional site, and provides the weighted data used in the CSAR analysis. It is divided into Part 1 that defines time-dependent releases from each regional site, Part 2 that defines transport conditions through the groundwater, and Part 3 that defines transport through surface water and populations using the surface waters for drinking.

  9. frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2008_register&docid=55825.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PRIME CONTRACTOR FEES ON SUBCONTRACTOR COSTS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES AUDIT REPORT DOE/IG-0427 SEPTEMBER 1998 September 11, 1998 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Acting Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "The U.S. Department of Energy's Prime Contractor Fees on Subcontractor Costs" BACKGROUND In Fiscal Year 1996, the Department's prime contractors awarded $5.3 billion in subcontracts. The

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cummins Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cummins at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation tier...

  12. Evaluation of SCR and DOC/CPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission Control to Meet U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The continuous regeneration trap may cause irreversibly negative effects on the NOx removal efficiency of the SCR system.

  13. frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2010_register&docid=fr23jy10-62.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2009_register&docid=fr02jy09-45.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  15. A note on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of VNTR data by using the Federal Bureau of Investigation's fixed-bin method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. )

    1992-09-01

    To fully utilize the information of VNTR data for forensic inference, the probability of observing the matching suspect and evidentiary profile in a reference population is estimated, usually by assuming independence of alleles within and between loci. This assumption has been challenged on the basis of the observation that there is frequently an excess of single-band phenotypes (SBP) in forensic data bases, which could indicate lack of independence. Nevertheless, another explanation is that the excess SBP are artifacts of laboratory methods. In this report the authors examine the excess of SBP for three VNTR loci studied by the FBI (D17S79 and D2S44, for blacks, and D14S13, for Caucasians). The FBI claims that the excess is due to the effect of null alleles; the null alleles are suspected to be small to be detected. The authors estimate the frequency of null alleles for two loci (D17S79 and D14A13) by comparing, for these loci, the data from the FBI data base and the data from the Lifecodes data base. These comparisons yield information on small fragments because Lifecodes uses the restriction enzyme PstI, which yields larger fragments than does HaeIII, which the FBI uses. For D17S19 in blacks, the authors estimate a null allele frequency of 4.4%, and, for D14S13 in Caucasians, they estimate a frequency of 3.0%. The null-allele frequency for D2S44 in blacks is derived similarly, again being based on analysis of DNA cut with HaeIII and PstI; the estimate of the null-allele frequency for this locus is 1.5%. Using these null-allele frequency estimates and a goodness-of-fit test, the authors show that there is no evidence for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype probabilities at these loci. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Zhang, Bin-Bin" Sort by Relevance ... Filter by Author Zhang, Bin-Bin (7) Chen, Yan-Feng (4) Dong, Song-Tao (4) Zhang, Shan-Tao ...

  17. Monte Carlo Bayesian search for the plausible source of the Telescope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Monte Carlo Bayesian search for the plausible source of the Telescope Array hotspot Authors: He, Hao-Ning ; Kusenko, Alexander ; Nagataki, Shigehiro ; Zhang, Bin-Bin ; Yang, ...

  18. 1 ISO 14001 requires that operational control be maintained...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bins with improved collection bins to include color coding for recycling categories and trash receptacles. Improve Life Cycle Management of Electronics 12. Complete phase I...

  19. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... and Food Processing Facilities * NFPA 68 Standard on Explosion Protection by ... Bin 1 FC* 85 31.0** 0** Bin 2 FC 16 29.8** 35** Bin 2 CTG 19 4.9 99 Bin 2 FTG 16 11.0 75 ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter by Author Wu, Bin (32) Smith, Gregory Scott (10) Chen, Wei-Ren (9) Li, Xin (9) Hong, Kunlun (8) Wu Bin (8) Liu, Emily (6) Liu, Yun (6) Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. (5) Do, Changwoo ...

  1. Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 ...

  2. nab-ARM_land2_v5.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure 5: Daily-averaged down-welling LW flux, from AMF measurements (red) and modelled ... (blue) are binned into the 10cm -1 bins used by the Edwards-Slingo RT code results (red). ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Brown, Ron (1) Chang, Ni-Bin (1) Davila, Eric (1) Dyson, Brian (1) Save ... facility in a fast-growing urban setting Chang, Ni-Bin ; Davila, Eric ; Dyson, Brian ; ...

  4. TWC Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk-based retrieval, IM updatediscussion LAWPSCesium, IM updatediscussion WTP Communication Plan, IM updatediscussion TVAT Implementation Plan Update HOLDING BIN...

  5. Resource conservation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Attachments: Volume 4 of 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Volume IV contains the following attachments for Module IV: VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests (Appendix D12); bin emission control and VOC monitoring system drawings; bin scale test room ventilation drawings; WIPP supplementary roof support system, underground storage area, room 1, panel 1, DOE/WIPP 91-057; and WIPP supplementary roof support system, room 1, panel 1, geotechnical field data analysis bi-annual report, DOE/WIPP 92-024.

  6. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2004_deer_hammerle.pdf (444.2 KB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5

  7. RSTT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002410WKSTN00 Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time https://na22.nnsa.doe.gov/cgi-bin/prod/nemr

  8. Method of multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2009-06-02

    A method for analyzing analytes from a sample introduced into a Spectrometer by generating a pseudo random sequence of a modulation bins, organizing each modulation bin as a series of submodulation bins, thereby forming an extended pseudo random sequence of submodulation bins, releasing the analytes in a series of analyte packets into a Spectrometer, thereby generating an unknown original ion signal vector, detecting the analytes at a detector, and characterizing the sample using the plurality of analyte signal subvectors. The method is advantageously applied to an Ion Mobility Spectrometer, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer interfaced with a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer.

  9. Benefits and Drawbacks of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI Combustion Application in an Advanced LD Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study of the effect of compression ratio on performance of light duty diesel operating with PCCI calibration, near EURO6/Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx limits.

  10. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Cafeteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Features Composting and recycling bins Locally-sourced food Dual-rinse, water conserving dishwashers Methods for recycling stormwater Native and xeriscape ...

  11. MiniBooNE Nue & Nuebar Data Release 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blocks) per reconstructed neutrino energy bin, including systematic uncertainties for all six samples, and statistical uncertainty for the predicted (anti)neutrino mode electron...

  12. Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is made publicly available for the updated electron antineutrino appearance analysis: * 1D array of electron antineutrino bin boundaries in E QE (reconstructed...

  13. Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information is made publicly available for the updated electron neutrino appearance analysis: * 1D array of electron neutrino bin boundaries in E QE (reconstructed neutrino...

  14. Modeling Feat Sheds Light on Protein Channel's Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or secreted across the cell membrane (inset). (Image credit: Bin Zhang and Thomas Miller, Caltech 2012) Using supercomputers at the Department of Energy's National Energy...

  15. CX-005721: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bins; 6) high efficiency street light retrofitreplacement project; and 7) traffic signal and crosswalk retrofitreplacement project. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low, Ke-Bin" Name Name ORCID Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ThesisDissertation ...

  17. Microchannel apparatus and methods of conducting catalyzed oxidative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An apparatus design that minimizes heat transfer to the apparatus' exterior is also described. Authors: Tonkovich, Anna Lee 1 ; Yang, Bin 2 ; Perry, Steven T. 3 ; Mazanec, ...

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this study, a marine stratocumulus cloud was simulated by using a large eddy simulation (LES) model and a detailed microphysical bin model. Including infrared cooling as well as...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (ARPA-E) USDOE Energy Information Administration (EI) ... Energy, Science and Technology (NE) (United States) ... Wu, Bin (2) Hur, Sun (1) Hur, Sun (Harvard-Med) (1) Save ...

  20. Probing the Out-of-Plane Distortion of Single Point Defects in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Alem, Nasim ; Yazyev, Oleg V. ; Kisielowski, Christian ; Denes, P. ; Dahmen, Ulrich ; Hartel, Peter ; Haider, Maximilian ; Bischoff, Maarten ; Jiang, Bin ; Louie, Steven ...

  1. Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, ...

  2. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program ...

  3. Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program ...

  4. IACT Conference Proceedings, Abstracts, Presentations, and Poster...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interfacial Catalysis for Hydrogen Production," Jeffrey Greeley, Bin Liu, Rees Rankin, Zhi-Jian Zhao, and Zhenhua Zeng, 2014 ACS Annual Meeting, March 16, 2014, Dallas, TX. "In...

  5. Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 Emission Limits | Department of Energy Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, particulate filter, and DeNOx catalyst are implemented to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 limits for U.S. market diesel engines. deer08_yoon.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents &

  6. Tet3 CXXC Domain and Dioxygenase Activity Cooperatively Regulate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Xu, Yufei ; Xu, Chao ; Kato, Akiko ; Tempel, Wolfram ; Abreu, Jose Garcia ; Bian, Chuanbing ; Hu, Yeguang ; Hu, Di ; Zhao, Bin ; Cerovina, Tanja ; Diao, Jianbo ; Wu, ...

  7. ARM-WPac-MSEbin-poster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amazonia, suggesting further improvements are needed. Tropical Oceanic Convection CRM Test Case Interesting features of MSE-binned results and parameterization implications. A...

  8. Final Report on the Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative ... integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds ...

  9. Analysis of Heat Rate Improvement Potential at Coal-Fired Power...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Reducing CO2 Emissions by Improving the Efficiency of the Existing Coal-fired Power ... various HRI methods, nor how ... included binning plants into 168 ...

  10. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn100

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    um sizebin ( sizebin ) Droplet bin bounds sizebinbounds ( sizebin, bound ) Time offset from midnight time ( time ) Time cell bounds timebounds ( time, bound ) Time offset...

  11. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Distribution Circuit from Substation, and Tap Existing High Voltage Distribution Circuit. ... Facilities were binned within the "Build New Distribution Circuit from Substation" ...

  12. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Committee call placeholder: Tuesday, August 13 @ 1:30 p.m. * PNNL Deep Vadose Zone technologies (Tim Johnson, John Morse) * Advice responses? * Committee Business Holding Bin: ...

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...2008 - Shouxian China 52008 - 2009 * BRWNSA - Barrow Alaska In-situ measurements of ... bins Submicron Particle Size Distribution (NSA and SGP) Submicron Inorganic Ion chemical ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability Huang, Quan ; Yu, Dongli ; Xu, Bo ; Hu, Wentao ; Ma, Yanming ; Wang, Yanbin ; Zhao, Zhisheng ; Wen, Bin ; He, Julong ; ...

  15. TWC Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrity Review Panel should review these recent events Rob draft Dirk Hillary send draft Monday Call Tuesday Pages 678 Bin - Sounding Board for WA letter at ...

  16. Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 | Department of Energy Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2002_deer_hammerle.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) Urea SCR and DPF System for

  17. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 | Department of Energy Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2003_deer_hammerle.pdf (408.4 KB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5

  18. Urea SCR Durability Assessment for Tier 2 Light-Duty Truck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes progress toward development of a durable urea SCR system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 on 3780 lb light truck

  19. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  20. MazzoleniARMMeeting2008PosterMazzoleni.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SO4 for bins conta ining a t le a st 2 points Error ba rs sta nda rd e rror StDe v... Orga nics for bins conta ining a t le a st 2 points Error ba rs sta nda rd e rror StDe ...

  1. Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins 2002_deer_stang.pdf (2.47 MB) More Documents & Publications Cummins/DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines

  2. Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

    2012-06-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The components fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRCs ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

  3. Minimizing I/O Costs of Multi-Dimensional Queries with BitmapIndices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2006-03-30

    Bitmap indices have been widely used in scientific applications and commercial systems for processing complex,multi-dimensional queries where traditional tree-based indices would not work efficiently. A common approach for reducing the size of a bitmap index for high cardinality attributes is to group ranges of values of an attribute into bins and then build a bitmap for each bin rather than a bitmap for each value of the attribute. Binning reduces storage costs,however, results of queries based on bins often require additional filtering for discarding it false positives, i.e., records in the result that do not satisfy the query constraints. This additional filtering,also known as ''candidate checking,'' requires access to the base data on disk and involves significant I/O costs. This paper studies strategies for minimizing the I/O costs for ''candidate checking'' for multi-dimensional queries. This is done by determining the number of bins allocated for each dimension and then placing bin boundaries in optimal locations. Our algorithms use knowledge of data distribution and query workload. We derive several analytical results concerning optimal bin allocation for a probabilistic query model. Our experimental evaluation with real life data shows an average I/O cost improvement of at least a factor of 10 for multi-dimensional queries on datasets from two different applications. Our experiments also indicate that the speedup increases with the number of query dimensions.

  4. Refinement of overlapping local/global iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Y.; Yun, S.; Cho, N. Z.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the overlapping local/global (OLG) iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations is refined in two aspects. One is the consistent use of estimators to generate homogenized scattering cross sections. Another is that the incident or exiting angular interval is divided into multi-angular bins to modulate albedo boundary conditions for local problems. Numerical tests show that, compared to the one angle bin case in a previous study, the four angle bin case shows significantly improved results. (authors)

  5. Summary.qxd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 DOEEIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS cussed below. Options excluded from DOE's Preferred Alternative are, storage of calcine in the bin sets for an indefinite period under the...

  6. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2006-07-31

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aziz Mohamed, A. (1) Dahlan, M. (1) Dris, Zakaria bin, E-mail: zakariadris@gmail.com (1) ... based fuel element Mohammed, Abdul Aziz, E-mail: azizM@uniten.edu.my ; Rahman, Shaik ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Canning, Andrew (1) Cieslinski, Robert (1) Derenzo, Stephen (1) Dou, Letian (1) Eaton, Samuel W. (1) Gibson, Natalie A. (1) Grnbech-Jensen, Niels (1) Jiang, Bin (1) Kang, Joo H. ...

  9. ARM - 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    am - 10:30 am Break 10:30 am - Noon Morning Plenary (Continued) 10:30 am - 10:50 am Hugh Morrison: A Novel Approach for Treating Ice Microphysics in Bulk and Bin Schemes:...

  10. Listing of awardee names: Active awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This catalog/directory presents DOE`s procurement and assistance data system, arranged according to awardee name, bin, completion date, description of work, division, vendor ID, city, state, congressional district, contract value, obligations to date, P/S.

  11. Structure of Bottlebrush Polymers: Simulations and Neutron Scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Zhang, Zhe 1 ; Ahn, Suk-Kyun 1 ; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y 1 ; Wu, Bin 1 ; Hong, Kunlun 1 ; Smith, Gregory Scott 1 ; Do, Changwoo 1 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  12. Phase Behavior of Asymmetrically Charged Colloids Investigated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chen, Wei-Ren 1 ; Li, Xin 1 ; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E 1 ; Smith, Gregory Scott 1 ; Shew, Chwen-Yang 2 ; Wu, Bin 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL City University ...

  13. Charge-Dependent Dynamics of Polyelectrolyte Dendrimer and Its...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chen, Wei-Ren 1 ; Hong, Kunlun 1 ; Li, Xin 1 ; Liu, Emily 2 ; Liu, Yun 3 ; Porcar, L. 3 ; Smith, Gregory Scott 1 ; Wu, Bin 1 ; Mamontov, Eugene 1 ; ...

  14. Scattering Functions of Yolk-Shell Particles (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Li, Xin 1 ; Liu, Kao-Hsiang 2 ; Wu, Bin 1 ; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E 1 ; Smith, Gregory Scott 1 ; Chen, Wei-Ren 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL National Taiwan ...

  15. Recovering complete and draft population genomes from metagenome datasets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sangwan, Naseer; Xia, Fangfang; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2016-03-08

    Assembly of metagenomic sequence data into microbial genomes is of fundamental value to improving our understanding of microbial ecology and metabolism by elucidating the functional potential of hard-to-culture microorganisms. Here, we provide a synthesis of available methods to bin metagenomic contigs into species-level groups and highlight how genetic diversity, sequencing depth, and coverage influence binning success. Despite the computational cost on application to deeply sequenced complex metagenomes (e.g., soil), covarying patterns of contig coverage across multiple datasets significantly improves the binning process. We also discuss and compare current genome validation methods and reveal how these methods tackle the problem ofmore » chimeric genome bins i.e., sequences from multiple species. Finally, we explore how population genome assembly can be used to uncover biogeographic trends and to characterize the effect of in situ functional constraints on the genome-wide evolution.« less

  16. Summary.qxd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Creates a cement-like solid. * Upgrade and permit the calciner * Calcine liquid mixed transuranic wasteSBW and add to bin sets. * Blend calcine with slag, caustic soda, and water ...

  17. Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Nordquist...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Philip E. Wannamaker, P.M. Wright, Zhou Zi-xing, Li Xing-bin, Zhao Jing-xiang (1991)...

  18. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Philip E. Wannamaker, P.M. Wright, Zhou Zi-xing, Li Xing-bin, Zhao Jing-xiang (1991)...

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Available Full TextPublicly Available Full Text1 Citation Only0 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Sun, Qing -feng (1) Xie, X. C. (1) Zhuang, Huai -Bin (1) Save ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zhu, Leyi (6) Dagotto, Elbio R (5) Hu, Bin (5) Zhang, Xiaoguang (5) Chi, Miaofang (4) ... Paul C ; Ward, Thomas Zac ; Gai, Zheng ; Zhang, Xiaoguang ; Shen, Jian January 2014 ...

  1. Distributing Urea for the On-Road Vehicle Market | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103)

  2. Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) NH3-Selective ...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Xie, X. C. (4) Sun, Qing-feng (3) Chen, Chui-Zhen (2) Jiang, Hua (2) Wang, Ziqiang (2) Liu, Haiwen (1) Liu, Xuele (1) Song, Juntao (1) Sun, Qing -feng (1) Zhuang, Huai -Bin (1) ...

  4. Enhanced Cycling Stability of Rechargeable Li-O2 Batteries Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reversibility. As a results, the cyclability of Li-O2 can be largely improved. Authors: Liu, Bin ; Xu, Wu ; Yan, Pengfei ; Sun, Xiuliang ; Bowden, Mark E. ; Read, Jeffrey ; Qian, ...

  5. St#26.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Osama bin Laden put it this way, according to Yonas: "We are continuing . . . to make America bleed profusely to the point of bankruptcy . . . ." The ACG - a technical think tank ...

  6. Guidelines for Process and Development of Annual HAB Work Plan...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    members and agencies, but not timely. Place in holding bin until timely, or use as agenda filler. A new topic is supported by committee members and agencies. Define new work...

  7. Structural basis for ubiquitin-mediated antiviral signal activation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Structural basis for ubiquitin-mediated antiviral signal activation by RIG-I Authors: Peisley, Alys ; Wu, Bin ; Xu, Hui ; Chen, Zhijian J. ; Hur , Sun 1 ; HHMI) 2 ; ...

  8. Meeting Minutes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... EM Quality Assurance Corporate Board Meeting Follow-Up Actions November 13 - 14, 2008 Atlanta, GA General: 1. Invite NRC to the next Board meeting to discuss 1 - 5 columns binning ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-29 300 TD 03 - GilbertsonCleanupWorkshop921

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    curies) packaged in 1,936 stainless steel capsules in underwater storage at ... (12.2 million lbs) stored in 43 stainless steel bins at Idaho "Calcine Challenge" is ...

  10. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... absolutely necessary) DON'T put personal data in the body of an email; rather, password-protect it as an attachment DON'T dispose of personal data in recycling bins or ...

  11. Comparison between MSW ash and RDF ash from incineration process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chang, Ni-Bin ; Wang, H.P. ; Lin, K.S. 1 + Show Author Affiliations National Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China) and others Publication Date: ...

  12. Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

  13. MetaBAT, an efficient tool for accurately reconstructing single genomes from complex microbial communities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kang, Dongwan D.; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Grouping large genomic fragments assembled from shotgun metagenomic sequences to deconvolute complex microbial communities, or metagenome binning, enables the study of individual organisms and their interactions. Because of the complex nature of these communities, existing metagenome binning methods often miss a large number of microbial species. In addition, most of the tools are not scalable to large datasets. Here we introduce automated software called MetaBAT that integrates empirical probabilistic distances of genome abundance and tetranucleotide frequency for accurate metagenome binning. MetaBAT outperforms alternative methods in accuracy and computational efficiency on both synthetic and real metagenome datasets. Lastly, it automatically formsmore » hundreds of high quality genome bins on a very large assembly consisting millions of contigs in a matter of hours on a single node. MetaBAT is open source software and available at https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/metabat.« less

  14. MetaBAT, an efficient tool for accurately reconstructing single genomes from complex microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Dongwan D.; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Grouping large genomic fragments assembled from shotgun metagenomic sequences to deconvolute complex microbial communities, or metagenome binning, enables the study of individual organisms and their interactions. Because of the complex nature of these communities, existing metagenome binning methods often miss a large number of microbial species. In addition, most of the tools are not scalable to large datasets. Here we introduce automated software called MetaBAT that integrates empirical probabilistic distances of genome abundance and tetranucleotide frequency for accurate metagenome binning. MetaBAT outperforms alternative methods in accuracy and computational efficiency on both synthetic and real metagenome datasets. Lastly, it automatically forms hundreds of high quality genome bins on a very large assembly consisting millions of contigs in a matter of hours on a single node. MetaBAT is open source software and available at https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/metabat.

  15. Containment System Michael F

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... They cannot be raised with a crane and placed inside a containment. Many dealerships lack ... A crane is then used to erect the walls and connect adjoining panels. The bin walls are ...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ATP-LD; Cummins...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Merit Review 2015: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine Presentation given by Cummins at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thickness: Within each of these layers, clouds are binned into ranges of optical depth: Tau 0 - 0.001 (clear) Tau 0.001 - 3 Tau 3 - 20 Tau 20 - 1000 Four optical depth...

  18. Fast transit portal dosimetry using density-scaled layer modeling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Authors: Jung, Jae Won ; Kim, Jong Oh ; Yeo, Inhwan Jason ; Cho, Young-Bin ; Kim, Sun Mo ; DiBiase, Steven 1 ; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer ...

  19. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval,...

  20. Department of Energy listing of awardee names active awards as of January 6, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The awards are listed according to awardee name, bin, completion date, description of work, division, vendor ID, city, state, congressional district, contract value, obligations to date, and P/S.

  1. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    so-called fundamental metallicity relation, in the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We separate the galaxies into narrow redshift bins and compare ...

  2. US Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or on the ground. They must be covered securely to contain the contents, and placed in trash bins. 7. Used tobacco products must be properly disposed of in the fire-resistent...

  3. Applied Materials Develops an Advanced Epitaxial Growth System to Bring Down LED Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Applied Materials has developed an advanced epitaxial growth system for gallium nitride (GaN) LED devices that decreases operating costs, increases internal quantum efficiency, and improves binning yields.

  4. NREL Science Central to Success of New Biofuels Projects: DuPont-NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership Delivered Key Innovations for Large Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Iowa - News Feature | NREL NREL Science Central to Success of New Biofuels Projects: DuPont-NREL Partnership Delivered Key Innovations for Large Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Iowa February 23, 2015 This photo shows two men in front of a bin the size of a golf cart. Both men are reaching into the bin to touch the biomass inside. NREL Biochemical Conversion Manager Rick Elander toured NREL's Biorefinery

  5. Janitor | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janitor Department: Facilities Supervisor(s): Margaret King Staff: MSU 2 Requisition Number: 1600682 Clean and sanitize bathrooms and restrooms including showers, sinks, mirrors, fixtures and other similar equipment. Fills paper towel, toilet tissue and soap dispensers. Maintain established standards of cleanliness. Clean water fountains/coolers,light fixtures, and change light bulbs if fixtures can be reached with a six foot ladder. Empty and clean wastepaper bins and recycling bins. Deposits

  6. Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework Programme

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration effectively deer12_suresh.pdf (986.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine 7 and additional activities in Germany | Department of Energy

    Provides survey of basic and applied thermoelectric activities in Germany

  7. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) | Department of Energy 5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_lambert.pdf (232.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  8. Task-based weights for photon counting spectral x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bornefalk, Hans

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for taking the spatial frequency composition of an imaging task into account when determining optimal bin weight factors for photon counting energy sensitive x-ray systems. A second purpose of the investigation is to evaluate the possible improvement compared to using pixel based weights. Methods: The Fourier based approach of imaging performance and detectability index d' is applied to pulse height discriminating photon counting systems. The dependency of d' on the bin weight factors is made explicit, taking into account both differences in signal and noise transfer characteristics across bins and the spatial frequency dependency of interbin correlations from reabsorbed scatter. Using a simplified model of a specific silicon detector, d' values for a high and a low frequency imaging task are determined for optimal weights and compared to pixel based weights. Results: The method successfully identifies bins where a large point spread function degrades detection of high spatial frequency targets. The method is also successful in determining how to downweigh highly correlated bins. Quantitative predictions for the simplified silicon detector model indicate that improvements in the detectability index when applying task-based weights instead of pixel based weights are small for high frequency targets, but could be in excess of 10% for low frequency tasks where scatter-induced correlation otherwise degrade detectability. Conclusions: The proposed method makes the spatial frequency dependency of complex correlation structures between bins and their effect on the system detective quantum efficiency easier to analyze and allows optimizing bin weights for given imaging tasks. A potential increase in detectability of double digit percents in silicon detector systems operated at typical CT energies (100 kVp) merits further evaluation on a real system. The method is noted to be of higher relevance for silicon detectors than for cadmium (zink

  9. Uncertainty in Modeling Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing from Size Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chun; Chen, Siyu; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Kok, Jasper; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Huang, J.

    2013-11-05

    This study examines the uncertainties in simulating mass balance and radiative forcing of mineral dust due to biases in the aerosol size parameterization. Simulations are conducted quasi-globally (180oW-180oE and 60oS-70oN) using the WRF24 Chem model with three different approaches to represent aerosol size distribution (8-bin, 4-bin, and 3-mode). The biases in the 3-mode or 4-bin approaches against a relatively more accurate 8-bin approach in simulating dust mass balance and radiative forcing are identified. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach simulates similar but coarser size distributions of dust particles in the atmosphere, while the 3-mode pproach retains more fine dust particles but fewer coarse dust particles due to its prescribed og of each mode. Although the 3-mode approach yields up to 10 days longer dust mass lifetime over the remote oceanic regions than the 8-bin approach, the three size approaches produce similar dust mass lifetime (3.2 days to 3.5 days) on quasi-global average, reflecting that the global dust mass lifetime is mainly determined by the dust mass lifetime near the dust source regions. With the same global dust emission (~6000 Tg yr-1), the 8-bin approach produces a dust mass loading of 39 Tg, while the 4-bin and 3-mode approaches produce 3% (40.2 Tg) and 25% (49.1 Tg) higher dust mass loading, respectively. The difference in dust mass loading between the 8-bin approach and the 4-bin or 3-mode approaches has large spatial variations, with generally smaller relative difference (<10%) near the surface over the dust source regions. The three size approaches also result in significantly different dry and wet deposition fluxes and number concentrations of dust. The difference in dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) (a factor of 3) among the three size approaches is much larger than their difference (25%) in dust mass loading. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach yields stronger dust absorptivity, while the 3-mode

  10. Modeling of stagnation-line nonequilibrium flows by means of quantum based collisional models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munafò, A. Magin, T. E.

    2014-09-15

    The stagnation-line flow over re-entry bodies is analyzed by means of a quantum based collisional model which accounts for dissociation and energy transfer in N{sub 2}-N interactions. The physical model is based on a kinetic database developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The reduction of the kinetic mechanism is achieved by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N{sub 2} molecule in energy bins. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The governing equations are discretized in space by means of the Finite Volume method. A fully implicit time-integration is used to obtain steady-state solutions. The results show that the population of the energy bins strongly deviate from a Boltzmann distribution close to the shock wave and across the boundary layer. The sensitivity analysis to the number of energy bins reveals that accurate estimation of flow quantities (such as chemical composition and wall heat flux) can be obtained by using only 10 energy bins. A comparison with the predictions obtained by means of conventional multi-temperature models indicates that the former can lead to an overestimation of the wall heat flux, due to an inaccurate modeling of recombination in the boundary layer.

  11. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.

    2015-07-13

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 10–30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  12. Still the same after all these years: Santa Rosa`s curbside recycling model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egan, K.

    1997-10-01

    When Santa Rosa, located north of San Francisco, first began its recycling program in 1977, it was no different from the other fledgling curbside recycling programs in the state. Back then, residents collected recyclables in their homes and put them out on the curb each week next to the garbage cans in whatever container they could find, whether it was a paper grocery bag or a cardboard box. The city`s pre-bin recycling program had a participation rate of about 25%. Then in 1978, with the firm`s help, Empire officials came up with the idea of providing recycling bins to residents. The program planners asked residents to source-separate their recyclables and then put the metals (including steel, tin, and aluminum); all three glass colors (brown, green, and clear); and newspaper in three individual bins. A few weeks after city officials distributed the bins to residents, the program showed a participation rate of 77%, indicating to Clark that the bins were necessary to significantly increase public awareness of the program.

  13. SU-E-P-57: Radiation Doses Assessment to Paediatric Patients for Some Digital Diagnostic Radiology Examination in Emergency Department in Qatar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdallah, I; Aly, A; Al Naemi, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to pediatric patients undergoing standard radiographic examinations using Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) in Paediatric emergency center of Hamad General Hospital (HGH) in state of Qatar and compared with regional and international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs). Methods: Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was measured for 2739 patients for two common X-ray examinations namely: Chest AP/PA, Abdomen. Exposure factors such as kV, mAs and Focal to Skin Distance (FSD) were recorded for each patient. Tube Output was measured for a range of selected kV values. ESD for each individual patient was calculated using the tube output and the technical exposure factors for each examination. The ESD values were compared with the some international Dose Reference Levels (DRL) for all types of examinations. Results: The most performed procedure during the time of this study was chest PA/PA (85%). The mean ESD values obtained from AP chest, PA chest and AP abdomen ranged 91–120, 80–84 and 209 – 659 µGy per radiograph for different age’s groups respectively. Two protocols have been used for chest AP and PA using different radiological parameters, and the different of ESD values for chest PA and were 41% for 1 years old child, 57% for 5 years old for chest AP. Conclusion: The mean ESD were compared with those found in literature and were found to be comparable. The radiation dose can be reduced more for Chest AP and PA examination by optimization of each investigation and hence more studies are required for this task. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving local reference doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in this local department and hence it can be applied in the whole Qatar.

  14. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths aremore » $$\\Delta z=0.1$$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.« less

  15. PRACTICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES IN THE RESONANCE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.S.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.

    2010-04-30

    Recent evaluations of neutron cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region reveal the need for further research in this area. Major issues include declining uncertainties in multigroup representations and proper treatment of scattering radius uncertainty. To address these issues, the present work introduces a practical method based on kernel approximation using resonance parameter uncertainties from the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Analytical expressions derived for average cross sections in broader energy bins along with their sensitivities provide transparent tool for determining cross section uncertainties. The role of resonance-resonance and bin-bin correlations is specifically studied. As an example we apply this approach to estimate (n,{gamma}) and (n,el) covariances for the structural material {sup 55}Mn.

  16. Towards Optimal Multi-Dimensional Query Processing with BitmapIndices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2005-09-30

    Bitmap indices have been widely used in scientific applications and commercial systems for processing complex, multi-dimensional queries where traditional tree-based indices would not work efficiently. This paper studies strategies for minimizing the access costs for processing multi-dimensional queries using bitmap indices with binning. Innovative features of our algorithm include (a) optimally placing the bin boundaries and (b) dynamically reordering the evaluation of the query terms. In addition, we derive several analytical results concerning optimal bin allocation for a probabilistic query model. Our experimental evaluation with real life data shows an average I/O cost improvement of at least a factor of 10 for multi-dimensional queries on datasets from two different applications. Our experiments also indicate that the speedup increases with the number of query dimensions.

  17. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. D. Staiger

    1999-06-01

    A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

  18. Constraints on dark energy from new observations including Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Wei [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 China (China); Li, Si-Yu [Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918-4, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Hong; Xia, Jun-Qing [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Mingzhe [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 China (China); Lu, Tan, E-mail: physicsweiwei@gmail.com, E-mail: lisy@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: hongli@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: xiajq@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: limz@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 China (China)

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we set the new limits on the equation of state parameter (EoS) of dark energy with the observations of cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) from Planck satellite, the type Ia supernovae from Pan-STARRS and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We consider two parametrization forms of EoS: a constant w and time evolving w(a)=w{sub 0}+w{sub a}(1-a). The results show that with a constant EoS, w=-1.1410.075 68% C.L.), which is consistent with ?CDM at about 2? confidence level. For a time evolving w(a) model, we get w{sub 0}=-1.09{sup +0.16}{sub -0.18} 1? C.L.), w{sub a}=-0.34{sup +0.87}{sub -0.51} 1? C.L.), and in this case ?CDM can be comparable with our observational data at 1? confidence level. In order to do the parametrization independent analysis, additionally we adopt the so called principal component analysis (PCA) method, in which we divide redshift range into several bins and assume w as a constant in each redshift bin (bin-w). In such bin-w scenario, we find that for most of the bins cosmological constant can be comparable with the data, however, there exists few bins which give w deviating from ?CDM at more than 2? confidence level, which shows a weak hint for the time evolving behavior of dark energy. To further confirm this hint, we need more data with higher precision.

  19. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  20. Beyond Scheme F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; Fisher, H.; Pepin, J.; Gillmann, R.

    1996-07-01

    Traffic classification techniques were evaluated using data from a 1993 investigation of the traffic flow patterns on I-20 in Georgia. First we improved the data by sifting through the data base, checking against the original video for questionable events and removing and/or repairing questionable events. We used this data base to critique the performance quantitatively of a classification method known as Scheme F. As a context for improving the approach, we show in this paper that scheme F can be represented as a McCullogh-Pitts neural network, oar as an equivalent decomposition of the plane. We found that Scheme F, among other things, severely misrepresents the number of vehicles in Class 3 by labeling them as Class 2. After discussing the basic classification problem in terms of what is measured, and what is the desired prediction goal, we set forth desirable characteristics of the classification scheme and describe a recurrent neural network system that partitions the high dimensional space up into bins for each axle separation. the collection of bin numbers, one for each of the axle separations, specifies a region in the axle space called a hyper-bin. All the vehicles counted that have the same set of in numbers are in the same hyper-bin. The probability of the occurrence of a particular class in that hyper- bin is the relative frequency with which that class occurs in that set of bin numbers. This type of algorithm produces classification results that are much more balanced and uniform with respect to Classes 2 and 3 and Class 10. In particular, the cancellation of errors of classification that occurs is for many applications the ideal classification scenario. The neural network results are presented in the form of a primary classification network and a reclassification network, the performance matrices for which are presented.

  1. app_c7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Description of Input and Final Waste Streams C.7-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix C.7 Description of Input and Final Waste Streams C.7-1 LIST OF TABLES Table Page C.7-1 Waste processing alternative inputs. C.7-1 C.7-2 Bin set total chemical inventory (fission and activation species decayed to 2016). C.7-2 C.7-3 Bin set total inventory of radionuclides (decayed to 2016). C.7-3 C.7-4 Calculated radionuclides activities for SBW (curies per liter)

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  3. Observation of narrow structures in the p-p analyzing power around 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajime, Shimizu . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    The momentum dependence of the analyzing power Ay in proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured in small steps using an internal target inserted into a polarized proton beam during acceleration from 1 to 3 GeV/c. The momentum bin size ranges from 5 to 18 MeV/c. The relative uncertainty of the analyzing power, {Delta}Ay, is typically less than 0.01 for each momentum bin. Narrow structures have been observed in the two-proton invariant mass distribution of the analyzing power. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. RAP Committee Meeting - Transcribed Flipchart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 11, 2013 Orchard Lands Work Plan □ Work plan to RAP Next steps * Continue tracking (holding bin) Page 1 100-K West Sludge Next Steps * Tracking * Next briefing... Sept 2013, after baseline update * Funding is a major issue o HAB consider funding priorities Page 2 ASCEM Follow Up * Update April 2014 (tentative) 340 Vault Follow Up * Track as needed Page 3 Bin/Follow Up * Emergency Preparedness Drill August 15 o EnviroIssues/DOE check how/if HAB members can participate - if you want to

  5. RAP Committee Meeting - Transcribed Flipchart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 13, 2013 Update on River Corridor * March - after 309 & 340 vault transport & when WCH demo current scope complete * 100-F public comment in Jan Rev 0 - Jan/Feb briefing Page 1 River Corridor (cont.) * D&H Proposed Plan o Check in Feb  Hope to have Ecy comments resolved then * Status on public comment on all plans at Dec TPA Quarterly Page 2 Work Plan * Add back Holding Bin - Needs timing tied to each item - Tied to work plan Page 3 Bin/Follow Up o Send HAB Advice#270 - 2

  6. RAP- Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 10, 2014 PFP * Follow up/Next steps: o Below grade structures at PFP (put on RAP Holding Bin/Follow Up list) o Recommend briefing for full Board Page 1 LTS * [for transition checklist:] Hanford.gov, LTS Project Management, Hanford LTS Program Plan 2010-35 Rev 1 Appendix A = transition checklist * Next steps: o Update in August, look at past advice o When Draft Assessment 5 year review available... o Track and get updates o Add to holding bin to track o Review past HAB Advice #269 (June

  7. Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_lambert.pdf (460.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5

  8. Recent Developments in BMW's Diesel Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developments in BMW's Diesel Technology Recent Developments in BMW's Diesel Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Bayerische Motoren Werke AG 2003_deer_steinparzer.pdf (1.15 MB) More Documents & Publications BMW Diesel - Engine Concepts for Efficient Dynamics BMW Diesel Engines - Dynamic, Efficient and Clean The BMW Approach to Tier2 Bin5

  9. Listing of awardee names: Active awards as of October 5, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-05

    This is a listing of awarded active contracts for all US DOE facilities and projects. The information contained in the list includes the awardee name and division responsible for the work, BIN, completion date, a one line description of the work, the vendor ID, city, state, congressional district, the value of the contract and the amount of funds expended to date.

  10. Linked-View Parallel Coordinate Plot Renderer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-06-28

    This software allows multiple linked views for interactive querying via map-based data selection, bar chart analytic overlays, and high dynamic range (HDR) line renderings. The major component of the visualization package is a parallel coordinate renderer with binning, curved layouts, shader-based rendering, and other techniques to allow interactive visualization of multidimensional data.

  11. The impact of an efficient collection sites location on the zoning phase in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo Manni, Andrea Manni, Emanuele Toraldo, Massimiliano

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We study the problems of locating collection areas and zoning the service territory in a municipal waste management system. • We investigate the impact that an efficient collection sites location has on the subsequent zoning phase. • On a real-world test case, we show that the proposed approach could allow achieving significant monetary savings. - Abstract: In this paper, we study two decisional problems arising when planning the collection of solid waste, namely the location of collection sites (together with bin allocation) and the zoning of the service territory, and we assess the potential impact that an efficient location has on the subsequent zoning phase. We first propose both an exact and a heuristic approach to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, and to decide the capacities and characteristics of the bins to be located at each collection site. A peculiar aspect we consider is that of taking into account the compatibility between the different types of bins when allocating them to collection areas. Moreover, we propose a fast and effective heuristic approach to identify homogeneous zones that can be served by a single collection vehicle. Computational results on data related to a real-life instance show that an efficient location is fundamental in achieving consistent monetary savings, as well as a reduced environmental impact. These reductions are the result of one vehicle less needed to perform the waste collection operations, and an overall traveled distance reduced by about 25% on the average.

  12. MetaBAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Assembling individual genomes from shotgun metagenomic sequences derived from complex microbial communities is so far one of the most challenging problems in bioinformatics. As it is impractical to directly assemble full-length genomes, a first step that groups contigs from the same organisms, called metagenome binning, has been developed to provide insights of individual organisms. However, current binning methods perform poorly in the context of large complex community, and as a result they fail to recovermore » many novel genomes. To overcome this limitation, we developed integrated software, called MetaBAT, which automatically forms hundreds of individual genome bins from metagenome contigs. Probabilistic models of abundance and tetranucleotide frequency were trained by extensive empirical studies and integrated to decide the membership of contigs iteratively. To test the performance of MetaBAT, we applied MetaBAT to both synthetic and several large-scale real world metagenome datasets. By using two independent metrics, we demonstrate that in all the data sets tested MetaBAT achieves good sensitivity (16~87%) and very high specificity (56~99%) in forming genome bins. Further analyses of the novel genomes recovered from the human gut microbiome suggest a subset of these genomes are potentially associated with pathological conditions. In conclusion, we believe MetaBAT is a powerful tool« less

  13. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. D. Staiger M. C. Swenson

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  14. H2 Internal Combustion Engine Research Towards 45% efficiency and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tier2-Bin5 emissions | Department of Energy ace_09_wallner.pdf (2.11 MB) More Documents & Publications Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

  15. Fast reactor 3D core and burnup analysis using VESTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luciano, N.; Shamblin, J.; Maldonado, I.

    2012-07-01

    Burnup analyses using the VESTA code have been performed on a MOX-fuelled fast reactor model as specified by an IAEA computational benchmark. VESTA is a relatively new code that has been used for burnup credit calculations and thermal reactor models, but not typically for fast reactor applications. The detailed input and results of the IAEA benchmark provides an opportunity to gauge the use of VESTA in a fast reactor application. VESTA employs an ultra-fine multi-group binning approach that accelerates Monte Carlo burnup calculations. Using VESTA to compute the end of cycle (EOC) power fractions by enrichment zone showed agreement with the published values within 5%. When comparing the ultra-fine multi-group binning approach to the tally-based approach, EOC isotopic masses also agree within 5%. Using the ultra-fine multi-group binning approach, we obtain a wall-time speedup factor of 35 when compared to the tally-based approach for computing a k{sub eff} eigenvalue with burnup problem. The authors conclude the use of VESTA's ultra-fine multi-group binning approach with Monte Carlo transport performs accurate depletion calculations for this fast reactor benchmark. (authors)

  16. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  17. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  18. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  19. Retrieval System for Calcined Waste for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, Randy L.; Johnston, Beau A.; Lower, Danielle E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the conceptual approach to retrieve radioactive calcine waste, hereafter called calcine, from stainless steel storage bins contained within concrete vaults. The retrieval system will allow evacuation of the granular solids (calcine) from the storage bins through the use of stationary vacuum nozzles. The nozzles will use air jets for calcine fluidization and will be able to rotate and direct the fluidization or displacement of the calcine within the bin. Each bin will have a single retrieval system installed prior to operation to prevent worker exposure to the high radiation fields. The addition of an articulated camera arm will allow for operations monitoring and will be equipped with contingency tools to aid in calcine removal. Possible challenges (calcine bridging and rat-holing) associated with calcine retrieval and transport, including potential solutions for bin pressurization, calcine fluidization and waste confinement, are also addressed. The Calcine Disposition Project has the responsibility to retrieve, treat, and package HLW calcine. The calcine retrieval system has been designed to incorporate the functions and technical characteristics as established by the retrieval system functional analysis. By adequately implementing the highest ranking technical characteristics into the design of the retrieval system, the system will be able to satisfy the functional requirements. The retrieval system conceptual design provides the means for removing bulk calcine from the bins of the CSSF vaults. Top-down vacuum retrieval coupled with an articulating camera arm will allow for a robust, contained process capable of evacuating bulk calcine from bins and transporting it to the processing facility. The system is designed to fluidize, vacuum, transport and direct the calcine from its current location to the CSSF roof-top transport lines. An articulating camera arm, deployed through an adjacent access riser, will work in conjunction with the

  20. Proposed first-generation WSQ bit allocation procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1993-09-08

    The Wavelet/Scalar Quantization (WSQ) gray-scale fingerprint image compression algorithm involves a symmetric wavelet transform (SWT) image decomposition followed by uniform scalar quantization of each subband. The algorithm is adaptive insofar as the bin widths for the scalar quantizers are image-specific and are included in the compressed image format. Since the decoder requires only the actual bin width values -- but not the method by which they were computed -- the standard allows for future refinements of the WSQ algorithm by improving the method used to select the scalar quantizer bin widths. This report proposes a bit allocation procedure for use with the first-generation WSQ encoder. In previous work a specific formula is provided for the relative sizes of the scalar quantizer bin widths in terms of the variances of the SWT subbands. An explicit specification for the constant of proportionality, q, that determines the absolute bin widths was not given. The actual compression ratio produced by the WSQ algorithm will generally vary from image to image depending on the amount of coding gain obtained by the run-length and Huffman coding, stages of the algorithm, but testing performed by the FBI established that WSQ compression produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20 to 1. The bit allocation procedure described in this report possesses a control parameter, r, that can be set by the user to achieve a predetermined amount of lossy compression, effectively giving the user control over the amount of distortion introduced by quantization noise. The variability observed in final compression ratios is thus due only to differences in lossless coding gain from image to image, chiefly a result of the varying amounts of blank background surrounding the print area in the images. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the proposed method`s effectiveness.

  1. 3013/9975 Surveillance Program Interim Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.; McClard, J.

    2011-06-22

    The K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) requires a surveillance program to monitor the safety performance of 3013 containers and 9975 shipping packages stored in KAMS. The SRS surveillance program [Reference 1] outlines activities for field surveillance and laboratory tests that demonstrate the packages meet the functional performance requirements described in the DSA. The SRS program also supports the complexwide Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) [Reference 2] for 3013 containers. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the SRS portion of the surveillance program activities through fiscal year 2010 (FY10) and formally communicate the interpretation of these results by the Surveillance Program Authority (SPA). Surveillance for the initial 3013 container random sampling of the Innocuous bin and the Pressure bin has been completed and there has been no indication of corrosion or significant pressurization. The maximum pressure observed was less than 50 psig, which is well below the design pressure of 699 psig for the 3013 container [Reference 3]. The data collected during surveillance of these bins has been evaluated by the Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Working Group and no additional surveillance is necessary for these bins at least through FY13. A decision will be made whether additional surveillance of these bins is needed during future years of storage and as additional containers are generated. Based on the data collected to date, the SPA concludes that 3013 containers in these bins can continue to be safely stored in KAMS. This year, 13 destructive examinations (DE) were performed on random samples from the Pressure & Corrosion bin. To date, DE has been completed for approximately 30% of the random samples from the Pressure & Corrosion bin. In addition, DE has been performed on 6 engineering judgment (EJ) containers, for a total of 17 to date. This includes one container that exceeded the 3013

  2. Measurements of inclusive $W+$jets production rates as a function of jet transverse momentum in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    This Letter describes measurements of inclusive W({yields} e{nu}) + n jet cross sections (n = 1-4), presented as total inclusive cross sections and differentially in the n{sup th} jet transverse momentum. The measurements are made using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and achieve considerably smaller uncertainties on W+jets production cross sections than previous measurements. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations in the n = 1-3 jet multiplicity bins and to leading order pQCD calculations in the 4-jet bin. The measurements are generally in agreement with pQCD predictions, although certain regions of phase space are identified where the calculations could be improved.

  3. Wind turbine performance: Methods and criteria for reliability of measured power curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    In order to evaluate the performance of prototype turbines, and to quantify incremental changes in performance through field testing, Advanced Wind Turbines (AWT) has been developing methods and requirements for power curve measurement. In this paper, field test data is used to illustrate several issues and trends which have resulted from this work. Averaging and binning processes, data hours per wind-speed bin, wind turbulence levels, and anemometry methods are all shown to have significant impacts on the resulting power curves. Criteria are given by which the AWT power curves show a high degree of repeatability, and these criteria are compared and contrasted with current published standards for power curve measurement. 6 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  5. MiniBooNE NC 1π0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    νμ and ν̅μ induced neutral current single π0 production cross sections on mineral oil at Eν~O(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 1π0 cross section paper is made available to the public: Neutrino Mode Running νμ NC 1π0 pπ0 Differential Cross Section 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the momentum of the π0 1D array of the value of the differential cross section in each bin in units of 10-40

  6. Tomography and weak lensing statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Kilbinger, Martin E-mail: peter.coles@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We provide generic predictions for the lower order cumulants of weak lensing maps, and their correlators for tomographic bins as well as in three dimensions (3D). Using small-angle approximation, we derive the corresponding one- and two-point probability distribution function for the tomographic maps from different bins and for 3D convergence maps. The modelling of weak lensing statistics is obtained by adopting a detailed prescription for the underlying density contrast that involves hierarchal ansatz and lognormal distribution. We study the dependence of our results on cosmological parameters and source distributions corresponding to the realistic surveys such as LSST and DES. We briefly outline how photometric redshift information can be incorporated in our results. We also show how topological properties of convergence maps can be quantified using our results.

  7. Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment eXtreme scale (EDENx)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad Allen

    2015-07-01

    EDENx is a multivariate data visualization tool that allows interactive user driven analysis of large-scale data sets with high dimensionality. EDENx builds on our earlier system, called EDEN to enable analysis of more dimensions and larger scale data sets. EDENx provides an initial overview of summary statistics for each variable in the data set under investigation. EDENx allows the user to interact with graphical summary plots of the data to investigate subsets and their statistical associations. These plots include histograms, binned scatterplots, binned parallel coordinate plots, timeline plots, and graphical correlation indicators. From the EDENx interface, a user can select a subsample of interest and launch a more detailed data visualization via the EDEN system. EDENx is best suited for high-level, aggregate analysis tasks while EDEN is more appropriate for detail data investigations.

  8. Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment eXtreme scale (EDENx)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    EDENx is a multivariate data visualization tool that allows interactive user driven analysis of large-scale data sets with high dimensionality. EDENx builds on our earlier system, called EDEN to enable analysis of more dimensions and larger scale data sets. EDENx provides an initial overview of summary statistics for each variable in the data set under investigation. EDENx allows the user to interact with graphical summary plots of the data to investigate subsets and their statisticalmore » associations. These plots include histograms, binned scatterplots, binned parallel coordinate plots, timeline plots, and graphical correlation indicators. From the EDENx interface, a user can select a subsample of interest and launch a more detailed data visualization via the EDEN system. EDENx is best suited for high-level, aggregate analysis tasks while EDEN is more appropriate for detail data investigations.« less

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Definition AFVs include vehicles propelled to a significant extent by electricity from a battery that has a capacity of at least four kilowatt-hours and can be recharged from an external source and vehicles propelled solely by compressed natural gas, hydrogen, or propane and that meet or exceed Tier 2, Bin 2 federal exhaust emissions standards. (Reference Nevada Revised Statutes 484A.196 through 484A.197

  10. Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine | Department of Energy Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine CFD modeling was used to compare conventional diesel and dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition combustion at US Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx levels, while accounting for Diesel Exhaust Fluid

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Anatomy and Physics of ZDR Columns Submitter: Kumjian, M., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kumjian MR, AP Khain, N Benmoshe, E Ilotoviz, AV Ryzhkov, and VT Phillips. 2014. "The anatomy and physics of ZDR columns: Investigating a polarimetric radar signature with a spectral bin microphysical model." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 53(7),

  12. I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PART III - SECTION J APPENDIX G LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES To be Updated During Transition In addition to the list of applicable directives listed below, the Contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive. Electronic copies of these documents are available at the following Websites: http://directives.doe.gov/cgi-bin/currentchecklist

  13. Regulated 2-Stage (R2S) Charging Systems for Future Diesel Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2-Stage (R2S) Charging Systems for Future Diesel Applications Regulated 2-Stage (R2S) Charging Systems for Future Diesel Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: BorgWarner Turbo Systms 2004_deer_sweetland.pdf (789.81 KB) More Documents & Publications The BMW Approach to Tier2 Bin5 Meeting the CO2 Challenge DEER 2002 BMW Diesel - Engine Concepts for Efficient Dynamics

  14. Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Market | Department of Energy Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_greaney.pdf (379.13 KB) More Documents & Publications Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research

  15. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low

  16. ATVM Program Overview 2015 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Innovation You Can Depend On(tm) This presentation does not contain any confidential, proprietary, or otherwise restricted information. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine This presentation does not contain any confidential, proprietary, or otherwise restricted information. Michael J Ruth Cummins Inc 19 June 2014 Project ID:ACE061 2 Innovation You Can Depend On(tm) This presentation does not contain any confidential, proprietary, or otherwise restricted information. Next

  17. Philips Lumileds Achieves 139 lm/W in a Neutral White LED

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philips Lumileds' LUXEON Rebel LED can now deliver 139 lm/W in a neutral white LED. The top bin LED, developed with a single InGaN die and phosphor conversion, shows high-performance characteristics up to 139 lm/W and 138 lumens at 350 mA, with a forward voltage of 2.83 V. The CCT of the device is 5385K and the CRI is 70.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 08XTPO-M_Node_Opt.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    node Optimization Single-node Optimization Customer Documentation and Training PGI Compiler Options -help option displays command line options Request information about either a single option or groups of options options % pgf90 -help=groups Display the available optimization switches % pgf90 -switch -help ------------------------------------ * % pgf90 -fast -help % pgf90 fast help * Reading rcfile /opt/pgi/6.2.2/linux8664/6.2/bin/.pgf90rc -fast * Common optimizations; includes -O2 -Munroll=c:1

  19. Further improvement of conventional diesel NOx aftertreatment concepts as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pathway for SULEV | Department of Energy Further improvement of conventional diesel NOx aftertreatment concepts as pathway for SULEV Further improvement of conventional diesel NOx aftertreatment concepts as pathway for SULEV Discusses possible improvement potential and various pathways for LNT after-treatment systems for diesel applications to comply with Tier 2 Bin 5 and SULEV regulations deer11_nanjundaswamy.pdf (1.91 MB) More Documents & Publications Diesel Passenger Car Technology

  20. ASEAM2.1. Simplified Building Energy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firevoid, J.A.; Willman, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    ASEAM2.1 is a modified bin temperature program for calculating the energy consumption of residential and simple commercial buildings. It can be used to evaluate the individual or combined effects of various energy design strategies. Algorithms include heating and cooling load calculations based on a methodology documented by the ASHRAE Technical Committee on Energy Calculation (TC4.7) and HVAC system and plant calculation routines with options to size heating and cooling equipment and air flows. HVAC systems are configured by selecting among the various available system types, control options, heating plants, and cooling plants. ASEAM2.1 primarily employs ASHRAE (WYEC) bin weather data; however, it is capable of alternatively using the DOD (AF88) or Battelle (TRY) bin weather data. The user can also supply as input bin weather data from other sources, if desired. Basic system types included are: a double duct or multizone unit, a terminal reheat unit, a variable air volume (VAV) system, a ceiling bypass VAV system, a variable temperature single zone system, a 2 pipe or 4 pipe fan coil system, a water/air heat pump system, and a packaged terminal air conditioner unit. In addition, ASEAM2.1 contains: baseboard heaters, a furnace system, unitary heater, and a heating and ventilation unit. Available cooling plant types are: direct expansion, centrifugal chiller, absorption chiller, district chilled water, double bundle chiller, cooling tower and reciprocating chiller. Five heating plant types are available: electric resistance, hot water or steam boiler, district steam or hot water from a central plant system, forced hot air furnace, and an air to air heat pump or double bundle chiller. Two life cycle cost programs, FBLCC and NBSLCC, developed by the National Bureau of Standards, are integrated into ASEAM2.1.

  1. TU-F-18A-04: Use of An Image-Based Material-Decomposition Algorithm for Multi-Energy CT to Determine Basis Material Densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z; Leng, S; Yu, L; McCollough, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Published methods for image-based material decomposition with multi-energy CT images have required the assumption of volume conservation or accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra and detector response. The purpose of this work was to develop an image-based material-decomposition algorithm that can overcome these limitations. Methods: An image-based material decomposition algorithm was developed that requires only mass conservation (rather than volume conservation). With this method, using multi-energy CT measurements made with n=4 energy bins, the mass density of each basis material and of the mixture can be determined without knowledge of the tube spectra and detector response. A digital phantom containing 12 samples of mixtures from water, calcium, iron, and iodine was used in the simulation (Siemens DRASIM). The calibration was performed by using pure materials at each energy bin. The accuracy of the technique was evaluated in noise-free and noisy data under the assumption of an ideal photon-counting detector. Results: Basis material densities can be estimated accurately by either theoretic calculation or calibration with known pure materials. The calibration approach requires no prior information about the spectra and detector response. Regression analysis of theoretical values versus estimated values results in excellent agreement for both noise-free and noisy data. For the calibration approach, the R-square values are 0.9960+/−0.0025 and 0.9476+/−0.0363 for noise-free and noisy data, respectively. Conclusion: From multi-energy CT images with n=4 energy bins, the developed image-based material decomposition method accurately estimated 4 basis material density (3 without k-edge and 1 with in the range of the simulated energy bins) even without any prior information about spectra and detector response. This method is applicable to mixtures of solutions and dissolvable materials, where volume conservation assumptions do not apply. CHM receives

  2. Hopper Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Hopper Job Size Charts Fractional Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of five job-core-size bins: 2014 Usage by Job Size Chart 2013 2012 2011 Large Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs using greater than 16,384 cores: 2014 2013 2012 Usage by Job Size Chart 2011 Last edited: 2016-05-02 09:20:42

  3. Advanced Boost System Developing for High EGR Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Harold

    2012-09-30

    To support industry efforts of clean and efficient internal combustion engine development for passenger and commercial applications • This program focuses on turbocharger improvement for medium and light duty diesel applications, from complete system optimization percepective to enable commercialization of advanced diesel combustion technologies, such as HCCI/LTC. • Improve combined turbocharger efficiency up to 10% or fuel economy by 3% on FTP cycle at Tier II Bin 5 emission level.

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Huai -Bin" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  5. Disentangling Redshift-Space Distortions and Nonlinear Bias using the 2D Power Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Elise; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2015-08-07

    We present the nonlinear 2D galaxy power spectrum, P(k, µ), in redshift space, measured from the Dark Sky simulations, using galaxy catalogs constructed with both halo occupation distribution and subhalo abundance matching methods, chosen to represent an intermediate redshift sample of luminous red galaxies. We find that the information content in individual µ (cosine of the angle to the line of sight) bins is substantially richer then multipole moments, and show that this can be used to isolate the impact of nonlinear growth and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects. Using the µ < 0.2 simulation data, which we show is not impacted by RSD effects, we can successfully measure the nonlinear bias to an accuracy of ~ 5% at k < 0.6hMpc-1 . This use of individual µ bins to extract the nonlinear bias successfully removes a large parameter degeneracy when constraining the linear growth rate of structure. We carry out a joint parameter estimation, using the low µ simulation data to constrain the nonlinear bias, and µ > 0.2 to constrain the growth rate and show that f can be constrained to ~ 26(22)% to a kmax < 0.4(0.6)hMpc-1 from clustering alone using a simple dispersion model, for a range of galaxy models. Our analysis of individual µ bins also reveals interesting physical effects which arise simply from different methods of populating halos with galaxies. We also find a prominent turnaround scale, at which RSD damping effects are greater then the nonlinear growth, which differs not only for each µ bin but also for each galaxy model. These features may provide unique signatures which could be used to shed light on the galaxy–dark matter connection. Furthermore, the idea of separating nonlinear growth and RSD effects making use of the full information in the 2D galaxy power spectrum yields significant improvements in constraining cosmological parameters and may be a promising probe of galaxy formation models.

  6. Page 8015 TITLE 42-THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE §

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8015 TITLE 42-THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE § 17013 § 17013. Advanced technology vehicles manufac- turing incentive program (a) Definitions In this section: (1) Advanced technology vehicle The term ''advanced technology vehicle'' means an ultra efficient vehicle or a light duty vehicle that meets- (A) the Bin 5 Tier II emission standard es- tablished in regulations issued by the Ad- ministrator of the Environmental Protec- tion Agency under section 202(i) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C.

  7. Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed state-of-the-art passive catalytic technology designed to reduce NOx released during vehicle cold start portion of the FTP-75 cycle deer11_henry.pdf (1.27 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light

  8. Microsoft Word - 2014_1008_TWC_ThreeMonth_WorkPlan.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10/8/14 Facilitator notes in blue November Committee meeting placeholder: Thursday, November 13 Call placeholder: Tuesday, November 18, 3:00 p.m. December Committee meeting placeholder: Wednesday, December 10 Call placeholder: Tuesday, December 16, 3:00 p.m. January Committee meeting placeholder: Wednesday, January 7 Call placeholder: Tuesday, January 13, 3:00 p.m. Tank Farm Vapor Issues (joint with HSEP) Direct Feed LAW HOLDING BIN Topic On HAB 2014 Work Plan? Timeframe? Alternative vessel

  9. High-Resolution Residential Feeder Load Characterization and Variability Modelling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential Feeder Load Characterization and Variability Modelling Andrew Pohl, Jay Johnson, Santiago Sena, Robert Broderick, and Jimmy Quiroz Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, USA Abstract - Data from of a highly instrumented residential feeder in Ota City, Japan was used to determine 1 second load variability for the aggregation of 50, 100, 250, and 500 homes. The load variability is categorized by binning the data into seasons, weekdays vs. weekends, and time of day to

  10. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  11. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  12. Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrot, Laurent Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia

    2009-02-15

    This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

  13. Statistical representation of clouds in climate models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g.,

  14. Photosynthetic Energy Transduction | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photosynthetic Energy Transduction We focus on understanding how the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems is converted to stored chemical products through various electron transfer processes and pathways in both cyanobacteria and algae. four flask beakers containing green algae set in bins surrounded by light and attached to sensors, hoses, and valves Full Publications List An Illustration in three sections with an image of a quarter moon with an arrow indicating a movement to

  15. ARM - VAP Product - qmeaerimeans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsqmeaerilblqmeaerimeans Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027749 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : QMEAERIMEANS QME: derived AERI vs. LBLRTM-radiance stats as f of bin, proc. & channel Active Dates 1993.12.08 - 2005.01.08

  16. Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

  17. Atmospheric characterization of five hot Jupiters with the wide field Camera 3 on the Hubble space telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David; Dsert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; Mandell, Avi M.

    2014-04-20

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 ?m) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 ?m, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1? precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1? precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 10{sup 4} and 2.1 10{sup 4} for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  18. Treatment of G1 Baskets at the CEA Marcoule Site - 12027

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourquet, Line; Boya, Didier

    2012-07-01

    In the dismantling program for the first-generation French reactors in accordance with the nonproliferation treaty, the CEA is in charge of cleanup and dismantling operations for the facilities at Marcoule, including the decladding units. The G1 decladding was built between 1955 and 1957 in order to de-clad spent fuel elements from the G1 plutonium-producing reactor and prepare them for dissolution. The facility was also used for interim storage of G1, G2 and G3 fuel dissolution baskets, which had been used during plant operation for transfer (from the decladding facility to the UP1 plant) and/or dissolution of spent fuel elements. One of the cleanup projects involves recovery of the baskets, which will be cut up, sorted, and conditioned in metal bins. The bins will be immobilized with cement grout, then transferred to the onsite solid waste conditioning facility (CDS) and to the repository operated by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). The project is now in progress, after special safety permits were issued and measurement stations and dedicated tools were developed to handle all types of baskets (which differed according to their origin and use). The disposal of all the baskets is scheduled to last 2 years and will produce 55 metal waste bins. (authors)

  19. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giannantonio, T.

    2016-01-07

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of themore » signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the LCDM Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.« less

  20. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  1. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  2. Capacitated location of collection sites in an urban waste management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo; Lagana, Demetrio; Manni, Emanuele; Triki, Chefi

    2012-07-15

    Urban waste management is becoming an increasingly complex task, absorbing a huge amount of resources, and having a major environmental impact. The design of a waste management system consists in various activities, and one of these is related to the location of waste collection sites. In this paper, we propose an integer programming model that helps decision makers in choosing the sites where to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, as well as the capacities of the bins to be located at each collection site. This model helps in assessing tactical decisions through constraints that force each collection area to be capacitated enough to fit the expected waste to be directed to that area, while taking into account Quality of Service constraints from the citizens' point of view. Moreover, we propose an effective constructive heuristic approach whose aim is to provide a good solution quality in an extremely reduced computational time. Computational results on data related to the city of Nardo, in the south of Italy, show that both exact and heuristic approaches provide consistently better solutions than that currently implemented, resulting in a lower number of activated collection sites, and a lower number of bins to be used.

  3. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  4. Transforming PV Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    powergui Discrete, Ts = Ts s. loadpoint A B C N docks A B C N Three-Phase Fault1 A B C Three-Phase Fault A B C D3 A B C N C3+D10 A B C N B6 A B C N AAC 3_336-1.2 _336 1 2 A8,9,11 A B C N A45+LP A B C N A38 A B C N A37+2 A B C N A36+1 A B C N 7825N Ain Bin Cin Aout Bout Cout 7685 Ain Bin Cin Aout Bout Cout 3-1/0 7 3-1/0 6.1 3-1/0 5.2 3-1/0 5 3-1/0 4.3 3-1/0 3.5 3-1/0 2.8 3-1/0 2.6 3-1/0 2.4 3-1/0 1.7 3-1/0 1.4 1960 Ain Bin Cin Aout Bout Cout A750 B750 C750 N750 A B C N A B C N A B C N A B C N A B

  5. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; Broers, Hans Peter

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated. A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the

  6. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; Broers, Hans Peter

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated.more » A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the freeform approach, especially for the cases where a larger amount of observed data is

  7. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as themore » planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.« less

  8. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  9. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as the planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-? level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.

  10. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties ?z ? 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of ?8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on ?8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, ?crit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  11. Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page "Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV" Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 022502, hep-ex/1305.2243 Data Ancillary data files for this result are given here, and supercede the ones originally associated with the arXiv entry: they have been updated with MINERvA's best estimate of the NuMI neutrino flux. The available data files have the following format: The columns are Q2 bins, first the 8 neutrino and

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Search

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    526 vehicles Search small New Search | Download | Print Spinner Filter by: Fuel/Technology: All | Class/Type: All | Manufacturer: All View: Matrix List Your search returned no results. You can modify your search using the filters on the right or start a new search. Acura RLX Hybrid (2016) 2016 acura rlx Hybrid Electric Sedan/Wagon Fuel Economy: 28 mpg city / 32 mpg hwy Emission Certification: LEV III SULEV30, Tier 2 Bin 3 Engine: 3.5L V6 Transmission: Auto Find a Dealer Audi A3 Sportback e-tron

  13. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports » Edison Job Size Charts Edison Job Size Charts Fraction of Hours Used per Job Size Note: Interactive charts with current and past Cori and Edison data are now available on MyNERSC This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Fraction of Hours Used by Big Jobs This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison by jobs using 16,384 or more cores. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Last edited: 2016-04-21

  14. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Here are some sample job scripts that cover the most of the use cases on Edison. If you find anything that you need is missing, please let us know at consult at nersc dot gov. Note, Edison queue may still undergo configuration change as we gain more insight about how Slurm works with Edison workload. Basic Job Scripts #!/bin/bash -l #SBATCH -p regular #SBATCH -N 2 #SBATCH -t 04:00:00 #SBATCH -J my_job #SBATCH -o my_job.o%j #SBATCH -L SCRATCH,project

  15. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Bertalot, L.

    2012-10-15

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  16. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  17. Technical Comparative Analysis of "Best of Breed" Turnkey Si-Based Processes and Equipment, to be Used to Produce a Combined Multi-entity Research and Development Technology Roadmap for Thick and Thin Silicon PV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovel, Harold; Prettyman, Kevin

    2015-03-27

    A side-by-side analysis was done on then currently available technology, along with roadmaps to push each particular option forward. Variations in turnkey line processes can and do result in finished solar device performance. Together with variations in starting material quality, the result is a distribution of effciencies. Forensic analysis and characterization of each crystalline Si based technology will determine the most promising approach with respect to cost, efficiency and reliability. Forensic analysis will also shed light on the causes of binning variations. Si solar cells were forensically analyzed from each turn key supplier using a host of techniques

  18. Automatic inspection system for nuclear fuel pellets or rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jr., William H.; Sease, John D.; Hamel, William R.; Bradley, Ronnie A.

    1978-01-01

    An automatic inspection system is provided for determining surface defects on cylindrical objects such as nuclear fuel pellets or rods. The active element of the system is a compound ring having a plurality of pneumatic jet units directed into a central bore. These jet units are connected to provide multiple circuits, each circuit being provided with a pressure sensor. The outputs of the sensors are fed to a comparator circuit whereby a signal is generated when the difference of pressure between pneumatic circuits, caused by a defect, exceeds a pre-set amount. This signal may be used to divert the piece being inspected into a "reject" storage bin or the like.

  19. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: After the 1/18 system maintenance, C++ code compilation gets an error if the default hdf5/1.8.5.0 module is loaded: "/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp". Read the full post "module: command not found" in batch jobs January 6, 2012 by Helen He Sympotom: Users with csh/tcsh as default login shells will get this error when trying to use

  20. PIC Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2/18/15 (Blue titles indicate those topics specifically identified in the 2015 HAB Work Plan; Italicized items indicate tentative) February March April Committee Call 2/18 Committee Call Placeholder 3/18 Committee Mtg Placeholder 4/7 (1 p.m. - 5 p.m.) Committee Business o Update 3-month committee work plan o Round-robin of HAB member outreach Debrief TPA Agency Public Involvement Events o What worked well; what didn't work well o Identify areas of possible improvements Holding Bin for future PIC

  1. PIC Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    worked well; what didn't work well o Identify areas of possible improvements Holding Bin for future PIC meeting topics WTP Communications Strategy o Debrief the TWC discussion from December o Identify PIC next steps as applicable including review of draft white paper if available Frame TPA Tutorial o Based on the tutorial given in November, discuss any additional framing questions/points to bring forward to the full Board in February Brainstorm Tutorial Topics o 100 D/H Proposed Plan Committee

  2. bgq_stack | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bgq_stack Location The bgq_stack script is located at: /soft/debuggers/scripts/bin/bgq_stack or for user convenience, the SoftEnv key +utility_paths (that you get in your default environment by putting @default in your ~/.soft file) allows you to use directly: bgq_stack List the possible options using -h: > bgq_stack -h Using bgq_stack on BG/Q to decode core files When a Blue Gene/Q program terminates abnormally, the system generates multiple core files, plain text files that can be viewed

  3. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS except the pillar and panel tanks) would be full of mixed transuranic waste in approximately 2017. Other facilities depending on the capacity of the Tank Farm for operation eventually would be shut down due to their inability to discharge liquid waste. Under this alternative, DOE would not meet its commitment to cease use of the Tank Farm by 2012 or to make its mixed HLW road ready by 2035. Facilities required for the No Action Alternative include the bin

  4. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    45 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3.4.2 Existing Facilities Associated with High-Level Waste Management The facilities in this group are those that have historically been used at the INTEC to generate, treat, and store HLW. Because of the number of facilities involved, DOE has grouped them in functional groups for purposes of analysis (see Table 3-3). DOE analyzed the HLW tanks and bin sets for closure under all five disposition sce- narios; however, facilities that support the Tank Farm

  5. Link error from craype/2.5.0

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Link error from craype/2.5.0 Link error from craype/2.5.0 January 13, 2016 by Woo-Sun Yang If you build a code using a file called 'configure' with craype/2.5.0, Cray build-tools assumes that you want to use the 'native' link mode (e.g., gcc defaults to dynamic linking), by adding '-Wl,-rpath=/opt/intel/composer_xe_2015/compiler/lib/intel64 -lintlc'. This creates a link error: /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lintlc A temporary work around is to swap the default craype (2.5.0) with an older or newer

  6. Antineutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antineutrino CCQE Data Release Page "Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV" Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 022501, hep-ex/1305.2234 Data Ancillary data files for this result are given here, and supercede the ones originally associated with the arXiv entry: they have been updated with MINERvA's best estimate of the NuMI neutrino flux. The available data files have the following format: The columns are Q2 bins, first the 8 neutrino

  7. Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ftn [-A module_name[, module_name] ...] [-b bin_obj_file] [-c] [-d disable] [-D identifier[=value]] [-e enable] [-f source_form] [-F] [-g] [-G debug_lvl] [-h arg] [-I incldir] [-J dir_name] [-K trap=opt[, opt] ...] [-l libname] [-L ldir] [-m msg_lvl] [-M msgs] [-N col] [-o out_file] [-O opt[, opt] ...] [-p module_site [,module_site ...]] [-Q path] [-r list_opt] [-R runchk] [-s size] [-S] [-T] [-U identifier[, identifier] ...] [-v] [-V] [-Wphase,"opt...",] [-x dirlist] [-X npes]

  8. Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-01-10

    Correlations in the hadron distributions produced in relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied in the discrete wavelet expansion method. The analysis is performed in the space of pseudorapidity (|{eta}| {le} 1) and azimuth (full 2{pi}) in bins of transverse momentum (p{sub t}) from 0.14 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2.1 GeV/c. In peripheral Au+Au collisions a correlation structure ascribed to minijet fragmentation is observed. It evolves with collision centrality and p{sub t} in a way not seen before which suggests strong dissipation of minijet fragmentation in the longitudinally-expanding medium.

  9. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Viryd CS8 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the Viryd CS8 is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  10. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine in Boulder, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and utilized binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  11. Historical Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Historical Data Hopper Hours Used Hours used per day on Hopper. Read More » Hopper Job Size Charts Fractional Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of five job-core-size bins: 2014 2013 2012 2011 Large Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs using greater than 16,384 cores: 2014 2013 2012 ... Read More » Carver Hours Used Hours used per day on Carver. Read More » Edison Phase I Hours Used Hours used per day on

  12. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  13. MiniBooNE LowE Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unexplained Excess of Electron-Like Events From a 1 GeV Neutrino Beam", arXiv:0812.2243 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 101802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 updated nue oscillation paper is made available to the public: Energy Range for Default Oscillation Fit (475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy) 1D array of bin boundaries in electron neutrino reconstructed neutrino energy 1D array of observed electron neutrino candidate events per reconstructed

  14. Model for Eukaryotic Tail-anchored Protein Binding Based on the Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal Gasoline

  15. ORC Closed Loop Control Systems for Transient and Steady State Duty Cycles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy ORC Closed Loop Control Systems for Transient and Steady State Duty Cycles ORC Closed Loop Control Systems for Transient and Steady State Duty Cycles System-level models using iterative concept analysis are being used on a closed loop controlled, waste heat recovery system running automatically over various drive cycles. p-26_wright.pdf (210.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of an ORC system to improve HD truck fuel efficiency US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel

  16. Oxidation of NO in Sample Bags to Yield NO2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of NO in Sample Bags to Yield NO2 Oxidation of NO in Sample Bags to Yield NO2 Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_shah.pdf (106.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Electrostatic Neutralization - A Key to Accurate & Repeatable PM Filter Weighing Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor

  17. MOLDEN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOLDEN MOLDEN Description Molden is a package for displaying molecular density from ab initio packages. It must be run under an X-Windows environment. It is available only on Carver. Use To use molden load the modulefile for it: module load molden The various executable programs are in the $MOLDEN/bin directory. The main display programs are molden and gmolden. There is a $MOLDEN/test directory containing various sample input files. The $MODLEN/doc directory contains the manual in postcript and

  18. HSEP Committee FY 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY 2016 Work Plan Updated 12/10/2015 during the committee meeting Beryllium program update  Placeholder Annual Employee Concerns Program  Placeholder  Hear from new program director at WRPS  Quarter 1 (Oct-Dec) Quarter 2 (Jan-Mar) Quarter 3 (Apr-Jun) Quarter 4 (July-Sept) Holding Bin Transportation Effects on Worker Safety - draft advice  Review of draft advice Safety culture improvement efforts (joint with TWC)  Discuss Sounding Board for upcoming Board meeting o Review

  19. Heidi Poxon Cobalt Batch System on Theta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Running and Tuning Programs on Cray XC Systems with KNL Heidi Poxon Cobalt Batch System on Theta 2 EXAMPLE: qsub -n 2 -t 15 --mode script -A Theta_ESP -q cache-quad --env OMP_NUM_THREADS=16 \ ./runScript qsub -n <number of nodes> -t <wallclock time> --mode script -A <project(allocation)> \ -q <queue> --env <var1=value1:var2=value2....> myScriptFile #!/bin/bash -evx # Command line options will override the three settings below: #COBALT -t 5 #COBALT -q cache-quad

  20. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  1. Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig

  2. Determination of the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi (n, {gamma}) {sup 210}Bi reaction from 500 eV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Berthomieux, E.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gunsing, F.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. M.; Milazzo, P. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.; Terlizzi, R.; Wynants, R.

    2006-07-01

    Energy differential neutron capture cross section measurements have been performed to determine the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi(n, {gamma}) reaction. The measurements were carried out at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (Belgium). The capture measurements were performed at a 12 m flight path using three High-Purity Germanium detectors. The experimental set-up was optimized to reduce the prompt background due to scattered neutrons. Several {gamma}-ray spectra corresponding to the {sup 209}Bi + n resonances up to 20 keV were deduced. The results of a preliminary data analysis are given in this paper. (authors)

  3. Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_wang.pdf (6.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR

  4. Monitoring and Managing Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring and Managing Jobs Monitoring and Managing Jobs Commonly Used Commands Action How to do it Comment Get a summary of all batch jobs sgeusers Shows a tally of all jobs for all users including their states. This is a script that parses the output of qstat and is maintained by PDSF staff (located in /common/usg/bin). Do "sgeusers -h" for usage info. Get a listing of your jobs and their states qstat -u user_name If you skip the -u option, you'll get all the jobs on PDSF. Get

  5. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 Follow up/Holding bin * "Cleanup" definition and comfort with risk (Vince) * Clarify TPA change package potential effects on RCRA permit * F Reactor RI/FS and D & H RI/FS - distribute end of December * Thorium vault at U Canyon? * PA integration WM Area C (TWC lead, joint) * Public understanding of cleanup level (PIC lead, joint) * 200-WA-1 Work Plan (May 2013) Page 1 F Reactor OU Follow Up * Draft A issued end of December 2012 o Regulators/DOE comment/response * Then to

  6. CPMD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CPMD CPMD Description CPMD is a plane wave/pseudopotential DFT code for ab initio molecular dynamics simulations How to Access CPMD NERSC uses modules to manage access to software. To use the default version of CPMD, type: % module load cpmd Using CPMD on Edison and Cori There are two ways of running CPMD: submitting a batch job or running interactively in an interactive batch session. Sample Batch Script for CPMD on Edison #!/bin/bash -l #SBATCH -p regular #SBATCH -N 2 #SBATCH -t 04:00:00

  7. Disentangling Redshift-Space Distortions and Nonlinear Bias using the 2D Power Spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jennings, Elise; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2015-08-07

    We present the nonlinear 2D galaxy power spectrum, P(k, µ), in redshift space, measured from the Dark Sky simulations, using galaxy catalogs constructed with both halo occupation distribution and subhalo abundance matching methods, chosen to represent an intermediate redshift sample of luminous red galaxies. We find that the information content in individual µ (cosine of the angle to the line of sight) bins is substantially richer then multipole moments, and show that this can be used to isolate the impact of nonlinear growth and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects. Using the µ < 0.2 simulation data, which we show ismore » not impacted by RSD effects, we can successfully measure the nonlinear bias to an accuracy of ~ 5% at k < 0.6hMpc-1 . This use of individual µ bins to extract the nonlinear bias successfully removes a large parameter degeneracy when constraining the linear growth rate of structure. We carry out a joint parameter estimation, using the low µ simulation data to constrain the nonlinear bias, and µ > 0.2 to constrain the growth rate and show that f can be constrained to ~ 26(22)% to a kmax < 0.4(0.6)hMpc-1 from clustering alone using a simple dispersion model, for a range of galaxy models. Our analysis of individual µ bins also reveals interesting physical effects which arise simply from different methods of populating halos with galaxies. We also find a prominent turnaround scale, at which RSD damping effects are greater then the nonlinear growth, which differs not only for each µ bin but also for each galaxy model. These features may provide unique signatures which could be used to shed light on the galaxy–dark matter connection. Furthermore, the idea of separating nonlinear growth and RSD effects making use of the full information in the 2D galaxy power spectrum yields significant improvements in constraining cosmological parameters and may be a promising probe of galaxy formation models.« less

  8. Allocating application to group of consecutive processors in fault-tolerant deadlock-free routing path defined by routers obeying same rules for path selection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Vitus J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Bender, Michael A.; Bunde, David P.

    2009-07-21

    In a multiple processor computing apparatus, directional routing restrictions and a logical channel construct permit fault tolerant, deadlock-free routing. Processor allocation can be performed by creating a linear ordering of the processors based on routing rules used for routing communications between the processors. The linear ordering can assume a loop configuration, and bin-packing is applied to this loop configuration. The interconnection of the processors can be conceptualized as a generally rectangular 3-dimensional grid, and the MC allocation algorithm is applied with respect to the 3-dimensional grid.

  9. Variational optimization method for calculation of cloud drop growth in an Eulerian drop-size framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingfu; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.; Khairoutdinov, M.P.

    1997-10-15

    A variational optimization (VO) method that requires specification of only one variable in each bin size for condensation and evaporation calculations in an Eulerian drop-size framework is proposed. The method is tested against the exact solution given by the Lagrangian method using more than 15000 spectra selected from experiments with a three-dimensional large eddy simulation model with explicit microphysics. The results show that the VO method not only conserves the integral parameters of the spectrum, such as drop number, mean radius, liquid water content, and the effective radius, but also provides an accurate calculation of the spectrum itself.

  10. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1–1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster mass–richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass–richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stackedmore » weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass–richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass–richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h–1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.« less

  11. FROM I J. T.Consiglio, Chief, Middlesex Operations SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;. ./I . S GOVERNMENT . MATERIM 10 TO t F. M. &more, Direotor, Produotioa Division DATX: November 8, 1948 \ , FROM I J. T.Consiglio, Chief, Middlesex Operations SUBJECT: DISPOSITION OF PORBIGN THORIUM BEARING ORBS AT HIDDLkX REFEBTO SYMBOL2 PAIJTC . J1-jrfTf,clI-tti /a Reference is made to a memorandum to you, subjeot Shipment of Thorium Bearing Ores, dated Ootober 25, 1948, in which an explanation was given concerning the reasons why subjeat materials were stored in bulk form.in bins at

  12. Batch Script Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qs -u <username> You can also get more detailed information about

  13. Best Practices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Best Practices Best Practices Here is a list of best practices for using Python at NERSC. Always Load a Python Module Always use a version of Python provided by NERSC through "module load python" with an optional version suffix (2.7.9, 2.7-anaconda, 3.5-anaconda, etc). Never use the version of Python found at /usr/bin/python, it is an older version of Python that NERSC does not support for its users. Understand Your Python Choices at NERSC Understand the difference between NERSC's

  14. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.11.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster massrichness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These massrichness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ? 0.4, 0.4 < z ? 0.7, 0.7 < z ? 1.0 and 0.1 < z ? 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present massrichness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the massrichness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (?) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 0.526, 14.1 1.78, 30.2 8.74 and 9.23 0.525 1013 h1 M? for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 0.0585, 0.948 0.100, 1.33 0.260 and 0.883 0.0500, respectively.

  15. Underground and earth sheltered food storage: historical, geographic, and economic considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunkel, F.V.

    1985-01-01

    Storage structures now used for bulk grain and beans have been derived from a combination of scientific experiments and tradition. Recent generations of US farmers have grown up with the understanding that grain is best stored in round metal bins or wooden cribs aboveground. It is generally thought that natural wind movements in the crib structures and forced air flow from aeration fans in metal bins will keep grain and beans safe, i.e., free of moisture accumulation and the resulting insect and fungal growth, and protected from germination, all of which deteriorate the commodity. North American farmers further believe that the low temperature of northern winters combined with careful use of aerating fans will keep the grain dry or beans safe (less than 14% moisture content) for years of storage. Traditional forms of grain and bean storage in other parts of the world have evolved differently. With the exception of North America, the people of every continent in the world have developed underground structures for long-term storage of food. A review of the varieties of underground structures that have evolved throughout the world, and research related to underground storage of grain and beans is presented.

  16. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume III. Western United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 24 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  17. Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M.; Grodzka, Philomena G.; McCormick, Paul O.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

  18. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Gentry, Stephen M.; Boye, Clinton A.; Grotbeck, Carter L.; Stallard, Brian R.; Descour, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  19. Integrated system checkout report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-14

    The planning and preparation phase of the Integrated Systems Checkout Program (ISCP) was conducted from October 1989 to July 1991. A copy of the ISCP, DOE-WIPP 90--002, is included in this report as an appendix. The final phase of the Checkout was conducted from July 10, 1991, to July 23, 1991. This phase exercised all the procedures and equipment required to receive, emplace, and retrieve contact handled transuranium (CH TRU) waste filled dry bins. In addition, abnormal events were introduced to simulate various equipment failures, loose surface radioactive contamination events, and personnel injury. This report provides a detailed summary of each days activities during this period. Qualification of personnel to safely conduct the tasks identified in the procedures and the abnormal events were verified by observers familiar with the Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test requirements. These observers were members of the staffs of Westinghouse WID Engineering, QA, Training, Health Physics, Safety, and SNL. Observers representing a number of DOE departments, the state of new Mexico, and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board observed those Checkout activities conducted during the period from July 17, 1991, to July 23, 1991. Observer comments described in this report are those obtained from the staff member observers. 1 figs., 1 tab.

  20. THE CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER B-STAR VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McKeever, Jean E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu

    2012-04-15

    The light curves of 252 B-star candidates in the Kepler database are analyzed in a similar fashion to that done by Balona et al. to further characterize B-star variability, increase the sample of variable B stars for future study, and to identify stars whose power spectra include particularly interesting features such as frequency groupings. Stars are classified as either constant light emitters, {beta} Cep stars, slowly pulsating B stars (SPBs), hybrid pulsators, binaries or stars whose light curves are dominated by rotation (Bin/Rot), hot subdwarfs, or white dwarfs. One-hundred stars in our sample were found to be either light constants or to be variable at a level of less than 0.02 mmag. We increase the number of candidate B-star variables found in the Kepler database by Balona et al. in the following fashion: {beta} Cep stars from 0 to 10, SPBs from eight to 54, hybrid pulsators from seven to 21, and Bin/Rot stars from 23 to 82. For comparison purposes, approximately 51 SPBs and six hybrids had been known prior to 2007. The number of {beta} Cep stars known prior to 2004 was 93. A secondary result of this study is the identification of an additional 11 pulsating white dwarf candidates, four of which possess frequency groupings.

  1. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, Robert J.; Wang Yinkun; Zhao Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada) and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector.

  2. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadropole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin.

  3. Multi-Level Bitmap Indexes for Flash Memory Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Madduri, Kamesh; Canon, Shane

    2010-07-23

    Due to their low access latency, high read speed, and power-efficient operation, flash memory storage devices are rapidly emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional magnetic storage devices. However, tests show that the most efficient indexing methods are not able to take advantage of the flash memory storage devices. In this paper, we present a set of multi-level bitmap indexes that can effectively take advantage of flash storage devices. These indexing methods use coarsely binned indexes to answer queries approximately, and then use finely binned indexes to refine the answers. Our new methods read significantly lower volumes of data at the expense of an increased disk access count, thus taking full advantage of the improved read speed and low access latency of flash devices. To demonstrate the advantage of these new indexes, we measure their performance on a number of storage systems using a standard data warehousing benchmark called the Set Query Benchmark. We observe that multi-level strategies on flash drives are up to 3 times faster than traditional indexing strategies on magnetic disk drives.

  4. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-05-22

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  5. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doctor, R.D.

    1986-07-24

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic-particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  6. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doctor, R.D.

    1988-10-18

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  7. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  8. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  9. Solid waste management in Kolkata, India: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Tumpa; Goel, Sudha

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of current solid waste management (SWM) practices in Kolkata, India and suggests solutions to some of the major problems. More than 2920 ton/d of solid waste are generated in the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) area and the budget allocation for 2007-2008 was Rs. 1590 million (US$40 million), which amounts to Rs. 265/cap-y (US$6.7/cap-d) on SWM. This expenditure is insufficient to provide adequate SWM services. Major deficiencies were found in all elements of SWM. Despite 70% of the SWM budget being allocated for collection, collection efficiency is around 60-70% for the registered residents and less than 20% for unregistered residents (slum dwellers). The collection process is deficient in terms of manpower and vehicle availability. Bin capacity provided is adequate but locations were found to be inappropriate, thus contributing to the inefficiency of the system. At this time, no treatment is provided to the waste and waste is dumped on open land at Dhapa after collection. Lack of suitable facilities (equipment and infrastructure) and underestimates of waste generation rates, inadequate management and technical skills, improper bin collection, and route planning are responsible for poor collection and transportation of municipal solid wastes.

  10. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  11. Mathematical models of cocurrent spray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negiz, A.; Lagergren, E.S.; Cinar, A.

    1995-10-01

    A steady state mathematical model for a cocurrent spray dryer is developed. The model includes the mass, momentum, and energy balances for a single drying droplet as well as the total energy and mass balances of the drying medium. A log normal droplet size distribution is assumed to hold at the exit of the twin-fluid atomizer located at the top of the drying chamber. The discretization of this log normal distribution with a certain number of bins yields a system of nonlinear coupled first-order differential equations as a function of the axial distance of the drying chamber. This system of equations is used to compute the axial changes in droplet diameter, density, velocity, moisture, and temperature for the droplets at each representative bin. Furthermore, the distributions of important process parameters such as droplet moisture content, diameter, density, and temperature are also obtainable along the length of the chamber. On the basis of the developed model, a constrained nonlinear optimization problem is solved, where the exit particle moisture content is minimized with respect to the process inputs subjected to a fixed mean particle diameter at the chamber exit. Response surface studies based on empirical models are also performed to illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques in achieving the optimal solution when an a priori model is not available. The structure of empirical models obtained from the model is shown to be in agreement with the structure of the empirical models obtained from the experimental studies.

  12. Development of a method utilizing drum headspace VOC concentration as a waste characterization tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    Pretest waste characterization for the bin-scale tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) required sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from within transuranic (TRU) waste drums. Although the bin-scale tests have been postponed, the development and demonstration of accurate waste characterization methods continues. The objectives of extensive sampling of waste drums are to obtain a representative sample from each layer of confinement to identify volatile and gaseous constituents, verify process knowledge of the drum contents, and demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. A method to estimate the VOC concentration between layers of confinement from a single headspace sample collected beneath the drum filter of a vented waste drum is investigated. This method of characterizing the void space within a drum could eventually lead to a significant reduction in sampling time and cost. A model based on fundamental principles of transport phenomena is developed to estimate the VOC concentration throughout a waste drum based on the knowledge of the transport properties and the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model and experimental results are compared.

  13. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (bin}>). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  14. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  15. Measuring subhalo mass in redMaPPer clusters with CFHT Stripe 82 Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Ran; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Mo, Houjun; Rozo, Eduardo; Leauthaud, Alexie; Moustakas, John; Xie, Lizhi; Erben, Thomas; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; et al

    2016-03-07

    Here, we use the shear catalogue from the CFHT Stripe-82 Survey to measure the subhalo masses of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters. Assuming a Chabrier initial mass function and a truncated NFW model for the subhalo mass distribution, we find that the subhalo mass to galaxy stellar mass ratio increases as a function of projected halo-centric radius rp, from Msub/Mstar = 4.43+6.63–2.23 at rp ε [0.1, 0.3] h–1 Mpc to Msub/Mstar = 75.40+19.73–19.09 at rp ε [0.6, 0.9] h–1 Mpc. We also investigate the dependence of subhalo masses on stellar mass by splitting satellite galaxies into two stellar mass bins:more » 10 < log (Mstar/h–1M⊙) < 10.5 and 11 < log (Mstar/h–1 M⊙) < 12. The best-fitting subhalo mass of the more massive satellite galaxy bin is larger than that of the less massive satellites: log(Msub/h–1M⊙) = 11.14+0.66–0.73 (Msub/Mstar = 19.5+19.8–17.9) versus log(Msub/h–1M⊙) = 12.38+0.16–0.16 (Msub/Mstar = 21.1+7.4–7.7).« less

  16. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  17. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: djm70@pitt.ed, E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that

  18. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity via iSW measurements with SKA continuum surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Dor, Olivier E-mail: olivier.dore@caltech.edu; Bacon, David J.; Maartens, Roy E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Planck CMB experiment has delivered the best constraints so far on primordial non-Gaussianity, ruling out early-Universe models of inflation that generate large non-Gaussianity. Although small improvements in the CMB constraints are expected, the next frontier of precision will come from future large-scale surveys of the galaxy distribution. The advantage of such surveys is that they can measure many more modes than the CMBin particular, forthcoming radio surveys with the Square Kilometre Array will cover huge volumes. Radio continuum surveys deliver the largest volumes, but with the disadvantage of no redshift information. In order to mitigate this, we use two additional observables. First, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effectthe cross-correlation of the radio number counts with the CMB temperature anisotropieshelps to reduce systematics on the large scales that are sensitive to non-Gaussianity. Second, optical data allows for cross-identification in order to gain some redshift information. We show that, while the single redshift bin case can provide a ?(f{sub NL})?20, and is therefore not competitive with current and future constraints on non-Gaussianity, a tomographic analysis could improve the constraints by an order of magnitude, even with only two redshift bins. A huge improvement is provided by the addition of high-redshift sources, so having cross-ID for high-z galaxies and an even higher-z radio tail is key to enabling very precise measurements of f{sub NL}. We use Fisher matrix forecasts to predict the constraining power in the case of no redshift information and the case where cross-ID allows a tomographic analysis, and we show that the constraints do not improve much with 3 or more bins. Our results show that SKA continuum surveys could provide constraints competitive with CMB and forthcoming optical surveys, potentially allowing a measurement of ?(f{sub NL})?1 to be made. Moreover, these measurements would act as a useful check of results

  19. MO-G-BRF-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - Sensitivity of PET-Based Texture Features to Respiratory Motion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yip, S; Aerts, H; Berbeco, R; McCall, K; Aristophanous, M; Chen, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PET-based texture features are used to quantify tumor heterogeneity due to their predictive power in treatment outcome. We investigated the sensitivity of texture features to tumor motion by comparing whole body (3D) and respiratory-gated (4D) PET imaging. Methods: Twenty-six patients (34 lesions) received 3D and 4D [F-18]FDG-PET scans before chemo-radiotherapy. The acquired 4D data were retrospectively binned into five breathing phases to create the 4D image sequence. Four texture features (Coarseness, Contrast, Busyness, and Complexity) were computed within the the physician-defined tumor volume. The relative difference (δ) in each measure between the 3D- and 4D-PET imaging was calculated. Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p<0.01) was used to determine if δ was significantly different from zero. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to determine the variability in the texture features between all 4D-PET phases. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to investigate the impact of tumor size and motion amplitude on δ. Results: Significant differences (p<<0.01) between 3D and 4D imaging were found for Coarseness, Busyness, and Complexity. The difference for Contrast was not significant (p>0.24). 4D-PET increased Busyness (∼20%) and Complexity (∼20%), and decreased Coarseness (∼10%) and Contrast (∼5%) compared to 3D-PET. Nearly negligible variability (CV=3.9%) was found between the 4D phase bins for Coarseness and Complexity. Moderate variability was found for Contrast and Busyness (CV∼10%). Poor correlation was found between the tumor volume and δ for the texture features (R=−0.34−0.34). Motion amplitude had moderate impact on δ for Contrast and Busyness (R=−0.64− 0.54) and no impact for Coarseness and Complexity (R=−0.29−0.17). Conclusion: Substantial differences in textures were found between 3D and 4D-PET imaging. Moreover, the variability between phase bins for Coarseness and Complexity was negligible, suggesting that similar

  20. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Mei; Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion; Lang, Jinyi; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes.

  1. Physiologically guided approach to characterizing respiratory motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Benjamin M. Lamb, James M.; Low, Daniel A.; Zhao, Tianyu; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To characterize radiation therapy patient breathing patterns based on measured external surrogate information. Methods: Breathing surrogate data were collected during 4DCT from a cohort of 50 patients including 28 patients with lung cancer and 22 patients without lung cancer. A spirometer and an abdominal pneumatic bellows were used as the surrogates. The relationship between these measurements was assumed to be linear within a small phase difference. The signals were correlated and drift corrected using a previously published method to convert the signal into tidal volume. The airflow was calculated with a first order time derivative of the tidal volume using a window centered on the point of interest and with a window length equal to the CT gantry rotation period. The airflow was compared against the tidal volume to create ellipsoidal patterns that were binned into 25 ml × 25 ml/s bins to determine the relative amount of time spent in each bin. To calculate the variability of the maximum inhalation tidal volume within a free-breathing scan timeframe, a metric based on percentile volume ratios was defined. The free breathing variability metric (κ) was defined as the ratio between extreme inhalation tidal volumes (defined as >93 tidal volume percentile of the measured tidal volume) and normal inhalation tidal volume (defined as >80 tidal volume percentile of the measured tidal volume). Results: There were three observed types of volume-flow curves, labeled Types 1, 2, and 3. Type 1 patients spent a greater duration of time during exhalation withκ = 1.37 ± 0.11. Type 2 patients had equal time duration spent during inhalation and exhalation with κ = 1.28 ± 0.09. The differences between the mean peak exhalation to peak inhalation tidal volume, breathing period, and the 85th tidal volume percentile for Type 1 and Type 2 patients were statistically significant at the 2% significance level. The difference between κ and the 98th tidal volume percentile for

  2. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  3. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  4. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  5. Method and apparatus for digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, W.K.; Hubbard, B.

    1997-11-04

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts input data from a detector-preamplifier and produces a spectral analysis of the x-rays illuminating the detector. The system achieves high throughputs at low cost by dividing the required digital processing steps between a ``hardwired`` processor implemented in combinatorial digital logic, which detects the presence of the x-ray signals in the digitized data stream and extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, and a programmable digital signal processing computer, which refines the filtered amplitude estimates and bins them to produce the desired spectral analysis. One set of algorithms allow this hybrid system to match the resolution of analog systems while operating at much higher data rates. A second set of algorithms implemented in the processor allow the system to be self calibrating as well. The same processor also handles the interface to an external control computer. 19 figs.

  6. Interstitial computing : utilizing spare cycles on supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearwater, Scott Harvey; Kleban, Stephen David

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of utilizing unused cycles on supercomputers through the use of many small jobs. What we call 'interstitial computing,' is important to supercomputer centers for both productivity and political reasons. Interstitial computing makes use of the fact that small jobs are more or less fungible consumers of compute cycles that are more efficient for bin packing than the typical jobs on a supercomputer. An important feature of interstitial computing is that it not have a significant impact on the makespan of native jobs on the machine. Also, a facility can obtain higher utilizations that may only be otherwise possible with more complicated schemes or with very long wait times. The key contribution of this paper is that it provides theoretical and empirical guidelines for users and administrators for how currently unused supercomputer cycles may be exploited. We find that that interstitial computing is a more effective means for increasing machine utilization than increasing native job run times or size.

  7. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, Karl M.; Fundakowski, Richard A.; Levitt, Tod S.; Overland, John E.; Suresh, Bindinganavle R.; Ulrich, Franz W.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges are segmented out by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections.

  8. Search for new physics in the multijet and missing transverse momentum final state in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-19

    A search for new physics is performed in multijet events with large missing transverse momentum produced in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb⁻¹collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample is divided into three jet multiplicity categories (3-5, 6-7, and ≥8 jets), and studied further in bins of two variables: the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta and the missing transverse momentum. The observed numbers of events in various categories are consistent with backgrounds expected from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are presented for several simplified supersymmetric models of squark or gluino pair production.« less

  9. Method and system rapid piece handling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of high-speed fabric cutters has made necessary the development of automated techniques for the collection and sorting of garment pieces into collated piles of pieces ready for assembly. The present invention enables a new method for such handling and sorting of garment parts, and to apparatus capable of carrying out this new method. The common thread is the application of computer-controlled shuttling bins, capable of picking up a desired piece of fabric and dropping it in collated order for assembly. Such apparatus with appropriate computer control relieves the bottleneck now presented by the sorting and collation procedure, thus greatly increasing the overall rate at which garments can be assembled.

  10. Investigation of redshift- and duration-dependent clustering of gamma-ray bursts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-11-05

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are detectable out to very large distances and as such are potentially powerful cosmological probes. Historically, the angular distribution of GRBs provided important information about their origin and physical properties. As a general population, GRBs are distributed isotropically across the sky. However, there are published reports that once binned by duration or redshift, GRBs display significant clustering. We have studied the redshift- and duration-dependent clustering of GRBs using proximity measures and kernel density estimation. Utilizing bursts detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment, Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor, and Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, we found marginal evidence for clustering inmore » very short duration GRBs lasting less than 100 ms. As a result, our analysis provides little evidence for significant redshift-dependent clustering of GRBs.« less

  11. Investigation of redshift- and duration-dependent clustering of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-11-05

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are detectable out to very large distances and as such are potentially powerful cosmological probes. Historically, the angular distribution of GRBs provided important information about their origin and physical properties. As a general population, GRBs are distributed isotropically across the sky. However, there are published reports that once binned by duration or redshift, GRBs display significant clustering. We have studied the redshift- and duration-dependent clustering of GRBs using proximity measures and kernel density estimation. Utilizing bursts detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment, Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor, and Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, we found marginal evidence for clustering in very short duration GRBs lasting less than 100 ms. As a result, our analysis provides little evidence for significant redshift-dependent clustering of GRBs.

  12. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in the $E\\gt 8$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$, that has a chance probability $P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.

  13. Search for t-Channel Single Top Quark Production in p anti-p Collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perea, Philip Michael

    2006-06-01

    I have performed a search for t-channel single top quark production in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV on a 366 pb{sup -1} dataset collected with the D0 detector from 2002-2005. The analysis is restricted to the leptonic decay of the W boson from the top quark to an electron or muon, tq{bar b} {yields} lv{sub l}b q{bar b} (l = e,{mu}). A powerful b-quark tagging algorithm derived from neural networks is used to identify b jets and significantly reduce background. I further use neural networks to discriminate signal from background, and apply a binned likelihood calculation to the neural network output distributions to derive the final limits. No direct observation of single top quark production has been made, and I report expected/measured 95% confidence level limits of 3.5/8.0 pb.

  14. A quasi-classical mapping approach to vibrationally coupled electron transport in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H.; Wilner, Eli Y.; Thoss, Michael

    2014-03-14

    We develop a classical mapping approach suitable to describe vibrationally coupled charge transport in molecular junctions based on the Cartesian mapping for many-electron systems [B. Li and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 154107 (2012)]. To properly describe vibrational quantum effects in the transport characteristics, we introduce a simple transformation rewriting the Hamiltonian in terms of occupation numbers and use a binning function to facilitate quantization. The approach provides accurate results for the nonequilibrium Holstein model for a range of bias voltages, vibrational frequencies, and temperatures. It also captures the hallmarks of vibrational quantum effects apparent in step-like structure in the current-voltage characteristics at low temperatures as well as the phenomenon of Franck-Condon blockade.

  15. Higher certainty of the laser-induced damage threshold test with a redistributing data treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Lars; Mrohs, Marius; Gyamfi, Mark; Mädebach, Heinrich; Ristau, Detlev

    2015-10-15

    As a consequence of its statistical nature, the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold holds always risks to over- or underestimate the real threshold value. As one of the established measurement procedures, the results of S-on-1 (and 1-on-1) tests outlined in the corresponding ISO standard 21 254 depend on the amount of data points and their distribution over the fluence scale. With the limited space on a test sample as well as the requirements on test site separation and beam sizes, the amount of data from one test is restricted. This paper reports on a way to treat damage test data in order to reduce the statistical error and therefore measurement uncertainty. Three simple assumptions allow for the assignment of one data point to multiple data bins and therefore virtually increase the available data base.

  16. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  17. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  18. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  19. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays BK(*)+-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-01

    In a sample of 471×106 BB¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)ℓ+-, where ℓ+- is either e+e- or μ+μ-. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  20. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyklinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Pernen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  1. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of ?? and ?? elliptic flow, v?, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that ?? (??) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at ?sNN = 27 GeV and higher. At ?sNN = 200 GeV, the slope of the difference of v? between ?? and ?? as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. In addition, similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  2. Galaxy luminosity function and Tully-Fisher relation: reconciled through rotation-curve studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Salucci, Paolo; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2014-03-10

    The relation between galaxy luminosity L and halo virial velocity v {sub vir} required to fit the galaxy luminosity function differs from the observed Tully-Fisher relation between L and disk speed v {sub rot}. Because of this, the problem of reproducing the galaxy luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation simultaneously has plagued semianalytic models since their inception. Here we study the relation between v {sub rot} and v {sub vir} by fitting observational average rotation curves of disk galaxies binned in luminosity. We show that the v {sub rot}-v {sub vir} relation that we obtain in this way can fully account for this seeming inconsistency. Therefore, the reconciliation of the luminosity function with the Tully-Fisher relation rests on the complex dependence of v {sub rot} on v {sub vir}, which arises because the ratio of stellar mass to dark matter mass is a strong function of halo mass.

  3. Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

    2012-03-31

    GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the remote phosphor platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

  4. Next-to-leading order predictions for Z gamma+jet and Z gamma gamma final states at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Hartanto, Heribertus B.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    We present next-to-leading order predictions for final states containing leptons produced through the decay of a Z boson in association with either a photon and a jet, or a pair of photons. The effect of photon radiation from the final state leptons is included and we also allow for contributions arising from fragmentation processes. Phenomenological studies are presented for the LHC in the case of final states containing charged leptons and in the case of neutrinos. We also use the procedure introduced by Stewart and Tackmann to provide a reliable estimate of the scale uncertainty inherent in our theoretical calculations of jet-binned Z gamma cross sections. These computations have been implemented in the public code MCFM.

  5. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HALIDES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphree, E.V.

    1957-10-29

    A process amd associated apparatus for producing UF/sub 4/ from U/sub 3/ O/sub 8/ by a fluidized'' technique are reported. The U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is first reduced to UO/sub 2/ by reaction with hydrogen, and the lower oxide of uranium is then reacted with gaseous HF to produce UF/sub 4/. In each case the reactant gas is used, alone or in combination with inert gases, to fluidize'' the finely divided reactant solid. The complete setup of the plant equipment including bins, reactor and the associated piping and valving, is described. An auxiliary fluorination reactor allows for the direct production of UF/sub 6/ from UF/sub 4/ and fluorine gas, or if desired, UF/sub 4/ may be collected as the product.

  6. Nuclear resonant scattering measurements on {sup 57}Fe by multichannel scaling with a 64-pixel silicon avalanche photodiode linear-array detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishimoto, S. Haruki, R.; Mitsui, T.; Yoda, Y.; Taniguchi, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Ikeno, M.; Saito, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2014-11-15

    We developed a silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) linear-array detector for use in nuclear resonant scattering experiments using synchrotron X-rays. The Si-APD linear array consists of 64 pixels (pixel size: 100 200 ?m{sup 2}) with a pixel pitch of 150 ?m and depletion depth of 10 ?m. An ultrafast frontend circuit allows the X-ray detector to obtain a high output rate of >10{sup 7} cps per pixel. High-performance integrated circuits achieve multichannel scaling over 1024 continuous time bins with a 1 ns resolution for each pixel without dead time. The multichannel scaling method enabled us to record a time spectrum of the 14.4 keV nuclear radiation at each pixel with a time resolution of 1.4 ns (FWHM). This method was successfully applied to nuclear forward scattering and nuclear small-angle scattering on {sup 57}Fe.

  7. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e? p? ?e'p'? are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  8. Gasoline Ultra Efficient Fuel Vehicle with Advanced Low Temperature Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confer, Keith

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this program was to develop, implement and demonstrate fuel consumption reduction technologies which are focused on reduction of friction and parasitic losses and on the improvement of thermal efficiency from in-cylinder combustion. The program was executed in two phases. The conclusion of each phase was marked by an on-vehicle technology demonstration. Phase I concentrated on short term goals to achieve technologies to reduce friction and parasitic losses. The duration of Phase I was approximately two years and the target fuel economy improvement over the baseline was 20% for the Phase I demonstration. Phase II was focused on the development and demonstration of a breakthrough low temperature combustion process called Gasoline Direct- Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI). The duration of Phase II was approximately four years and the targeted fuel economy improvement was 35% over the baseline for the Phase II demonstration vehicle. The targeted tailpipe emissions for this demonstration were Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards.

  9. FastBit: Interactively Searching Massive Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Chen, Jacqueline; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, Cameron; Gu, Junmin; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Koegler, Wendy; Lauret, Jerome; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Otoo, Ekow; Perevoztchikov, Victor; Poskanzer, Arthur; Prabhat,; Rubel, Oliver; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alexander; Stockinger, Kurt; Weber, Gunther; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2009-06-23

    As scientific instruments and computer simulations produce more and more data, the task of locating the essential information to gain insight becomes increasingly difficult. FastBit is an efficient software tool to address this challenge. In this article, we present a summary of the key underlying technologies, namely bitmap compression, encoding, and binning. Together these techniques enable FastBit to answer structured (SQL) queries orders of magnitude faster than popular database systems. To illustrate how FastBit is used in applications, we present three examples involving a high-energy physics experiment, a combustion simulation, and an accelerator simulation. In each case, FastBit significantly reduces the response time and enables interactive exploration on terabytes of data.

  10. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. ); Griffee, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P.; Griffee, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Cadmium induces a novel metallothionein and phytochelatin 2 in an aquatic fungus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeckel, Petra [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle in the Helmholtz Association, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Krauss, Gudrun [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle in the Helmholtz Association, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Menge, Sieglinde [Martin-Luther-University, Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Biochemistry/Biotechnology, Kurt-Mothes-Str. 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Schierhorn, Angelika [Martin-Luther-University, Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Biochemistry/Biotechnology, Kurt-Mothes-Str. 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Ruecknagel, Peter [Max-Planck-Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Germany); Krauss, Gerd-Joachim [Martin-Luther-University, Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Biochemistry/Biotechnology, Kurt-Mothes-Str. 3, 06120 Halle (Germany)]. E-mail: krauss@biochemtech.uni-halle.de

    2005-07-22

    Cadmium stress response was measured at the thiol peptide level in an aquatic hyphomycete (Heliscus lugdunensis). In liquid culture, 0.1mM cadmium increased the glutathione (GSH) content and induced the synthesis of additional thiol peptides. HPLC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and Edman degradation confirmed that a novel small metallothionein as well as phytochelatin (PC2) were synthesized. The metallothionein has a high homology to family 8 metallothioneins (http://www.expasy.ch/cgi-bin/lists?metallo.txt). The bonding of at least two cadmium ions to the metallothionein was demonstrated by mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). This is the first time that simultaneous induction of metallothionein and phytochelatin accompanied by an increase in GSH level has been shown in a fungus under cadmium stress, indicating a potential function of these complexing agents for in vivo heavy metal detoxification. The method presented here should be applicable as biomarker tool. ol.

  13. Measurement of the ?*? distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb1 at ?s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z ? ?+? boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  14. Measurement of the Gluon Polarization {delta}g/g from Open Charm at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2009-08-04

    We have measured the gluon polarization in the nucleon by detecting charm production via D{sup 0} meson decay to charged K and {pi} in polarized muon scattering off a longitudinally polarized deuteron target. The dominant process for charm production is the photon gluon fusion into a charm anti-charm quark pair. By using all deuteron statistics from COMPASS accumulated between 2002 and 2006, we extract double spin asymmetries in bins of the transverse momentum and the energy of the D{sup 0} meson and we perform a leading order analysis of the data to extract the gluon polarization <{delta}g/g> = -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst) at a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) scale {mu}{sup 2} = 13 GeV{sup 2} and at a gluon momentum fraction = 0.11.

  15. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  16. Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Daniel E.; Beauchamp, Brock R.; Mauger, G. Joseph; Nelson, Karl E.; Mercer, Michael B.; Pletcher, David C.; Riot, Vincent J.; Schek, James L.; Knapp, David A.

    2006-06-20

    A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

  17. Method for adding nodes to a quantum key distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grice, Warren P

    2015-02-24

    An improved quantum key distribution (QKD) system and method are provided. The system and method introduce new clients at intermediate points along a quantum channel, where any two clients can establish a secret key without the need for a secret meeting between the clients. The new clients perform operations on photons as they pass through nodes in the quantum channel, and participate in a non-secret protocol that is amended to include the new clients. The system and method significantly increase the number of clients that can be supported by a conventional QKD system, with only a modest increase in cost. The system and method are compatible with a variety of QKD schemes, including polarization, time-bin, continuous variable and entanglement QKD.

  18. Search for associated production of z and Higgs bosons in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BackusMayes, John Alexander; /Washington U., Seattle

    2010-12-01

    We present a search for associated production of Z and Higgs bosons in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, produced in RunII of the Tevatron and recorded by the D0 detector. The search is performed in events containing at least two muons and at least two jets. The ZH signal is distinguished from the expected backgrounds by means of multivariate classifiers known as random forests. Binned random forest output distributions are used in comparing the data to background-only and signal+background hypotheses. No excess is observed in the data, so we set upper limits on ZH production with a 95% confidence level.

  19. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse June 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 CollAborAtion meeting on Fission meAsurements mAjewski to give leC- tures CommemorAting AnniversAry oF mArie Curie's nobel Prize 4 CholerA toxin binDing to moDel membrAnes reveAls PotentiAl signAling PAthwAy neutron DiFFrAC- tion stuDy oF γ-ChymotryPsin At the Protein CrystAllog- rAPhy stAtion 5 heADs uP!

  20. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  1. Centrality dependence of high energy jets in p+Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir; Bathe, Stefan

    2016-04-08

    We investigate the recently measured centrality dependence of high energy jets in proton-lead collisions at the LHC. Here, we hypothesize that events with jets of very high energy (a few hundred GeV) are characterized by a suppressed number of soft particles, thus shifting these events into more peripheral bins. This naturally results in the suppression (enhancement) of the nuclear modification factor, RpA, in central (peripheral) collisions. Our calculations suggest that a moderate suppression of the order of 20%, for 103 GeV jets, can quantitatively reproduce the experimental data. Finally, we further extract the suppression factor as a function of jetmore » energy and test our conjecture using available RpA data for various centralities.« less

  2. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage Low-Moisture Switchgrass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, Alvin; Groothuis, Mitch; Westover, Tyler; Phanphanich, Manunya; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Turhollow, Anthony

    2013-09-24

    This project evaluates and compares comprehensive feedstock logistics systems (FLS), where a FLS is defined to comprehensively span from biomass material standing in a field to conveyance of a uniform, industrial-milled product into the throat of a biomass conversion facility (BCF). Elements of the bulk-format FLS evaluated in this project include: field-standing switchgrass dry chopped into bulk format on the farm, hauled (either loose or bulk compacted) to storage, stored with confining overburden in a protective facility, reclaimed and conveyed to bulk-format discharge, bulk compacted into an ejector trailer, and conveyed as bulk flow into the BCF. In this FLS evaluation, bulk storage bins served as a controlled and sensored proxy for large commercial stacks protected from moisture with a membrane cover.

  3. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  4. THE DEEP BLUE COLOR OF HD 189733b: ALBEDO MEASUREMENTS WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH AT VISIBLE WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Barstow, Joanna K.; Pont, Frederic; Sing, David K.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Knutson, Heather A.; Gibson, Neale; Heng, Kevin; Lecavelier des Etangs, Alain

    2013-08-01

    We present a secondary eclipse observation for the hot Jupiter HD 189733b across the wavelength range 290-570 nm made using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure geometric albedos of A{sub g} = 0.40 {+-} 0.12 across 290-450 nm and A{sub g} < 0.12 across 450-570 nm at 1{sigma} confidence. The albedo decrease toward longer wavelengths is also apparent when using six wavelength bins over the same wavelength range. This can be interpreted as evidence for optically thick reflective clouds on the dayside hemisphere with sodium absorption suppressing the scattered light signal beyond {approx}450 nm. Our best-fit albedo values imply that HD 189733b would appear a deep blue color at visible wavelengths.

  5. Method and apparatus for a self-cleaning filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P.; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael

    2010-11-16

    A method and apparatus for removing fine particulate matter from a fluid stream without interrupting the overall process or flow. The flowing fluid inflates and expands the flexible filter, and particulate is deposited on the filter media while clean fluid is permitted to pass through the filter. This filter is cleaned when the fluid flow is stopped, the filter collapses, and a force is applied to distort the flexible filter media to dislodge the built-up filter cake. The dislodged filter cake falls to a location that allows undisrupted flow of the fluid after flow is restored. The shed particulate is removed to a bin for periodic collection. A plurality of filter cells can operate independently or in concert, in parallel, or in series to permit cleaning the filters without shutting off the overall fluid flow. The self-cleaning filter is low cost, has low power consumption, and exhibits low differential pressures.

  6. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  7. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  8. Method and apparatus for digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, William K.; Hubbard, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts input data from a detector-preamplifier and produces a spectral analysis of the x-rays illuminating the detector. The system achieves high throughputs at low cost by dividing the required digital processing steps between a "hardwired" processor implemented in combinatorial digital logic, which detects the presence of the x-ray signals in the digitized data stream and extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, and a programmable digital signal processing computer, which refines the filtered amplitude estimates and bins them to produce the desired spectral analysis. One set of algorithms allow this hybrid system to match the resolution of analog systems while operating at much higher data rates. A second set of algorithms implemented in the processor allow the system to be self calibrating as well. The same processor also handles the interface to an external control computer.

  9. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Solaron-Akron, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The long-term field performance of the installed system and technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design are reported. The Solar Energy System was designed by Solaron Corporation, Denver, Colorado, to provide an 1840 square foot floor area with space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) for a dual-level single family residence in Akron, Ohio. The Solar Energy System uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 546 square foot flat plate collector array subsystem, a 270 cubic foot rock thermal storage bin subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat tank, pumps, controls and transport lines. The auxiliary space heating subsystem is an air to liquid heat pump coupled with a 1000 gallon water storage tank. Electricity provides auxiliary energy for both space heating and DHW subsystems.

  10. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  11. EPICS release 3.11 specific documentation -- EPICS release notes for 3.11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-19

    EPICS release 3.11 is now ready for user testing. A person who wants to set up a simplified application environment to boot an IOC and create databases using R3.11 should follow the directions in Appendix B, page 27, of the EPICS Source/Release Control Manual, Sept. 20, 1993. The R3.11 EPICS path at ANL/APS is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11 so the command to get the new release is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11/Unix/share/bin/getrel /net/phebos/epics/R3.11. An existing R3.8 short form report can be copied to this new directory and used to create a database. ANL/APS is currently testing an Application Developers Source/Release control system. It is not yet ready for general distribution. Attached are the EPICS R3.11 release notes.

  12. Unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions from SIDIS multiplicities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; H. J.O. Gonzalez; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of SIDIS multiplicities for charged hadron production. The data are grouped into independent bins of the kinematical variables, in which the TMD factorisation is expected to hold. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape. HERMES data do not need any normalisation correction, while fits of the COMPASS data much improve with a y-dependent overall normalisation factor. A comparison ofmore » the extracted TMDs with previous EMC and JLab data confirms the adequacy of the simple gaussian distributions. The possible role of the TMD evolution is briefly considered.« less

  13. STAR CLUSTERS IN A NUCLEAR STAR FORMING RING: THE DISAPPEARING STRING OF PEARLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visnen, Petri; Barway, Sudhanshu; Randriamanakoto, Zara

    2014-12-20

    An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early-type galaxy, NGC2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural two-dimensional decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circumnuclear environment and they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a ''pearls-on-a-string'' formation scenario, suggesting bar-driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at timescales of just several million years. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circumnuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

  14. Unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions from SIDIS multiplicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; H. J.O. Gonzalez; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of SIDIS multiplicities for charged hadron production. The data are grouped into independent bins of the kinematical variables, in which the TMD factorisation is expected to hold. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape. HERMES data do not need any normalisation correction, while fits of the COMPASS data much improve with a y-dependent overall normalisation factor. A comparison of the extracted TMDs with previous EMC and JLab data confirms the adequacy of the simple gaussian distributions. The possible role of the TMD evolution is briefly considered.

  15. Exploiting structure similarity in refinement: automated NCS and target-structure restraints in BUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, Oliver S. Womack, Thomas O.; Flensburg, Claus; Keller, Peter; Paciorek, Włodek; Sharff, Andrew; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gérard

    2012-04-01

    Local structural similarity restraints (LSSR) provide a novel method for exploiting NCS or structural similarity to an external target structure. Two examples are given where BUSTER re-refinement of PDB entries with LSSR produces marked improvements, enabling further structural features to be modelled. Maximum-likelihood X-ray macromolecular structure refinement in BUSTER has been extended with restraints facilitating the exploitation of structural similarity. The similarity can be between two or more chains within the structure being refined, thus favouring NCS, or to a distinct ‘target’ structure that remains fixed during refinement. The local structural similarity restraints (LSSR) approach considers all distances less than 5.5 Å between pairs of atoms in the chain to be restrained. For each, the difference from the distance between the corresponding atoms in the related chain is found. LSSR applies a restraint penalty on each difference. A functional form that reaches a plateau for large differences is used to avoid the restraints distorting parts of the structure that are not similar. Because LSSR are local, there is no need to separate out domains. Some restraint pruning is still necessary, but this has been automated. LSSR have been available to academic users of BUSTER since 2009 with the easy-to-use -autoncs and @@target target.pdb options. The use of LSSR is illustrated in the re-refinement of PDB entries http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm, where -target enables the correct ligand-binding structure to be found, and http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm, where -autoncs contributes to the location of an additional copy of the cyclic peptide ligand.

  16. Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loferski, J.J.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

  17. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  18. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  19. Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds: Importance of Ice Size Distribution Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alex; Cheng, Anning; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Ghan, Steven J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Korolev, Alexei; McFarquhar, Greg; Morrison, H.; Paukert, Marco; Savre, Julien; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Solomon, Amy; Sulia, Kara

    2014-03-14

    Large-eddy simulations of mixed-phase Arctic clouds by 11 different models are analyzed with the goal of improving understanding and model representation of processes controlling the evolution of these clouds. In a case based on observations from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), it is found that ice number concentration, Ni, exerts significant influence on the cloud structure. Increasing Ni leads to a substantial reduction in liquid water path (LWP) and potential cloud dissipation, in agreement with earlier studies. By comparing simulations with the same microphysics coupled to different dynamical cores as well as the same dynamics coupled to different microphysics schemes, it is found that the ice water path (IWP) is mainly controlled by ice microphysics, while the inter-model differences in LWP are largely driven by physics and numerics of the dynamical cores. In contrast to previous intercomparisons, all models here use the same ice particle properties (i.e., mass-size, mass-fall speed, and mass-capacitance relationships) and a common radiation parameterization. The constrained setup exposes the importance of ice particle size distributions (PSD) in influencing cloud evolution. A clear separation in LWP and IWP predicted by models with bin and bulk microphysical treatments is documented and attributed primarily to the assumed shape of ice PSD used in bulk schemes. Compared to the bin schemes that explicitly predict the PSD, schemes assuming exponential ice PSD underestimate ice growth by vapor deposition and overestimate mass-weighted fall speed leading to an underprediction of IWP by a factor of two in the considered case.

  20. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarna, Karolina; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.

    2016-03-14

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution measurements from a lidar, a radar and a radiometer, which allow us to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example case studies were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurementmore » (ARM) Program deployment on Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, in 2009 to present the method. We use the cloud droplet effective radius (re) to represent cloud microphysical properties and an integrated value of the attenuated backscatter coefficient (ATB) below the cloud to represent the aerosol concentration. All data from each case study are divided into bins of the liquid water path (LWP), each 10 g m–2 wide. For every LWP bin we present the correlation coefficient between ln re and ln ATB, as well as ACIr (defined as ACIr = –d ln re/d ln ATB, change in cloud droplet effective radius with aerosol concentration). Obtained values of ACIr are in the range 0.01–0.1. Lastly, we show that ground-based remote sensing instruments used in synergy can efficiently and continuously monitor aerosol–cloud interactions.« less

  1. Comments on shielding for dual energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, M. C.; Lincoln, H. M.; Quarin, D. J.; Zwicker, R. D.

    2008-06-15

    Determination of shielding requirements for medical linear accelerators has been greatly facilitated by the publication of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) latest guidelines on this subject in NCRP Report No. 151. In the present report the authors review their own recent experience with patient treatments on conventional dual energy linear accelerators to examine the various input parameters needed to follow the NCRP guidelines. Some discussion is included of workloads, occupancy, use factors, and field size, with the effects of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments included. Studies of collimator settings showed average values of 13.1x16.2 cm{sup 2} for 6 MV and 14.1x16.8 cm{sup 2} for 18 MV conventional ports, and corresponding average unblocked areas of 228 and 254 cm{sup 2}, respectively. With an average of 77% of the field area unblocked, this gives a mean irradiated area of 196 cm{sup 2} for the 18 MV beam, which dominates shielding considerations for most dual energy machines. Assuming conservatively small room dimensions, a gantry bin angle of 18 deg. was found to represent a reasonable unit for tabulation of use factors. For conventional 18 MV treatments it was found that the usual treatment angles of 0, 90, 180, and 270 deg. were still favored, and use factors of 0.25 represent reasonable estimates for these beams. As expected, the IMRT fields (all at 6 MV) showed a high degree of gantry angle randomization, with no bin having a use factor in excess of 0.10. It is concluded that unless a significant number of patients are treated with high energy IMRT, the traditional use factors of 0.25 are appropriate for the dominant high energy beam.

  2. DECORRELATION TIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC FIELDS AND FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, B. T.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-03-10

    We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.''3), high-cadence ({approx_equal} 2 minute) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the narrowband filter imager of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite over 2006 December 12 and 13. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms' susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval {Delta}t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter {sigma} used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, {tau}. For {Delta}t > {tau}, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and {Delta}t.

  3. ANOMALOUS ANISOTROPIC CROSS-CORRELATIONS BETWEEN WMAP CMB MAPS AND SDSS GALAXY DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLICATIONS ON THE DARK FLOW SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang; Chen Xuelei; Zhang Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2012-10-20

    We search for the dark flow induced diffuse kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect through CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. Such angular correlation is anisotropic, with a unique cos ({theta}{sub DF}) angular dependence, and hence can be distinguished from other components. Here, {theta}{sub DF} is the angle between the opposite dark flow direction and the direction of the sky where the correlation is measured. We analyze the KIAS-VAGC galaxy catalog of SDSS-DR7 and the WMAP seven-year temperature maps, applying an unbiased optimal weighting scheme to eliminate any statistically isotropic components and to enhance the dark flow detection signal. Non-zero weighted cross-correlations are detected at 3.5 {sigma} for the redshift bin z < 0.1 and at 3 {sigma} for the bin 0.1 < z < 0.2, implying the existence of statistically anisotropic components in CMB. However, further analysis does not support the dark flow explanation. The observed directional dependence deviates from the {proportional_to}cos {theta}{sub DF} relation expected, and hence cannot be explained by the presence of a single dark flow, and if the observed cross-correlation is generated by the dark flow induced kSZ effect, the velocity would be too high ({approx}> 6000 km s{sup -1}). We report this work as the first attempt to search for dark flow through weighted CMB-galaxy cross-correlation and to draw the attention on the sources of the detected anomalous CMB-galaxy cross-correlation.

  4. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing.

  5. SU-D-201-02: Prediction of Delivered Dose Based On a Joint Histogram of CT and FDG PET Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, M; Choi, Y; Cho, A; Hwang, S; Cha, J; Lee, N; Yun, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether pre-treatment images can be used in predicting microsphere distribution in tumors. When intra-arterial radioembolization using Y90 microspheres was performed, the microspheres were often delivered non-uniformly within the tumor, which could lead to an inefficient therapy. Therefore, it is important to estimate the distribution of microspheres. Methods: Early arterial phase CT and FDG PET images were acquired for patients with primary liver cancer prior to radioembolization (RE) using Y90 microspheres. Tumor volume was delineated on CT images and fused with FDG PET images. From each voxel (3.9×3.9×3.3 mm3) in the tumor, the Hounsfield unit (HU) from the CT and SUV values from the FDG PET were harvested. We binned both HU and SUV into 11 bins and then calculated a normalized joint-histogram in an 11×11 array.Patients also underwent a post-treatment Y90 PET imaging. Radiation dose for the tumor was estimated using convolution of the Y90 distribution with a dose-point kernel. We also calculated a fraction of the tumor volume that received a radiation dose great than 100Gy. Results: Averaged over 40 patients, 55% of tumor volume received a dose greater than 100Gy (range : 1.1 – 100%). The width of the joint histogram was narrower for patients with a high dose. For patients with a low dose, the width was wider and a larger fraction of tumor volume had low HU. Conclusion: We have shown the pattern of joint histogram of the HU and SUV depends on delivered dose. The patterns can predict the efficacy of uniform intra-arterial delivery of Y90 microspheres.

  6. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei X.; Braverman J.; Miranda, M.; Rosario, M.E.; Costantino, C.J.

    2015-02-25

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  7. Seismic estimation of porosity in the Permian San Andres carbonate reservoir, Welch Field, Dawson, County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, G.P.; Hinterlong, G.D. )

    1996-01-01

    OXY and the DOE Are partners in a advanced technology demonstration project at OXY's West Welch Unit. Production is from a low permeability San Andres reservoir of Permian age similar to many shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The project involves the construction of a detailed geological model for numerical simulation to design and then conduct a CO[sub 2] flood of the reservoir. Depositional textures of the reservoir rock are highly variable from diagenesis, mostly anhydritic cementing, creating a highly complex pore system. Identification of the interwell reservoir continuity and flow units present the greatest challenge to the reservoir description. A 1993 vintage 3-D seismic survey with a bin spacing of 110[prime] by 165[prime] has been used to assist with the interwell reservoir description. The structure definition at the top and base of the reservoir have been accurately mapped with respect to the well data. Core and well log measurements of porosity, permeability and water saturation were computed and summed across the seismic reservoir interval. Measurements of amplitude, frequency and phase within the 3-D volume were summed across the reservoir interval. All seismic attributes were sampled to the wells and compared through scatterplots to the well log and core measurements. Excellent correlation between three seismic attributes and porosity has been documented. A deterministic method has been used to estimate porosity values at each seismic bin location. The method uses the seismic measurements to shape the geology between the wells while maintaining agreement with the well data at the well locations.

  8. Seismic estimation of porosity in the Permian San Andres carbonate reservoir, Welch Field, Dawson, County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, G.P.; Hinterlong, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    OXY and the DOE Are partners in a advanced technology demonstration project at OXY`s West Welch Unit. Production is from a low permeability San Andres reservoir of Permian age similar to many shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The project involves the construction of a detailed geological model for numerical simulation to design and then conduct a CO{sub 2} flood of the reservoir. Depositional textures of the reservoir rock are highly variable from diagenesis, mostly anhydritic cementing, creating a highly complex pore system. Identification of the interwell reservoir continuity and flow units present the greatest challenge to the reservoir description. A 1993 vintage 3-D seismic survey with a bin spacing of 110{prime} by 165{prime} has been used to assist with the interwell reservoir description. The structure definition at the top and base of the reservoir have been accurately mapped with respect to the well data. Core and well log measurements of porosity, permeability and water saturation were computed and summed across the seismic reservoir interval. Measurements of amplitude, frequency and phase within the 3-D volume were summed across the reservoir interval. All seismic attributes were sampled to the wells and compared through scatterplots to the well log and core measurements. Excellent correlation between three seismic attributes and porosity has been documented. A deterministic method has been used to estimate porosity values at each seismic bin location. The method uses the seismic measurements to shape the geology between the wells while maintaining agreement with the well data at the well locations.

  9. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx

  10. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

    2014-09-01

    This paper estimates the temperature of high Pu content ZPPR fuel while in storage to determine the probablilty of fuel damage during storage. The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) is an experimental reactor which has been decomissioned. It ran only at extremely low power, for testing nuclear reactor designs and was operated as a criticality facility from April 18, 1969 until decommissioned in 1990. Its fuel was manufactured in 1967 and has been in storage since the reactor was decomissioned. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible fuel damage. Any damage to the cladding would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing over a long period of storage as was described in the analysis of the damage to the ZPPR uranium fuel resulting in the fuel becoming unuseable and a large potential source of contamination. (Ref. Solbrig, 1994). A series of computer runs were made to scope out the range of temperatures that can occur in the ZPPR fuel in storage. The maximum calculated conservative fuel temperature is high (292 degrees C [558 degrees F]) in spite of the fact that the fuel element heat generation rates seem quite low, between 35 and 10 W for containers (called clamshells) full of fuel. However, the ZPPR storage bins, built for safeguards, are very effective insulators. The calculated clamshells and the cavity doors temperatures are also high. No record exists of people receiving skin burns by touching the cavity doors or clamshells, which indicates the computed temperatures may be higher than actual. (Note, gloves are worn when handling hotter clamshells.) Given the high calculated temperatures, a cursory measurement program was conducted to calibrate the calculated results. The measurement of bin doors, cavity doors, and clamshell temperatures would be easy to make if it were not for regulations resulting from security and potential contamination. Due to conservative assumptions in the model like high heat

  11. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this after-the-fact binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective Faraday shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ?90 and 145 projections were

  12. PLANETARY AND OTHER SHORT BINARY MICROLENSING EVENTS FROM THE MOA SHORT-EVENT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Kamiya, K.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Botzler, C. S.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Korpela, A. V.; Sullivan, D. J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present the analysis of four candidate short-duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short-event analysis. These events were discovered as a by-product of an analysis designed to find short-timescale single-lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which the stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio and separation are q (4.9 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and s = 2.10 {+-} 0.05, respectively. A Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model indicates that the planet, MOA-bin-1Lb, has a mass of m{sub p} = 3.7 {+-} 2.1 M{sub Jup} and orbits a star of M{sub *} = 0.75{sub -0.41}{sup +}0{sup .33} M{sub Sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 8.3{sub -2.7}{sup +4.5} AU. This is one of the most massive and widest separation planets found by microlensing. The scarcity of such wide-separation planets also has implications for interpretation of the isolated planetary mass objects found by this analysis. If we assume that we have been able to detect wide-separation planets with an efficiency at least as high as that for isolated planets, then we can set limits on the distribution of planets in wide orbits. In particular, if the entire isolated planet sample found by Sumi et al. consists of planets bound in wide orbits around stars, we find that it is likely that the median orbital semimajor axis is >30 AU.

  13. Attitude towards the incorporation of the selective collection of biowaste in a municipal solid waste management system. A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernad-Beltrán, D.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Attitude towards incorporating biowaste selective collection is analysed. • Willingness to participate and to pay in biowaste selective collection is obtained. • Socioeconomic aspects affecting WtParticipate and WtPay are identified. - Abstract: European waste legislation has been encouraging for years the incorporation of selective collection systems for the biowaste fraction. European countries are therefore incorporating it into their current municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems. However, this incorporation involves changes in the current waste management habits of households. In this paper, the attitude of the public towards the incorporation of selective collection of biowaste into an existing MSWM system in a Spanish municipality is analysed. A semi-structured telephone interview was used to obtain information regarding aspects such as: level of participation in current waste collection systems, willingness to participate in selective collection of biowaste, reasons and barriers that affect participation, willingness to pay for the incorporation of the selective collection of biowaste and the socioeconomic characteristics of citizens who are willing to participate and pay for selective collection of biowaste. The results showed that approximately 81% of the respondents were willing to participate in selective collection of biowaste. This percentage would increase until 89% if the Town Council provided specific waste bins and bags, since the main barrier to participate in the new selective collection system is the need to use specific waste bin and bags for the separation of biowaste. A logit response model was applied to estimate the average willingness to pay, obtaining an estimated mean of 7.5% on top of the current waste management annual tax. The relationship of willingness to participate and willingness to pay for the implementation of this new selective collection with the socioeconomic variables (age, gender, size of the

  14. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-09-30

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three

  15. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  16. Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Christine

    2006-05-31

    Ford Motor Company, with ExxonMobil and FEV, participated in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuels Program with the goal to develop an innovative emission control system for light-duty diesel vehicles. The focus on diesel engine emissions was a direct result of the improved volumetric fuel economy (up to 50%) and lower CO2 emissions (up to 25%) over comparable gasoline engines shown in Europe. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with aqueous urea as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) were chosen as the primary emission control system components. The program expected to demonstrate more than 90% durable reduction in particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions on a light-duty truck application, based on the FTP-75 drive cycle. Very low sulfur diesel fuel (<15 ppm-wt) enabled lower PM emissions, reduced fuel economy penalty due to the emission control system and improved long-term system durability. Significant progress was made toward a durable system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standards on a 6000 lbs light-duty truck. A 40% reduction in engine-out NOx emissions was achieved with a mid-size prototype diesel engine through engine recalibration and increased exhaust gas recirculation. Use of a rapid warm-up strategy and urea SCR provided over 90% further NOx reduction while the CDPF reduced tailpipe PM to gasoline vehicle levels. Development work was conducted to separately improve urea SCR and CDPF system durability, as well as improved oxidation catalyst function. Exhaust gas NOx and ammonia sensors were also developed further. While the final emission control system did not meet Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx after 120k mi of aging on the dynamometer, it did meet the standards for HC, NMOG, and PM, and an improved SCR catalyst was shown to have potential to meet the NOx standard, assuming the DOC durability could be improved further. Models of DOC and SCR function were developed to guide the study of several key design

  17. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siva, Shankar; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Callahan, Jason; MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki; Hicks, Rodney J.; Steinfort, Daniel; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  18. SU-E-J-183: Quantification of Motion During Hypo-Fractionated Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindranath, B; Zhang, P; Xiong, J; Mageras, G; Hunt, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify patient motion during hypo-fractionated prostate cancer treatment as tracked by Calypso™ 4D localization system. Methods: 50 prostate cancer patients with implanted Calypso beacons underwent hypofractionated IMRT treatment. Typical fraction size was 5 with doses of 5–8 Gy/fraction. 213 traces from the 50 patients were analyzed to quantify the probability of motion vs time starting from beam-on. Couch corrections applied by therapists were undone to obtain the natural course of patient motion. The Calypso data was used to identify vector displacements greater than 2 mm from the starting position. The direction of this vector was classified into one of the 26 directions (combinations of L/R, A/P, S/I). The probability of motion >2mm was estimated by computing the fraction of traces that exceed the 2mm threshold at each time point. The violating motion points were also binned by direction in order to identify specific directions that were more prone to movement. Results: The overall probability of motion greater than 2 mm at 5 and 10 minutes from beam-on were 27 % and 50% respectively. The primary directions in which motion occurred were Posterior-Inferior (PI) and Inferior (I) with a probability of 8.5% and 4% at 5 minutes and 10% for both at 10 minutes. Motion was classified into the following bins: 0–2, 2–3, 3–4, 4–5, 5–6, 6–7, 7–8 and greater than 8 mm. It is observed that motion < 2mm decreases from the first 5 minutes to the next while the higher magnitude components increase with time. Conclusion: The probability of prostate motion increases with time. The trend seen in the PI and I directions can be attributed to physiological factors like bladder filling. This probability can be factored in for scheduling intrafraction imaging and used to compare dosimetric impact of VMAT vs. IMRT plans. This work is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  19. An analysis of representative heating load lines for residential HSPF ratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C. Keith; Shen, Bo; Shrestha, Som S.

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an analysis to investigate representative heating loads for single-family detached homes using current EnergyPlus simulations (DOE 2014a). Hourly delivered load results are used to determine binned load lines using US Department of Energy (DOE) residential prototype building models (DOE 2014b) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The selected residential single-family prototype buildings are based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2006) in the DOE climate regions. The resulting load lines are compared with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 210/240 (AHRI 2008) minimum and maximum design heating requirement (DHR) load lines of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) ratings procedure for each region. The results indicate that a heating load line closer to the maximum DHR load line, and with a lower zero load ambient temperature, is more representative of heating loads predicted for EnergyPlus prototype residential buildings than the minimum DHR load line presently used to determine HSPF ratings. An alternative heating load line equation was developed and compared to binned load lines obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation results. The effect on HSPF of the alternative heating load line was evaluated for single-speed and two-capacity heat pumps, and an average HSPF reduction of 16% was found. The alternative heating load line relationship is tied to the rated cooling capacity of the heat pump based on EnergyPlus autosizing, which is more representative of the house load characteristics than the rated heating capacity. The alternative heating load line equation was found to be independent of climate for the six DOE climate regions investigated, provided an adjustable zero load ambient temperature is used. For Region IV, the default DOE climate region used for HSPF ratings, the higher load line results in an ~28

  20. Validation of a radar doppler spectra simulator using measurements from the ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remillard, J.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.

    2010-03-15

    The use of forward models as an alternative approach to compare models with observations contains advantages and challenges. Radar Doppler spectra simulators are not new; their application in high- resolution models with bin microphysics schemes could help to compare model output with the Doppler spectra recorded from the vertically pointing cloud radars at the ARM Climate Research Facility sites. The input parameters to a Doppler spectra simulator are both microphysical (e.g., particle size, shape, phase, and number concentration) and dynamical (e.g., resolved wind components and sub-grid turbulent kinetic energy). Libraries for spherical and non-spherical particles are then used to compute the backscattering cross-section and fall velocities, while the turbulence is parameterized as a Gaussian function with a prescribed width. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is used to determine the amount of noise added throughout the spectrum, and the spectral smoothing due to spectral averages is included to reproduce the averaging realized by cloud radars on successive returns. Thus, realistic Doppler spectra are obtained, and several parameters that relate to the morphological characteristics of the synthetically generated spectra are computed. Here, the results are compared to the new ARM microARSCL data products in an attempt to validate the simulator. Drizzling data obtained at the SGP site by the MMCR and the AMF site at Azores using the WACR are used to ensure the liquid part and the turbulence representation part of the simulator are properly accounted in the forward model.

  1. Challenges in determining b value in the Northwest Geysers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saltiel, S.; Boyle, K.; Majer, E.

    2011-02-01

    Past analyses of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value in the Geysers and other geothermal settings have revealed a deviation from the assumed linear relationship in log space between magnitude and the number of earthquakes. In this study of the Northwest Geysers, we found a gently-sloping discontinuity in the b-value curve. This is especially apparent when comparing the least-squares fit (LSQ) of the curve to the fit obtained by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), a widely-respected method of analyzing magnitude-frequency relationships. This study will describe the assumptions made when using each of these two methods and will also explore how they can be used in conjunction to investigate the characteristics of the observed b-value curve. To understand whether slope-fit differences in the LSQR and MLE methods is due to physical properties of the system or due to artifacts from errors in sampling, it is extremely important to consider the catalog completeness, magnitude bin size, number of events, and differences in source mechanisms for the events comprising the study volume. This work will hopefully lead to informative interpretations of frequency-magnitude curves for the Northwest Geysers, a geothermal area of ongoing high-volume coldwater injection and steam production. Through this statistical investigation of the catalog contents, we hope to better understand the dominant source mechanisms and the role of injected fluids in the creation of seismic clustering around nearly 60 wells of varying depths and injection volumes.

  2. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnis, Patrick

    2013-06-28

    During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

  4. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

    1999-08-24

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

  5. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavy or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.

  6. Rapid response sensor for analyzing Special Nuclear Material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitra, S. S.; Doron, O.; Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.

    2015-06-18

    Rapid in-situ analytical techniques are attractive for characterizing Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Present techniques are time consuming, and require sample dissolution. Proof-of-principal studies are performed to demonstrate the utility of employing low energy neutrons from a portable pulsed neutron generator for non-destructive isotopic analysis of nuclear material. In particular, time-sequenced data acquisition, operating synchronously with the pulsing of a neutron generator, partitions the characteristic elemental prompt gamma-rays according to the type of the reaction; inelastic neutron scattering reactions during the ON state and thermal neutron capture reactions during the OFF state of the generator. Thus, the key challenge is isolatingmore » these signature gamma- rays from the prompt fission and β-delayed gamma-rays that are also produced during the neutron interrogation. A commercial digital multi-channel analyzer has been specially customized to enable time-resolved gamma-ray spectral data to be acquired in multiple user-defined time bins within each of the ON/OFF gate periods of the neutron generator. Preliminary results on new signatures from depleted uranium as well as modeling and benchmarking of the concept are presented, however this approach should should be applicable for virtually all forms of SNM.« less

  7. SU-E-E-03: Developing Solutions to Critical Radiation Oncology Challenges in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenton, O; Dachi, J; Metz, J; Avery, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop solutions to critical medical physics challenges in Tanzania. Methods: In September of 2013 we began working with Jumaa Bin Dachi, a Therapy Physicist at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We developed a bi-lateral learning partnership over the course of eight qualitative Skype meetings with Jumaa. From these meetings we have ascertained that there is a gap between the installation of new equipment and treating patients. This gap has often been overlooked by international partners attempting to improve radiation therapy access. Relationships with academic institutions abroad can fill these gaps, and lead to sustained care of patients needing radiation. Results: Our efforts are best given in a supporting role to help develop solutions and new technology that can reduce the burden on the Medical Physicist. Solutions may include: training material, support for radiation therapy classes, development of appropriate local protocols, and peer-review on documents being produced. New technology needs to focus around simple and easy field shaping, improved patient imaging systems, and systems for patient set-up. We believe our work can help alleviate some of the burdens faced by this institute. Conclusion: While we are just in the beginning stage of this partnership, we believe there is great potential for success between both parties. We hope that the Ocean Road Cancer Institute will benefit from potential funding and resources by partnering with a High Income Country to develop affordable solutions to clinical problems in Tanzania.

  8. A Search for Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in the Di-tau Decay Mode in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Amy Lynn

    2003-09-01

    A search for directly produced Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons has been performed in the di-tau decay channel in 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF during Run1b at the Tevatron. They search for events where one tau decays to an electron and the other tau decays hadronically. They perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for Higgs production in the high tan {beta} region of the m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A} = 100 and tan {beta} = 50, they set a 95% confidence level upper limit at 891 pb compared to the theoretically predicted cross section of 122 pb. For events where the tau candidates are not back-to-back, they utilize a di-tau mass reconstruction technique for the first time on hadron collider data. Limits based on a likelihood binned in di-tau mass from non-back-to-back events alone are weaker than the limits obtained from the counting experiment using the full di-tau sample.

  9. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  10. 1H NMR metabolomics study of metastatic melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Liu, Maili; Hu, Jian Z.

    2014-04-03

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Although extensive investigations have been done to study metabolic changes in primary melanoma in vivo and in vitro, little effort has been devoted to metabolic profiling of metastatic tumors in organs other than lymph nodes. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis is used to study metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to find important metabolites responsible formore » discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Two different strategies, i.e., spectral binning and spectral deconvolution, are used to reduce the original spectral data before statistical analysis. Spectral deconvolution is found to be superior for identifying a set of discriminatory metabolites between the control and the melanoma groups, especially when the sample size is small. OPLS results show that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. It is found that taurine, glutamate, aspartate, O-Phosphoethanolamine, niacinamide ,ATP, lipids and glycerol derivatives are decreased statistically and significantly while alanine, malate, xanthine, histamine, dCTP, GTP, thymidine, 2'-Deoxyguanosine are statistically and significantly elevated. Furthermore, these significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in spleen.« less

  11. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a $W$ Boson Using a Matrix Element Technique at CDF in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between m{sub H} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  13. Measurement of prompt psi(2S) to J/psi yield ratios in PbPb and pp collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. et al.

    2014-12-01

    The ratio between the prompt psi(2S) and J/psi yields, reconstructed via their decays into muon pairs, is measured in PbPb and pp collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV. The analysis is based on PbPb and pp data samples collected by CMS at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150 inverse microbarns and 5.4 inverse picobarns, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields, (N[psi(2S)]/N[J/psi])[PbPb] / (N[psi(2S)]/ N[J/psi])[pp], is computed in three PbPb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, abs(y) < 1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5 < pt < 30 GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6 < abs(y) < 2.4, extending to lower pt values, 3 < pt < 30 GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45 +/- 0.13 (stat) +/- 0.07 (syst) in the first range to 1.67 +/- 0.34 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions.

  14. Controlling wet abrasion in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1997-09-01

    Maintenance departments in many industries are continually battling the daily fires that run costs up and productivity down. Many plants have equipment that must operate under wet sliding conditions which can lead to accelerated wear of the equipment. Electric power generating plants, for example, have ongoing maintenance concerns for piping, chutes, hoppers, heat exchangers, and valves. Pulp and paper plants have heavy maintenance on: plate screens, conical bottoms of blow tanks, chutes, and augers. Coal handling equipment is often subjected to wet sliding conditions. Utility and coal prep plants can have serious flow problems if an improper structural or wear material is selected. Vibrating screens, chutes, surge bin feeders, conical distributors, screw conveyors, and cyclones are some of the components that must resist the ravages of corrosion and wear. This paper will address many of the issues that affect the life of plant components under wet sliding conditions. Environmental effects and material effects will be examined. Since the material of construction is most times the easier to change, the paper will concentrate on this subject. Such factors as: hardness, surface roughness, corrodent, and material of construction will be explored. Both controlled laboratory studies and real world service evaluations will be presented.

  15. Controlling abrasion in coal prep plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, W.

    1996-12-31

    Maintenance departments in many industries are continually battling the daily fires that run costs up and productivity down. Many plants have equipment that must operate under wet sliding conditions which can lead to accelerated wear of the equipment. Electric power generating plants, for example, have ongoing maintenance concerns for piping, chutes, hoppers, heat exchangers, and valves. Pulp and paper plants have heavy maintenance on: plate screens, conical bottoms of blow tanks, chutes, and augers. Coal handling equipment is often subjected to wet sliding conditions. Utility and coal prep plants can have serious flow problems if an improper structural or wear material is selected. Vibrating screens, chutes, surge bin feeders, conical distributors, screw conveyors, and cyclones are some of the components that must resist the ravages of corrosion and wear. This paper will address many of the issues that affect the life of plant components under wet sliding conditions. Environmental effects and material effects will be examined. Since the material of construction is most times the easier to change, the paper will concentrate on this subject. Such factors as: hardness, surface roughness, corrodent, and material of construction will be explored. Both controlled laboratory studies and real world service evaluations will be presented.

  16. STUDIES IN ASTRONOMICAL TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. VI. BAYESIAN BLOCK REPRESENTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Norris, Jay P.; Jackson, Brad; Chiang, James

    2013-02-20

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and characterizing local variability in time series and other forms of sequential data. The goal is to identify and characterize statistically significant variations, at the same time suppressing the inevitable corrupting observational errors. We present a simple nonparametric modeling technique and an algorithm implementing it-an improved and generalized version of Bayesian Blocks-that finds the optimal segmentation of the data in the observation interval. The structure of the algorithm allows it to be used in either a real-time trigger mode, or a retrospective mode. Maximum likelihood or marginal posterior functions to measure model fitness are presented for events, binned counts, and measurements at arbitrary times with known error distributions. Problems addressed include those connected with data gaps, variable exposure, extension to piecewise linear and piecewise exponential representations, multivariate time series data, analysis of variance, data on the circle, other data modes, and dispersed data. Simulations provide evidence that the detection efficiency for weak signals is close to a theoretical asymptotic limit derived by Arias-Castro et al. In the spirit of Reproducible Research all of the code and data necessary to reproduce all of the figures in this paper are included as supplementary material.

  17. Method and apparatus for combinatorial logic signal processor in a digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, William K.; Zhou, Zhiquing

    1999-01-01

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts a digitized input signal and detects the presence of step-like pulses in the this data stream, extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, inspects for pulse pileup, and records input pulse rates and system livetime. The system has two parallel processing channels: a slow channel, which filters the data stream with a long time constant trapezoidal filter for good energy resolution; and a fast channel which filters the data stream with a short time constant trapezoidal filter, detects pulses, inspects for pileups, and captures peak values from the slow channel for good events. The presence of a simple digital interface allows the system to be easily integrated with a digital processor to produce accurate spectra at high count rates and allow all spectrometer functions to be fully automated. Because the method is digitally based, it allows pulses to be binned based on time related values, as well as on their amplitudes, if desired.

  18. Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

    2008-04-01

    There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

  19. Development and testing of an aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsson, P.Q.; Meyers, M.P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/microphysics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number concentrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the droplet spectrum, so that the aerosol population directly affects the cloud formation and microphysics. Second, we plan to couple the aerosol model to the gas and aqueous-chemistry module that will drive the aerosol formation and growth. We begin by exploring the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations of Arctic stratus clouds over the North Slope CART site. These simulations using Colorado State University`s regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) will be useful in designing the structure of the cloud-resolving model and in interpreting data acquired at the North Slope site.

  20. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore » are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  1. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  2. The massive star population in M101. II. Spatial variations in the recent star formation history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grammer, Skyler; Humphreys, Roberta M. E-mail: roberta@umn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We investigate star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by Hα, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Hα is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Hα emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant.

  3. X-ray observations of complex temperature structure in the cool-core cluster A85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenck, David E.; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Sam

    2014-07-01

    X-ray observations were used to examine the complex temperature structure of A85, a cool-core galaxy cluster. Temperature features can provide evidence of merging events which shock heat the intracluster gas. Temperature maps were made from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The combination of a new, long-exposure XMM observation and an improved temperature map binning technique produced the highest fidelity temperature maps of A85 to date. Hot regions were detected near the subclusters to the south and southwest in both the Chandra and XMM temperature maps. The presence of these structures implies A85 is not relaxed. The hot regions may indicate the presence of shocks. The Mach numbers were estimated to be ∼1.9 at the locations of the hot spots. Observational effects will tend to systematically reduce temperature jumps, so the measured Mach numbers are likely underestimated. Neither temperature map showed evidence for a shock in the vicinity of the presumed radio relic near the southwest subcluster. However, the presence of a weak shock cannot be ruled out. There was tension between the temperatures measured by the two instruments.

  4. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi,I.; Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-05-01

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R&D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions.

  5. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-29

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixedmore » parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the “super-adiabatic” growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision–coalescence in warm clouds.« less

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene melts: Mechanical and structural responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frhlich, Markus G. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu; Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu

    2014-01-14

    The mechanical and structural responses of hydroxyl-terminated cis-1,4-polybutadiene melts to shock waves were investigated by means of all-atom non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed using the OPLS-AA force field but with the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential replaced by the Buckingham exponential-6 potential to better represent the interactions at high compression. Monodisperse systems containing 64, 128, and 256 backbone carbon atoms were studied. Supported shock waves were generated by impacting the samples onto stationary pistons at impact velocities of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 km s{sup ?1}, yielding shock pressures between approximately 2.8 GPa and 12.5 GPa. Single-molecule structural properties (squared radii of gyration, asphericity parameters, and orientational order parameters) and mechanical properties (density, shock pressure, shock temperature, and shear stress) were analyzed using a geometric binning scheme to obtain spatio-temporal resolution in the reference frame centered on the shock front. Our results indicate that while shear stress behind the shock front is relieved on a ?0.5 ps time scale, a shock-induced transition to a glass-like state occurs with a concomitant increase of structural relaxation times by several orders of magnitude.

  7. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; et al

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavymore » or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.« less

  8. APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Light-Duty Passenger Car Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomazic, D; Tatur, M; Thornton, M

    2003-08-24

    A 1.9L turbo direct injection (TDI) diesel engine was modified to achieve the upcoming Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standard in combination with a NOx adsorber catalyst (NAC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary objective for developing this test bed is to investigating the effects of different fuel sulfur contents on the performance of an advanced emission control system (ECS) in a light-duty application. During the development process, the engine-out emissions were minimized by applying a state-of-the-art combustion system in combination with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The subsequent calibration effort resulted in emission levels requiring 80-90 percent nitrogen-oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) conversion rates by the corresponding ECS. The strategy development included ean/rich modulation for NAC regeneration, as well as, the desulfurization of the NAC and the regeneration of the DPF. Two slightly different ECS were investigated and calibrated. The initial vehicle results in an Audi A4 station wagon over the federal test procedure (FTP), US 06, and the highway fuel economy test (HFET) cycle indicate the potential of these configuration to meet the future Tier 2 emission standard.

  9. Snake River Plain Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 Raster Files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Shervais

    2015-10-09

    Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 CRS Raster Files. This dataset contains raster files created in ArcGIS. These raster images depict Common Risk Segment (CRS) maps for HEAT, PERMEABILITY, AND SEAL, as well as selected maps of Evidence Layers. These evidence layers consist of either Bayesian krige functions or kernel density functions, and include: (1) HEAT: Heat flow (Bayesian krige map), Heat flow standard error on the krige function (data confidence), volcanic vent distribution as function of age and size, groundwater temperature (equivalue interval and natural breaks bins), and groundwater T standard error. (2) PERMEABILTY: Fault and lineament maps, both as mapped and as kernel density functions, processed for both dilational tendency (TD) and slip tendency (ST), along with data confidence maps for each data type. Data types include mapped surface faults from USGS and Idaho Geological Survey data bases, as well as unpublished mapping; lineations derived from maximum gradients in magnetic, deep gravity, and intermediate depth gravity anomalies. (3) SEAL: Seal maps based on presence and thickness of lacustrine sediments and base of SRP aquifer. Raster size is 2 km. All files generated in ArcGIS.

  10. Field power measurements of imaging equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

    2004-05-14

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy, electricity use by non-PC commercial office equipment is growing at an annual rate of nearly 5 percent (AEO 2003). To help address this growth in consumption, U.S. EPA periodically updates its ENERGY STAR specifications as products and markets change. This report presents background research conducted to help EPA update the ENERGY STAR specification for imaging equipment, which covers printers, fax machines, copiers, scanners, and multifunction devices (MFDs). We first estimated the market impact of the current ENERGY STAR imaging specification, finding over 90 percent of the current market complies with the specification. We then analyzed a sample of typical new imaging products, including 11 faxes, 57 printers and 19 copiers/MFD. For these devices we metered power levels in the most common modes: active/ready/sleep/off, and recorded features that would most likely affect energy consumption. Our metering indicates that for many products and speed bins, current models consume substantially less power than the current specification. We also found that for all product categories, power consumption varied most considerably across technology (i.e. inkjet vs. laser). Although inkjet printers consumed less energy than laser printers in active, ready and sleep-mode, they consumed more power on average while off, mostly due to the use of external power supplies. Based on these findings, we developed strategies for the ENERGY STAR program to achieve additional energy reductions. Finally, we present an assessment of manufacturer's ENERGY STAR labeling practices.

  11. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  12. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  13. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  14. Measurement of the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→η(')l⁺ν branching fractions, the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→ηl⁺ν form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O’Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sun, S.; Suzuki, K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Guttman, N.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B⁺→η(')l⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν, undertaken with approximately 464×10⁶ BB¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B⁺→ηl⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B⁺→ηl⁺ν)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10⁻⁴ and B(B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10⁻⁴. We also measure B(B+→η'l⁺ν)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10⁻⁴. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

  15. COMPARISON OF KEPLER PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY WITH THE SUN ON DIFFERENT TIMESCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basri, Gibor; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Reiners, Ansgar

    2013-05-20

    We utilize Kepler data to study the precision differential photometric variability of solar-type and cooler stars at different timescales, ranging from half an hour to three months. We define a diagnostic that characterizes the median differential intensity change between data bins of a given timescale. We apply the same diagnostics to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data that has been rendered comparable to Kepler. The Sun exhibits similar photometric variability on all timescales as comparable solar-type stars in the Kepler field. The previously defined photometric ''range'' serves as our activity proxy (driven by starspot coverage). We revisit the fraction of comparable stars in the Kepler field that are more active than the Sun. The exact active fraction depends on what is meant by ''more active than the Sun'' and on the magnitude limit of the sample of stars considered. This active fraction is between a quarter and a third (depending on the timescale). We argue that a reliable result requires timescales of half a day or longer and stars brighter than M{sub Kep} of 14, otherwise non-stellar noise distorts it. We also analyze main sequence stars grouped by temperature from 6500 to 3500 K. As one moves to cooler stars, the active fraction of stars becomes steadily larger (greater than 90% for early M dwarfs). The Sun is a good photometric model at all timescales for those cooler stars that have long-term variability within the span of solar variability.

  16. Centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of charged hadron production at intermediate p{sub t} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-04-15

    We present STAR measurements of charged hadron production as a function of centrality in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. The measurements cover a phase space region of 0.2 < p{sub T} < 6.0 GeV/c in transverse momentum and 11 < {eta} < 1 in pseudorapidity. Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons in the pseudorapidity region 0.5 < |{eta}| < 1 are reported and compared to our previously published results for |{eta}| < 0.5. No significant difference is seen for inclusive p{sub T} distributions of charged hadrons in these two pseudorapidity bins. We measured dN/d{eta} distributions and truncated mean p{sub T} in a region of p{sub T} > P{sub T}{sup cut}, and studied the results in the framework of participant and binary scaling. No clear evidence is observed for participant scaling of charged hadron yield in the measured pT region. The relative importance of hard scattering process is investigated through binary scaling fraction of particle production.

  17. Centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of charged hadron production at intermediate p{sub T} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-04-15

    We present STAR measurements of charged hadron production as a function of centrality in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. The measurements cover a phase space region of 0.2 < p{sub T} < 6.0 GeV/c in transverse momentum and -1 < {eta} < 1 in pseudorapidity. Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons in the pseudorapidity region 0.5 < |{eta}| < 1 are reported and compared to our previously published results for |{eta}| < 0.5. No significant difference is seen for inclusive p{sub T} distributions of charged hadrons in these two pseudorapidity bins. We measured dN/d{eta} distributions and truncated mean p{sub T} in a region of p{sub T} > p{sub T}{sup cut}, and studied the results in the framework of participant and binary scaling. No clear evidence is observed for participant scaling of charged hadron yield in the measured p{sub T} region. The relative importance of hard scattering process is investigated through binary scaling fraction of particle production.

  18. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of π⁻ and π⁺ elliptic flow, v₂, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π⁻ (π⁺) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √sNN = 27 GeV and higher. At √sNN = 200 GeV, the slope of the difference of v₂ between π⁻ and π⁺ as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. In addition, similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  19. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  20. X- and γ-ray pulsations of the nearby radio-faint PSR J1741–2054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Sarazin, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Camilo, F.

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ∼35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  1. Exoplanet transit spectroscopy using WFC3: WASP-12 b, WASP-17 b, and WASP-19 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Haynes, Korey; Sinukoff, Evan; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake

    2013-12-20

    We report an analysis of transit spectroscopy of the extrasolar planets WASP-12 b, WASP-17 b, and WASP-19 b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze the data for a single transit for each planet using a strategy similar, in certain aspects, to the techniques used by Berta et al., but we extend their methodology to allow us to correct for channel- or wavelength-dependent instrumental effects by utilizing the band-integrated time series and measurements of the drift of the spectrum on the detector over time. We achieve almost photon-limited results for individual spectral bins, but the uncertainties in the transit depth for the band-integrated data are exacerbated by the uneven sampling of the light curve imposed by the orbital phasing of HST's observations. Our final transit spectra for all three objects are consistent with the presence of a broad absorption feature at 1.4 ?m most likely due to water. However, the amplitude of the absorption is less than that expected based on previous observations with Spitzer, possibly due to hazes absorbing in the NIR or non-solar compositions. The degeneracy of models with different compositions and temperature structures combined with the low amplitude of any features in the data preclude our ability to place unambiguous constraints on the atmospheric composition without additional observations with WFC3 to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and/or a comprehensive multi-wavelength analysis.

  2. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Goegues, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Vaughan, Simon; Finger, Mark H.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  3. Evidence for universal structure in galactic halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, William H.; Sikivie, Pierre

    2000-04-15

    The late infall of dark matter onto a galaxy produces structure (such as caustics) in the distribution of dark matter in the halo. We argue that such structure is likely to occur generically on length scales proportional to l{approx}t{sub 0}v{sub rot}, where t{sub 0} is the age of the universe and v{sub rot} is the rotation velocity of the galaxy. A set of 32 extended galactic rotation curves is analyzed. For each curve, the radial coordinate is rescaled according to r{yields}r(tilde sign){identical_to}r(v{sub 0}/v{sub rot}), where we choose v{sub 0}=220 km/s. A linear fit to each rescaled rotation curve is subtracted, and the residuals are binned and averaged. The sample shows significant features near r(tilde sign)=40 kpc and r(tilde sign)=20 kpc. This is consistent with the predictions of the self-similar caustic ring model of galactic halos. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Development of Bayesian analysis program for extraction of polarisation observables at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Stefanie; Ireland, David; Vanderbauwhede, W.

    2014-06-01

    At the mass scale of a proton, the strong force is not well understood. Various quark models exist, but it is important to determine which quark model(s) are most accurate. Experimentally, finding resonances predicted by some models and not others would give valuable insight into this fundamental interaction. Several labs around the world use photoproduction experiments to find these missing resonances. The aim of this work is to develop a robust Bayesian data analysis program for extracting polarisation observables from pseudoscalar meson photoproduction experiments using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. This method, known as nested sampling, has been compared to traditional methods and has incorporated data parallelisation and GPU programming. It involves an event-by-event likelihood function, which has no associated loss of information from histogram binning, and results can be easily constrained to the physical region. One of the most important advantages of the nested sampling approach is that data from different experiments can be combined and analysed simultaneously. Results on both simulated and previously analysed experimental data for the K{sup +}? channel will be discussed.

  5. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  6. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  7. Testing neutrino spectra formation in collapsing stars with the diffuse supernova neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2007-04-01

    I address the question of what can be learned from the observation of the diffuse supernova neutrino flux in the precision phase, at next generation detectors of Megaton scale. An analytical study of the spectrum of the diffuse flux shows that, above realistic detection thresholds of 10 MeV or higher, the spectrum essentially reflects the exponential-times-polynomial structure of the original neutrino spectrum at the emission point. There is only a weak (tens of percent) dependence on the power {beta} describing the growth of the supernova rate with the redshift. Different original neutrino spectra correspond to large differences in the observed spectrum of events at a water Cherenkov detector: for typical supernova rates, the ratio of the numbers of events in the first and second energy bins (of 5 MeV width) varies in the interval 1.5-4.3 for pure water (energy threshold 18 MeV) and in the range 1-2.5 for water with gadolinium (10 MeV threshold). In the first case, discrimination would be difficult due to the large errors associated with background. With gadolinium, instead, the reduction of the total error down to the 10%-20% level would allow spectral sensitivity, with a dramatic improvement of precision with respect to the SN1987A data. Even in this latter case, for typical neutrino luminosity the dependence on {beta} is below sensitivity, so that it can be safely neglected in data analysis.

  8. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Umeno, Marc M.

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  9. Measurement of the φ*η distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1 at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurementsmore » at any collider of the φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z → ℓ+ℓ– boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  10. Measurement of the φ*η distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1 at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z → ℓ+ boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  11. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.; Andrus, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) operated from April 18, 1969, until 1990. ZPPR operated at low power for testing nuclear reactor designs. This paper examines the temperature of Pu content ZPPR fuel while it is in storage. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible cladding damage. Damage to the cladding could lead to fuel hydriding and oxidizing. A series of computer simulations were made to determine the range of temperatures potentially occuring in the ZPPR fuel. The maximum calculated fuel temperature is 292°C (558°F). Conservative assumptions in themore » model intentionally overestimate temperatures. The stored fuel temperatures are dependent on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel. Direct fuel temperatures could not be measured but storage bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and storage canister temperatures were measured. Comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are, as expected, higher than the actual temperatures. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions is significantly below the fuel failure criterion of 600°C (1,112°F).« less

  12. E85 Optimized Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Stanley

    2011-12-31

    A 5.0L V8 twin-turbocharged direct injection engine was designed, built, and tested for the purpose of assessing the fuel economy and performance in the F-Series pickup of the Dual Fuel engine concept and of an E85 optimized FFV engine. Additionally, production 3.5L gasoline turbocharged direct injection (GTDI) EcoBoost engines were converted to Dual Fuel capability and used to evaluate the cold start emissions and fuel system robustness of the Dual Fuel engine concept. Project objectives were: to develop a roadmap to demonstrate a minimized fuel economy penalty for an F-Series FFV truck with a highly boosted, high compression ratio spark ignition engine optimized to run with ethanol fuel blends up to E85; to reduce FTP 75 energy consumption by 15% - 20% compared to an equally powered vehicle with a current production gasoline engine; and to meet ULEV emissions, with a stretch target of ULEV II / Tier II Bin 4. All project objectives were met or exceeded.

  13. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  14. Detecting features in the dark energy equation of state: a wavelet approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hojjati, Alireza; Pogosian, Levon; Zhao, Gong-Bo E-mail: levon@sfu.ca

    2010-04-01

    We study the utility of wavelets for detecting the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state w(z) from the combination of supernovae (SNe), CMB and BAO data. We show that local features in w, such as bumps, can be detected efficiently using wavelets. To demonstrate, we first generate a mock supernovae data sample for a SNAP-like survey with a bump feature in w(z) hidden in, then successfully discover it by performing a blind wavelet analysis. We also apply our method to analyze the recently released ''Constitution'' SNe data, combined with WMAP and BAO from SDSS, and find weak hints of dark energy dynamics. Namely, we find that models with w(z) < −1 for 0.2 < z < 0.5, and w(z) > −1 for 0.5 < z < 1, are mildly favored at 95% confidence level. This is in good agreement with several recent studies using other methods, such as redshift binning with principal component analysis (PCA) (e.g. Zhao and Zhang, arXiv: 0908.1568)

  15. Method and apparatus for combinatorial logic signal processor in a digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, W.K.

    1999-02-16

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system is disclosed which accepts a digitized input signal and detects the presence of step-like pulses in the this data stream, extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, inspects for pulse pileup, and records input pulse rates and system lifetime. The system has two parallel processing channels: a slow channel, which filters the data stream with a long time constant trapezoidal filter for good energy resolution; and a fast channel which filters the data stream with a short time constant trapezoidal filter, detects pulses, inspects for pileups, and captures peak values from the slow channel for good events. The presence of a simple digital interface allows the system to be easily integrated with a digital processor to produce accurate spectra at high count rates and allow all spectrometer functions to be fully automated. Because the method is digitally based, it allows pulses to be binned based on time related values, as well as on their amplitudes, if desired. 31 figs.

  16. Measurement of the double differential diject mass cross section in pp(bar) collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; /Oklahoma U.

    2009-07-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of the double differential dijet mass cross section, measured at the D0 detector in Batavia, IL, using p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The dijet mass was calculated using the two highest p{sub T} jets in the event, with approximately 0.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected between 2004 and 2005. The analysis was presented in bins of dijet mass (M{sub JJ}) and rapidity (y), and extends the measurement farther in M{sub JJ} and y than any previous measurement. Corrections due to detector effects were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and applied to data. The errors on the measurement consist of statistical and systematic errors, of which the Jet Energy Scale was the largest. The final result was compared to next-to-leading order theory and good agreement was found. These results may be used in the determination of the proton parton distribution functions and to set limits on new physics.

  17. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-30

    The General Motors and DOE cooperative agreement program DE-EE0003379 is completed. The program has integrated and demonstrated a lean-stratified gasoline engine, a lean aftertreatment system, a 12V Stop/Start system and an Active Thermal Management system along with the necessary controls that significantly improves fuel efficiency for small cars. The fuel economy objective of an increase of 25% over a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu and the emission objective of EPA T2B2 compliance have been accomplished. A brief review of the program, summarized from the narrative is: The program accelerates development and synergistic integration of four cost competitive technologies to improve fuel economy of a light-duty vehicle by at least 25% while meeting Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards. These technologies can be broadly implemented across the U.S. light-duty vehicle product line between 2015 and 2025 and are compatible with future and renewable biofuels. The technologies in this program are: lean combustion, innovative passive selective catalyst reduction lean aftertreatment, 12V stop/start and active thermal management. The technologies will be calibrated in a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu mid-size sedan for final fuel economy demonstration.

  18. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact on an Automated Mobility District: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Gonder, Jeff; Qi, Xuewei

    2015-12-11

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  19. EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard

    2013-03-15

    Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmorenext-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).less

  1. Where do the 3.5 keV photons come from? A morphological study of the Galactic Center and of Perseus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Eric; Jeltema, Tesla; Profumo, Stefano E-mail: tesla@ucsc.edu

    2015-02-01

    We test the origin of the 3.5 keV line photons by analyzing the morphology of the emission at that energy from the Galactic Center and from the Perseus cluster of galaxies. We employ a variety of different templates to model the continuum emission and analyze the resulting radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission. We then perform a pixel-by-pixel binned likelihood analysis including line emission templates and dark matter templates and assess the correlation of the 3.5 keV emission with these templates. We conclude that the radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission is incompatible with a dark matter origin for both the Galactic center and Perseus; the Galactic center 3.5 keV line photons trace the morphology of lines at comparable energy, while the Perseus 3.5 keV photons are highly correlated with the cluster's cool core, and exhibit a morphology incompatible with dark matter decay. The template analysis additionally allows us to set the most stringent constraints to date on lines in the 3.5 keV range from dark matter decay.

  2. Water vapor in the spectrum of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. II. The eclipse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouzet, Nicolas; McCullough, Peter R.; Deming, Drake; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-11-10

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are crucial to infer the composition and properties of their atmospheres. HD 189733b is one of the most extensively studied exoplanets and is a cornerstone for hot Jupiter models. In this paper, we report the dayside emission spectrum of HD 189733b in the wavelength range 1.1-1.7 μm obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in spatial scan mode. The quality of the data is such that even a straightforward analysis yields a high-precision Poisson noise-limited spectrum: the median 1σ uncertainty is 57 ppm per 0.02 μm bin. We also build a white-light curve correcting for systematic effects and derive an absolute eclipse depth of 96 ± 39 ppm. The resulting spectrum shows marginal evidence for water vapor absorption, but can also be well explained by a blackbody spectrum. However, the combination of these WFC3 data with previous Spitzer photometric observations is best explained by a dayside atmosphere of HD 189733b with no thermal inversion and a nearly solar or subsolar H{sub 2}O abundance in a cloud-free atmosphere. Alternatively, this apparent subsolar abundance may be the result of clouds or hazes that future studies need to investigate.

  3. JV Task 112-Optimal Ethanol Blend-Level Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Shockey; Ted Aulich; Bruce Jones; Gary Mead; Paul Steevens

    2008-01-31

    Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET) and Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) tests were conducted on four 2007 model vehicles; a Chevrolet Impala flex-fuel and three non-flex-fuel vehicles: a Ford Fusion, a Toyota Camry, and a Chevrolet Impala. This investigation utilized a range of undenatured ethanol/Tier II gasoline blend levels from 0% to 85%. HWFET testing on ethanol blend levels of E20 in the flex fuel Chevrolet Impala and E30 in the non-flex-fuel Ford Fusion and Toyota Camry resulted in miles-per-gallon (mpg) fuel economy greater than Tier 2 gasoline, while E40 in the non-flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala resulted in an optimum mpg based on per-gallon fuel Btu content. Exhaust emission values for non-methane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) obtained from both the FTP-75 and the HWFET driving cycles were at or below EPA Tier II, Light-Duty Vehicles, Bin 5 levels for all vehicles tested with one exception. The flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala exceeded the NMOG standard for the FTP-75 on E-20 and Tier II gasoline.

  4. Top-pair forward-backward asymmetry beyond next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, Valentin; Neubert, Matthias; Pecjak, Ben D.; Ferroglia, Andrea; Yang Lilin

    2011-10-01

    We make use of recent results in effective theory and higher-order perturbative calculations to improve the theoretical predictions of the QCD contribution to the top-quark pair production forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron. In particular, we supplement the fixed-order next-to-leading order calculation with higher-order corrections from soft-gluon resummation at next-to next-to-leading order accuracy performed in two different kinematic schemes, which allows us to make improved predictions for the asymmetry in the pp and tt rest frames as a function of the rapidity and invariant mass of the tt pair. Furthermore, we provide binned results which can be compared with the recent measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry in events with a large pair invariant mass or rapidity difference. Finally, we calculate at NLO+NNLL order the top-quark charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of a lower rapidity cutoff for the top and antitop quarks.

  5. Measurement of the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→η(')l⁺ν branching fractions, the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→ηl⁺ν form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; et al

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B⁺→η(')l⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν, undertaken with approximately 464×10⁶ BB¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B⁺→ηl⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B⁺→ηl⁺ν)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10⁻⁴ and B(B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10⁻⁴. We also measure B(B+→η'l⁺ν)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10⁻⁴. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| usingmore » three different QCD calculations.« less

  6. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  7. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance prediction in PATRIC and RAST

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, James J.; Boisvert, Sebastien; Brettin, Thomas; Kenyon, Ronald W.; Mao, Chunhong; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Santerre, John; Shukla, Maulik; Wattam, Alice R.; et al

    2016-06-14

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) mechanisms in bacterial pathogens, coupled with the dwindling number of effective antibiotics, has created a global health crisis. Being able to identify the genetic mechanisms of AMR and predict the resistance phenotypes of bacterial pathogens prior to culturing could inform clinical decision-making and improve reaction time. At PATRIC (http://patricbrc.org/), we have been collecting bacterial genomes with AMR metadata for several years. In order to advance phenotype prediction and the identification of genomic regions relating to AMR, we have updated the PATRIC FTP server to enable access to genomes that are binned bymore » their AMR phenotypes, as well as metadata including minimum inhibitory concentrations. Using this infrastructure, we custom built AdaBoost (adaptive boosting) machine learning classifiers for identifying carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, and beta-lactam and co-trimoxazole resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae with accuracies ranging from 88–99%. We also did this for isoniazid, kanamycin, ofloxacin, rifampicin, and streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, achieving accuracies ranging from 71–88%. Lastly, this set of classifiers has been used to provide an initial framework for species-specific AMR phenotype and genomic feature prediction in the RAST and PATRIC annotation services.« less

  9. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: FOUR YEARS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruber, David; Von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, Dave; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cleveland, William H. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2014-03-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly but not identically to Goldstein et al. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  10. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. ); Wagner, K.C. )

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

  11. SANE's Measurement of the Proton's Virtual Photon Spin Asymmetry, Ap1, at Large Bjorken x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulholland, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    The experiment SANE (Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) measured inclusive double polarization electron asymmetries on a proton target at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory in Newport News Virgina. Polarized electrons were scattered from a solid 14NH3 polarized target provided by the University of Virginia target group. Measurements were taken with the target polarization oriented at 80 degrees and 180 degrees relative to the beam direction, and beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were used. Scattered electrons were detected by a multi-component novel non-magnetic detector package constructed for this experiment. Asymmetries measured at the two target orientations allow for the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetries A1p and A2p as well as the spin structure functions g1p and g2p. This work addresses the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetry A1p in the deep inelastic regime. The analysis uses data in the kinematic range from Bjorken x of 0.30 to 0.55, separated into four Q2 bins from 1.9 to 4.7 GeV2.

  12. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  13. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  14. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|1. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radiusmoreparameters, R = 0.4 and R = 0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.less

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermodynamic Properties in Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Li, Xin; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Akinlalu, Ademola V.; Liu, L.

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide (UO2) by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As for solid UO2, the lattice parameter, density, and enthalpy obtained by MD simulations were in good agreement with existing experimental data and previous theoretical predictions. The calculated thermal conductivities matched the experiment results at the midtemperature range but were underestimated at very low and very high temperatures. The calculation results of mean square displacement represented the stability of uranium at all temperatures and the high mobility of oxygen toward 3000 K. By fitting the diffusivity constant of oxygen with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman law, we noticed a secondary phase transition near 2006.4 K, which can be identified as a strong to fragile supercooled liquid or glass phase transition in UO2. By fitting the oxygen diffusion constant with the Arrhenius equation, activation energies of 2.0 and 2.7 eV that we obtained were fairly close to the recommended values of 2.3 to 2.6 eV. Xiangyu Wang, Bin Wu, Fei Gao, Xin Li, Xin Sun, Mohammed A. Khaleel, Ademola V. Akinlalu and Li Liu

  16. TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE COS TIME-TAG CAPABILITY: OBSERVATIONS OF PULSATING HOT DQ WHITE DWARFS AND DISCOVERY OF A NEW ONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, P.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Beland, S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Chayer, P., E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: sbeland@colorado.edu, E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We present an analysis of the ultraviolet light curves of five Hot DQ white dwarfs recently observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These light curves were constructed by extracting the time-tag information from the FUV and NUV spectroscopic data. Single-color light curves were thus produced in 60 s time bins. The Fourier analysis of these data successfully recovers the main pulsation modes of the three stars previously known to be variable from ground-based observations. We also report the discovery of pulsations in another object, SDSS J1153+0056, making it only the fifth member of the new class of variable Hot DQ stars and the first pulsating white dwarf to be discovered from space-based observations. The relatively high amplitudes of the modes observed in the FUV (2-4 times that observed in the optical) as well as the high fraction of stars variable in our sample suggest that most, if not all, Hot DQ white dwarfs might be pulsating at some level when observed at high enough sensitivity. Our results also underline the vast potential of the time-tag capability of the HST/COS combination.

  17. Cazymes Analysis Toolkit (CAT): Webservice for searching and analyzing carbohydrateactive enzymes in a newly sequenced organism using CAZy database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Park, Byung; Syed, Mustafa H; Uberbacher, Edward C; Leuze, Michael Rex

    2010-01-01

    The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database provides a rich set of manually annotated enzymes that degrade, modify, or create glycosidic bonds. Despite rich and invaluable information stored in the database, software tools utilizing this information for annotation of newly sequenced genomes by CAZy families are limited. We have employed two annotation approaches to fill the gap between manually curated high-quality protein sequences collected in the CAZy database and the growing number of other protein sequences produced by genome or metagenome sequencing projects. The first approach is based on a similarity search against the entire non-redundant sequences of the CAZy database. The second approach performs annotation using links or correspondences between the CAZy families and protein family domains. The links were discovered using the association rule learning algorithm applied to sequences from the CAZy database. The approaches complement each other and in combination achieved high specificity and sensitivity when cross-evaluated with the manually curated genomes of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 and Saccharophagus degradans 2-40. The capability of the proposed framework to predict the function of unknown protein domains (DUF) and of hypothetical proteins in the genome of Neurospora crassa is demonstrated. The framework is implemented as a Web service, the CAZymes Analysis Toolkit (CAT), and is available at http://cricket.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cat.cgi.

  18. Measurement of the Φ η * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable Φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb⁻¹ at √s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable Φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at anymore » collider of the Φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z→l⁺l⁻ boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  19. High Conduction Neutron Absorber to Simulate Fast Reactor Environment in an Existing Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillen, Donna; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Parry, James

    2014-06-22

    A need was determined for a thermal neutron absorbing material that could be cooled in a gas reactor environment without using large amounts of a coolant that would thermalize the neutron flux. A new neutron absorbing material was developed that provided high conduction so a small amount of water would be sufficient for cooling thereby thermalizing the flux as little as possible. An irradiation experiment was performed to assess the effects of radiation and the performance of a new neutron absorbing material. Neutron fluence monitors were placed inside specially fabricated holders within a set of drop-in capsules and irradiated for up to four cycles in the Advanced Test Reactor. Following irradiation, the neutron fluence monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and x-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. The adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins – thermal, epithermal and fast to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. Fluence monitors were evaluated after four different irradiation periods to evaluate the effects of burn-up in the absorbing material. Additionally, activities of the three highest activity isotopes present in the specimens are given.

  20. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  1. Pebble bed modular reactor safeguards: developing new approaches and implementing safeguards by design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyer, Brian David; Beddingfield, David H; Durst, Philip; Bean, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) does not fit or seem appropriate to the IAEA safeguards approach under the categories of light water reactor (LWR), on-load refueled reactor (OLR, i.e. CANDU), or Other (prismatic HTGR) because the fuel is in a bulk form, rather than discrete items. Because the nuclear fuel is a collection of nuclear material inserted in tennis-ball sized spheres containing structural and moderating material and a PBMR core will contain a bulk load on the order of 500,000 spheres, it could be classified as a 'Bulk-Fuel Reactor.' Hence, the IAEA should develop unique safeguards criteria. In a multi-lab DOE study, it was found that an optimized blend of: (i) developing techniques to verify the plutonium content in spent fuel pebbles, (ii) improving burn-up computer codes for PBMR spent fuel to provide better understanding of the core and spent fuel makeup, and (iii) utilizing bulk verification techniques for PBMR spent fuel storage bins should be combined with the historic IAEA and South African approaches of containment and surveillance to verify and maintain continuity of knowledge of PBMR fuel. For all of these techniques to work the design of the reactor will need to accommodate safeguards and material accountancy measures to a far greater extent than has thus far been the case. The implementation of Safeguards-by-Design as the PBMR design progresses provides an approach to meets these safeguards and accountancy needs.

  2. Properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northwest photon dominated region of NGC 7023. II. Traditional PAH analysis using k-means as a visualization tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boersma, C.; Bregman, J.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2014-11-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the Spitzer-IRS spectral map of the northwest photon dominated region (PDR) in NGC 7023 is analyzed using the 'traditional' approach in which the PAH bands and plateaus between 5.2-19.5 μm are isolated by subtracting the underlying continuum and removing H{sub 2} emission lines. The spectra are organized into seven spectroscopic bins by using k-means clustering. Each cluster corresponds to, and reveals, a morphological zone within NGC 7023. The zones self-organize parallel to the well-defined PDR front that coincides with an increase in intensity of the H{sub 2} emission lines. PAH band profiles and integrated strengths are measured, classified, and mapped. The morphological zones revealed by the k-means clustering provides deeper insight into the conditions that drive variations in band strength ratios and evolution of the PAH population that otherwise would be lost. For example, certain band-band relations are bifurcated, revealing two limiting cases; one associated with the PDR, the other with the diffuse medium. Traditionally, PAH band strength ratios are used to gain insight into the properties of the emitting PAH population, i.e., charge, size, structure, and composition. Insights inferred from this work are compared and contrasted to those from Boersma et al. (first paper in this series), where the PAH emission in NGC 7023 is decomposed exclusively using the PAH spectra and tools made available through the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database.

  3. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4more » and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  4. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the fully hadronic decay channel from ATLAS data at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-23

    In this study, the mass of the top quark is measured in a data set corresponding to 4.6 fb-1 of proton–proton collisions with centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with hadronic decays of top–antitop quark pairs with at least six jets in the final state are selected. The substantial background from multijet production is modelled with data-driven methods that utilise the number of identified b-quark jets and the transverse momentum of the sixth leading jet, which have minimal correlation. The top-quark mass is obtained from template fits to the ratio of three-jetmore » to dijet mass. The three-jet mass is calculated from the three jets produced in a top-quark decay. Using these three jets the dijet mass is obtained from the two jets produced in the W boson decay. The top-quark mass obtained from this fit is thus less sensitive to the uncertainty in the energy measurement of the jets. A binned likelihood fit yields a top-quark mass of mt=175.1±1.4(stat.) ±1.2(syst.) GeV.« less

  5. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore » on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  6. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plionis, Alexander A; Peterson, Dominic S; Tandon, Lav; Lamont, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  7. Cosmology from Cosmic Shear with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, T.

    2015-07-20

    We present the first constraints on cosmology from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using weak lensing measurements from the preliminary Science Verification (SV) data. We use 139 square degrees of SV data, which is less than 3% of the full DES survey area. Using cosmic shear 2-point measurements over three redshift bins we find ?8(m=0.3)0.5 = 0:81 0:06 (68% confidence), after marginalising over 7 systematics parameters and 3 other cosmological parameters. Furthermore, we examine the robustness of our results to the choice of data vector and systematics assumed, and find them to be stable. About 20% of our error bar comes from marginalising over shear and photometric redshift calibration uncertainties. The current state-of-the-art cosmic shear measurements from CFHTLenS are mildly discrepant with the cosmological constraints from Planck CMB data. Our results are consistent with both datasets. Our uncertainties are ~30% larger than those from CFHTLenS when we carry out a comparable analysis of the two datasets, which we attribute largely to the lower number density of our shear catalogue. We investigate constraints on dark energy and find that, with this small fraction of the full survey, the DES SV constraints make negligible impact on the Planck constraints. The moderate disagreement between the CFHTLenS and Planck values of ?8(?m=0.3)0.5 is present regardless of the value of w.

  8. Site characterization report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    Several Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) structures (i.e., Building 7852, the bulk storage bins, the pump house, water tank T-5, and pump P-3) are surplus facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). OHF was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solids storage, handling, mixing, and grout injection facility. It was shut down in 1980 and transferred to ORNL`s Surveillance and Maintenance Program. The hydrofracture process was a unique disposal method that involved injecting waste materials mixed with grout and additives under pumping pressures of 2,000 psi or greater into a deep, low-permeability shale formation. The injected slurry spread along fractures and bedding planes for hundreds of feet from the injection points, forming thin grout sheets (often less than 1/8 in. thick). The grout ostensibly immobilized and solidified the liquid wastes. Site characterization activities were conducted in the winter and spring of 1994 to collect information necessary to plan the D and D of OHF structures. This site characterization report documents the results of the investigation of OHF D and D structures, presenting data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate. 25 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Automatic Mesh Adaptivity for Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Neutronics Modeling of Fusion Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Wilson, P.; Sawan, M.; Mosher, Scott W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  10. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  11. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been reprocessed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1953 to recover uranium-235 and krypton-85 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The resulting acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel underground bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal.

  12. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis is on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.

  13. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sNN=2.76TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ⁺μ⁻, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at √sNN = 2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb⁻¹ and 5.4  pb⁻¹, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)Pb−Pb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)p−p is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y| < 1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5 < pT < 30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values,more » 3« less

  14. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zastrau, Ulf; Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Frster, Eckhart; Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud

    2014-09-15

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ?E/E = 1.1 ?10{sup ?4} and wave-number resolution of ?k/k = 3 ?10{sup ?3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/ in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5??m agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  15. Comparative analysis of various CO2 configurations in supermarket refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian; Bansal, Pradeep

    2014-07-09

    Our paper presents an analysis of various CO2 transcritical and cascade/secondary loop refrigeration systems that are becoming popular in supermarket applications with the objective of optimizing the operating parameters of these systems. In addition, the performance of selected CO2-based refrigeration systems is compared to the baseline R404A multiplex direct expansion system using bin analyses in the eight climate zones of the United States. Moreover, for the refrigeration systems investigated, it was found that the Transcritical Booster System with Bypass Compressor (TBS-BC) had the lowest energy consumption for ambient temperatures (Tamb) less than 8 °C, and for higher ambient temperatures the R404A direct expansion system was found to have the lowest energy consumption. Finally, the TBS-BC performs equivalent to or better than the R404A direct expansion system in the northern two-thirds of the US. For the southern portion of the US, the R404A multiplex DX system performs better than CO2 systems.

  16. A new approach to integrate seismic and production data in reservoir models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouenes, A.; Chawathe, A.; Weiss, W.

    1997-08-01

    A great deal of effort is devoted to reducing the uncertainties in reservoir modeling. For example, seismic properties are used to improve the characterization of interwell properties by providing porosity maps constrained to seismic impedance. Another means to reduce uncertainties is to constrain the reservoir model to production data. This paper describes a new approach where the production and seismic data are simultaneously used to reduce the uncertainties. In this new approach, the primary geologic parameter that controls reservoir properties is identified. Next, the geophysical parameter that is sensitive to the dominant geologic parameter is determined. Then the geology and geophysics are linked using analytic correlations. Unfortunately, the initial guess resulted in a reservoir model that did not match the production history. Since the time required for trial and error matching of production history is exorbitant, an automatic history matching method based on a fast optimization method was used to find the correlating parameters. This new approach was illustrated with an actual field in the Williston Basin. Upscalling problems do not arise since the scale is imposed by the size of the seismic bin (66m, 219 ft) which is the size of the simulator gridblocks.

  17. Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, D E; Durling, R L

    2005-10-10

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  18. Comparative analysis of various CO2 configurations in supermarket refrigeration systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian; Bansal, Pradeep

    2014-07-09

    Our paper presents an analysis of various CO2 transcritical and cascade/secondary loop refrigeration systems that are becoming popular in supermarket applications with the objective of optimizing the operating parameters of these systems. In addition, the performance of selected CO2-based refrigeration systems is compared to the baseline R404A multiplex direct expansion system using bin analyses in the eight climate zones of the United States. Moreover, for the refrigeration systems investigated, it was found that the Transcritical Booster System with Bypass Compressor (TBS-BC) had the lowest energy consumption for ambient temperatures (Tamb) less than 8 °C, and for higher ambient temperatures themore » R404A direct expansion system was found to have the lowest energy consumption. Finally, the TBS-BC performs equivalent to or better than the R404A direct expansion system in the northern two-thirds of the US. For the southern portion of the US, the R404A multiplex DX system performs better than CO2 systems.« less

  19. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact from an Automated Mobility District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Qi, Xuewei; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-19

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  20. NDT-COMP9 microcomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodd, C.V.; Cowan, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    An 8080-based microcomputer system, the NDT-COMP9, has been designed for instrumentation control and data analysis in eddy-current tests. The NDT-COMP9 represents a significantly more powerful computer system than the NDT-COMP8 microcomputer from which it was developed. The NDT-COMP9 system is contained on a 240- by 120-mm (9.5- by 4.8-in.) circuit board and will fit in a four-wide Nuclear Instrumentation Module (NIM) BIN with 26-pin edge connectors. In addition to the 8080-compatible central processing unit (CPU), an arithmetic processing unit (APU) is available to provide up to 32-bit fixed- or floating-point, basic or transcendental math functions. The 16K of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM), one serial input-output (I/O) port (RS-232-C at a maximum speed of 9600 baud), and 72 parallel I/O ports are available. The baud rate is under software control. A system monitor and math package are available for use with the microcomputer.

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the fully hadronic decay channel from ATLAS data at √s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyka, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.

    2015-04-23

    In this study, the mass of the top quark is measured in a data set corresponding to 4.6 fb-1 of proton–proton collisions with centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with hadronic decays of top–antitop quark pairs with at least six jets in the final state are selected. The substantial background from multijet production is modelled with data-driven methods that utilise the number of identified b-quark jets and the transverse momentum of the sixth leading jet, which have minimal correlation. The top-quark mass is obtained from template fits to the ratio of three-jet to dijet mass. The three-jet mass is calculated from the three jets produced in a top-quark decay. Using these three jets the dijet mass is obtained from the two jets produced in the W boson decay. The top-quark mass obtained from this fit is thus less sensitive to the uncertainty in the energy measurement of the jets. A binned likelihood fit yields a top-quark mass of mt=175.1±1.4(stat.) ±1.2(syst.) GeV.

  2. Unfolding the high energy electron flux from CRRES fluxmeter measurements. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKellar, B.D.

    1996-12-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) was launched on 25 July 1990 to collect measurements in the earth`s radiation belts. One instrument, the High Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF), measured the flux of electrons in 10 channels with energies between 1 MeV and 10 MeV. The channel sensitivities, Ri(E), have been calibrated and partially re-calibrated. The authors explore the errors introduced in unfolding the electron flux spectrum from the channel measurements and the propagation and growth of calibration and measurement errors. Using numerical experimentation, they fold the responses with known spectra to obtain simulated measurements, add random measurement and calibration errors, and unfold the spectra as 10-bin histograms which are compared with histograms of the original spectra. The authors observe that the shape (of the response functions) is the major factor in the growth of error in unfolding and in determining which type of error dominates the unfolding process. They conclude that successful unfolding of the electron flux is critically dependent upon the shape of the response functions. The re-calibration of the REEF must be accurately completed if reliable unfolds of the high energy electron flux are to be obtained.

  3. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction (more » $$\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.« less

  4. Determination of the beam-spin asymmetry of deuteron photodisintegration in the energy region Eγ=1.1 –2.3 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zachariou, N.; Ilieva, Y.; Ivanov, N. Ya.; Sargsian, M. M.; Avakian, R.; Feldman, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.

    2015-05-01

    The beam-spin asymmetry, Σ, for the reaction γd→ΣΣpn has been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) for six photon-energy bins, between 1.1 and 2.3 GeV, and proton angles in the center-of-mass frame, Θc.m., between 25° and 160°. These are the first measurements of beam-spin asymmetries at Θc.m.=90° for photon-beam energies above 1.6 GeV, and the first measurements for angles other than Θc.m.=90°. The angular and energy dependence of Σ is expected to aid in the development of QCD-based models to understand the mechanisms of deuteron photodisintegration in the transition regionmore » between hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom, where both effective field theories and perturbative QCD cannot make reliable predictions.« less

  5. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of π⁻ and π⁺ elliptic flow, v₂, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π⁻ (π⁺) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √sNN = 27 GeV and higher. At √sNN = 200 GeV, the slope of the difference of v₂ between π⁻ and π⁺ as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations thatmore » incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. In addition, similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.« less

  6. Qualitative risk assessment of Sandia`s rocket preparation and launch facility at Barking Sands, Kauai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper demonstrates the application of a qualitative methodology for performing risk assessments using the consequence and probability binning criteria of DOE Order 5481.1B. The particular application that is the subject of this paper is a facility risk assessment conducted for Sandia National Laboratories` Kauai Test Facility (KTF). The KTF is a rocket preparation and launch facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy and is located on the US Navy`s Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands on the western side of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The KTF consists of an administrative compound and main launch facility located on the north end of the PMRF, as well as the small Kokole Point launch facility located on the south end of the PMRF. It is classified as a moderate hazard facility in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B. As such, its authorization basis for operations necessitates a safety/risk assessment. This paper briefly addresses the hazards associated with KTF operations and the accidents selected for evaluation, introduces the principal elements of the accident assessment methodology, presents analysis details for two of the selected accidents, and provides a summary of results for all of the accidents evaluated.

  7. Rapid response sensor for analyzing Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra, S. S.; Doron, O.; Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.

    2015-06-18

    Rapid in-situ analytical techniques are attractive for characterizing Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Present techniques are time consuming, and require sample dissolution. Proof-of-principal studies are performed to demonstrate the utility of employing low energy neutrons from a portable pulsed neutron generator for non-destructive isotopic analysis of nuclear material. In particular, time-sequenced data acquisition, operating synchronously with the pulsing of a neutron generator, partitions the characteristic elemental prompt gamma-rays according to the type of the reaction; inelastic neutron scattering reactions during the ON state and thermal neutron capture reactions during the OFF state of the generator. Thus, the key challenge is isolating these signature gamma- rays from the prompt fission and β-delayed gamma-rays that are also produced during the neutron interrogation. A commercial digital multi-channel analyzer has been specially customized to enable time-resolved gamma-ray spectral data to be acquired in multiple user-defined time bins within each of the ON/OFF gate periods of the neutron generator. Preliminary results on new signatures from depleted uranium as well as modeling and benchmarking of the concept are presented, however this approach should should be applicable for virtually all forms of SNM.

  8. Spearfish High School, Sparfish, South Dakota solar energy system performance evaluation, September 1980-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, B.D.

    1981-01-01

    Spearfish High School in South Dakota contains 43,000 square feet of conditioned space. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 57% of the space heating and 50% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 8034 square feet of flat plate collectors, 4017 cubic feet of rock bin sensible heat storage, and auxiliary equipment including 8 heat pumps, 6 of which are solar supplied and instrumented, air conditioning units, and natural-gas-fired boilers. Performance data are given for the system including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor and solar system coefficient of performance. Insolation, solar energy utilization and operation data are also given. The performance of the collector, storage, domestic hot water and space heating subsystems, the operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, long-term weather data, sensor technology, and typical monthly data. (LEW)

  9. Measurement of jet fragmentation in PbPb and pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    The jet fragmentation function of inclusive jets with transverse momentum pt above 100 GeV in PbPb collisions has been measured using reconstructed charged particles with pt above 1 GeV in a cone of radius 0.3 around the jet axis. A data sample of PbPb collisions collected in 2011 at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 150 inverse microbarns is used. The results for PbPb collisions as a function of collision centrality and jet transverse momentum are compared to reference distributions based on pp data collected at the same center-of-mass energy in 2013, with an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse picobarns. A centrality-dependent modification of the fragmentation function is found. For the most central collisions, a significant enhancement is observed in the PbPb / pp fragmentation function ratio for charged particles with pt less than 3 GeV. This enhancement is observed for all jet pt bins studied.

  10. Searching for Stopped Gluinos at CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnikov, Fedor

    2010-02-10

    We describe plans for a search for long-lived particles which will become stopped by the CMS detector. We will look for the subsequent decay of these particles during time intervals where there are no pp collisions in CMS: during gaps between crossings in the LHC beam structure, and during inter-fill periods between the beam being dumped and re-injection. Such long living particles decays will be recorded with dedicated calorimeter triggers. For models predicting these particles, such as split-susy gluinos, the large cross-section combined with good stopping power of CMS, yields a significant number of triggerable decays. If LHC instantaneous luminosity approaches 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in 2009-10, 5sigma significance can be established in a matter of days, since these decays occur on top of a negligible background.Due to limited size, this paper concentrates on main idea and expected results. More details are available in https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/CMS/PhysicsResults.

  11. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Building 922 solid office waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    Building 922 houses all of SNL/California`s ES and H Departments: Health Protection, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Environmental Operations. It covers approximately 10,000 square feet and houses about 80 people. The office personnel generate nonhazardous solid office wastes in their daily activities. To determine the types and amounts of waste generated, a special PPOA sorting team sorted all of the trash collected from the building for a period of one-week (including paper and aluminum cans in the recycling bins). The team sorted the trash into major categories: paper, plastic, metals, glass, wet garbage, rest room waste, and miscellaneous materials. They then sorted it into subcategories within each major category. Rest room waste was collected but not sorted. The waste in each category was weighed separately. The total amount of trash collected during the week was approximately 168.8 kg (371.4 lbs). The results of this PPOA indicate that SNL/California is minimizing most nonhazardous office waste and reductions planned for the near future will add significantly to the minimization efforts.

  12. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J. -M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J. -S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  15. An integrated CMOS 0.15 ns digital timing generator for TDC`s and clock distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, J.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the architecture and performance of a new high resolution timing generator used as a building block for time to Digital Converters (TDC) and clock alignment functions. The timing generator is implemented as an array of locked loops. This architecture enables a timing generator with sub-gate delay resolution to be implemented in a standard digital CMOS process. The TDC function is implemented by storing the state of the timing generator signals in an asynchronous pipeline buffer when a hit signal is asserted. The clock alignment function is obtained by selecting one of the timing generator signals as an output clock. The proposed timing-generator has been mapped into a 1.0 {micro}m CMOS process a RMS error of the time taps of 48 ps has been measured with a bin size 0.15 ns. Used as a TDC device a RMS error of {minus}6 ps has been obtained. A short overview of the basic principles of major TDC and timing generator architectures is given to compare the merits of the proposed scheme to other alternatives.

  16. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salviander, S.; Shields, G. A.; Bonning, E. W. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M {sub BH}, and the host galaxy luminosity, L {sub gal}, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship by examining the redshift dependence of ? log M {sub BH}, the offset in M {sub BH} from the local M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship. There is little systematic trend in ? log M {sub BH} out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, ?{sub *}, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for ?{sub *} in statistical studies.

  17. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    , 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops

  18. Streamlined energy-savings calculations for heat-island reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-03-15

    We have developed summary tables (sorted by heating- and cooling-degree-days) to estimate the potential of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., solar-reflective roofs, shade trees, reflective pavements, and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings. The tables provide estimates of savings for both direct effect (reducing heat gain through the building shell) and indirect effect (reducing the ambient air temperature). In this analysis, we considered three building types that offer the most savings potential : residences, offices, and retail stores. Each building type was characterized in detail by Pre-1980 (old) or 1980+ (new) construction vintage and with natural gas or electricity as heating fuel. We defined prototypical-building characteristics for each building type and simulated the effects of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model and weather data for about 240 locations in the U.S. A statistical analysis of previously completed simulations for five cities was used to estimate the indirect savings. Our simulations included the effect of (1) solar-reflective roofing material on building [direct effect], (2) placement of deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], and (3) ambient cooling achieved by urban reforestation and reflective building surfaces and pavements [indirect effect]. Upon completion of estimating the direct and indirect energy savings for all the selected locations, we integrated the results in tables arranged by heating- and cooling-degree-days. We considered 15 bins for heating-degree-days, and 11 bins for cooling-degree-days. Energy use and savings are presented per 1000 ft2 of roof area. In residences heated with gas and in climates with greater than 1000 cooling-degree-days, the annual electricity savings in Pre-1980 stock ranged from 650 to 1300 kWh/1000ft2; for 1980+ stock savings ranged 300 to 600 kWh/1000 ft2

  19. Theoretical investigation of the design and performance of a dual energy (kV and MV) radiotherapy imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E. El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In modern radiotherapy treatment rooms, megavoltage (MV) portal imaging and kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging are performed using various active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) designs. To expand the clinical utility of MV and kV imaging, MV AMFPIs incorporating thick, segmented scintillators and, separately, kV imaging using a beams eye view geometry have been investigated by a number of groups. Motivated by these previous studies, it is of interest to explore to what extent it is possible to preserve the benefits of kV and MV imaging using a single AMFPI design, given the considerably different x ray energy spectra used for kV and MV imaging. In this paper, considerations for the design of such a dual energy imager are explored through examination of the performance of a variety of hypothetical AMFPIs based on x ray converters employing segmented scintillators. Methods: Contrast, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio performances were characterized through simulation modeling of CBCT imaging, while modulation transfer function, Swank factor, and signal performance were characterized through simulation modeling of planar imaging. The simulations were based on a previously reported hybrid modeling technique (accounting for both radiation and optical effects), augmented through modeling of electronic additive noise. All designs employed BGO scintillator material with thicknesses ranging from 0.25 to 4 cm and element-to-element pitches ranging from 0.508 to 1.016 mm. A series of studies were performed under both kV and MV imaging conditions to determine the most advantageous imager configuration (involving front or rear x ray illumination and use of a mirror or black reflector), converter design (pitch and thickness), and operating mode (pitch-binning combination). Results: Under the assumptions of the present study, the most advantageous imager design was found to employ rear illumination of the converter in combination with a black reflector

  20. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    1997-12-01

    procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.