National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for big explosives experimental

  1. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  2. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  3. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unveils explosives detection expertise A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection expertise A team of scientists is now rolling out a collaborative...

  4. The Big Bang explosion at the start of the Universe was responsible for the production of the light elements hydrogen and helium, along with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    The Big Bang explosion at the start of the Universe was responsible for the production of the light elements hydrogen and helium, along with some fraction of lithium. All of the other elements in nature Galaxy and throughout the Universe were essentially composed of only hydrogen and helium -- no heavy

  5. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection expertise February 19, 2015 Collaboration project defeats explosives threats through enhanced detection...

  6. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G; Kulesz, James J; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kruse, Kara L

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  7. Big Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2010-01-08

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  8. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives, mixtures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives, mixtures, and plastic-bonded explosives determined experimentally Baytos, J.F. 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL...

  9. Explosive nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hernanz

    2001-03-26

    Many radioactive nuclei relevant for gamma-ray astrophysics are synthesized during explosive events, such as classical novae and supernovae. A review of recent results of explosive nucleosynthesis in these scenarios is presented, with a special emphasis on the ensuing gamma-ray emission from individual nova and supernova explosions. The influence of the dynamic properties of the ejecta on the gamma-ray emission features, as well as the still remaining uncertainties in nova and supernova models is also reviewed.

  10. Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team, UNH Cooperative Extension The explosion of apple blossoms in May transforms the most gnarled old tree into a delicate cloud of beauty (1817-1862) in his essay "The Wild Apple Tree," described the blossoms perfectly: `The flowers

  11. How to Lie with Big Data (and/or big computations)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Philip B.

    How to Lie with Big Data (and/or big computations) Philip B. Stark Department of Statistics experimental design doesn't matter #12;What's new in Big Data? · design still matters; experiments versus flu trends http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/28/ google-flu-trends-the-limits-of-big-data/ #12

  12. Explosives Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    missions. gas gun A Los Alamos researcher installs a target in one of the research "gas guns" designed for high precision experiments on the ignition of explosives. Full-spectrum...

  13. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-03-29

    This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

  14. Explosive complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-08-16

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  15. Explosive complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  16. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kury, John W. (Danville, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA)

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  17. Explosives Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan-5 Beamline 1-5ComputingExplosives Science

  18. Leidenfrost explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreau, F; Dorbolo, S

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the behavior of Leidenfrost droplets composed by a mixture of water and surfactant (SDS, Sodium Dodecyl sulfate). When a droplet is released on a plate heated above a given temperature a thin layer of vapor isolates the droplet from the plate. The droplet levitates over the plate. This is called the Leidenfrost effect. In this work we study the influence of the addition of a surfactant on the Leidenfrost phenomenon. As the droplet evaporates the concentration of SDS rises up to two orders of magnitude over the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). An unexpected and violent explosive behavior is observed. The video presents several explosions taken with a high speed camera (IDT-N4 at 30000 fps). All the presented experiments were performed on a plate heated at 300{\\deg}C. On the other hand, the initial quantity of SDS was tuned in two ways: (i) by varying the initial concentration of SDS and (ii) by varying the initial size of the droplet. By measuring the volume of th...

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  20. Dust cluster explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2012-09-15

    A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

  1. Insensitive Extrudable Explosive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Military and law enforcement Flexible shaped charges Shock hardening Explosive welding Sheet explosives Detonating cord (cased or bare) Benefits: Compatible with standard...

  2. An Experimental Study Of Hydromagmatic Fragmentation Through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fragmentation Through Energetic, Non-Explosive Magma-Water Mixing Abstract In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic...

  3. Satellites provide the big picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Famiglietti, JS; Cazenave, A; Eicker, A; Reager, JT; Rodell, M; Velicogna, I

    2015-01-01

    provide the necessary “big-picture” spatial coverage, asprovide the big picture gether, these measurements will

  4. BIG CPU, BIG DATABIG CPU, BIG DATA Solving the World's Toughest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Alan

    BIG CPU, BIG DATABIG CPU, BIG DATA Solving the World's Toughest Computational Problems with Parallel Computing Alan Kaminsky #12;#12;BIG CPU, BIG DATABIG CPU, BIG DATA Solving the World's Toughest College of Computing and Information Sciences Rochester Institute of Technology #12;ii BIG CPU, BIG DATA

  5. Supernova bangs as a tool to study big bang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blinnikov, S. I., E-mail: Sergei.Blinnikov@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in observed Universe. This educational review tells about supernovae and their applications in cosmology. It is explained how to understand the production of light in the most luminous events with minimum required energy of explosion. These most luminous phenomena can serve as primary cosmological distance indicators. Comparing the observed distance dependence on red shift with theoretical models one can extract information on evolution of the Universe from Big Bang until our epoch.

  6. Introduction Big Radio Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Big Radio Data Ue-Li Pen CITA, UofT, CIFAR July 3, 2014U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Overview History VLBI Processing Future U. Pen Big signal processing U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary VLBI Current experiments

  7. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

    2007-11-13

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  9. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  10. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  11. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-01-09

    The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  12. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electromagnetic radiation, or to detect with currently fielded technologies. Approaches to improving detectionInitiative for Explosives Detection Highly Concealed Bulk Explosives Detection This focus area emphasizes the detection of explosives or IEDs hidden in vehicles, buildings or various types of containers

  13. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  14. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Supersedes DOE O 452.2D and DOE M 452.2-1A.

  15. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  16. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laintz, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  17. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  18. One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (Thermal Sensitivity) of ANPZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P.; Hust, G.; McClelland, M.; Gresshoff, M.

    2014-11-12

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the recent ODTX experimental data and modeling results for 2,6-diamino-3,5-dintropyrazine (ANPZ).

  19. Explosives tester with heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  20. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  2. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News BelowAsked toUSC-Aiken,AU T H O R

  3. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  4. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  5. Big Data Begets Big Database Theory University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suciu, Dan

    Big Data Begets Big Database Theory Dan Suciu University of Washington 1 Motivation Industry analysts describe Big Data in terms of three V's: volume, velocity, variety. The data is too big to process the technical challenges in big data, but we find no inspiration in the three Vs. Volume is surely nothing new

  6. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  7. Big Eddy-Knight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Reliability Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Line Projects Big Eddy-Knight Central Ferry Lower Monumental Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement...

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12

    The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

  9. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  10. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  11. Explosion suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  12. Explosive Nucleosynthesis: Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett

    1999-08-16

    Explosive nucleosynthesis is a combination of the nuclear physics of thermonuclear reactions, and the hydrodynamics of the plasma in which the reactions occur. It depends upon the initial conditions---the stellar evolution up to the explosive instability, and the nature of the explosion mechanism. Some key issues for explosive nucleosynthesis are the interaction of burning with hydrodynamics, the degree of microscopic mixing in convective zones, and the breaking of spherical symmetry by convection and rotation. Recent experiments on high intensity lasers provides new opportunities for laboratory testing of astrophysical hydrodynamic codes. Implications of SN1987A, SN1998bw (GRB980425?), and eta Carina are discussed, as well as the formation of black holes or neutron stars.

  13. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  14. ( 'tams Dlvllan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ~ ( ·'tams Dlvl·lan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE STOWAGE THERMAL CONSTRAINTS LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE presents the study of LSPE High Explosive Package and transport frame stowage thermal constraints subsequent to LM touchdown and prior to lunar deployment. Approved by: #12;LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE STOWAGE

  15. Nuclear explosive safety study process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear explosives by their design and intended use require collocation of high explosives and fissile material. The design agencies are responsible for designing safety into the nuclear explosive and processes involving the nuclear explosive. The methodology for ensuring safety consists of independent review processes that include the national laboratories, Operations Offices, Headquarters, and responsible Area Offices and operating contractors with expertise in nuclear explosive safety. A NES Study is an evaluation of the adequacy of positive measures to minimize the possibility of an inadvertent or deliberate unauthorized nuclear detonation, high explosive detonation or deflagration, fire, or fissile material dispersal from the pit. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Group (NESSG) evaluates nuclear explosive operations against the Nuclear Explosive Safety Standards specified in DOE O 452.2 using systematic evaluation techniques. These Safety Standards must be satisfied for nuclear explosive operations.

  16. Making big data, in theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Tom

    2013-01-01

    3.0 Unported License. Making big data, in theory by Tommethods for analyzing big data originate in mid-twentieth2012. “Critical questions for Big Data: Provocations for a

  17. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  18. Big Data Privacy Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    This paper is the first in a series on privacy in Big Data. As an outgrowth of a series of workshops on the topic, the Big Data Privacy Working Group undertook a study of a series of use scenarios to highlight the challenges ...

  19. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

  20. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1997-07-15

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

  1. Viscoelastic models for explosive binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Harstad, E.N.; Maudlin, P.J.; Gray, G.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Foster, J.C. Jr. [Wright Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1997-07-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can he idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. This paper is a continuation of previous work in modeling polyurethane at moderately high strain rates and for large deformations. Simulation of a large deformation (strains in excess of 100%) Taylor Anvil experiment revealed numerical difficulties which have been addressed. Additional experimental data have been obtained including improved resolution Taylor Anvil data, and stress relaxation data at various strain rates. A thorough evaluation of the candidate viscoelastic constitutive model is made and possible improvements discussed.

  2. Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Describes technique of explosively...

  3. Microcantilever detector for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, T.G.

    1999-06-29

    Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever. 2 figs.

  4. Explosion at Glyncorrwg Colliery, Glamorganshire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, T.A.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER EXPLOSION AT GLYNCORRWG COLLIERY, GLAMORGANSHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Glyncorrwg Colliery, Glamorganshire, on 13th January, ...

  5. Explosion at Cardowan Colliery Lanarkshire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, H. R.

    MINISTRY OF POWER EXPLOSION AT CARDOWAN COLLIERY LANARKSHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the explosion which occurred at Cardowan Colliery, Lanarkshire, on 25th July, 1960 BY H. R. HOUSTON, C.B.E ...

  6. Physically based simulation of explosions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Matthew Douglas

    2005-08-29

    This thesis describes a method for using physically based techniques to model an explosion and the resulting side effects. Explosions are some of the most visually exciting phenomena known to humankind and have become ...

  7. Explosion at Walton Colliery Yorkshire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, T. A.

    MINISTRY OF POWER EXPLOSION AT WALTON COLLIERY YORKSHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the explosion which occurred at Walton Colliery, Yorkshire, on 22nd April, 1959 by T. A. ROGERS, C.B.E. H.M. ...

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

  9. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06

    the dust for explosibility based on the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E 1226 to ensure proper regulation of facilities. Dusts found in cotton gins were tested to determine if they are explosible. Safety Consulting Engineers Inc. (SCE...

  10. Naked Singularity Explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiro Harada; Hideo Iguchi; Ken-ichi Nakao

    2000-03-09

    It is known that the gravitational collapse of a dust ball results in naked singularity formation from an initial density profile which is physically reasonable. In this paper, we show that explosive radiation is emitted during the formation process of the naked singularity.

  11. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides supplemental details on selected topics to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Cancels DOE M 452.2-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-1A.

  12. Big Questions: Missing Antimatter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    Einstein's equation E = mc2 is often said to mean that energy can be converted into matter. More accurately, energy can be converted to matter and antimatter. During the first moments of the Big Bang, the universe was smaller, hotter and energy was everywhere. As the universe expanded and cooled, the energy converted into matter and antimatter. According to our best understanding, these two substances should have been created in equal quantities. However when we look out into the cosmos we see only matter and no antimatter. The absence of antimatter is one of the Big Mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains the problem, although doesn't answer it. The answer, as in all Big Mysteries, is still unknown and one of the leading research topics of contemporary science.

  13. BIG: A ResourceBounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent \\Lambday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqin

    BIG: A Resource­Bounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent \\Lambday Victor Lesser an invaluable information resource but the explosion of available information has made web search a time of accessibility, reliability and associated costs present a complex information gathering coordination problem

  14. BIG: A Resource-Bounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    BIG: A Resource-Bounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent y Victor Lesser Bryan an invaluable information resource but the explosion of available information has made web search a time of accessibility, reliability and associated costs present a complex information gathering coordination problem

  15. BIG: A Resource-Bounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    BIG: A Resource-Bounded Information Gathering and Decision Support Agent ¡ Victor Lesser Bryan an invaluable information resource but the explosion of available information has made web search a time of accessibility, reliability and associated costs present a complex information gathering coordination problem

  16. Rutgers Workshop on Big Data: Theoretical Foundation of Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    Rutgers Workshop on Big Data: Theoretical Foundation of Big Data Department of Statistics:05pm: Welcome and Introduction of Big Data Research at Rutgers Regina Liu, Chair, Department, Carnegie Mellon University "On Data Parallelism and Model Parallelism for Large Scale Machine Learning" 4

  17. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    N. 2010. Big science and big data in biology: from theCONCEPTS AND QUESTIONS Big data and the future of ecologyof the information age and “big data” across all sectors of

  18. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith A. Olive

    1997-12-11

    The concordance of standard big bang nucleosynthesis theory and the related observations of the light element isotopes (including some new higher \\he4 abundances) will be reviewed. Implications of BBN on chemical evolution, dark matter and constraints on particle properties will be discussed.

  19. Semantic Interoperability for Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baclawski, Kenneth B.

    Semantic Interoperability for Big Data Ken Baclawski College of Computer and Information Science Northeastern University #12;August 11, 2014 2 Emergence of Big Data The phenomenon was studied in the early based on the information scarcity model. #12;August 11, 2014 3 Characteristics of Big Data Large

  20. MICROSOFT PRESENTS FROM BIG DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    1 MICROSOFT PRESENTS FROM BIG DATA TO SMART DATA: Using data to drive personalized brand January 22, 2014 ABSTRACT This white paper looks at Big Data from the marketing perspective, running DO WITH IT NEARLY EVERYONE IN MARKETING TODAY SHOULD BE FAMILIAR WITH THE CONCEPT OF BIG DATA

  1. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  2. Laser machining of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Myers, Booth R. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  3. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Hypernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayoshi Nakamura; Hideyuki Umeda; Koichi Iwamoto; Ken'ichi Nomoto; Masa-aki Hashimoto; W. Raphael Hix; Friedrich-Karl Thielemann

    2001-03-25

    We examine the characteristics of nucleosynthesis in 'hypernovae', i.e., supernovae with very large explosion energies ($ \\gsim 10^{52} $ ergs). We carry out detailed nucleosynthesis calculations for these energetic explosions and compare the yields with those of ordinary core-collapse supernovae. We find that both complete and incomplete Si-burning takes place over more extended, lower density regions, so that the alpha-rich freezeout is enhanced and produces more Ti in comparison with ordinary supernova nucleosynthesis. In addition, oxygen and carbon burning takes place in more extended, lower density regions than in ordinary supernovae. Therefore, the fuel elements O, C, Al are less abundant while a larger amount of Si, S, Ar, and Ca ("Si") are synthesized by oxygen burning; this leads to larger ratios of "Si"/O in the ejecta. Enhancement of the mass ratio between complete and incomplete Si-burning regions in the ejecta may explain the abundance ratios among iron-peak elements in metal-poor stars. Also the enhanced "Si"/O ratio may explain the abundance ratios observed in star burst galaxies. We also discuss other implications of enhanced [Ti/Fe] and [Fe/O] for Galactic chemical evolution and the abundances of low mass black hole binaries.

  4. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

  5. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  6. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  7. High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    research; and Development of environmentally focused processes such as molten salt oxidation of explosives for safe and clean disposal of explosive waste. Related Topics...

  8. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-05

    The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  9. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  10. Light metal explosives and propellants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.; Viecelli, James A.

    2005-04-05

    Disclosed herein are light metal explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants (LME&Ps) comprising a light metal component such as Li, B, Be or their hydrides or intermetallic compounds and alloys containing them and an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a non-explosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 .mu.m to 1000 .mu.m.

  11. Small Particles, Big Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3performed StevenSmall Particles, Big Impact

  12. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Escaping the Big Rip?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariam Bouhmadi-Lopez; Jose A. Jimenez Madrid

    2004-04-27

    We discuss dark energy models which might describe effectively the actual acceleration of the universe. More precisely, for a 4-dimensional Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe we consider two situations: First of them, we model dark energy by phantom energy described by a perfect fluid satisfying the equation of state $P=(\\beta-1)\\rho$ (with $\\beta<0$ and constant). In this case the universe reaches a ``Big Rip'' independently of the spatial geometry of the FLRW universe. In the second situation, the dark energy is described by a phantom (generalized) Chaplygin gas which violates the dominant energy condition. Contrary to the previous case, for this material content a FLRW universe would never reach a ``big rip'' singularity (indeed, the geometry is asymptotically de Sitter). We also show how this dark energy model can be described in terms of scalar fields, corresponding to a minimally coupled scalar field, a Born-Infeld scalar field and a generalized Born-Infeld scalar field. Finally, we introduce a phenomenologically viable model where dark energy is described by a phantom generalized Chaplygin gas.

  15. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Supersedes DOE O 452.1D.

  16. Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons National Security Science Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Debunking six big myths about nuclear weapons Are nuclear...

  17. Big Iron for Big Data: An Unnatural Alliance?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERTWaterSharingBeyondBang or BigBigBig

  18. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2009-10-16

    Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

  19. BIG DATA IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE Submitted to Provost Hexter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    BIG DATA IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE REPORT Submitted to Provost Hexter February 22, 2013 #12..................................................................................................................................... 5 1. Big Data, Big Challenges, Big Opportunities ......................................................................................... 5 2. UC Davis and Big Data: State of the Art and Current Needs

  20. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  1. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1994-01-04

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

  2. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

  3. Big Data-Driven Marketing: How Machine Learning Outperforms Marketers’ Gut-Feeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundsøy, Pål

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how big data can be experimentally used at large scale for marketing purposes at a mobile network operator. We present results from a large-scale experiment in a MNO in Asia where we use machine learning ...

  4. Physics: the big black box Mirror conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalieri, Renzo

    Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A look into the mirror (I) an overview of Mirror Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture Outline 1 Physics: the big black box 2 Math Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A slogan Mirror Symmetry is a correspondence

  5. Big Data Analytics in Financial Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Demographic and Weather Big Data · OfficeMax personalizes online landing pages based on customerBig Data Analytics in Financial Statement Audits Min Cao Roman Chychyla Trevor Stewart February 26th, 2015 #12;Big Data Analytics · Big Data analytics is the process of inspecting, cleaning

  6. The big picture Victoria University of Wellington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Outline Abstract Basics The big picture Victoria University of Wellington Te Whare W¯ananga o te Overview of modern cosmology #12;Outline Abstract Basics The big picture Outline: Abstract Basics The big picture Matt Visser Overview of modern cosmology #12;Outline Abstract Basics The big picture Abstract: VUW

  7. Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

  8. Making big data, in theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Tom

    2013-01-01

    for this work. Notes 1. Curran, 2012, pp. 34, 60. 2. Peng etin-big-data/, accessed 5 July 2013. James Curran, 2012. “Internet history,” In: James Curran, Natalie Fenton, and Des

  9. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyburt, Richard H; Olive, Keith A; Yeh, Tsung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) describes the production of the lightest nuclides via a dynamic interplay among the four fundamental forces during the first seconds of cosmic time. We briefly overview the essentials of this physics, and present new calculations of light element abundances through li6 and li7, with updated nuclear reactions and uncertainties including those in the neutron lifetime. We provide fits to these results as a function of baryon density and of the number of neutrino flavors, N_nu. We review recent developments in BBN, particularly new, precision Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements that now probe the baryon density, helium content, and the effective number of degrees of freedom, n_eff. These measurements allow for a tight test of BBN and of cosmology using CMB data alone. Our likelihood analysis convolves the 2015 Planck data chains with our BBN output and observational data. Adding astronomical measurements of light elements strengthens the power of BBN. We include a ...

  10. Explosion at Harrington No. 10 Colliery, Cumberland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felton, John

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER EXPLOSION AT HARRINGTON No. 10 COLLIERY, CUMBERLAND REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending the Explosion which occurred at the Harrington No. 10 Colliery, Lowca,Cumberland, on ...

  11. Explosion at Hapton Valley Colliery, Lancashire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, H. S.

    MINISTRY OF POWER EXPLOSION AT HAPTON VALLEY COLLIERY, LANCASHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Hapton Valley Colliery, Lancashire, on 22nd March, 1962 By H. S. ...

  12. Explosion at Ingham Colliery, Thornhill, Yorkshire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, A. M.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER EXPLOSION AT INGHAM COLLIERY, THORNHILL, YORKSHIRE REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending the Explosion which occurred at Ingham Colliery Thornhill, Yorkshire) on the 9th September, ...

  13. Prompt detonation of secondary explosives by laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Secondary high explosives have been promptly detonated by directing a laser beam of various wavelengths from 266 nanometers to 1.06 micron on the surface of the explosives. For this paper ''prompt'' means the excess transit time through an explosive charge is /approximately/250 nanoseconds (or less) less than the accepted full detonation velocity time. Timing between laser pulse, explosive initiation and detonation velocity and function time have been recorded. The laser parameters studied include: wavelength, pulse length, energy and power density, and beam diameter (spot size). Explosives evaluated include: PETN, HNS, HMX, and graphited PETN, HNS, and HMX. Explosive parameters that have been correlated with optical parameters include: density, surface area, critical diameter (spot size), spectral characteristics and enhance absorption. Some explosives have been promptly detonated over the entire range of wavelengths, possibly by two competing initiating mechanisms. Other explosives could not be detonated at any of the wavelengths or power densities tested. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  15. Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-11-12

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

  16. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  17. Removing High Explosives from Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

  18. Safety of Nuclear Explosive Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-07

    This directive establishes responsibilities and requirements to ensure the safety of routine and planned nuclear explosive operations and associated activities and facilities. Cancels DOE O 452.2A and DOE G 452.2A-1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.2C.

  19. Explosives: The Ammonium Nitrate in Oil Exemption Order, 1958 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnew, W.G.

    1958-01-01

    Under section 50 of the Explosives Act, 1875, certain explosives there named and any other explosives prescribed by Order in Council (or the purpose are exempted from certain provisions of the Act requiring that explosives ...

  20. ANALYSIS OF MINING EXPLOSION PERFORMANCE WITH MULTIPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    ANALYSIS OF MINING EXPLOSION PERFORMANCE WITH MULTIPLE SENSOR DATA AND PHYSICAL MODELS Brian W Martin Thunder Basin Coal Company Wright, Wyoming #12;Analysis of Mining Explosion Performance 2 1 to Different Types of Mining Explosions · Single Shot · Cast Blast · Coal Fragmentation #12;Analysis of Mining

  1. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  2. A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility KeshengUniversity of California. A Big Data Approach to Analyzingefforts to handle the big data problem. However, the

  3. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  4. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  5. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Matthew J. Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.; Muller, Elmar

    2014-10-06

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  6. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-06-21

    Because calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae have become a major tool to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe and also its geometrical structure, considerable attention has been given to models of these events over the past couple of years. There are good reasons to believe that perhaps most Type Ia supernovae are the explosions of white dwarfs that have approached the Chandrasekhar mass, M_ch ~ 1.39 M_sun, and are disrupted by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen. However, the mechanism whereby such accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs explode continues to be uncertain. Recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae as well as several of the still open questions are addressed in this review. Although the main emphasis will be on studies of the explosion mechanism itself and on the related physical processes, including the physics of turbulent nuclear combustion in degenerate stars, we also discuss observational constraints.

  7. Explosives detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-11

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  8. Stellar explosions, instabilities, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Muthsam, H. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-04-15

    It has become very clear that the evolution of structure during supernovae is centrally dependent on the pre-existing structure in the star. Modeling of the pre-existing structure has advanced significantly, leading to improved understanding and to a physically based assessment of the structure that will be present when a star explodes. It remains an open question whether low-mode asymmetries in the explosion process can produce the observed effects or whether the explosion mechanism somehow produces jets of material. In any event, the workhorse processes that produce structure in an exploding star are blast-wave driven instabilities. Laboratory experiments have explored these blast-wave-driven instabilities and specifically their dependence on initial conditions. Theoretical work has shown that the relative importance of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities varies with the initial conditions and does so in ways that can make sense of a range of astrophysical observations.

  9. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise between optimizing the combustion performance and keeping the number of elementary charges low. Further tests in a barometric bomb calorimeter of 21.2 l volume were performed with four types of aluminum. The mass fraction burned in this case appeared to depend on the morphology of the aluminum particles. Flake aluminum exhibited a better performance than granulated aluminum with particle sizes ranging from below 25 {micro}m to 125 {micro}m for the coarsest material. In addition, a feasibility study on electro-magnetic effects from SDF charges detonated in a tunnel has been performed. A method was developed to measure the local, unsteady electro-conductivity in the detonation/combustion products cloud. This method proved to yield reproducible results. A variety of methods were tested with regard to probing electro-magnetic pulses from the detonation of SDF charges. The results showed little reproducibility and were small compared to the effect from pulsed high voltage discharges of comparatively small energy (around 32 J). Thus either no significant electromagnetic pulse is generated in our small-scale tests or the tested techniques have to be discarded as too insensitive or too limited in bandwidth to detect possibly very high frequency electro-magnetic disturbances.

  10. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-03-12

    We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T < 3,000 K and p < 1k-bar. This model is used to derive a Fundamental Equation u(v,s) for C-4. Given u(v,s), one can use Maxwell's Relations to derive all other thermodynamic functions, such as temperature: T(v,s), pressure: p(v,s), enthalpy: h(v,s), Gibbs free energy: g(v,s) and Helmholz free energy: f(v,s); these loci are displayed in figures for C-4. Such complete equations of state are needed for numerical simulations of blast waves from explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.

  11. Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

  12. THE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    THE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH" LINKS FISHERY MANAGEMENT AND BIODIVERSITY Anthony economy and coastal communities. Accordingly, there is a need to move toward a "big picture" perspective

  13. Big Things from Small Beginnings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation given by D. Bullen on behalf of Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D., Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board; prepared by D. Bullen, D. Owen, J. MacSleyne, and D. Minnema. Big Things from Small Beginnings. How seemingly unimportant situations can lead to significant, undesirable events.

  14. Neutrinos and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2002-03-18

    The role of neutrinos in big bang nucleosynthesis is discussed. The bounds on the number of neutrino families, neutrino degeneracy, parameters of neutrino oscillations are presented. A model of chemically inhomogeneous, while energetically smooth, universe created by inhomogeneous cosmological neutrino asymmetry is described. Nucleosynthesis limits on production of right-handed neutrinos are considered.

  15. Big Data in Technology Services Mathew Benwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    Big Data in Technology Services #12;Presenter Mathew Benwell Security Specialist Click here to watch online video University of Adelaide 2 #12;What is Big Data ­ 3 V's University of Adelaide 3 #12;Our Big Data Platform ­ Splunk> · The most asked question! Where did the name Splunk come from

  16. Rolling the Dice on Big Data Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ipsen, Ilse

    Rolling the Dice on Big Data Ilse Ipsen Department of Mathematics #12;The Economist, 27 February on Big Data What is "Big"? #12;Measuring Units 1 byte 1 character 10 bytes 1 word 100 bytes 1 sentence #12;Rolling the Dice on Big Data Data #12;Rolling the Dice on Big Data #12;Rolling the Dice on Big

  17. Theoretical and computer models of detonation in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C.M.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding energy transfer and chemical kinetics have led to improved models of detonation waves in solid explosives. The Nonequilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) model is supported by picosecond laser experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of the multiphonon up-pumping and internal vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) processes by which the unreacted explosive molecules are excited to the transition state(s) preceding reaction behind the leading shock front(s). High temperature, high density transition state theory calculates the induction times measured by laser interferometric techniques. Exothermic chain reactions form product gases in highly excited vibrational states, which have been demonstrated to rapidly equilibrate via supercollisions. Embedded gauge and Fabry-Perot techniques measure the rates of reaction product expansion as thermal and chemical equilibrium is approached. Detonation reaction zone lengths in carbon-rich condensed phase explosives depend on the relatively slow formation of solid graphite or diamond. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model based on pressure dependent reaction rates and Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state has reproduced this nanosecond time resolved experimental data and thus has yielded accurate average reaction zone descriptions in one-, two- and three- dimensional hydrodynamic code calculations. The next generation reactive flow model requires improved equations of state and temperature dependent chemical kinetics. Such a model is being developed for the ALE3D hydrodynamic code, in which heat transfer and Arrhenius kinetics are intimately linked to the hydrodynamics.

  18. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  19. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  20. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  1. Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 3. Origins

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. If the LHC is successful, it will explain the nature of the Universe around us in terms of a few simple ingredients and a few simple rules. But the Universe now was forged in a Big Bang where conditions were very different, and the rules were very different, and those early moments were crucial to determining how things turned out later. At the LHC they can recreate conditions as they were billionths of a second after the Big Bang, before atoms and nuclei existed. They can find out why matter and antimatter didn't mutually annihilate each other to leave behind a Universe of pure, brilliant light. And they can look into the very structure of space and time - the fabric of the Universe

  2. Explosion at Easington Colliery County Durham 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, H. C. W.

    Report On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the explosion which occurred at Easington Colliery, County Durham, on the 29th May, 1951.

  3. Method and apparatus for detecting explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, David Steven (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

  4. Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-27

    A Nuclear Explosive Safety Study (NESS) is performed on all DOE Nuclear Explosive Operations (NEOs) in accordance with DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program; DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety; and DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes.

  5. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  6. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  7. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  8. NEW - DOE O 452.2E, Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  9. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-05-09

    A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  10. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  11. Ignition dynamics of high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Sander, R.K.; Asay, B.W.; Brewster, M.Q.

    1999-04-01

    The laser ignition of the explosives HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine, C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8}), {delta}-phase HMX, PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% Estane, 2.5% BDNPA/BDNPF), TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and aged PBX 9502 has been conducted with the intent to compare the relative sensitivities of those explosives and to investigate the effect of beam profile, binder addition, and porosity. It has been found that there was little difference between a gaussian beam and a top hat profile on the laser ignition of HMX. The authors observe that the addition of binder in the amounts present in PBX 9501 resulted in longer ignition delays than that of HMX. In contrast to HMX, the addition of binder to TATB in PBX 9502 shows no measurable effect. Porosity effects were considered by comparing the ignition of granular HMX and pressed HMX pellets. Porosity appears to increase ignition delay due to an increased effective absorption scale and increased convective heat loss. This porosity effect also resulted in longer ignition delays for {delta}-phase HMX than for {beta}-phase HMX. In order to simulate ignition in voids or cracks, the standard ignition experiment was modified to include a NaCl window placed at variable distances above the sample surface. When ignition experiments were performed at 29 W/cm{sup 2} and 38 W/cm{sup 2} a critical gap distance was observed of 6 {+-} 0.4 mm below which ignition was severely inhibited. This result underscores the importance of gas phase processes in ignition and illustrates that conditions can exist where simple ignition criteria such as surface temperature is inadequate.

  12. EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas...

  13. Chemical analysis kit for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes; Peter J. (Danville, CA); Alcaraz, Armando (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-05-10

    A tester for testing for explosives associated with a test location comprising a first explosives detecting reagent; a first reagent holder, the first reagent holder containing the first explosives detecting reagent; a second explosives detecting reagent; a second reagent holder, the second reagent holder containing the second explosives detecting reagent; a sample collection unit for exposure to the test location, exposure to the first explosives detecting reagent, and exposure to the second explosives detecting reagent; and a body unit containing a heater for heating the sample collection unit for testing the test location for the explosives.

  14. EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo,...

  15. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

    2009-06-03

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  16. Traffic information computing platform for big data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Zongtao Li, Ying Zheng, Xibin Liu, Yan Dai, Jiting Kang, Jun

    2014-10-06

    Big data environment create data conditions for improving the quality of traffic information service. The target of this article is to construct a traffic information computing platform for big data environment. Through in-depth analysis the connotation and technology characteristics of big data and traffic information service, a distributed traffic atomic information computing platform architecture is proposed. Under the big data environment, this type of traffic atomic information computing architecture helps to guarantee the traffic safety and efficient operation, more intelligent and personalized traffic information service can be used for the traffic information users.

  17. 3/12/2015 1 Big Data in Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3/12/2015 1 Big Data in Accounting: An Overview #12;2 The Meaning of Big Data · Differs across of Storage · Processing #12;3 Accounting and Big Data · Big Data has the potential to cause a paradigm shift the current structured data stores of ERPs. #12;Non-traditional Big Data · Addition of new types of data

  18. Transforming big data into knowledge : experimental techniques in dynamic visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Stephen James, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Information visualizations, especially those utilizing web-based platforms, are becoming an increasingly common medium for exchanging ideas. This emergent class of tools enabling web-based, interactive platforms for ...

  19. Big Efficieny for Small Manufacturing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.

    2014-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-14-05-10.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6203 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-14-05-10.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Big Efficiency for Small... and corporate memberships • Research and technical assistance • Data on real world experiences, best practices • Policies advancing market transformation/market development • Education and Advocacy • Conferences, publications • National, state and local ESL...

  20. Big bang nucleosynthesis: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-07-23

    An update on the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is presented. With the value of the baryon-tophoton ratio determined to high precision by WMAP, standard BBN is a parameter-free theory. In this context, the theoretical prediction for the abundances of D, {sup 4}He, and {sup 7}Li is discussed and compared to their observational determination. While concordance for D and {sup 4}He is satisfactory, the prediction for {sup 7}Li exceeds the observational determination by a factor of about four. Possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  1. Big Data Hits the Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium and ChronicBestBeyond theBid-ListBig Data

  2. Big Sol - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium and ChronicBestBeyond theBid-ListBig

  3. Yushu Yao Big Data @ NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single|YejunOpportunityYue Lu Yue LuYao Big

  4. Astrophysical S-factor for destructive reactions of lithium-7 in big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Kwon, YoungKwan; Moon, JunYoung; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang-Bum [Hoseo University, Asan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ozawa, Akira; Sasa, Kimikazu; Onishi, Takahiro; Yuasa, Toshiaki; Okada, Shunsuke; Saito, Yuta [Division of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayakawa, Takehito; Shizuma, Toshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kubono, Shigeru [RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Kusakabe, Motohiko [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    One of the most prominent success with the Big Bang models is the precise reproduction of mass abundance ratio for {sup 4}He. In spite of the success, abundances of lithium isotopes are still inconsistent between observations and their calculated results, which is known as lithium abundance problem. Since the calculations were based on the experimental reaction data together with theoretical estimations, more precise experimental measurements may improve the knowledge of the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. As one of the destruction process of lithium-7, we have performed measurements for the reaction cross sections of the {sup 7}L({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction.

  5. Big Data Big Talent The Master's in Business Analytics program starting Spring 2015 is designed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Business Analytics Big Data Big Talent The Master's in Business Analytics program starting Spring Intelligence Web and Social Analytics Big Data Analytics Python for Data Analytics Forecasting Applied 2015 is designed to create an empowered workforce that understands how data - regardless of size

  6. Report on the Night of the Big Wind The Big Wind of 1839 was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the Night of the Big Wind The Big Wind of 1839 was Ireland's worst natural disaster. It brought hurricane force winds very rare in such a temperate climate during the night of 6th - 7th January a coincidence. The day before the `Night of the Big Wind' was Little Christmas, the day when the date Christmas

  7. Tools for Extracting Actionable Medical Knowledge from Genomic Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Theodore Charles

    2013-01-01

    KNOWLEDGE FROM GENOMIC BIG DATA A dissertation submitted inKNOWLEDGE FROM GENOMIC BIG DATA By Theodore C. Goldsteinby the quantities of big data from these assays and cannot

  8. Producing a computer generated explosive effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Wei

    1999-01-01

    is conducted in order to produce a convincing explosive effect with a computer. A description of the current state of the art provides current achievements by industry and individual artists. A tutorial focusing on modeling, lighting, and setting up animation...

  9. Explosion at Blaenhirwaun Colliery, Carmarthenshire Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, T.A.

    1957-01-01

    In accordance with the instructions given by your predecessor under the terms of Section 82 of the Coal Mines Act. 1911, I beg to submit my report on the causes of, and circumstances attending, the explosion which occurred ...

  10. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-01-17

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

  11. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-06

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

  12. CRAD, NNSA- Nuclear Explosive Safety (NES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRAD for Nuclear Explosive Safety (NES). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  13. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-20

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D

  14. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D Admin Chg 1.

  15. Explosive Safety Manual, to a New Order

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-02

    This memorandum provides justification for the conversion of Department of Energy (DOE) Manual (M) 440.1-1A, DOE Explosives Safety Manual, dated 1-9-06, into a new DOE Order.

  16. Reliability Meets Big Data: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Reliability Meets Big Data: Opportunities and Challenges William Q. Meeker Department of Statistics maintenance operations. 1.2 Examples of systems providing big data Some examples of particular systems 1, 2013 Abstract Reliability field data such as that obtained from warranty claims and maintenance

  17. GREEN IT STRATEGY WHITE PAPER BIG DATA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    GREEN IT STRATEGY WHITE PAPER BIG DATA. BIG ENERGY. #12;GREEN:ons in MassachuseUs. In one day, Odyssey's cloud compu:ng power can process the same amount of 250 more kilowaUs annually. HARVARD'S GREEN IT COMMITMENT Achieve University

  18. The big picture Victoria University of Wellington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Abstract Basics The big picture Victoria University of Wellington Te Whare W¯ananga o te ¯Upoko o picture Abstract: VUW Modern cosmology is an interesting mixture -- some aspects of cosmology are now... #12;Abstract Basics The big picture Basics: Some parts of cosmology are rock solid: Yes, the universe

  19. Deep Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Excitation Enables Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX), the chemically related nitroamine explosive HMX

  20. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Ganesh

    1991-01-01

    AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Approved as to style and content by: M. T. 1 e (Chair of Committee) R. W. Flumerfelt (Member) F. M, By (Membe C. R. Engler (Member...

  1. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  2. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  3. In Defense of the National Labs and Big-Budget Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, J R

    2008-07-29

    The purpose of this paper is to present the unofficial and unsanctioned opinions of a Visiting Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the values of LLNL and the other National Labs. The basic founding value and goal of the National Labs is big-budget scientific research, along with smaller-budget scientific research that cannot easily be done elsewhere. The most important example in the latter category is classified defense-related research. The historical guiding light here is the Manhattan Project. This endeavor was unique in human history, and might remain so. The scientific expertise and wealth of an entire nation was tapped in a project that was huge beyond reckoning, with no advance guarantee of success. It was in many respects a clash of scientific titans, with a large supporting cast, collaborating toward a single well-defined goal. Never had scientists received so much respect, so much money, and so much intellectual freedom to pursue scientific progress. And never was the gap between theory and implementation so rapidly narrowed, with results that changed the world, completely. Enormous resources are spent at the national or international level on large-scale scientific projects. LLNL has the most powerful computer in the world, Blue Gene/L. (Oops, Los Alamos just seized the title with Roadrunner; such titles regularly change hands.) LLNL also has the largest laser in the world, the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has the most powerful microscope in the world. Not only is it beyond the resources of most large corporations to make such expenditures, but the risk exceeds the possible rewards for those corporations that could. Nor can most small countries afford to finance large scientific projects, and not even the richest can afford largess, especially if Congress is under major budget pressure. Some big-budget research efforts are funded by international consortiums, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, a magnetic-confinement fusion research project. The postWWII histories of particle and fusion physics contain remarkable examples of both international competition, with an emphasis on secrecy, and international cooperation, with an emphasis on shared knowledge and resources. Initiatives to share sometimes came from surprising directions. Most large-scale scientific projects have potential defense applications. NIF certainly does; it is primarily designed to create small-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L operates in part in service to NIF, and in part to various defense projects. The most important defense projects include stewardship of the national nuclear weapons stockpile, and the proposed redesign and replacement of those weapons with fewer, safer, more reliable, longer-lived, and less apocalyptic warheads. Many well-meaning people will consider the optimal lifetime of a nuclear weapon to be zero, but most thoughtful people, when asked how much longer they think this nation will require them, will ask for some time to think. NIF is also designed to create exothermic small-scale fusion explosions. The malapropos 'exothermic' here is a convenience to cover a profusion of complexities, but the basic idea is that the explosions will create more recoverable energy than was used to create them. One can hope that the primary future benefits of success for NIF will be in cost-effective generation of electrical power through controlled small-scale fusion reactions, rather than in improved large-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L also services climate research, genomic research, materials research, and a myriad of other computational problems that become more feasible, reliable, and precise the larger the number of computational nodes employed. Blue Gene/L has to be sited within a security complex for obvious reasons, but its value extends to the nation and the world. There is a duality here between large-scale scientific research machines and the supercomputers used

  4. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis We study...

  5. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-28

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  6. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-03

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  7. Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian; Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong; Li, Xingwen

    2014-10-15

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

  8. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr.; Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  9. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF SEISMIC AND INFRASOUND SIGNALS FROM MINING EXPLOSIONS a) Explosion Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    are illustrated below. Type 1 - Coal overburden casting (Black Thunder) where explosions are designed to expose coal. Type 2 - Rock fragmentation for copper recovery (Morenci) where explosions are designed to break Carlsbad Seismic ~ 20 km #1 #2 #3 infrasound infrasound infrasound seismic UNUSUAL EVENTS TYPES OF MINING

  10. Report on the treatability study for inerting small quantities of radioactive explosives and explosive components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyola, V.M.; Reber, S.D.

    1996-02-01

    As a result of Sandia`s radiation hardening testing on a variety of its explosive components, radioactive waste streams were generated and have to be disposed of as radioactive waste. Due to the combined hazards of explosives and radioactivity, Sandia`s Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management organization did not have a mechanism for disposal of these waste streams. This report documents the study done to provide a method for the removal of the explosive hazard from those waste streams. The report includes the design of the equipment used, procedures followed, results from waste stream analog tests and the results from the actual explosive inerting tests on radioactive samples. As a result of the inerting treatment, the waste streams were rendered non-explosive and, thus, manageable through normal radioactive waste disposal channels.

  11. Prediction of explosive cylinder tests using equations of state from the PANDA code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerley, G.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Christian-Frear, T.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-28

    The PANDA code is used to construct tabular equations of state (EOS) for the detonation products of 24 explosives having CHNO compositions. These EOS, together with a reactive burn model, are used in numerical hydrocode calculations of cylinder tests. The predicted detonation properties and cylinder wall velocities are found to give very good agreement with experimental data. Calculations of flat plate acceleration tests for the HMX-based explosive LX14 are also made and shown to agree well with the measurements. The effects of the reaction zone on both the cylinder and flat plate tests are discussed. For TATB-based explosives, the differences between experiment and theory are consistently larger than for other compositions and may be due to nonideal (finite dimameter) behavior.

  12. Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

  13. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  14. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  15. Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferranti, L; Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J; Vandersall, K S

    2010-03-25

    The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity of fragmentation resulting from high velocity impact events. These parameters are necessary for developing and validating physically based material constitutive models that will characterize the safety and performance of energetic materials. The preliminary study uses a reverse Taylor impact configuration that was designed to measure the dynamic behavior of the explosive mock up to and including associated fragmentation. A stationary rod-shaped specimen was impacted using a compressed-gas gun by accelerating a rigid steel anvil attached to a sabot. The impact test employed high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry diagnostics for capturing the transient deformation of the sample at discrete times. Once established as a viable experimental technique with mock explosives, future studies will examine the dynamic response of insensitive high explosives and propellants.

  16. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  17. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  18. Big Data ja vakuutustoiminta Oulun yliopisto 28.1.2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemelä, Jussi

    Big Data ja vakuutustoiminta Oulun yliopisto 28.1.2014 Lasse Koskinen Model IT & Aalto University; Finland 1 #12;Agenda · Model IT · The age of Big Data · Not generally accepted definition · Important #12;Big Data Creates Value · The use of big data offers tremendous potential for creating value · Mc

  19. Big Data Applications in Cloud and Cyber Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    Big Data Applications in Cloud and Cyber Security Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Endowed Professor UTSA COB Symposium on Big Data, Big Challenges March 17, 2015 ravi.sandhu@utsa.edu www Security 1 #12;© Ravi Sandhu 2 World-Leading Research with Real-World Impact! Big Data Volume Variety

  20. The SIKS/BiGGrid Big Data Tutorial Djoerd Hiemstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    The SIKS/BiGGrid Big Data Tutorial Djoerd Hiemstra U. Twente, The Netherlands d BiG Grid organized a new two- day tutorial on Big Data at the University of Twente on 30 November terabytes of data on large clusters, and discusses several core computer science top- ics adapted for big

  1. Statistical Inference, Learning and Models for Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Keith

    Statistical Inference, Learning and Models for Big Data Steering Committee Yoshua Bengio Hugh: Strategies and Principles Feb 23 - 27 · Big Data in Health Policy Mar 23 - 27 · Big Data for Social Policy Jordan, UC Berkeley, April 7, 8 and 9 · Andrew Lo, MIT March 25 ­ law, finance and big data · Graduate

  2. Big Data As Complementary Audit Kyunghee Yoon, Rutgers Business School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Data As Complementary Audit Evidence Kyunghee Yoon, Rutgers Business School Lucas Hoogduin variety of information - High litigation risks - Advanced technologies · Big data and big data analytics (SAS No. 106) #12;Sufficiency consideration 1. Relevant external big data could be a complement

  3. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  4. R-process Nucleosynthesis in Supernova Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saruwatari, M.; Hashimoto, M. [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kotake, K. [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yamada, S. [Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjyuku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-28

    We investigate the possibility of the r-process during the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) explosion of supernova in a massive star of 13 M{sub {center_dot}} with the effects of neutrinos included. Contrary to the case of the spherical explosion, jet-like explosion due to the combined effects of rotation and magnetic field lowers the electron fraction significantly inside the layers. We find that the ejected material of low electron fraction responsible for the r-process comes out from the inner deep region of the core that is made up of iron-group nuclei. This leads to the production of the second to third peak in the solar r-process elements. We suggest that there are some variations in the r-process nucleosynthesis according to the initial conditions of rotational and magnetic fields.

  5. THE BIGGEST EXPLOSIONS IN THE UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jarrett L.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Group (T-2), Thermonuclear Applications Physics Group (XTD-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [Computational Physics and Methods Group (CCS-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alex [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Chen, Ke-Jung, E-mail: jlj@lanl.gov [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Supermassive primordial stars are expected to form in a small fraction of massive protogalaxies in the early universe, and are generally conceived of as the progenitors of the seeds of supermassive black holes (BHs). Supermassive stars with masses of ?55, 000 M{sub ?}, however, have been found to explode and completely disrupt in a supernova (SN) with an energy of up to ?10{sup 55} erg instead of collapsing to a BH. Such events, ?10, 000 times more energetic than typical SNe today, would be among the biggest explosions in the history of the universe. Here we present a simulation of such a SN in two stages. Using the RAGE radiation hydrodynamics code, we first evolve the explosion from an early stage through the breakout of the shock from the surface of the star until the blast wave has propagated out to several parsecs from the explosion site, which lies deep within an atomic cooling dark matter (DM) halo at z ? 15. Then, using the GADGET cosmological hydrodynamics code, we evolve the explosion out to several kiloparsecs from the explosion site, far into the low-density intergalactic medium. The host DM halo, with a total mass of 4 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}, much more massive than typical primordial star-forming halos, is completely evacuated of high-density gas after ?< 10 Myr, although dense metal-enriched gas recollapses into the halo, where it will likely form second-generation stars with metallicities of ? 0.05 Z{sub ?} after ?> 70 Myr. The chemical signature of supermassive star explosions may be found in such long-lived second-generation stars today.

  6. Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

    2011-03-27

    Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

  7. Astronomical Surveys and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickaelian, A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from Gamma-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in Gamma-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics play a...

  8. Quality of Big Data in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Ramachandran, Natarajan; Ferrell, Regina Kay

    2015-01-01

    The current trend in Big Data Analytics and in particular Health information technology is towards building sophisticated models, methods and tools for business, operational and clinical intelligence, but the critical issue of data quality required for these models is not getting the attention it deserves. The objective of the paper is to highlight the issues of data quality in the context of Big Data Healthcare Analytics.

  9. Evaluation of ferrocyanide/nitrate explosive hazard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cady, H.H.

    1992-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory agreed to assist Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the Ferrocyanide Safety Evaluation Program by helping to evaluate the explosive hazard of several mixtures of simulated ferrocyanide waste-tank sludge containing sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This report is an evaluation of the small-scale safety tests used to assess the safety of these materials from an explosive point of view. These tests show that these materials are not initiated by mechanical insult, and they require an external heat source before any exothermic chemical reaction can be observed.

  10. Using fly ash to mitigate explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taulbee, D.

    2008-07-01

    In 2005 the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research was given funding to evaluate the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) to reduce the explosive potential of ammonium nitrate (AN) fertilizers. Fly ash C (FAC), fly ash F (FAF) and flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) were evaluated. It was found that applying a CCB coating to the AN particles at concentrations of 5 wt% or greater prevented the AN explosion from propagating. The article reports on results so far and outlines further work to be done. 6 figs.

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  12. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  13. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  14. Detection of Explosives via Photolytic Cleavage of Nitroesters and Nitramines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    The nitramine-containing explosive RDX and the nitroester-containing explosive PETN are shown to be susceptible to photofragmentation upon exposure to sunlight. Model compounds containing nitroester and nitramine moieties ...

  15. Explosion at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, Durham 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, R.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER - EXPLOSION AT LOUISA (including MORRISON OLD) COLLIERY, DURHAM REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, ...

  16. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 0: General introduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1971-01-01

    This Recommendation has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres; It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas ...

  17. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  18. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  19. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  20. Presented by Toward the Explosion Mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -supernova StructurePre-supernova Structure Orbit of Earth around Sun Core Collapse and Explosion representative.S. Department of Energy Mezzacappa_Astro_SC10 Simulation Building Blocks "RbR-Plus" MGFLD Neutrino TransportV (nuclear compressibility), 29.3 MeV (

  1. Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-02-28

    An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

  2. Glass ceramics for explosive device headers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, C. P.; Eagan, R. J.; Kjeldgaard, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    The desired features of a header for our advanced explosive devices include small size; 700 Mpa static burst strength; corrosion resistant alloys for electrodes, bridgewire, and housing; integral charge holder; high thermal conductivity (approaching that of alumina ceramic); no braze around the electrodes; design flexibility and quick turnaround time for fabrication of development prototypes; and low cost.

  3. New Dark Matter Detector using Nanoscale Explosives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Tarle, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We present nanoscale explosives as a novel type of dark matter detector and study the ignition properties. When a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle WIMP from the Galactic Halo elastically scatters off of a nucleus in the detector, the small amount of energy deposited can trigger an explosion. For specificity, this paper focuses on a type of two-component explosive known as a nanothermite, consisting of a metal and an oxide in close proximity. When the two components interact they undergo a rapid exothermic reaction --- an explosion. As a specific example, we consider metal nanoparticles of 5 nm radius embedded in an oxide. One cell contains more than a few million nanoparticles, and a large number of cells adds up to a total of 1 kg detector mass. A WIMP interacts with a metal nucleus of the nanoparticles, depositing enough energy to initiate a reaction at the interface between the two layers. When one nanoparticle explodes it initiates a chain reaction throughout the cell. A number of possible thermite mat...

  4. NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Thomas

    NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS Thomas Rauscher 1 , Friedrich. of Astron. and Astroph., Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract The majority of nuclear­Feshbach). The global parametrizations of the nuclear properties needed for predictions far off stability probe our

  5. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

  6. Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Simpson, Randall L.

    2014-07-01

    A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

  7. Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Pagoria, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-09-27

    A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

  8. 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions October 25, 2013 During the Cold War, U) have partnered to develop a 3-D model of the Earth's mantle and crust called SALSA3D (Sandia-Los Alamos of explosions. Significance of the research After an explosion, the energy travels through the Earth as waves

  9. SUPERNOVA NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AS A TOOL TO ANALYZE THE EXPLOSION MECHANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Thomas

    SUPERNOVA NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AS A TOOL TO ANALYZE THE EXPLOSION MECHANISM F.­K. Thielemann 1;4 , F for the explosion and ejection of matter. This affects the nucleosynthesis products via two main uncertainties, (i energy responsible for explosive nucleosynthesis. Thus, observations can constrain these quantities. Type

  10. Testing Vpin on Big Data Response to Reflecting on the Vpin Dispute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Wu,  K. ,  et  al.   A  Big  Data  Approach  to  Analyzing  Testing VPIN on Big Data -- Response to “Reflecting on theTesting  VPIN  on  Big  Data    –  Response  to  “

  11. Solution Path Clustering with Minimax Concave Penalty and Its Applications to Noisy Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Yuliya

    2014-01-01

    Path Clustering of Noisy Big Data . . . . . . . . . . . .Y. Wah, and T. Herawan. “Big Data Clustering: A Review. ” InPath Clustering of Noisy Big Data Introduction In this

  12. Big Data Analaysis and Visualization: What Do LINACS and Tropical Storms Have In Common?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethel, E. Wes

    2013-01-01

    Big Data Analaysis and Visualization: What Do LINACS andof California. BIG DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION: WHAT DOproblems. INTRODUCTION Big data and its attendant

  13. Intra- and interspecific responses to Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) social calls.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Britzke, Eric, R.

    2010-07-01

    Bats respond to the calls of conspecifics as well as to calls of other species; however, few studies have attempted to quantify these responses or understand the functions of these calls. We tested the response of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) to social calls as a possible method to increase capture success and to understand the function of social calls. We also tested if calls of bats within the range of the previously designated subspecies differed, if the responses of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats varied with geographic origin of the calls, and if other species responded to the calls of C. rafinesquii. We recorded calls of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats at two colony roost sites in South Carolina, USA. Calls were recorded while bats were in the roosts and as they exited. Playback sequences for each site were created by copying typical pulses into the playback file. Two mist nets were placed approximately 50–500 m from known roost sites; the net with the playback equipment served as the Experimental net and the one without the equipment served as the Control net. Call structures differed significantly between the Mountain and Coastal Plains populations with calls from the Mountains being of higher frequency and longer duration. Ten of 11 Rafinesque’s big-eared bats were caught in the Control nets and, 13 of 19 bats of other species were captured at Experimental nets even though overall bat activity did not differ significantly between Control and Experimental nets. Our results suggest that Rafinesque’s big-eared bats are not attracted to conspecifics’ calls and that these calls may act as an intraspecific spacing mechanism during foraging.

  14. Big Brothers needed in Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERTWaterSharingBeyondBang or BigBig

  15. Systematic approach to verification and validation: High explosive burn models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, Christina A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-16

    Most material models used in numerical simulations are based on heuristics and empirically calibrated to experimental data. For a specific model, key questions are determining its domain of applicability and assessing its relative merits compared to other models. Answering these questions should be a part of model verification and validation (V and V). Here, we focus on V and V of high explosive models. Typically, model developers implemented their model in their own hydro code and use different sets of experiments to calibrate model parameters. Rarely can one find in the literature simulation results for different models of the same experiment. Consequently, it is difficult to assess objectively the relative merits of different models. This situation results in part from the fact that experimental data is scattered through the literature (articles in journals and conference proceedings) and that the printed literature does not allow the reader to obtain data from a figure in electronic form needed to make detailed comparisons among experiments and simulations. In addition, it is very time consuming to set up and run simulations to compare different models over sufficiently many experiments to cover the range of phenomena of interest. The first difficulty could be overcome if the research community were to support an online web based database. The second difficulty can be greatly reduced by automating procedures to set up and run simulations of similar types of experiments. Moreover, automated testing would be greatly facilitated if the data files obtained from a database were in a standard format that contained key experimental parameters as meta-data in a header to the data file. To illustrate our approach to V and V, we have developed a high explosive database (HED) at LANL. It now contains a large number of shock initiation experiments. Utilizing the header information in a data file from HED, we have written scripts to generate an input file for a hydro code, run a simulation, and generate a comparison plot showing simulated and experimental velocity gauge data. These scripts are then applied to several series of experiments and to several HE burn models. The same systematic approach is applicable to other types of material models; for example, equations of state models and material strength models.

  16. Method and system for detecting explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-03-10

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  17. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  18. DOE explosives safety manual. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This manual prescribes the Department of Energy (DOE) safety rules used to implement the DOE safety policy for operations involving explosives. This manual is applicable to all DOE facilities engaged in operations of development, manufacturing, handling, storage, transportation, processing, or testing of explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, or assemblies containing these materials. The standards of this manual deal with the operations involving explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, and the safe management of such operations. The design of all new explosives facilities shall conform to the requirements established in this manual and implemented in DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria Manual.`` It is not intended that existing physical facilities be changed arbitrarily to comply with these provisions, except as required by law. Existing facilities that do not comply with these standards may continue to be used for the balance of their functional life, as long as the current operation presents no significantly greater risk than that assumed when the facility was originally designed and it can be demonstrated clearly that a modification to bring the facility into compliance is not feasible. However, in the case of a major renovation, the facility must be brought into compliance with current standards. The standards are presented as either mandatory or advisory. Mandatory standards, denoted by the words ``shall,`` ``must,`` or ``will,`` are requirements that must be followed unless written authority for deviation is granted as an exemption by the DOE. Advisory standards denoted by ``should`` or ``may`` are standards that may be deviated from with a waiver granted by facility management.

  19. Presented by Toward the Explosion Mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    picture from 2-D multiphysics models 11-Solar-Mass Star · Shock powered in part by neutrino (radiation to an explosion. #12;7 Mezzacappa_Astro_SC07 An emerging picture for 2-D multiphysics models 20-Solar-Mass Star for a range of massive stars. N.B. Progenitor for supernova SN1987A was a 20-Solar-mass star. Bruenn et al., J

  20. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruhe, Thomas C. (Duquesne, PA); Rao, Pilaka P. (Baghlingampalli, IN)

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  1. THE BIGGEST EXPLOSIONS IN THE UNIVERSE. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L. [XTD-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    One of the leading contenders for the origin of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z ?> 7 is catastrophic baryon collapse in atomically cooled halos at z ? 15. In this scenario, a few protogalaxies form in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner UV backgrounds that quench H{sub 2} formation in their constituent halos, preventing them from forming stars or blowing heavy elements into the intergalactic medium prior to formation. At masses of 10{sup 8} M{sub ?} and virial temperatures of 10{sup 4} K, gas in these halos rapidly cools by H lines, in some cases forming 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub ?} Population III stars and, a short time later, the seeds of SMBHs. Instead of collapsing directly to black holes (BHs), some of these stars died in the most energetic thermonuclear explosions in the universe. We have modeled the explosions of such stars in the dense cores of line-cooled protogalaxies in the presence of cosmological flows. In stark contrast to the explosions in diffuse regions in previous simulations, these supernovae briefly engulf the protogalaxy, but then collapse back into its dark matter potential. Fallback drives turbulence that efficiently distributes metals throughout the interior of the halo and fuels the rapid growth of nascent BHs at its center. The accompanying starburst and X-ray emission from these line-cooled galaxies easily distinguish them from more slowly evolving neighbors and might reveal the birthplaces of SMBHs on the sky.

  2. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-03-21

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  3. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-24

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  4. The Politics of European Collaboration in Big Olof Hallonsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongartz, Klaus

    politics. Keywords Big Science · CERN · Common market · European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOMThe Politics of European Collaboration in Big Science Olof Hallonsten Abstract Intergovernmental outside of the political integration work of the European Community/Union, which has resulted

  5. Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch October 31, 2013 - 4:14pm Addthis The California Valley...

  6. At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power February 20, 2014 - 1:29pm Addthis Construction work inside the Vogtle 3 and 4 module assembly...

  7. BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain Berkeley Researchers and Supercomputers to Help Create a Standard 3D Neuron...

  8. Distributed Wind Market Report: Small Turbines Lead to Big Growth...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Distributed Wind Market Report: Small Turbines Lead to Big Growth in Exports Distributed Wind Market Report: Small Turbines Lead to Big Growth in Exports August 18, 2014 - 12:13pm...

  9. Photon Speedway Puts Big Data In the Fast Lane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Speedway Puts Big Data In the Fast Lane Photon Speedway Puts Big Data In the Fast Lane Scientists from Berkeley Lab and SLAC are using NERSC and ESnet to achieve...

  10. PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Seth

    PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big? Seth Stein Because deep Earth processes are inacces. Recent results for the mys- terious deep earthquakes that occur to depths greater than 600 km is that large deep earthquakes (1-3) seem to have occurred on faults larger than ex- pected from the competing

  11. Space Time Quantization and the Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    1998-06-21

    A recent cosmological model is recapitulated which deduces the correct mass, radius and age of the universe as also the Hubble constant and other well known apparently coincidental relations. It also predicts an ever expanding accelerating universe as is confirmed by latest supernovae observations. Finally the Big Bang model is recovered as a suitable limiting case.

  12. How to think big The 20th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    ,200 to .033 cents)* * Source: John McCallum, PC Direct #12;If only gas mileage improved as much as disk pricesHow to think big Udi Manber Google #12;· The 20th century was about taming nature (and winning wars performance has gone up by a factor of 3500 (1 MHz ­ 3.5GHz)* · Memory prices per megabyte are down

  13. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  14. No "big trips" for the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Faraoni

    2007-02-27

    It has been claimed in several papers that a phantom energy-dominated universe can undergo a ``big trip'', i.e., tunneling through a wormhole that grows faster than the cosmic substratum due to the accretion of phantom energy, and will reappear on the other mouth of the wormhole. We show that such claims are unfounded and contradict the Einstein equations.

  15. Data Mining with Big Data Xindong Wu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    1 Data Mining with Big Data Xindong Wu1,2 , Xingquan Zhu3 , Gong-Qing Wu2 , Wei Ding4 1 School Boston, USA Abstract: Big Data concerns large-volume, complex, growing data sets with multiple, Big Data is now rapidly expanding in all science and engineering domains, including physical

  16. Mapping collective behavior in the big-data era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Alex

    Mapping collective behavior in the big-data era R. Alexander Bentley Department of Archaeology. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to "big data" sets ­ those from Twitter and Facebook & Reinsel 2011). These digital shadows are the subjects of "big data" research, which optimists see

  17. Statistical Inference, Learning and Models for Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Statistical Inference, Learning and Models for Big Data Nancy Reid University of Toronto P · Optimization and Matrix Methods Feb 9 ­ 11 · Visualization: Strategies and Principles Feb 23 ­ 27 · Big Data in Health Policy Mar 23 ­ 27 · Big Data for Social Policy Apr 13 ­ 16 #12;And more Distinguished Lecture

  18. Toward Effective Big Data Analysis in Continuous Auditing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toward Effective Big Data Analysis in Continuous Auditing By Juan Zhang, Xiongsheng Yang, and Deniz Appelbaum #12;Towards Effective Big Data Analysis Introduction New sources: emails, phone calls, click stream traffic, social media, news media, sensor recordings and videos, and RFID tags 4 V's of Big Data

  19. Cost aware real time big data processing in Cloud Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Cost aware real time big data processing in Cloud Environments By Cristian Montero Under and volatility of Big-data application workloads, it is difficult to decide when and how to scale up and down Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Big Data

  20. When Recommenders Met Big Data An Architectural Proposal and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coruña, Universidade da

    When Recommenders Met Big Data An Architectural Proposal and Evaluation Daniel Valcarce, Javier factor in the design of any system working with big data. In particular, it has been recognised as a main capable of making per- sonalised recommendations using collaborative filtering in a big data en- vironment

  1. Big Data: A Survey Min Chen Shiwen Mao Yunhao Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Big Data: A Survey Min Chen · Shiwen Mao · Yunhao Liu © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract In this paper, we review the background and state-of-the-art of big data. We first introduce the general background of big data and review related technologies, such as could computing

  2. Behavioral Implications of Big Data's Impact on Audit Judgment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavioral Implications of Big Data's Impact on Audit Judgment and Decision Making and Future state of Big Data with regards to the audit environment · Information processing weaknesses and limitations that can impede the effective use of Big Data in an audit environment, with a focus on

  3. Implementing 'Big Open Data' in government through Open Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baclawski, Kenneth B.

    1 Implementing 'Big Open Data' in government through Open Collaboration - case examples@mitre.org> Ken Baclawski Presented at the Joint DATA.GOV - ONTOLOG "Big Open Data" Session 17-May-2012 ( v1.02 ) #12;2ppy/lo/md/kb/Leveraging-OOR-in BigOpenData_May-2012 Presentation Outline

  4. Random Forests and Big Data Robin Genuer 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villa-vialaneix, Nathalie

    Random Forests and Big Data Robin Genuer 1 , Jean-Michel Poggi 2 , Christine Tuleau-Malot3 Castanet Tolosan cedex, nathalie.villa@toulouse.inra.fr R´esum´e. Le Big Data est un des grands d´efis que. Le Big Data implique toujours le caract`ere massif des donn´ees mais comprend bien souvent aussi des

  5. Big Data, the Crowd, and Me Cathy Marshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Cathy

    Big Data, the Crowd, and Me Cathy Marshall Microsoft Research, Silicon Valley Like many of you, I've been swept up by the romance of Big Data. But instead of stepping back and taking the long view, in this account I plan to get enmired in the details and tell you a story about my own Big Data dalliance

  6. Exploring big data opportunities for Online Customer Segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Exploring big data opportunities for Online Customer Segmentation Georgia Fotaki Marco Spruit Sjaak University P.O. Box 80.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;iii Exploring big data opportunities and analyzing the huge amount of data; and this is where the concept of "Big Data" can play an essential role

  7. Orchestrating Science DMZs for Big Data Acceleration: Challenges and Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calyam, Prasad

    Orchestrating Science DMZs for Big Data Acceleration: Challenges and Approaches Saptarshi Debroy: {debroysa, calyamp, dickinsonmg}@missouri.edu. I. INTRODUCTION A. What is Science Big Data? In recent years computing centers, experiments and simulations produce peta-bytes of data viz., Big Data, that is likely

  8. One Statistician's Perspectives on Statistics and "Big Data" Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    One Statistician's Perspectives on Statistics and "Big Data" Analytics Some (Ultimately 2014 Vardeman (Iowa State University) Perspectives on "Big Data" Analytics July 2014 1 / 16 #12;My/modern-multivariate-statistical-learning/ Vardeman (Iowa State University) Perspectives on "Big Data" Analytics July 2014 2 / 16 #12;Some (Indirect

  9. The Foundation of Big Data: Experiments, Formulation, and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    The Foundation of Big Data: Experiments, Formulation, and Applications Robert C. Qiu 1 1 . In the age of Big Data, the size of n is large, but FINITE! The large but finite n asks for a new paradigm for big data analysis. Size is the only thing that matters. It is natural to model massive datasets

  10. Rethinking Abstractions for Big Data: Why, Where, How, and What

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Rethinking Abstractions for Big Data: Why, Where, How, and What Mary Hall, Robert M. Kirby, Feifei Venkatasubramanian, University of Utah June 17, 2013 Big data refers to large and complex data sets that, under, analytical tools and human understanding [7]. Numerous lessons on the scalability of big data can already

  11. IMPLICATIONS OF NON-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    #12;IMPLICATIONS OF NON-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS A Thesis by JOHN FUQUA ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS A Thesis by JOHN FUQUA Approved by: Advisor: Carlos Bertulani Committee-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS John Fuqua, MS Texas A&M University-Commerce, 2013 Advisor: Carlos

  12. A new 40 MA ranchero explosive pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goforth, James; Herrera, Dennis; Oona, Hank; Torres, David; Atchison, W L; Colgate, S A; Griego, J R; Guzik, J; Holtkamp, D B; Idzorek, G; Kaul, A; Kirkpatrick, R C; Menikoff, R; Reardon, P T; Reinovsky, R E; Rousculp, C L; Sgro, A G; Tabaka, L J; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a new high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system based on the 1.4 m long Ranchero generator which was developed in 1999 for driving solid density z-pinch loads. The new application requires approximately 40 MA to implode similar liners, but the liners cannot tolerate the 65 {micro}s, 3 MA current pulse associated with delivering the initial magnetic flux to the 200 nH generator. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system with an internal start switch and four explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches. The integral start switch is installed between the output glide plane and the armature. It functions in the same manner as a standard input crowbar switch when armature motion begins, but initially isolates the load. The circuit is completed during the flux loading phase using post hole convolutes. Each convolute attaches the inner (coaxial) output transmission line to the outside of the outer coax through a penetration of the outer coaxial line. The attachment is made with the conductor of an EFF at each location. The EFFs conduct 0.75 MA each, and are actuated just after the internal start switch connects to the load. EFFs operating at these parameters have been tested in the past. The post hole convolutes must withstand as much as 80 kV at peak dl/dt during the Ranchero load current pulse. We describe the design of this new HEPP system in detail, and give the experimental results available at conference time. In addition, we discuss the work we are doing to test the upper current limits of a single standard size Ranchero module. Calculations have suggested that the generator could function at up to {approx}120 MA, the rule of thumb we follow (1 MA/cm) suggests 90 MA, and simple flux compression calculations, along with the {approx}4 MA seed current available from our capacitor bank, suggests 118 MA is the currently available upper limit.

  13. Visualizing Distributed Data with BigWig and BigBed at UCSC (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kent, Jim [UCSC

    2011-06-08

    Jim Kent from University of California, Santa Cruz presents on "Visualizing Distributed Data with BigWig and BigBed at UCSC" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  14. IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel By Clare Byrne Visitors for the production of fuel crops. http://www.iol.co.za/general/news/newsprint.php?art_id=nw20071106135542969C112694&sf= (1 of 3) [11/11/2008 11:48:04 AM] http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=31&art

  15. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  16. Quadractic Model of Thermodynamic States in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    We study the thermodynamic states encountered during Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. Such explosions contain up to six components: three fuels (PETN, TNT and Aluminum) and their products corresponding to stoichiometric combustion with air. We establish the loci in thermodynamic state space that correctly describes the behavior of the components. Results are fit with quadratic functions that serve as fast equations of state suitable for 3D numerical simulations of SDF explosions.

  17. Mesoscale modeling of metal-loaded high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bdzil, John Bohdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lieberthal, Brandon [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Srewart, Donald S [UNIV OF ILLINOIS

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 3D approach to modeling multi-phase blast explosive, which is primarily condensed explosive by volume with inert embedded particles. These embedded particles are uniform in size and placed on the array of a regular lattice. The asymptotic theory of detonation shock dynamics governs the detonation shock propagation in the explosive. Mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations are used to show how the particles are compressed, deformed, and accelerated by the high-speed detonation products flow.

  18. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  19. Method and system for detecting an explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Bozeman, MT)

    2010-12-07

    A method and system for detecting at least one explosive in a vehicle using a neutron generator and a plurality of NaI detectors. Spectra read from the detectors is calibrated by performing Gaussian peak fitting to define peak regions, locating a Na peak and an annihilation peak doublet, assigning a predetermined energy level to one peak in the doublet, and predicting a hydrogen peak location based on a location of at least one peak of the doublet. The spectra are gain shifted to a common calibration, summed for respective groups of NaI detectors, and nitrogen detection analysis performed on the summed spectra for each group.

  20. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mace, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pemberton, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Richard J [INDIAN HEAD DIVISION

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  1. Energetic Material - Explosives - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureElyElectro Nitration Idaho NationalExplosives

  2. Explosion at Six Bells Colliery Monmouthshire: Report and Maps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, T.A.

    REPORT ON THE CAUSES OF, AND CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDING, THE EXPLOSION WHICH OCCURRED AT SIX BELLS COLLIERY, MONMOUTHSHlRE, ON 28TH JUNE, 1960

  3. Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

  4. Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) High Explosives Pressing Facility at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, this month passed the 85 percent construction completion mark and is on schedule and...

  5. Laser-driven miniature flyer plates for shock initiation of secondary explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Miniature flyer plates (<1-mm diameter X <5-micron thick) of aluminum and other materials are accelerated by a 10-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser to velocities >5 km/s. Velocity profiles are recorded by velocity interferometry (VISAR) techniques and impact planarity by electronic streak photography. Techniques for improving energy coupling from laser to flyer plate will be discussed. Flyer plate performance parameters will be compared with material properties. The P/sup n/t criteria for shock initiation of explosives will be compared for various flyer materials, pressure, and pulse duration. Performance of secondary explosives (PETN, HNS, HMX, various PBX, others) will be reported. These data will detail the experimental effect of t (in P/sup n/t) approaching values of a few nanoseconds. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  6. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  7. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  8. Dark Radiation Emerging After Big Bang Nucleosynthesis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willy Fischler; Joel Meyers

    2011-02-28

    We show how recent data from observations of the cosmic microwave background may suggest the presence of additional radiation density which appeared after big bang nucleosynthesis. We propose a general scheme by which this radiation could be produced from the decay of non-relativistic matter, we place constraints on the properties of such matter, and we give specific examples of scenarios in which this general scheme may be realized.

  9. Dark radiation emerging after big bang nucleosynthesis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischler, Willy; Meyers, Joel [Theory Group, Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    We show how recent data from observations of the cosmic microwave background may suggest the presence of additional radiation density which appeared after big bang nucleosynthesis. We propose a general scheme by which this radiation could be produced from the decay of nonrelativistic matter, we place constraints on the properties of such matter, and we give specific examples of scenarios in which this general scheme may be realized.

  10. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-06-28

    There are ongoing efforts in detecting Hawking radiation from primordial black holes (PBH) formed during the early universe. Here we put an upper limit on the PBH number density that could have been formed prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis era, based on the constraint that the PBH evaporation energy consisting of high energy radiation not affect the observed abundances' of elements, by disintegrating the nuclei.

  11. Tackling Big Data Together | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | DepartmentXIII--SMART GRID SEC.Quadrennial Technology Review AboutBig

  12. Alfven Wave-Driven Supernova Explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Suzuki; K. Sumiyoshi; S. Yamada

    2007-12-06

    We investigate the role of Alfven waves in the core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion. We assume that Alfven waves are generated by convections inside a proto-neutron star (PNS) and emitted from its surface. Then these waves propagate outwards, dissipate via nonlinear processes, and heat up matter around a stalled prompt shock. To quantitatively assess the importance of this process for the revival of the stalled shock, we perform 1D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations, taking into account the heating via the dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate radially outwards along open flux tubes. We show that the shock revival occurs if the surface field strength is larger than ~2e15 G and if the amplitude of velocity fluctuation at the PNS surface is larger than 20% of the local sound speed. Interestingly, the Alfven wave mechanism is self-regulating in the sense that the explosion energy is not very sensitive to the surface field strength and initial amplitude of Alfven waves as long as they are larger than the threshold values given above.

  13. Keeping Pace with Big Data Arizona State University Data Mining and Machine Learning Lab NSF Workshop on Big Data Analy6cs, Beijing 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Keeping Pace with Big Data Arizona State University Data Mining and Machine Learning Lab NSF Workshop on Big Data Analy6cs, Beijing 1 Keeping Pace with Big Data - A Data Mining Perspec>ve Huan Liu Data

  14. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  15. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th January 2014 2 / 20 #12;Overview This talk is about the mean field forest fire model

  16. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-01-22

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A. Canceled by DOE O 452.4C.

  17. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-11-19

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  18. Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog OUTLINE Microtephra horizons, found in soils across Scotland, contain fine ash produced by explosive eruptions in Iceland. They represent presented by the eruptions that produce them. ASHFALL IN SCOTLAND Ash from numerous volcanoes in Iceland can

  19. Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

  20. HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R

    2010-05-02

    Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

  1. Burn propagation in a PBX 9501 thermal explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L.; Romero, J. J.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Asay, B. W.; Schwartz, C.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F.; Morris, C.; Murray, M. M.; McNeil, W. V.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.

    2007-12-12

    We have applied proton radiography to study the conversion of solid density to gaseous combustion products subsequent to ignition of a thermal explosion in PBX 9501. We apply a thermal boundary condition to the cylindrical walls of the case, ending with an induction period at 205 C. We then introduce a laser pulse that accelerates the thermal ignition and synchronizes the explosion with the proton accelerator. We then obtain fast, synchronized images of the evolution of density loss with few microsecond resolution during the approximately 100 microsecond duration of the explosion. We present images of the solid explosive during the explosion and discuss measured rates and assumed mechanisms of burning the role of pressure in this internal burning.

  2. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  3. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ?10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  4. Antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. In the second part, the technologies for producing antiprotons with high energy accelerator systems and the means for manipulating and storing microgram amounts of antihydrogen are examined. While there seems to be no theoretical obstacles to the production of 10^{18} antiprotons per day (the amount required for triggering one thermonuclear bomb), the construction of such a plant involves several techniques which are between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude away from present day technology.

  5. Magic ultramagnetized nuclei in explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratyev, V. N., E-mail: vkondra@univ.kiev.ua [Ukraine JINR, Taras Shevchenko National University Kiev (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    Direct evidence of the presence of {sup 44}Ti and content of the isotope in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A are obtained from the analysis of gamma-ray spectrum of the remnant. A significant excess of observational {sup 44}Ti volume on predictions of supernova models can be explained as the magnetization effect in the process of explosive nucleosynthesis. The formation of chemical elements is considered accounting for superstrong magnetic fields predicted for supernovae and neutron stars. Using the arguments of nuclear statistical equilibrium, a significant effect of magnetic field on the nuclear shell energy is demonstrated. The magnetic shift of the most tightly 'bound' nuclei from the transition metals of iron series to titanium leads to an exponential increase in the portion of {sup 44}Ti and, accordingly to a significant excess of the yield of these products of nucleosynthesis.

  6. C-Safe Image Gallery from the Center for the Simulation of Accidental Fires and Explosions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The University of Utah created an alliance with the DOE Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program to form the Center for the Simulation of Accidental Fires and Explosions (C-SAFE). The Center focuses specifically on providing state-of-the-art, science-based tools for the numerical simulation of accidental fires and explosions, especially within the context of handling and storage of highly flammable materials. The objective of C-SAFE is to provide a system comprising a problem-solving environment in which fundamental chemistry and engineering physics are fully coupled with non-linear solvers, optimization, computational steering, visualization and experimental data verification. The availability of simulations using this system will help to better evaluate the risks and safety issues associated with fires and explosions. The scientific images at this website provide technical views of various flame types and configurations (http://www.csafe.utah.edu/Information/summary.html). See also the Container Dynamics presentations at http://www.csafe.utah.edu/Teams/ContainerDynamics/cd_presentations.html.

  7. Big, Deep, and Smart Data in Energy Materials Research: Atomic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big, Deep, and Smart Data in Energy Materials Research: Atomic View on Materials Functionalities Event Sponsor: Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences Seminar Start Date: Sep 22...

  8. Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings Fact sheet describes how the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved...

  9. Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesis Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding...

  10. Big Thicket National Preserve: Trails to the Future 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Luke; Allen, Chris; Elrod, Leah; Forbes, Melissa; Harbin, Hannah; Stromm, Diann

    2003-01-01

    stream_source_info Big_Thicket.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 292407 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Big_Thicket.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Capstone Project... The George Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University Big Thicket National Preserve: Trails to the Future By Luke Anderson Chris Allen Leah Elrod Melissa Forbes Hannah Harbin Diann Strom Big Thicket National Preserve...

  11. LDRD symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LDRD symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and energy use impacts | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  12. The Big Picture on Process Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Big Picture on Process Heating (January 2001) More Documents & Publications Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems...

  13. Managing Research Data in Big Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Gray; Tobia Carozzi; Graham Woan

    2012-07-17

    The project which led to this report was funded by JISC in 2010--2011 as part of its 'Managing Research Data' programme, to examine the way in which Big Science data is managed, and produce any recommendations which may be appropriate. Big science data is different: it comes in large volumes, and it is shared and exploited in ways which may differ from other disciplines. This project has explored these differences using as a case-study Gravitational Wave data generated by the LSC, and has produced recommendations intended to be useful variously to JISC, the funding council (STFC) and the LSC community. In Sect. 1 we define what we mean by 'big science', describe the overall data culture there, laying stress on how it necessarily or contingently differs from other disciplines. In Sect. 2 we discuss the benefits of a formal data-preservation strategy, and the cases for open data and for well-preserved data that follow from that. This leads to our recommendations that, in essence, funders should adopt rather light-touch prescriptions regarding data preservation planning: normal data management practice, in the areas under study, corresponds to notably good practice in most other areas, so that the only change we suggest is to make this planning more formal, which makes it more easily auditable, and more amenable to constructive criticism. In Sect. 3 we briefly discuss the LIGO data management plan, and pull together whatever information is available on the estimation of digital preservation costs. The report is informed, throughout, by the OAIS reference model for an open archive.

  14. Analytics over Large-Scale Multidimensional Data: The Big Data Revolution!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Analytics over Large-Scale Multidimensional Data: The Big Data Revolution! Alfredo Cuzzocrea ICAR in the field of analytics over big data, and we extend the discussion to analytics over big multidimensional, Management, Performance, Theory Keywords Analytics over Big Data, Analytics over Big Multidimensional Data

  15. The Next Big Thing - Eric Haseltine

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Haseltine

    2010-01-08

    Eric Haseltine, Haseltine Partners president and former chief of Walt Disney Imagineering, presented "The Next Big Thing," on Sept. 11, at the ORNL. He described the four "early warning signs" that a scientific breakthrough is imminent, and then suggested practical ways to turn these insights into breakthrough innovations. Haseltine is former director of research at the National Security Agency and associate director for science and technology for the director of National Intelligence, former executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering and director of engineering for Hughes Aircraft. He has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web and Discover Magazine.

  16. Big Data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpower Srl JumpOpenRenewableBielat SantoreBig

  17. Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics Hit

  18. Big Blue Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake, California:Big

  19. A Combustion Model for the TWA 800 Center-Wing Fuel Tank Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1998-10-02

    In support of the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the TWA Flight 800 accident, a combined experimental/computational effort was conducted that focused on quarter-scale testing and simulation of the fuel-air explosion in the Boeing 747 center wing fuel tank. This report summarizes the modeling approach used at Sandia National Laboratories. In this approach approximations are introduced that capture the essential physics associated with turbulent flame propagation in multiple compartment fuel tanks. This model efficiently defines the pressure loading conditions during a jet-fuel air explosion in a fuel tank confinement. Modeling calculations compare favorably with a variety of experimental quarter-scale tests conducted in rigid confinement. The modeling describes well the overpressure history in several geometry configurations. Upon demonstrating a reasonable comparison to experimental observations, a parametric study of eight possible ignition sources is then discussed. Model calculations demonstrate that different loading conditions arise as the location of the ignition event is varied. By comparing the inferred damage and calculated impulses to that seen in the recovered tank, it maybe possible to reduce the number of likely sources. A possible extension of this work to better define tank damage includes coupling the combustion model as a pressure loading routine for structural failure analysis.

  20. Process and apparatus for producing ultrafine explosive particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGowan, Michael J. (Martinsburg, WV)

    1992-10-20

    A method and an improved eductor apparatus for producing ultrafine explosive particles is disclosed. The explosive particles, which when incorporated into a binder system, have the ability to propagate in thin sheets, and have very low impact sensitivity and very high propagation sensitivity. A stream of a solution of the explosive dissolved in a solvent is thoroughly mixed with a stream of an inert nonsolvent by obtaining nonlaminar flow of the streams by applying pressure against the flow of the nonsolvent stream, to thereby diverge the stream as it contacts the explosive solution, and violently agitating the combined stream to rapidly precipitate the explosive particles from the solution in the form of generally spheroidal, ultrafine particles. The two streams are injected coaxially through continuous, concentric orifices of a nozzle into a mixing chamber. Preferably, the nonsolvent stream is injected centrally of the explosive solution stream. The explosive solution stream is injected downstream of and surrounds the nonsolvent solution stream for a substantial distance prior to being ejected into the mixing chamber.

  1. Towards an Empirically Based Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R; Ruppert, S; Matzel, E; Hauk, T; Gok, R

    2009-08-31

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before been tested. The focus of our work is on the local and regional distances (< 2000 km) and phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg) necessary to see small explosions. We are developing a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum that is compatible with the earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation models developed using the Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC) techniques (Walter and Taylor, 2002). The explosion parametric model will be particularly important in regions without any prior explosion data for calibration. The model is being developed using the available body of seismic data at local and regional distances for past nuclear explosions at foreign and domestic test sites. Parametric modeling is a simple and practical approach for widespread monitoring applications, prior to the capability to carry out fully deterministic modeling. The achievable goal of our parametric model development is to be able to predict observed local and regional distance seismic amplitudes for event identification and yield determination in regions with incomplete or no prior history of underground nuclear testing. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  2. A simple line wave generator using commercial explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple and inexpensive explosive line wave generator has been designed using commercial sheet explosive and plane wave lens concepts. The line wave generator is constructed using PETN and RDX based sheet explosive for the slow and fast components respectively. The design permits the creation of any desired line width. A series of experiments were performed on a 100 mm design, measuring the detonation arrival time at the output of the generator using a streak camera. An iterative technique was used to adjust the line wave generator's slow and fast components, so as to minimize the arrival time deviation. Designs, test results, and concepts for improvements will be discussed.

  3. Thermally stable booster explosive and process for manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinlin, William T. (Amarillo, TX); Thorpe, Raymond (Amarillo, TX); Lightfoot, James M. (Amarillo, TX)

    2006-03-21

    A thermally stable booster explosive and process for the manufacture of the explosive. The product explosive is 2,4,7,9-tetranitro-10H-benzo[4,5]furo[3,2-b]indole (TNBFI). A reactant/solvent such as n-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) or dimethyl formamide (DMF) is made slightly basic. The solution is heated to reduce the water content. The solution is cooled and hexanitrostilbene is added. The solution is heated to a predetermined temperature for a specific time period, cooled, and the product is collected by filtration.

  4. The Big Data Rush Practically every major funding agency is kindling (or rekindling) the idea of`big data'as key to solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    The Big Data Rush Practically every major funding agency is kindling (or rekindling) the idea of`big.TheWhite House has recently launched a major initiative in this space (Google for"Big Data Across the Federal Government") highlighting the pervasiveness of big data programs across multiple government units. The

  5. Purdue University Faculty Openings in Big Data Purdue University has identified Big Data as a major thrust for inter-disciplinary research and education.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Purdue University Faculty Openings in Big Data Purdue University has identified Big Data as a major shape Purdue's vision and research/education agenda in Big Data. Candidates for tenure and tenure, and participate in interdisciplinary Big-Data activities. Salary and benefits are highly competitive, and Purdue

  6. 6 Scalable End-user Access to Big Data 1 6.1 The Data Access Problem of Big Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvanese, Diego

    Contents 6 Scalable End-user Access to Big Data 1 6.1 The Data Access Problem of Big Data;Chapter 6 Scalable End-user Access to Big Data Martin Giese,1 Diego Calvanese,2 Peter Haase,3 Ian Horrocks-users typically face when dealing with Big Data: · They need to pose ad hoc queries to a collection of data

  7. Big SaaS: The Next Step Beyond Big Data Hong Zhu, Ian Bayley, M. Younas, David Lightfoot, Basel Yousef and Dongmei Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Big SaaS: The Next Step Beyond Big Data Hong Zhu, Ian Bayley, M. Younas, David Lightfoot, Basel will integrate with the Internet of Things, Mobile Computing, Big Data, Wireless Sensor Networks, and many other and require Big Data but provide great value to the customer. With these benefits come great societal risks

  8. Review: Eco-Business: A Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability By Peter Dauvergne andA Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability. Cambridge, MA: MITA Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability is a very important

  9. Bid & Open Data position paper 1 / 47 Big and Open data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    Bid & Open Data position paper 1 / 47 Big and Open data Position Paper #12;Bid & Open Data position ..................................................................................................................5 II- Challenges with BIG/OPEN DATA ..............................................................................6 III- Technical approaches to Big Data

  10. Recommendations for Technologies for Microgrids on the Big Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recommendations for Technologies for Microgrids on the Big Island Prepared for U.S. Department Island microgrids By Sentech, Inc. Bethesda, Maryland And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy for technologies to be used in future installation of Big Island microgrids Subtask 2.2 Deliverable #4 Prepared By

  11. SCIENCE IN HIGH DIMENSIONS: MULTIPARAMETER MODELS AND BIG DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethna, James P.

    SCIENCE IN HIGH DIMENSIONS: MULTIPARAMETER MODELS AND BIG DATA A Dissertation Presented #12;SCIENCE IN HIGH DIMENSIONS: MULTIPARAMETER MODELS AND BIG DATA Ricky Chachra, Ph.D. Cornell parameters as well as a large-dimensional space of predicted data. These high-dimensional spaces of inputs

  12. "Developing the infrastructure and skills needed to handle big data."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    "Developing the infrastructure and skills needed to handle big data." Don Brown W.S. Calcott Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.2074 Big Data Research Group Our research group and uncertain behaviors. Methodological interests in these areas include data- mining, simulation

  13. Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle, Swift, and Yellow of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality August 2011 1 ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS An Extension Community Economics Program #12; Economic Impact of New Residents: Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui

  14. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear and en- hance the comprehensive synoptic observing programs at BBSO, which include the following ve studies. Statistical studies on sunspot areas and magnetic shear are among the highlights of this research

  15. Rethinking Abstractions for Big Data: Why, Where, How, and What

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and applications communities. However, scale is only one aspect of current big data trends; fundamentally, current that is being addressed. The "big data challenge" has disrupted computer science by stressing to the very limits heterogeneous and specialized units, with resilience and energy becoming important considerations. The design

  16. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nutt, Gerald L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  17. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M.; Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J.

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  18. Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work...

  19. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2014-11-03

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  20. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

    2005-04-19

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  1. Program to Prevent Accidental or Unauthorized Nuclear Explosive Detonations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-12-18

    The order establishes the DOE program to prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear explosive detonations, and to define responsibilities for DOE participation in the Department of Defense program for nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system safety. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17

    This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

  3. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  4. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2015-01-05

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  5. From Convection to Explosion: End-to-End Simulation of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Ia supernova is the thermonuclear runaway and subsequent explosion of a white dwarf that is accreting

  6. Study of the beta delayed particle emission from 48Mn and its relevance for explosive nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martel, I

    2015-01-01

    Study of the beta delayed particle emission from 48Mn and its relevance for explosive nucleosynthesis

  7. NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  8. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengbing Bian; Fabian Chudak; William G. Macready; Lane Clark; Frank Gaitan

    2013-08-14

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$. Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and $R(m,2)$ for $4\\leq m\\leq 8$. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  9. A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabrey, Wayne Edward

    1970-01-01

    A MATHEMATICAL SIKJLATION OF EARTH SATELLITE EXPLOSION DEBRIS ORBITAI ELEMENTS A Thesis WAYNE EDWARD NABREY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE... Nay 1970 Major Subject Nathematics A MATHEMATICAL SlmZATION OZ EARTH SATELLITE EXPLOSION DEBRIS ORBITAL ELEMENTS A Thesis WAI? EDWARD MABREY Approved as to style and content by: haxrman o ommi tee Head o epartment mber Member May 1...

  10. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment of municipal solid waste components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundeen, Joseph Eric

    1991-01-01

    AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) PRETREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS A Thesis by JOSEPH ERIC LUNDEEN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) PRETREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS A Thesis Joseph Eric Lundeen Approved as to style and content by: Mark Hol pie ( tte R. W...

  11. Reagent Selection Methodology for a Novel Explosives Detection Platform

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Marvin Warner, a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in the individual pieces of antibodies used to set up a chemical reaction that will give off light just by mixing reagents together with a sample that contains an explosive molecule. This technology would help detect if explosives are present with just the use of a handheld system or container.

  12. Galaxies as seen through the most Energetic Explosions in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savaglio, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a strong and fast gamma-ray emission from the explosion of stellar systems (massive stars or coalescing binary compact stellar remnants), happening at any possible redshift, and detected by space missions. Although GRBs are the most energetic events after the Big Bang, systematic search (started after the first localization in 1997) led to only 374 spectroscopic redshift measurements. For less than half, the host galaxy is detected and studied in some detail. Despite the small number of known hosts, their impact on our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is immense. These galaxies offer the opportunity to explore regions which are observationally hostile, due to the presence of gas and dust, or the large distances reached. The typical long-duration GRB host galaxy at low redshift is small, star-forming and metal poor, whereas, at intermediate redshift, many hosts are massive, dusty and chemically evolved. Going even farther in the past of the Universe, at z > 5, long-GRB...

  13. Direct Real-Time Detection of Vapors from Explosive Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Clowers, Brian H.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-10-03

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances is demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a non-radioactive ionization source and coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was demonstrated in less than 5 seconds at ambient temperature without sample pre-concentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provides a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3- and NO3-•HNO3), enables highly sensitive explosives detection. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicate detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284 and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX and NG respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations, including double base propellants, plastic explosives and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN and RDX product ions.

  14. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.; Torres, H.M.

    1996-04-01

    In 1991, a DOE ``Tiger Team`` audited the SNL/California Explosives Program and cited Sandia for not being in compliance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual requirements for having an explosives storage review program. At that time, SNL/California did not have a site-wide inventory record of explosives, and no storage review as in place. Sandia corporately owns approximately 1,800,000 lb energetic material, which is located at various sites throughout the country. In 1992, in response to the Tiger Team findings, Sandia formed the Propellants, Explosives, and Pyrotechnics Evaluation and Reapplication Task Force (PEPER) to develop the tools to implement life-cycle management of energetic materials at Sandia. PEPER met the following objectives: (1) create an accurate inventory of all energetic materials owned by Sandia; (2) evaluate the stability of the inventory, and thereby identify and destroy all imminent hazards; (3) draw down the inventory to be consistent with post-Cold War business needs; (4) create a cradle-to-grave ownership process. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted to document the activities at SNL/California that have involved propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics; and to outline options for minimizing energetic materials and waste at SNL/California.

  15. Astrogenomics: big data, old problems, old solutions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M

    2013-01-01

    The ominous warnings of a `data deluge' in the life sciences from high-throughput DNA sequencing data are being supplanted by a second deluge, of cliches bemoaning our collective scientific fate unless we address the genomic data `tsunami'. It is imperative that we explore the many facets of the genome, not just sequence but also transcriptional and epigenetic variability, integrating these observations in order to attain a genuine understanding of how genes function, towards a goal of genomics-based personalized medicine. Determining any individual's genomic properties requires comparison to many others, sifting out the specific from the trends, requiring access to the many in order to yield information relevant to the few. This is the central big data challenge in genomics that still requires some sort of resolution. Is there a practical, feasible way of directly connecting the scientific community to this data universe? The best answer could be in the stars overhead.

  16. New Nuclear Physics for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard N. Boyd; Carl R. Brune; George M. Fuller; Christel J. Smith

    2010-08-04

    We discuss nuclear reactions which could play a role in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of these reactions involve lithium and beryllium isotopes and the rates for some of these have not previously been included in BBN calculations. Few of these reactions are well studied in the laboratory. We also discuss novel effects in these reactions, including thermal population of nuclear target states, resonant enhancement, and non-thermal neutron reaction products. We perform sensitivity studies which show that even given considerable nuclear physics uncertainties, most of these nuclear reactions have minimal leverage on the standard BBN abundance yields of 6Li and 7Li. Although a few have the potential to alter the yields significantly, we argue that this is unlikely.

  17. DMP Planning for Big Science Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Bicarregui; Norman Gray; Rob Henderson; Roger Jones; Simon Lambert; Brian Matthews

    2012-08-18

    This report exists to provide high-level guidance for the strategic and engineering development of Data Management and Preservation plans for 'Big Science' data. Although the report's nominal audience is therefore rather narrow, we intend the document to be of use to other planners and data architects who wish to implement good practice in this area. For the purposes of this report, we presume that the reader is broadly persuaded (by external fiat if nothing else) of the need to preserve research data appropriately, and that they have both sophisticated technical support and the budget to support developments. The goal of the document is not to provide mechanically applicable recipes, but to allow the user to develop and lead a high-level plan which is appropriate to their organisation. Throughout, the report is informed where appropriate by the OAIS reference model.

  18. Optimization of steam explosion pretreatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foody, P.

    1980-04-01

    Different operating conditions are required to optimize the yield from each of the various fractions in the substrate. Xylose recovery is maximized at short cooking times whereas maximum lignin recovery requires much longer cooking times. Peak glucose yield and rumen digestibility occur at intermediate times. If process conditions are set for maximum glucose yield we have achieved a yield of 68% of the theoretical, based on an average of a dozen substrates tested. Individual results ranged from 46 to 87%. If the process is optimized for maximum total sugars (i.e. glucose plus xylose) we have obtained an average yield of 60%, with a range of 31 to 75%. With rumen microflora, the average value of the in-vitro cellulose digestibility was 82%, with a range of 41 to 90%. The optimum operating conditions for total sugars are a pressure of 500 to 550 psig with a cooking time of 40 to 50 seconds and 35% starting moisture content. Particle size is not a significant factor, nor is pre-steaming or use of a constricting die in the gun nozzle. High quality lignin can be extracted with 80% yield. The Iotech lignin is very soluble, has a low molecular weight and is reactive. The unique properties of the lignin derive from the explosion at the end of the pretreatment. A lignin formaldehyde resin has been successfully formulated and tested. It represents a high value utilization of the lignin byproduct with immediate market potential. A detailed engineering design of the process gives an estimated operating cost of $7.50/OD ton of biomass. At this low cost, the Iotech process achieves many important pretreatment goals in a single step. The substrate has been sterilized; it has been pulverized into a powder; the cellulose has been accessible; and a highly reactive lignin fraction can be recovered and utilized.

  19. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  20. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  1. An Integral Condition for Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in core-collapse supernova theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for shock expansion, $v_s > 0$. Assuming that $v_s > 0$ corresponds to explosion, we recast this integral condition as a dimensionless condition for explosion, $\\Psi > 0$. Using 1D simulations, we confirm that $\\Psi = 0$ during the stalled phase and $\\Psi > 0$ during explosion. Having validated the integral condition, we use it to derive a useful explosion diagnostic. First, for a given set of parameters, we find the family of solutions to the steady-state equations, parameterized by shock radius $R_s$, yielding $\\Psi(R_s)$. For any particular solution, $\\Psi(R_s)$ may be negative, zero, or positive, and, since $\\Psi \\propto v...

  2. UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzati, Davide; Blackwell, Christopher H.; Morsony, Brian J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

  3. Big Earth observation data analytics for land use and land cover change information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    .......................................................................................... 3 2.2 CONTRIBUTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE: BIG DATA IN GEOINFORMATICS

  4. Machine-Learning for Big Data: Sampling and Distributed On-Line Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combettes, Patrick Louis

    Machine-Learning for Big Data: Sampling and Distributed On-Line Algorithms Stéphan Clémençon LTCI variance control: rate faster than n 1/2 3 Convex risk minimization 4 Oracle inequalities #12;Big Data? Big phones, internet, embedded systems, social networks, . . .) · to store and manage Big (and Complex) Data

  5. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, Special Issue: Big Data 1 Breaking the Curse of Dimensionality using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, Special Issue: Big Data 1 Breaking the Curse of Dimensionality will discuss two promising tools to alleviate this curse when handling big data. First, instead of using full, Special Issue: Big Data 2 paper we show how to use this expertise to manage otherwise unmanageable big

  6. November2012 IU Bloomington Pascal Hitzler Semantic Web and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    November2012 ­ IU Bloomington ­ Pascal Hitzler Semantic Web and Big Data ­ Opportunities://www.pascal-hitzler.de/ #12;November2012 ­ IU Bloomington ­ Pascal Hitzler 2 Contents · Big Data, Linked Data, Semantic Web · The Big Data Added Value Pipeline · Fragments #12;November2012 ­ IU Bloomington ­ Pascal Hitzler 3 Big

  7. Big Data is Not About the Data! Institute for Quantitative Social Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Big Data is Not About the Data! Gary King1 Institute for Quantitative Social Science Harvard Value in Big Data: the Analytics 2/10 #12;The Value in Big Data: the Analytics · Data: 2/10 #12;The Value in Big Data: the Analytics · Data: · easy to come by; often a free byproduct of IT improvements 2

  8. Efficient and Customizable Data Partitioning Framework for Distributed Big RDF Data Processing in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    Efficient and Customizable Data Partitioning Framework for Distributed Big RDF Data Processing}@gatech.edu Abstract--Big data business can leverage and benefit from the Clouds, the most optimized in processing big data in the Clouds is how to effectively partition the big data to ensure efficient

  9. Closing the Loop on Big Data Rob Nowak www.ece.wisc.edu/~nowak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Closing the Loop on Big Data data Rob Nowak www.ece.wisc.edu/~nowak NSF Big Data Workshop March 21, 2013 #12;model space questions /queries "training data" BIG DATA: A Marriage of Machine and Man Human Judgements labeling, annotation, comparisons #12;model space questions /queries "training data" BIG DATA

  10. Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE hosted the "Big & Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs" breakout session during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum. This session explored a range of...

  11. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  12. Eliot Feibush leads new Princeton consortium to visualize Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eliot Feibush leads new Princeton consortium to visualize Big Data By John Greenwald April 22, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Eliot Feibush (Photo by Elle...

  13. Scalable multi-access flash store for Big Data analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    For many "Big Data" applications, the limiting factor in performance is often the transportation of large amount of data from hard disks to where it can be processed, i.e. DRAM. In this work we examine an architecture for ...

  14. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  15. Thoughts About Really Big Computers | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thoughts About Really Big Computers Event Sponsor: Leadership Facility Seminar Start Date: Jun 30 2015 - 10:30am BuildingRoom: Building 240Room 1407 Location: Argonne National...

  16. Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A small New York City startup is hoping it has the next big solution in energy storage. A video documents what the company's breakthrough means for the future of grid-scale energy storage.

  17. LiBeB and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith A. Olive; Brian D. Fields

    1999-02-20

    The dual origin of population II Li7, in both big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis is discussed. It is argued that with additional Li6 data, stringent limits on the degree of Li7 depletion can be obtained. Li7 depletion is also constrained by the concordance of big bang predictions with observational determinations of light element abundances. Stringent limits can also be obtained for a fixed primordial D/H abundance.

  18. Big Bang or Big Bounce? Professor Paul J. Steinhardt Princeton University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERTWaterSharingBeyondBang or Big

  19. Method for loading explosive laterally from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. At least one void is excavated in the formation, leaving zones of unfragmented formation adjacent the void. An array of main blastholes is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation and at least one explosive charge which is shaped for forming a high velocity gas jet is placed into a main blasthole with the axis of the gas jet extending transverse to the blasthole. The shaped charge is detonated for forming an auxiliary blasthole in the unfragmented formation adjacent a side wall of the main blasthole. The auxiliary blasthole extends laterally away from the main blasthole. Explosive is placed into the main blasthole and into the auxiliary blasthole and is detonated for explosively expanding formation towards the free face for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the in situ oil shale retort.

  20. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and the Helium Isotope Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan Cooke

    2015-10-09

    The conventional approach to search for departures from the standard model of physics during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis involves a careful, and subtle measurement of the mass fraction of baryons consisting of helium. Recent measurements of this quantity tentatively support new physics beyond the standard model but, historically, this method has suffered from hidden systematic uncertainties. In this letter, I show that a combined measurement of the primordial deuterium abundance and the primordial helium isotope ratio has the potential to provide a complementary and reliable probe of new physics beyond the standard model. Using the recent determination of the primordial deuterium abundance and assuming that the measured pre-solar 3He/4He meteoritic abundance reflects the primordial value, a bound can be placed on the effective number of neutrino species, Neff(BBN) = 3.01 (+0.95 -0.76, with 95 per cent confidence). Although this value of Neff supports the standard model, it is presently unclear if the pre-solar 3He/4He ratio reflects the primordial value. New astrophysical measurements of the helium isotope ratio in near-pristine environments, together with updated calculations and experimental values of several important nuclear reactions (some of which are already being attempted), will lead to much improved limits on possible departures from the standard model. To this end, I describe an analysis strategy to measure the 3He I flux emitted from nearby low metallicity H II regions. The proposed technique can be attempted with the next generation of large telescopes, and will be easier to realize in metal-poor H II regions with quiescent kinematics.

  1. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  2. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  3. An Alternate Approach to Determine the Explosibility of Dusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Balaji

    2013-12-04

    Figure 3. A deflagration fueled by corn starch in the CAAQES chamber at 50 g m-3 ..... 20 Figure 4. The characteristic PvT curves obtained for corn starch at a concentration of 50 g m-3 for three replications... ........................................................................ 28 Figure 7. Explosibility tests conducted for CGD in the CAAQES chamber ................... 36 Figure 8. The characteristic PvT curves for gin dust at a concentration of 1000 g m-3 ... 36 Figure 9. A dust explosion fueled by Dust XX at a...

  4. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  5. Cluster Explosive Synchronization in a Power Grid model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Peng; Menck, Peter J; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of explosive synchronization has been reported as an abrupt transition in complex networks of first-order Kuramoto oscillators. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the nodes in a power grid model, equivalent to a second-order Kuramoto model, perform a cascade of transitions toward a synchronous macroscopic state, a novel phenomenon that we call cluster explosive synchronization. We provide a rigorous analytical treatment using a mean-field analysis in uncorrelated networks. Our findings are in good agreement with numerical simulations and fundamentally deepen the understanding of microscopic mechanisms toward synchronization.

  6. Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carles Badenes; Eduardo Bravo; Kazimierz J. Borkowski

    2003-09-03

    We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

  7. Development of ab initio techniques critical for future science-based explosives R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

    2013-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has emerged as an indispensable tool in materials research, since it can accurately predict properties of a wide variety of materials at both equilibrium and extreme conditions. However, for organic molecular crystal explosives, successful application of DFT has largely failed due to the inability of current exchange-correlation functionals to correctly describe intermolecular van der Waals' (vdWs) forces. Despite this, we have discovered that even with no treatment of vdWs bonding, the AM05 functional and DFT based molecular dynamics (MD) could be used to study the properties of molecular crystals under compression. We have used DFT-MD to predict the unreacted Hugoniots for PETN and HNS and validated the results by comparison with crystalline and porous experimental data. Since we are also interested in applying DFT methods to study the equilibrium volume properties of explosives, we studied the nature of the vdWs bonding in pursuit of creating a new DFT functional capable of accurately describing equilibrium bonding of molecular crystals. In this report we discuss our results for computing shock Hugoniots of molecular crystals and also what was learned about the nature of bonding in these materials.

  8. Response of a water-filled spherical vessel to an internal explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.W.; Wilson, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    Many problems of interest to the defense community involve fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Such problems include underwater blast loading of structures, bubble dynamics and jetting around structures, and hydrodynamic ram events. These problems may involve gas, fluid, and solid dynamics, nonlinear material behavior, cavitation, reaction kinetics, material failure, and nonlinearity that is due to varying geometry and contact conditions within a structure or between structures. Here, the authors model the response of a water-filled, thick-walled, spherical steel vessel to an internal explosion of 30 grams of C-4 with FSI2D--a two-dimensional coupled finite element and finite volume hydrodynamics code. The gas phase detonation products were modeled with a Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson high-explosive equation of state. Predictions from a fully coupled model were compared to experimental results in the form of strain gauge traces. Agreement was reasonably good. Additionally, the calculation was run in an uncoupled mode to understand the importance of fluid-structure interaction in this problem. The uncoupled model results in an accumulation of nonphysical energy in the vessel.

  9. Quasars and the Big Blue Bump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaohui Shang; Michael S. Brotherton; Richard F. Green; Gerard A. Kriss; Jennifer Scott; Jessica Kim Quijano; Omer Blaes; Ivan Hubeny; John Hutchings; Mary Elizabeth Kaiser; Anuradha Koratkar; William Oegerle; Wei Zheng

    2004-09-29

    We investigate the ultraviolet-to-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 17 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using quasi-simultaneous spectrophotometry spanning 900-9000 Angstrom (rest frame). We employ data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Taking advantage of the short-wavelength coverage, we are able to study the so-called "big blue bump," the region where the energy output peaks, in detail. Most objects exhibit a spectral break around 1100 Angstrom. Although this result is formally associated with large uncertainty for some objects, there is strong evidence in the data that the far-ultraviolet spectral region is below the extrapolation of the near-ultraviolet-optical slope, indicating a spectral break around 1100 Angstrom. We compare the behavior of our sample to those of non-LTE thin-disk models covering a range in black-hole mass, Eddington ratio, disk inclination, and other parameters. The distribution of ultraviolet-optical spectral indices redward of the break, and far-ultraviolet indices shortward of the break, are in rough agreement with the models. However, we do not see a correlation between the far-ultraviolet spectral index and the black hole mass, as seen in some accretion disk models. We argue that the observed spectral break is intrinsic to AGNs, although intrinsic reddening as well as Comptonization can strongly affect the far-ultraviolet spectral index. We make our data available online in digital format.

  10. Does Big Oil Collude and Price Gouge? Big Oil came back into the headlines in recent weeks with another spike in gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    with another spike in gasoline prices and their reported record profits. Some months ago, during the last gasoline price spike, Congress summoned the executives of the Big Oil companies to testify aboutDoes Big Oil Collude and Price Gouge? Big Oil came back into the headlines in recent weeks

  11. 1 Big Data and User Valuation: a Synergistic Combination Big data analytics is the problem of bringing the massive amounts of data produced today down to human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Big Data and User Valuation: a Synergistic Combination Big data analytics is the problem will require fundamental advances in big data analytics. arXiv Topic Models User Models Predicted Preferences of bringing the massive amounts of data produced today down to human scale. This problem is faced

  12. Rethinking Abstractions for Big Data: Why, Where, How, and What

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mary Hall; Robert M. Kirby; Feifei Li; Miriah Meyer; Valerio Pascucci; Jeff M. Phillips; Rob Ricci; Jacobus Van der Merwe; Suresh Venkatasubramanian

    2013-06-14

    Big data refers to large and complex data sets that, under existing approaches, exceed the capacity and capability of current compute platforms, systems software, analytical tools and human understanding. Numerous lessons on the scalability of big data can already be found in asymptotic analysis of algorithms and from the high-performance computing (HPC) and applications communities. However, scale is only one aspect of current big data trends; fundamentally, current and emerging problems in big data are a result of unprecedented complexity--in the structure of the data and how to analyze it, in dealing with unreliability and redundancy, in addressing the human factors of comprehending complex data sets, in formulating meaningful analyses, and in managing the dense, power-hungry data centers that house big data. The computer science solution to complexity is finding the right abstractions, those that hide as much triviality as possible while revealing the essence of the problem that is being addressed. The "big data challenge" has disrupted computer science by stressing to the very limits the familiar abstractions which define the relevant subfields in data analysis, data management and the underlying parallel systems. As a result, not enough of these challenges are revealed by isolating abstractions in a traditional software stack or standard algorithmic and analytical techniques, and attempts to address complexity either oversimplify or require low-level management of details. The authors believe that the abstractions for big data need to be rethought, and this reorganization needs to evolve and be sustained through continued cross-disciplinary collaboration.

  13. Experimental Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Gasification is that any type of biomass (including low cost feedstocks like agricultural residues, forest) Objective Results Experimental Conclusions 1000°C 600°C 4s 30s A major advantage of Biomass waste, etc) can be converted to syngas. Pyrolysis and Char gasification proceed sequentially

  14. Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Changquan

    2010-01-01

    The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

  15. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 10: Classification of hazardous areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1972-01-01

    This Report has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres. It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas atmospheres. ...

  16. Explosion at Bickershaw Nos 1, 2, 3, and 4 Colliery, Lancashire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clough, R. H.

    MINISTRY OF POWER EXPLOSION AT BICKERSHAW Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 COLLIERY, LANCASHIRE REPORT On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Bickershaw Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Colliery, Lancashire, ...

  17. Detection of Explosives Using a Micro-cantilever Array Nano-Calorimeter System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Matthew

    2011-08-08

    Over the past few decades, the likeliness of an attack from explosives has increased dramatically. Hence, the need to find a reliable device with the ability to detect explosives has increased even more. Sensing schemes ...

  18. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 4: Method of test for ignition temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1966-01-01

    This Recommendation was prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31 , Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres. It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas ...

  19. Experimental and numerical simulations of explosive loading on structural components : composite sandwich connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huson, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    pressure nitro- gen/hydraulic energy source. In explosivepressure nitrogen/hydraulic energy source. Each actuator,

  20. UTILIZATION OF SEISMIC AND INFRASOUND SIGNALS FOR CHARACTERIZING MINING EXPLOSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    on the Western US, where a variety of different types of mining operations exist, ranging from surface coal cast, single-fired explosions of varying yield were conducted in the coal mine. At regional distances in developing ground truth. Unlike coal cast or taconite blasts, Morenci Copper Mine often shoots several

  1. Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Cathy

    Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits Peter Kokelaar and Cathy Busby fabrics indicative of welding of glass shards and pumice at temperatures >500"C. The occurrence emplacement temperature in pyroclas- tic deposits is welding. Welding is hot-state viscous deformation

  2. Safety analysis of optically ignited explosive and pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Holswade, S.

    1994-05-01

    The future of optical ordnance depends on the acceptance, validation and verification of the stated safety enhancement claims of optical ordnance over existing electrical explosive devices (EED`s). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance, with the primary motivation of this effort being the enhancement of explosive safety by specifically reducing the potential of premature detonation that can occur with low energy electrically ignited explosive devices. By using semiconductor laser diodes for igniting these devices, safety improvements can be made without being detrimental to current system concerns since the inputs required for these devices are similar to electrical systems. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) of the energetic material provides the opportunity to remove the bridgewire and electrically conductive pins from the charge cavity, creating a Faraday cage and thus isolating the explosive or pyrotechnic materials from stray electrical ignition sources. Recent results from our continued study of safety enhancements are presented. The areas of investigation which are presented include: (1) unintended optical source analysis, specifically lightning insensitivity, (2) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and electrostatic discharge (ESD) insensitivity analysis, and (3) powder safety.

  3. Identification of process controls for nuclear explosive operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Houghton, K.; Wilson, M.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear explosive assembly/disassembly operations that are carried out under United States Department of Energy (DOE) purview are characterized by activities that primarily involve manual tasks. These process activities are governed by procedural and administrative controls that traditionally have been developed without a formal link to process hazards. This work, which was based on hazard assessment (HA) activities conducted as part of the W69 Integrated Safety Process (ISP), specifies an approach to identifying formal safety controls for controlling (i.e., preventing or mitigating) hazards associated with nuclear explosive operations. Safety analysis methods are used to identify controls, which then are integrated into a safety management framework to provide assurance to the DOE that hazardous activities are managed properly. As a result of the work on the W69 ISP dismantlement effort, the authors have developed an approach to identify controls and safety measures to improve the safety of nuclear explosive operations. The methodology developed for the W69 dismantlement effort is being adapted to the W76 ISP effort. Considerable work is still ongoing to address issues such as the adequacy or effectiveness of controls. DOE nuclear explosive safety orders and some historical insights are discussed briefly in this paper. The safety measure identification methodology developed as part of the W69 ISP dismantlement process then is summarized.

  4. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-28

    The order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1E to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts, deliberate unauthorized use, and denial of authorized use. Supersedes DOE O 452.4B, dated 1-22-10.

  5. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in GRB Jets Accompanied by Hypernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mizuta, Akira; /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Sato, Katsuhiko; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., RESCEU

    2006-09-21

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a collapsar using the model of MacFadyen and Woosley (1999). It is shown that {sup 56}Ni is not produced in the jet of the collapsar sufficiently to explain the observed amount of a hypernova when the duration of the explosion is {approx} 10 sec, which is considered to be the typical timescale of explosion in the collapsar model. Even though a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized if all explosion energy is deposited initially, the opening angles of the jets become too wide to realize highly relativistic outflows and gamma-ray bursts in such a case. From these results, it is concluded that the origin of {sup 56}Ni in hypernovae associated with GRBs is not the explosive nucleosynthesis in the jet. We consider that the idea that the origin is the explosive nucleosynthesis in the accretion disk is more promising. We also show that the explosion becomes bi-polar naturally due to the effect of the deformed progenitor. This fact suggests that the {sup 56}Ni synthesized in the accretion disk and conveyed as outflows are blown along to the rotation axis, which will explain the line features of SN 1998bw and double peaked line features of SN 2003jd. Some fraction of the gamma-ray lines from {sup 56}Ni decays in the jet will appear without losing their energies because the jet becomes optically thin before a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni decays as long as the jet is a relativistic flow, which may be observed as relativistically Lorentz boosted line profiles in future. We show that abundance of nuclei whose mass number {approx} 40 in the ejecta depends sensitively on the energy deposition rate, which is a result of incomplete silicon burning and alpha-rich freezeout. So it may be determined by observations of chemical composition in metal poor stars which model is the proper one as a model of a gamma-ray burst accompanied by a hypernova.

  6. Aftershock Characteristics as a Means of Discriminating Explosions from Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-05-20

    The behavior of aftershock sequences around the Nevada Test Site in the southern Great Basin is characterized as a potential discriminant between explosions and earthquakes. The aftershock model designed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989, 1994) allows for a probabilistic statement of earthquake-like aftershock behavior at any time after the mainshock. We use this model to define two types of aftershock discriminants. The first defines M{sub X}, or the minimum magnitude of an aftershock expected within a given duration after the mainshock with probability X. Of the 67 earthquakes with M > 4 in the study region, 63 of them produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} within the first seven days after a mainshock. This is contrasted with only six of 93 explosions with M > 4 that produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} for the same period. If the aftershock magnitude threshold is lowered and the M{sub 90} criteria is used, then no explosions produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 90} for durations that end more than 17 days after the mainshock. The other discriminant defines N{sub X}, or the minimum cumulative number of aftershocks expected for given time after the mainshock with probability X. Similar to the aftershock magnitude discriminant, five earthquakes do not produce more aftershocks than N{sub 99} within 7 days after the mainshock. However, within the same period all but one explosion produce less aftershocks then N{sub 99}. One explosion is added if the duration is shortened to two days after than mainshock. The cumulative number aftershock discriminant is more reliable, especially at short durations, but requires a low magnitude of completeness for the given earthquake catalog. These results at NTS are quite promising and should be evaluated at other nuclear test sites to understand the effects of differences in the geologic setting and nuclear testing practices on its performance.

  7. Flying-plate detonator using a high-density high explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stroud, John R. (Livermore, CA); Ornellas, Donald L. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A flying-plate detonator containing a high-density high explosive such as benzotrifuroxan (BTF). The detonator involves the electrical explosion of a thin metal foil which punches out a flyer from a layer overlying the foil, and the flyer striking a high-density explosive pellet of BTF, which is more thermally stable than the conventional detonator using pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  8. Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final Stages of Stellar Evolution For Take Away Final Stages of Stellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final Stages of Stellar Evolution For Take Away Final Stages.XII.2006 Seminar on Astroparticle Physics - Cosmic Rays #12;Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final are supernova explosions and which different types exist? Where do heavy elements come from? #12;Nucleosynthesis

  9. Afterburning in spherical premixed turbulent explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Scott, M.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mushi, E.M.J. )

    1994-12-01

    During the early stages of spherical turbulent flame propagation, more than half of the gas behind the visible flame front may be unburned. Previous models of the afterburning of the gas behind the apparent flame front have been extended in the present work, to include the effects of flame quenching, consequent upon localized flame stretch. The predictions of the model cover, the spatial and temporal variations of the fraction burned, the flame propagation rate, and the mass burning rate. They are all in dimensionless form and are well supported by associated experimental measurements in a fan-stirred bomb with controlled turbulence. The proportion of the gas that is unburned decreases with time and increases with the product of the Karlovitz stretch factor and the Lewis number. Simultaneous photographs were taken of the spherical schlieren image and of that due to Mie scattering from small seed particles in a thin laser sheet that sectioned the spherical flame. These clearly showed the amount of unburned gas within the sphere and, along with other evidence suggest laminar flamelet burning across a scale of distance which is close to the Taylor confirm the predictions of the fraction of gas unburned and of the rate at which it is burning.

  10. STANDARD BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS UP TO CNO WITH AN IMPROVED EXTENDED NUCLEAR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Batiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Goriely, Stephane; Xu, Yi [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP 226, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Saimpert, Matthias; Vangioni, Elisabeth [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France)

    2012-01-10

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three strong pieces of evidence for the big bang model together with the expansion of the universe and cosmic microwave background radiation. In this study, we improve the standard BBN calculations taking into account new nuclear physics analyses and enlarge the nuclear network up to sodium. This is, in particular, important to evaluate the primitive value of CNO mass fraction that could affect Population III stellar evolution. For the first time we list the complete network of more than 400 reactions with references to the origin of the rates, including Almost-Equal-To 270 reaction rates calculated using the TALYS code. Together with the cosmological light elements, we calculate the primordial beryllium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen nuclei. We performed a sensitivity study to identify the important reactions for CNO, {sup 9}Be, and boron nucleosynthesis. We re-evaluated those important reaction rates using experimental data and/or theoretical evaluations. The results are compared with precedent calculations: a primordial beryllium abundance increase by a factor of four compared to its previous evaluation, but we note a stability for B/H and for the CNO/H abundance ratio that remains close to its previous value of 0.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15}. On the other hand, the extension of the nuclear network has not changed the {sup 7}Li value, so its abundance is still 3-4 times greater than its observed spectroscopic value.

  11. Experimental Modeling of Cosmological Inflation with Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung; Ehren Hwang

    2012-07-23

    Recently we demonstrated that mapping of monochromatic extraordinary light distribution in a hyperbolic metamaterial along some spatial direction may model the flow of time and create an experimental toy model of the big bang. Here we extend this model to emulate cosmological inflation. This idea is illustrated in experiments performed with two-dimensional plasmonic hyperbolic metamaterials. Spatial dispersion which is always present in hyperbolic metamaterials results in scale-dependent (fractal) structure of the inflationary "metamaterial spacetime". This feature of our model replicates hypothesized fractal structure of the real observable universe.

  12. In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

    2008-02-06

    TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

  13. 2013 strategic petroleum reserve big hill well integrity grading report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa; Wynn, Karen; Checkai, Dean; Perry, James Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a framework for the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. This framework was then applied to all 28 wells at the Big Hill site with each well receiving a grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading framework including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The framework was developed in a way as to be applicable to all four of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites.

  14. Quantum particle production near the big rip revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Alvarenga; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; M. J. S. Houndjo

    2009-04-06

    The effect of quantum particle production near the big rip singularity has been investigated previously, with the conclusion that the energy of the produced particle decreases as the future singularity is approached. Hence, the effect of particle production would not be effective to avoid the big rip singularity. That calculation was performed by introducing an ultra-violet cut-off. In the present work we consider a renormalization of the energy-momentum tensor, obtainning a different expression for the particle production. The new expression seems to indicate that the effect of particle production may be dominant as the singularity is approached.

  15. Dirac Fields in Loop Quantum Gravity and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald; Rupam Das; Robert J. Scherrer

    2008-03-19

    Big Bang nucleosynthesis requires a fine balance between equations of state for photons and relativistic fermions. Several corrections to equation of state parameters arise from classical and quantum physics, which are derived here from a canonical perspective. In particular, loop quantum gravity allows one to compute quantum gravity corrections for Maxwell and Dirac fields. Although the classical actions are very different, quantum corrections to the equation of state are remarkably similar. To lowest order, these corrections take the form of an overall expansion-dependent multiplicative factor in the total density. We use these results, along with the predictions of Big Bang nucleosynthesis, to place bounds on these corrections.

  16. Big Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake, California:BigBig

  17. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the optical emission produced thereby is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  18. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  19. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  20. Experimental Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergy Technologies | Blandinenews Experimental

  1. A HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.

    2013-03-28

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  2. EECBG Success Story: Big Savings for Texas City with Energy Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Big Savings for Texas City with Energy Monitoring Sensors EECBG Success Story: Big Savings for Texas City with Energy Monitoring Sensors August 19, 2010 - 5:00pm Addthis With more...

  3. OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets August 27, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy...

  4. Big Bang Expansion A textbook example of how observations drive theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korn, Andreas

    of structure seeds. The cosmic web will later form out of these sedes. #12;II. Observing the CMB Variations WMAP tot = 1 Dark matter: 23% Dark energy (): 73% #12;Big Bang: a self-consistent theory? Big Bang

  5. Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs April 16, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis Located near...

  6. Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held Oct. 28, 29 | ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... meeting of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... science policy and technology of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Panels ...

  7. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  8. Characterization of plasma sprayed and explosively consolidated simulated lunar soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, S.J.; Inal, O.T.; Smith, M.F.

    1997-06-01

    Two methods for the use of lunar materials for the construction of shelters on the Moon are being proposed: explosive consolidation of the soil into structural components and plasma spraying of the soil to join components. The plasma-sprayed coating would also provide protection from the intense radiation. In this work, a mare simulant was plasma-sprayed onto a stainless steel substrate. Deposition of a 0.020 inch coating using power inputs of 23, 25, 27 and 29 kW were compared. Hardness of the coatings increased with each increase of power to the system, while porosity at the interface decreased. All coatings exhibited good adhesion. Simultaneously, an explosively consolidated sample was similarly characterized to afford a comparison of structural features associated with each mode of proposed use.

  9. Sub-sonic thermal explosions investigated by radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, Laura B; Henson, Bryan F; Romero, Jerry J; Asay, Blaine W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the past 5 years of experiments utilizing radiographic techniques to study defiagration in thermal explosions in HMX based formulations. Details of triggering and timing synchronization are given. Radiographic images collected using both protons and x-rays are presented. Comparisons of experiments with varying size, case confinement, binder, and synchronization are presented. Techniques for quantifying the data in the images are presented and a mechanism for post-ignition burn propagation in a thermal explosion is discussed. From these experiments, we have observed a mechanism for sub-sonic defiagration with both gas phase convective and solid phase conductive burning. The convective front velocity is directly measured from the radiographic images and consumes only a small fraction of the HE. It lights the HE as it passes beginning the slower solid state conductive burn process. This mechanism is used to create a model to simulate the radiographic results and a comparison will be shown.

  10. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  11. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schatz, Hendrick [Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States

    2010-01-08

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  12. Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors for Detection of Pesticides and Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting OP pesticides and explosives. CNTs and functionalized silica nanoparticles have been chosen for this study. The biosensors were combined with the flow-injection system, providing great advantages for onsite, real-time, and continuous detection of environmental pollutants such as OPs and TNT. The sensors take advantage of the electrocatalytic properties of CNTs, which makes it feasible to achieve a sensitive electrochemical detection of the products from enzymatic reactions at low potential. This approach uses a large aspect ratio of silica nanoparticles, which can be used as a carrier for loading a large amount of electroactive species, such as poly(guanine), for amplified detection of explosives. These methods offer a new environmental monitoring tool for rapid, inexpensive, and highly sensitive detection of OPs or TNT compounds.

  13. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN); McCoig, Thomas M. (Maryville, TN); Dooley, Joseph B. (Kingston, TN); Smith, Cyrus M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-06-15

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent.

  14. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and explosives containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN); McCoig, Thomas M. (Maryville, TN); Dooley, Joseph B. (Kingston, TN); Smith, Cyrus M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-16

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent.

  15. Safe arming system for two-explosive munitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jaroska, Miles F. (Livermore, CA); Niven, William A. (Livermore, CA); Morrison, Jasper J. (Livermore, CA)

    1978-01-01

    A system for safely and positively detonating high-explosive munitions, including a source of electrical signals, a split-phase square-loop transformer responsive solely to a unique series of signals from the source for charging an energy storage circuit through a voltage doubling circuit, and a spark-gap trigger for initiating discharge of the energy in the storage circuit to actuate a detonator and thereby fire the munitions.

  16. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.; Smith, C.M.

    1999-06-15

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent. 10 figs.

  17. Thermal initiation caused by fragment impact on cased explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnurr, N.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been used to predict the velocity threshold for thermal initiation of a cased explosive caused by fragment impact. A structural analysis code was used to determine temperature profiles and a thermal analysis code was used to calculate reaction rates. Results generated for the United States Air Force MK 82 bomb indicate that the velocity threshold for thermal initiation is slightly higher than that for the shock-to-detonation process. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Plewa

    2006-11-24

    We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

  19. The Digital Skin of Cities: Urban Theory and Research in the Age of the Sensored and Metered City, Ubiquitous Computing, and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabari, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    2012, September 30). “Big data: Mind the gaps. ” The BostonQuestions for Big Data. Information, Communication &BigQuery – Real-time big data analytics in the cloud [

  20. AutoGrid - Turning Big Data Into Power with the Energy Data Platform and Apps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, Amit; Dresselhuys, Eric; Kulp, Yann; Buseman, Greg; Piette, Mary Ann; Tang, Andrew; Dailey, Karla; Knudsen, Chris

    2014-03-25

    AutoGrid personnel discuss how they are turning big data into power with the energy data platform and apps.

  1. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. I. PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Lovekin, C. C. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Frey, Lucille H. [HPC-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L.; Hungerford, Aimee L. [XTD-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The first stars are the key to the formation of primitive galaxies, early cosmological reionization and chemical enrichment, and the origin of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their extreme luminosities, individual Population III (Pop III) stars will likely remain beyond the reach of direct observation for decades to come. However, their properties could be revealed by their supernova explosions, which may soon be detected by a new generation of near-IR (NIR) observatories such as JWST and WFIRST. We present light curves and spectra for Pop III pair-instability supernovae calculated with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. Our numerical simulations account for the interaction of the blast with realistic circumstellar envelopes, the opacity of the envelope, and Lyman absorption by the neutral intergalactic medium at high redshift, all of which are crucial to computing the NIR signatures of the first cosmic explosions. We find that JWST will detect pair-instability supernovae out to z ?> 30, WFIRST will detect them in all-sky surveys out to z ? 15-20, and LSST and Pan-STARRS will find them at z ?< 7-8. The discovery of these ancient explosions will probe the first stellar populations and reveal the existence of primitive galaxies that might not otherwise have been detected.

  2. Pre-explosion companion stars in Type Iax supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Abate, Carlo; Wang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are proposed as one new sub-class of SNe Ia since they present sufficiently distinct observational properties from the bulk of SNe Ia. SNe Iax are the most common of all types of peculiar SNe by both number and rate, with an estimated rate of occurrence of about 5-30% of the total SN Ia rate. However, the progenitor systems of SNe Iax are still uncertain. Analyzing pre-explosion images at SN Iax positions provides a direct way to place strong constraints on the nature of progenitor systems of SNe Iax. In this work, we predict pre-explosion properties of binary companion stars in a variety of potential progenitor systems by performing detailed binary evolution calculations with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code STARS. This will be helpful for constraining progenitor systems of SNe Iax from their pre-explosion observations. With our binary evolution calculations, it is found that the non-degenerate helium (He) companion star to both a massive C/O WD (> 1.1 solar mass) and ...

  3. Disease-induced resource constraints can trigger explosive epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Böttcher, Lucas; Araújo, Nuno A M; Herrmann, Hans J; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mathematical epidemiology have led to a better understanding of the risks posed by epidemic spreading and informed strategies to contain disease spread. However, a challenge that has been overlooked is that, as a disease becomes more prevalent, it can limit the availability of the capital needed to effectively treat those who have fallen ill. Here we use a simple mathematical model to gain insight into the dynamics of an epidemic when the recovery of sick individuals depends on the availability of healing resources that are generated by the healthy population. We find that epidemics spiral out of control into "explosive" spread if the cost of recovery is above a critical cost. This can occur even when the disease would die out without the resource constraint. The onset of explosive epidemics is very sudden, exhibiting a discontinuous transition under very general assumptions. We find analytical expressions for the critical cost and the size of the explosive jump in infection levels in terms of the...

  4. Pre-big bang scenario and the WZW model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcel Jacon

    2015-06-09

    Extensive studies of pre-big bang scenarios for Bianchi-I type universe have been made, at various approximation levels. Knowing the solution of the equations for the post-big bang universe, the symmetries of the equations (time reversal and scale dual transformations) allow the study of pre-big bang solutions. However, the proposed solutions are unable to explain the actually observed acceleration of the expantion of the universe.Calculating the $\\beta $ equations for the Non-Linear Sigma model, at the first loop approximation and imposing conformal invariance at this level, lead to equations of motion that simply state that the curvature must be nil, which in turn allows the utilization of groups to solve the $\\beta $ equations. This is what is done in the Weiss-Zumino-Witten (WZW) model. In this article, I will show that using the WZW model on $SU_2$, some of the difficulties encountered in the determination of the pre and post big-bang solutions are eliminated. Combining the general results obtained with the $\\Lambda $CDM parameters lead to realistic solutions for the evolution of the universe, giving an explanation to the actually observed acceleration of the expansion in terms ot the dilation field $\\phi $(t).

  5. Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui

    1996-01-01

    Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co...

  6. People's Physics Book Ch 20-1 The Big Ideas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 20-1 The Big Ideas Einstein believed that the laws of physics do of physics. In other words, if you are on a moving train and drop a ball or if you are standing on a farm and drop a ball, the physics that describe the motion of that ball will be the same. Einstein realized

  7. SHADING CALCULATIONS FOR THE BIG DISH Jeff Cumpston1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], building the 'SG4' 500m2 Big Dish solar paraboloidal concentrator for solar-thermal to electric energy into an array of a specific shape with a pre-defined energy transport network was simulated for a site location of the energy transport network pipe length. Results shows that dish separations can be altered to reduce pipe

  8. The State of the Art in Supporting "Big Data"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    of investigation · Startups in this space · If there is any achilles heel in big data, this is it! #12;10 DBMS Security · Works well -- i.e. I have never heard of the DBMS screwing up in this area. #12;11 Encryption · Can be entrusted to the DBMS -- Appropriate when there are many clients sharing data -- Don't want

  9. Adventures in Transportation from a (Big) Data Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    + Adventures in Transportation from a (Big) Data Perspective Kristin Tufte NEDB Day, Jan 30, 2015 Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science #12;+Portal... !Portland-Vancouver Transportation Data Archive ! Policy of Open Data ! Publicly-funded (Thanks to NSF, FHWA, Metro, RTC,TREC) ! Focus on open

  10. The Big Data Newsvendor: Practical Insights from Machine Learning Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    2013-10-16

    We present a version of the newsvendor problem where one has n observations of p features as well as past demand. We consider both \\big data" (p=n = O(1)) as well as small data (p=n = o(1)). For small data, we provide a ...

  11. The Big Data Newsvendor: Practical Insights from Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    2014-02-06

    We investigate the newsvendor problem when one has n observations of p features related to the demand as well as past demands. Both small data (p=n = o(1)) and big data (p=n = O(1)) are considered. For both cases, we propose ...

  12. "Machine learning for big data analytics in biomedicine"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    "Machine learning for big data analytics in biomedicine" Yanjun (Jane) Qi Assistant Professor yq2h-learning techniques on important challenges in biomedicine, especially those dealing with enormous data sets. Taking on Data Mining (ICDM) · Y. Qi, et al,(2009) "Systematic prediction of human membrane receptor interactions

  13. People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea Energy is a measure of the amount of, or potential for, dynamical activity in something. The total amount of energy in the universe is always the same universe. A group of things (we'll use the word system) has a certain amount of energy. Energy can be added

  14. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  15. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  17. SHADING CALCULATIONS FOR THE BIG DISH Jeff Cumpston1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], building the 'SG4' 500m2 Big Dish solar paraboloidal concentrator for solar-thermal to electric energy shading fraction in an array of two-axis tracking collectors. Annual shading on the SG4 dish included transport network, these losses may be reduced by closely spacing collectors within the array. Another form

  18. Original article Energy balance storage terms and big-leaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for the determination of big leaf forest evapotranspiration are not of the utmost importance. energy storage / deciduous. The available energy is defined as the net radiation (Rn), from which the net change in energy storage within), biomass heat storage (Sv) and photosynthetic energy storage (Sp). Soil heat storage Sg can be further

  19. People's Physics Book Ch 5-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 5-1 The Big Idea Acceleration is caused by force. All forces come in pairs of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. Key Concepts · An object pairs must obey three rules: they must be of the same type of force, 1 Principia in modern English

  20. YOU MIGHT BE CELEBRATING THE BIG 3-0 IF....

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YOU MIGHT BE CELEBRATING THE BIG 3-0 IF.... You remember the power-house figures pictured or shine CVHS will be open for family fun, so do come to experience all the amazing Open House activities for a large variety of exotic animal clinical care. You might save a life with your purchase! To partner

  1. Constraints on massive gravity theory from big bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lambiase

    2012-08-27

    The massive gravity cosmology is studied in the scenario of big bang nucleosynthesis. By making use of current bounds on the deviation from the fractional mass, we derive the constraints on the free parameters of the theory. The cosmological consequences of the model are also discussed in the framework of the PAMELA experiment.

  2. Long Lived Charged Massive Particles and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunori Kohri; Fumihiro Takayama

    2006-11-06

    We consider Big Bang Nucleosynthesis(BBN) with long lived charged massive particles. Before decaying, the long lived massive particles recombines with a light element to form a bound state like a hydrogen atom. We discuss the possible change of primordial light element abundances due to formations of such bound states.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  4. Neutrino energy transport in weak decoupling and big bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grohs, E; Kishimoto, C T; Paris, M W; Vlasenko, A

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the early universe through the epochs of weak decoupling, weak freeze-out and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) by simultaneously coupling a full strong, electromagnetic, and weak nuclear reaction network with a multi-energy group Boltzmann neutrino energy transport scheme. Such an approach allows a detailed accounting of the evolution of the $\

  5. Data Aware Caching for Big-Data Applications Using MapReduce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Data Aware Caching for Big-Data Applications Using MapReduce Yaxiong Zhao, Jie Wu #12;Outline · MapReduce and big-data · Cache description · Protocol ­ Relationship between job types and cache organization · Conclusion #12;Outline · MapReduce and big-data · Cache description · Protocol ­ Cache request and reply

  6. Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs Raghvendra Mall, Vilen Jumutc, Rocco a deterministic method to obtain subsets from big data which are a good representative of the inherent structure a subset for this big data network. The FURS selection technique selects nodes from different dense regions

  7. CloudVista: Interactive and Economical Visual Cluster Analysis for Big Data in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CloudVista: Interactive and Economical Visual Cluster Analysis for Big Data in the Cloud Huiqi Xu Analysis of big data has become an important problem for many business and scientific applications, among which clustering and visualizing clusters in big data raise some unique challenges. This demonstration

  8. Preface: Big Data Is Not About The Data! 1 Gary King 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Preface: Big Data Is Not About The Data! 1 Gary King 2 Institute for Quantitative Social Science to it. Now "Big Data" is what you and I do. As trivial as this change sounds, we should be grateful is about. Throughout, we need to remember that for the most part, Big Data is not about the data. Data

  9. Recent Advances in Autonomic Provisioning of Big Data Applications on Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    Recent Advances in Autonomic Provisioning of Big Data Applications on Clouds Rajiv Ranjan, Lizhe for the user, which just pays for the used services. Big Data [2], [3], [4], [5] applications has become a com, medical imaging, and the like. The "BigData" problem, which is defined as the practice of collecting

  10. Crowdsourcing Semantics for Big Data in Geoscience Applications Tom Narock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    Crowdsourcing Semantics for Big Data in Geoscience Applications Tom Narock1 and Pascal Hitzler 1 the potential to overcome some of the issues currently surrounding Big Data. Semantic technologies, and complexity of data sources ­ the very definition of Big Data. Yet, for some tasks, semantic algorithms do

  11. Towards an Understanding of Facets and Exemplars of Big Data Applications Geoffrey C.Fox1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards an Understanding of Facets and Exemplars of Big Data Applications Geoffrey C.Fox1 Big Data applications from a variety of research and commercial areas and suggest a set Big Data properties, and then to understand applications with those properties. There are many

  12. Scalable Euclidean Embedding for Big Data Zohreh Alavi, Sagar Sharma, Lu Zhou, Keke Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scalable Euclidean Embedding for Big Data Zohreh Alavi, Sagar Sharma, Lu Zhou, Keke Chen Data is critical to many visualization techniques. At big-data scale, these algorithms need to be scalable affecting the algorithms are important research problems for visually analyzing big data. We propose

  13. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Indexing Big Data with Map-Reduce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arampatzis, Avi

    A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Indexing Big Data with Map-Reduce Dimitrios Siafarikas Argyrios@ee.duth.gr Abstract--We reflect upon the challenge a Big Data analyst faces when dealing with the complex problem the system we developed works. Keywords: Information Retrieval, Big Data, Data Mining, Cluster, Inverted

  14. Principles of Software-defined Elastic Systems for Big Data Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    Principles of Software-defined Elastic Systems for Big Data Analytics Hong-Linh Truong, Schahram}@dsg.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Techniques for big data analytics should support principles of elasticity that are inherent characteristics of big data described through the "four V's of volume, variety, velocity and veracity" [1] have

  15. Becoming data-savvy in a big-data world Meng Xu and Seung Yon Rhee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becoming data-savvy in a big-data world Meng Xu and Seung Yon Rhee Carnegie Institution for Science analysis. Big data analysis Advances in digital, information, and communications technologies generate enormous amounts of data ­ coined big data ­ in all sectors of our society [The Economist (2010) http

  16. Data Locality-Aware Query Evaluation for Big Data Analytics in Distributed Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Data Locality-Aware Query Evaluation for Big Data Analytics in Distributed Clouds Qiufen Xia, Weifa. Such data referred to as big data now becomes an invaluable asset to many businesses or organizations, as it can be used to identify business advantages by helping them make their strategic decisions. Big data

  17. When Private Set Intersection Meets Big Data: An Efficient and Scalable Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    When Private Set Intersection Meets Big Data: An Efficient and Scalable Protocol Changyu Dong1 to scale up smoothly when data being protected is big. Efficiency and scalability become critical criteria for privacy preserving protocols in the age of Big Data. In this paper, we present a new Private Set

  18. Querying Big Data: Bridging Theory and Practice Wenfei Fana,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Wenfei

    Querying Big Data: Bridging Theory and Practice Wenfei Fana,b , Jinpeng Huaib aInternational Research Center on Big Data, Beihang University, Beijing, No.37 XueYuan Road, 100083, Beijing, China Abstract Big data introduces challenges to query answering, from theory to practice. A number of questions

  19. Big Data: A Foundational Explanation Michael J. Sal, Richard J. Barilla, Steven Lindo, and Sam Elnagdy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tappert, Charles

    D6.1 Big Data: A Foundational Explanation Michael J. Salé, Richard J. Barilla, Steven Lindo for the science and practice of Big Data analytics. So long as innovations in data processing and storage capabilities continue, Big Data models and the technologies that enable them will also continue to evolve

  20. Genetic Algorithm based Data-aware Group Scheduling for Big Data Clouds Raghavendra Kune1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Genetic Algorithm based Data-aware Group Scheduling for Big Data Clouds Raghavendra Kune1 , Pramod on demand. Big Data Clouds is a new generation data analytics platform using Cloud computing as a back end and empirical tools. MapReduce scheduling models for Big Data computing operate in the cluster mode, where

  1. Bayes and Big Data: The Consensus Monte Carlo Algorithm Steven L. Scott1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Bayes and Big Data: The Consensus Monte Carlo Algorithm Steven L. Scott1 , Alexander W. Blocker1 of Business October 31, 2013 Abstract A useful definition of "big data" is data that is too big to comfortably by splitting data across multiple machines. Communication between large numbers of machines is expensive

  2. Big Data Storytelling through Interactive Maps Jayant Madhavan, Sreeram Balakrishnan, Kathryn Brisbin, Hector Gonzalez, Nitin Gupta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Big Data Storytelling through Interactive Maps Jayant Madhavan, Sreeram Balakrishnan, Kathryn) brings big data collaboration and visualization to data-experts who possess neither large data high-profile stories. 1 Introduction Much of the current excitement about Big Data refers to performing

  3. On Interference-aware Provisioning for Cloud-based Big Data Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    On Interference-aware Provisioning for Cloud-based Big Data Processing Yi YUAN, Haiyang WANG, Dan--Recent advances in cloud-based big data analysis offers a convenient mean for providing an elastic and cost and IBM deploy various of big data systems on their cloud platforms, aiming to occupy the huge market

  4. A System Architecture for Running Big Data Workflows in the Cloud Andrey Kashlev, Shiyong Lu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Shiyong

    A System Architecture for Running Big Data Workflows in the Cloud Andrey Kashlev, Shiyong Lu management systems (SWFMSs) to utilize the power of Cloud computing to perform big data analyses. Unlike by running a big data workflow in Amazon EC2, FutureGrid Eucalyptus and OpenStack clouds. From

  5. Evaluating Corpora Documentation with regards to the Ethics and Big Data Charter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating Corpora Documentation with regards to the Ethics and Big Data Charter Alain Couillault.de-mazancourt@eptica.com Abstract The authors have written the Ethics and Big Data Charter in collaboration with various agencies to show the benefit it offers. Keywords: language resources, ethics, documentation, big data. 1

  6. The Trento Big Data Platform for Public Administration and Large Companies: Use cases and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velegrakis, Yannis

    The Trento Big Data Platform for Public Administration and Large Companies: Use cases in the Trentino territory for the collection, cleaning, integration and analysis of BigData. 2. BIGDATA PLATFORM Making the data public has no value if none can actually access, study and use that data. The BigData

  7. SLA-aware Provisioning and Scheduling of Cloud Resources for Big Data Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    SLA-aware Provisioning and Scheduling of Cloud Resources for Big Data Analytics Mohammed Alrokayan and traditional data management system could not keep up to scale of Big Data. They have to either invest heavily on their infrastructure or move their Big Data analytics to Cloud where they can benefit from both on-demand scalability

  8. Big data from small data: data-sharing in the 'long tail' of neuroscience.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Adam R; Nielson, Jessica L; Cragin, Melissa H; Bandrowski, Anita E; Martone, Maryann E

    2014-01-01

    F O C U S O N B I G D ATA Big data from small data: data-small data sources into big data for improved knowledgeo mm e n ta r y Organized big data Data size Long-tail data

  9. Big Data Retour vers le Futur -3 -De Statisticien Data Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besse, Philippe

    Big Data ­ Retour vers le Futur - 3 - De Statisticien à Data Scientist Philippe Besse Aurélien ; statistical learning ; big data. Université de Toulouse ­ INSA, Institut de Mathématiques, UMR CNRS 5219 omiques la décennie suivante ; ­ avènement récent et très médiatisé du big data. Nous terminons en

  10. Big Data Use Cases and Requirements GEOFFREY FOX, Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Data Use Cases and Requirements GEOFFREY FOX, Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing Co-Chair, Use Cases & Requirements Subgroup, NIST Big Data Public Working Group WO CHANG, National Institute of Standards and Technologies Co-Chair, NIST Big Data Public Working Group Abstract We formed

  11. Handling Big Dimensions in Distributed Data Warehouses using the DWS Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Handling Big Dimensions in Distributed Data Warehouses using the DWS Technique Marco Costa Critical tables creates a limitation to the applicability of the DWS technique to data warehouses with big is also common in big data warehouses [7]. Two types of parallelism can be explored at the query level

  12. The Big Picture Multisets Sets One Last Word A Tiny Introduction to Group Arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarenko, Vadim

    The Big Picture Multisets Sets One Last Word A Tiny Introduction to Group Arithmetic past University July 3, 2008 http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/vadim/arithmetic.pdf #12;The Big Picture Multisets Sets One of S. "Sequence"=Multiset #12;The Big Picture Multisets Sets One Last Word the basic problem Let G

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 83, 018801 (2011) Electron screening and its effects on big-bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 83, 018801 (2011) Electron screening and its effects on big-bang nucleosynthesis screening on nuclear reaction rates occurring during the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch. The sensitivity. This work rules out electron screening as a relevant ingredient to big-bang nucleosynthesis, confirming

  14. Near-critical phase explosion promoting breakdown plasma ignition during laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Seleznev, L. V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    Removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure parameters were measured as a function of laser intensity I{sub peak} during nanosecond laser ablation of graphite. Surface vaporization of molten graphite at low intensities I{sub peak}<0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} was observed to transform into its near-critical phase explosion (intense homogeneous boiling) at the threshold intensity I{sub PE}approx =0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} in the form of a drastic, correlated rise of removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure magnitudes. Just above this threshold (I{sub peak}>=0.25 GW/cm{sup 2}), the explosive mass removal ended up with saturation of the removal rate, much slower increase of the air and recoil pressure magnitudes, and appearance of a visible surface plasma spark. In this regime, the measured far-field air shock pressure amplitude exhibits a sublinear dependence on laser intensity (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 4/9}), while the source plasma shock pressure demonstrates a sublinear trend (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), both indicating the subcritical character of the plasma. Against expectations, in this regime the plasma recoil pressure increases versus I{sub peak} superlinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 1.1}), rather than sublinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), with the mentioned difference related to the intensity-dependent initial spatial plasma dimensions within the laser waist on the graphite surface and to the plasma formation time during the heating laser pulse (overall, the pressure source effect). The strict coincidence of the phase explosion, providing high (kbar) hydrodynamic pressures of ablation products, and the ignition of ablative laser plasma in the carbon plume may indicate the ablative pressure-dependent character of the underlying optical breakdown at the high plume pressures, initiating the plasma formation. The experimental data evidence that the spatiotemporal extension of the plasma in the laser plume and ambient air during the heating laser pulse is supported by fast lateral electron and radiative heat conduction (laser-supported combustion wave regime), rather than by propagation of a strong shock wave (laser-supported detonation wave regime).

  15. Extraction of the pretzelosity distribution from experimental data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lefky, Christopher; Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-02-13

    We attempt an extraction of the pretzelosity distribution ($h^{\\perp}_{1T}$) from preliminary COMPASS, HERMES, and JLAB experimental data on $\\sin(3\\phi_h - \\phi_S)$ asymmetry on proton and deuteron targets. The resulting distributions, albeit big errors, show tendency for up quark pretzelosity to be positive and down quark pretzelosity to be negative. A model relation of pretzelosity distribution and Orbital Angular Momentum of quarks is used to estimate contributions of up and down quarks.

  16. 2013 Mark S. Fox City Data: Big, Open and Linked 1 City Data: Big, Open and Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    is their "grease disposal" compliance program1 . 61% of all sewer backups are caused by improperly disposed of restaurant grease. The city combined sewer data, grease hauling licenses data and grease producer data sources of grease entering the sewer system. Big Data is the buzzword du jour. It is rare to read

  17. Microenergetic research involving a coupled experimental and computational approach to evaluate microstructural effects on detonation and combustion at sub-millimeter geometries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogan, John; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew; Brundage, Aaron L.; Long, Gregory T.; Wroblewski, Brian D.; Tappan, Alexander Smith; Renlund, Anita Mariana; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Baer, Melvin R.

    2006-07-01

    A new approach to explosive sample preparation is described in which microelectronics-related processing techniques are utilized. Fused silica and alumina substrates were prepared utilizing laser machining. Films of PETN were deposited into channels within the substrates by physical vapor deposition. Four distinct explosive behaviors were observed with high-speed framing photography by driving the films with a donor explosive. Initiation at hot spots was directly observed, followed by either energy dissipation leading to failure, or growth to a detonation. Unsteady behavior in velocity and structure was observed as reactive waves failed due to decreasing channel width. Mesoscale simulations were performed to assist in experiment development and understanding. We have demonstrated the ability to pattern these films of explosives and preliminary mesoscale simulations of arrays of voids showed effects dependent on void size and that detonation would not develop with voids below a certain size. Future work involves experimentation on deposited films with regular patterned porosity to elucidate mesoscale explosive behavior.

  18. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  19. Shock Desensitization Effect in the STANAG 4363 Confined Explosive Component Water Gap Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefrancois, A S; Lee, R S; Tarver, C M

    2006-06-07

    The Explosive Component Water Gap Test (ECWGT) in the Stanag 4363 has been recently investigated to assess the shock sensitivity of lead and booster components having a diameter less than 5 mm. For that purpose, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) based pellets having a height and diameter of 3 mm have been confined by a steel annulus of wall thickness 1-3.5 mm and with the same height as the pellet. 1-mm wall thickness makes the component more sensitive (larger gap). As the wall thickness is increased to 2-mm, the gap increases a lesser amount, but when the wall thickness is increased to 3.5-mm a decrease in sensitivity is observed (smaller gap). This decrease of the water gap has been reproduced experimentally by many nations. Numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model have been performed in this paper and have reproduced the experimental results for the steel confinement up to 2 mm thick and aluminum confinement. A stronger re-shock following the first input shock from the water is focusing on the axis due to the confinement. The double shock configuration is well-known to lead in some cases to shock desensitization.

  20. Astrophysical Explosions: From Solar Flares to Cosmic Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical explosions result from the release of magnetic, gravitational, or thermonuclear energy on dynamical timescales, typically the sound-crossing time for the system. These explosions include solar and stellar flares, eruptive phenomena in accretion disks, thermonuclear combustion on the surfaces of white dwarfs and neutron stars, violent magnetic reconnection in neutron stars, thermonuclear and gravitational collapse supernovae and cosmic gamma-ray bursts, each representing a different type and amount of energy release. This paper summarizes the properties of these explosions and describes new research on thermonuclear explosions and explosions in extended circumstellar media. Parallels are drawn between studies of terrestrial and astrophysical explosions, especially the physics of the transition from deflagration to detonation. Keywords: neutron stars, black holes, supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, deflagration, detonation.