Sample records for big explosives experimental

  1. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  2. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  3. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unveils explosives detection expertise A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection expertise A team of scientists is now rolling out a collaborative...

  4. Physicists believe that our universe began with a huge explosion about thirteen billion years ago, called the Big Bang.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazama, Hokto

    the cooling period, after the Big Bang explosion, quarks and electrons were formed, followed by protons particles cannot be separated from the macroscopic system at large. RHIC is the first high energy of 20th century physics indicates, scientific progress has always been made by younger researchers

  5. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection expertise February 19, 2015 Collaboration project defeats explosives threats through enhanced detection...

  6. Nanosecond electrical explosion of thin aluminum wire in vacuum : experimental and computational investigations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Struve, Kenneth William; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Deeney, Christopher

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and computational investigations of nanosecond electrical explosion of thin Al wire in vacuum are presented. We have demonstrated that increasing the current rate leads to increased energy deposited before voltage collapse. Laser shadowgrams of the overheated Al core exhibit axial stratification with a {approx}100 {micro}m period. The experimental evidence for synchronization of the wire expansion and light emission with voltage collapse is presented. Two-wavelength interferometry shows an expanding Al core in a low-ionized gas condition with increasing ionization toward the periphery. Hydrocarbons are indicated in optical spectra and their influence on breakdown physics is discussed. The radial velocity of low-density plasma reaches a value of {approx}100 km/s. The possibility of an overcritical phase transition due to high pressure is discussed. 1D MHD simulation shows good agreement with experimental data. MHD simulation demonstrates separation of the exploding wire into a high-density cold core and a low-density hot corona as well as fast rejection of the current from the wire core to the corona during voltage collapse. Important features of the dynamics for wire core and corona follow from the MHD simulation and are discussed.

  7. Nanosecond electrical explosion of thin aluminum wires in a vacuum: Experimental and computational investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisov, G.S.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Cochrane, K.R.; Struve, K.W.; Deeney, C.; McDaniel, D.H. [Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and computational investigations of nanosecond electrical explosion of a thin Al wire in vacuum are presented. We have demonstrated that increasing the current rate leads to increased energy deposited before voltage collapse. The experimental evidence for synchronization of the wire expansion and light emission with voltage collapse is presented. Hydrocarbons are indicated in optical spectra and their influence on breakdown physics is discussed. The radial velocity of low-density plasma reaches a value of {approx}100 km/s. The possibility of an overcritical phase transition due to high pressure is discussed. A one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation shows good agreement with experimental data. The MHD simulation demonstrates separation of the exploding wire into a high-density cold core and a low-density hot corona as well as fast rejection of the current from the wire core to the corona during voltage collapse. Important features of the dynamics for the wire core and corona follow from the MHD simulation and are discussed.

  8. Big Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  9. Big Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  10. Explosives tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Eckels, Joel D. (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  11. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Center for the Physics of Materials, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16?m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material.

  12. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

  13. Explosive complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  14. Explosive complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  15. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kury, John W. (Danville, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA)

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  16. Explosives Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids1spectroscopies |Explosives

  17. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  19. Insensitive Extrudable Explosive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Applications: Plastic and extrudable explosive replacement Demolition Seismic prospecting Geographical...

  20. Dust cluster explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

  1. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  2. Supernova bangs as a tool to study big bang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blinnikov, S. I., E-mail: Sergei.Blinnikov@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in observed Universe. This educational review tells about supernovae and their applications in cosmology. It is explained how to understand the production of light in the most luminous events with minimum required energy of explosion. These most luminous phenomena can serve as primary cosmological distance indicators. Comparing the observed distance dependence on red shift with theoretical models one can extract information on evolution of the Universe from Big Bang until our epoch.

  3. Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data The City University of New York (CUNY) and its partners developed an...

  4. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  5. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  6. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  7. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  8. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  9. Plastic explosives Mike Hopkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravenel, Douglas

    Plastic explosives Mike Hill Mike Hopkins Doug Ravenel What this talk is about The poster The HHRH The reduced E4 -term 1.1 Plastic explosives: A C4 analog of the Kervaire invariant calculation Conference of Virginia Mike Hopkins Harvard University Doug Ravenel University of Rochester #12;Plastic explosives Mike

  10. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  11. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  12. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  13. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  14. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  15. Experimental Highlights - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weapons as they age or are subjected to the immense pressures and temperatures of a thermonuclear explosion. By providing experimental data to compare to computer models of...

  16. Modeling of buried explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, E.S.; Wohletz, K.H.; House, J.W.; Brown, J.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been and continues developing techniques for modeling buried explosions using a large geotechnical centrifuge. When fully developed, the techniques should permit the accurate modeling of large explosions in complex geometries. Our intentional application is to study the phenomena of explosive cavity formation and collapse. However, the same methods should also be applicable to simulation of bursts shallow enough to produce craters, and perhaps even of airbursts in situations where soil overburden is important. We have placed primary emphasis on test bed construction methods and on accurate measurement of the ground shock produced by the explosions. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A different Big Bang theory: Los Alamos unveils explosives detection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced Charged-CurrentN N U

  18. Beyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke, Thorsten Joachims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    ]: Learning General Terms Algorithms, Experimentation, Theory Keywords Big Data Pipelines, Modular Design Detection & Recognition pipeline. creation, model construction, testing, and visualization. In orderBeyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke

  19. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  20. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  1. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  2. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  3. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  4. Explosion suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  5. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  6. Explosive Nucleosynthesis: Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett

    1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive nucleosynthesis is a combination of the nuclear physics of thermonuclear reactions, and the hydrodynamics of the plasma in which the reactions occur. It depends upon the initial conditions---the stellar evolution up to the explosive instability, and the nature of the explosion mechanism. Some key issues for explosive nucleosynthesis are the interaction of burning with hydrodynamics, the degree of microscopic mixing in convective zones, and the breaking of spherical symmetry by convection and rotation. Recent experiments on high intensity lasers provides new opportunities for laboratory testing of astrophysical hydrodynamic codes. Implications of SN1987A, SN1998bw (GRB980425?), and eta Carina are discussed, as well as the formation of black holes or neutron stars.

  7. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

  9. Improving airport explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has developed the technology to detect hidden explosives in luggage using X ray and neutron detection devices. The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered the airlines to buy and install Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA) units. The combined pulsed-neutron and X-ray interrogation inspection (CPNX) system developed at ORNL uses less radioactive materials as well as being more sensitive to weapons, electronic devices and plastic explosives.

  10. DOE explosives safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires that all DOE activities be conducted in a manner that protects the safety of the public and provides a safe and healthful workplace for employees. DOE has also prescribed that all personnel be protected in any explosives operation undertaken. The level of safety provided shall be at least equivalent to that of the best industrial practice. The risk of death or serious injury shall be limited to the lowest practicable minimum. DOE and contractors shall continually review their explosives operations with the aim of achieving further refinements and improvements in safety practices and protective features. This manual describes the Department's explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in explosives safety. In addition, it is essential that applicable criteria and requirements for implementing this policy be readily available and known to those responsible for conducting DOE programs.

  11. Nuclear explosive safety study process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear explosives by their design and intended use require collocation of high explosives and fissile material. The design agencies are responsible for designing safety into the nuclear explosive and processes involving the nuclear explosive. The methodology for ensuring safety consists of independent review processes that include the national laboratories, Operations Offices, Headquarters, and responsible Area Offices and operating contractors with expertise in nuclear explosive safety. A NES Study is an evaluation of the adequacy of positive measures to minimize the possibility of an inadvertent or deliberate unauthorized nuclear detonation, high explosive detonation or deflagration, fire, or fissile material dispersal from the pit. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Group (NESSG) evaluates nuclear explosive operations against the Nuclear Explosive Safety Standards specified in DOE O 452.2 using systematic evaluation techniques. These Safety Standards must be satisfied for nuclear explosive operations.

  12. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

  13. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

  14. Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

  15. Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Describes technique of explosively...

  16. Microcantilever detector for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, T.G.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever. 2 figs.

  17. explosion: Role of hydrogen thermonuclear explosion in support of cometary hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. E. Kim

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deuteron fusion rates and that a thermonuclear explosion may compete with a thermo-chemical explosion

  18. Big Questions: Missing Antimatter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's equation E = mc2 is often said to mean that energy can be converted into matter. More accurately, energy can be converted to matter and antimatter. During the first moments of the Big Bang, the universe was smaller, hotter and energy was everywhere. As the universe expanded and cooled, the energy converted into matter and antimatter. According to our best understanding, these two substances should have been created in equal quantities. However when we look out into the cosmos we see only matter and no antimatter. The absence of antimatter is one of the Big Mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains the problem, although doesn't answer it. The answer, as in all Big Mysteries, is still unknown and one of the leading research topics of contemporary science.

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

  20. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides supplemental details on selected topics to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Cancels DOE M 452.2-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-1A.

  1. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capabilities. Staff at PNNL are developing effective integrated systems for explosives detection, addressing, fundamental science and health. Battelle, based in Columbus, Ohio, has operated PNNL since 1965. PNNL's long. PNNL is located in Richland, Washington. Additional web resources are at: http

  2. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  3. Before the Big Bang

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roger Penrose

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second law of thermodynamics says, in effect, that things get more random as time progresses. Thus, we can deduce that the beginning of the universe - the Big Bang - must have been an extraordinarily precisely organized state. What was the nature of this state? How can such a special state have come about? In Penrose's talk, a novel explanation is suggested.

  4. Evidence of the Big Fix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kiyoharu Kawana

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an evidence of the Big Fix. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value $v_{h}$. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self coupling are fixed when we vary $v_{h}$. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental low in our case.

  5. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    COTTON GIN DUST EXPLOSIBILITY DETERMINATIONS A Thesis by FRANCIS JEROME VANDERLICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... Francis Jerome Vanderlick ii ABSTRACT Following the recent Imperial sugar dust explosion in 2008, a comprehensive survey of past dust explosions was conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to determine potential...

  6. UCID-20974 Spherical Explosions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The LA:UR-EnergyUCID-20974

  7. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  8. Laser machining of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Myers, Booth R. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  9. Solving Big Problems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main MenuPortalSolving Big

  10. Big Eddy-Knight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycle SafetyBig

  11. Big Numbers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycle SafetyBigCould

  12. Addressing Big Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinideAddingAddress: ~~. . ~L~Big Data

  13. Big Crunch-based omnidirectional light concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Omnidirectional light concentration remains an unsolved problem despite such important practical applications as design of efficient mobile photovoltaic cells. Optical black hole designs developed recently offer partial solution to this problem. However, even these solutions are not truly omnidirectional since they do not exhibit a horizon, and at large enough incidence angles light may be trapped into quasi-stationary orbits around such imperfect optical black holes. Here we propose and realize experimentally another gravity-inspired design of a broadband omnidirectional light concentrator based on the cosmological Big Crunch solutions. By mimicking the Big Crunch spacetime via corresponding effective optical metric we make sure that every photon world line terminates in a single point.

  14. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

  15. Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

  16. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    test method was found to be flawed. It used pressure as the only criterion for a dust explosion, utilized high energy ignition sources, limited the amount of oxygen, and had no requirement for a dust to have a minimum explosible concentration (MEC...

  17. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  18. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  19. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  20. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research. Abstract: The generation of calibrated vapor samples of...

  1. The bigness of things Vaughn Climenhaga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climenhaga, Vaughn

    is . . . a crowd of people? number weight a fish? #12;How big is it? Meaning of "big" depends on what "it" is, and why we care. How big is . . . a crowd of people? number weight a fish? length weight #12;How big is it weight a fish? length weight a city? #12;How big is it? Meaning of "big" depends on what "it" is, and why

  2. Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Now playing at a supercomputer near you: proteins in action June 29, 2005 Contact: Dan Krotz,...

  3. Explosive detection research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malotky, L.O.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of explosives carried by a passenger or included in checked baggage is a priority objective of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Security Research and Development Program. Significant accomplishments have been made in the detection of explosives in checked baggage. A technology, thermal neutron analysis, has been developed and tested extensively in airports with actual passenger baggage. The screening of people for explosives is also progressing with laboratory testing underway of an integrated passenger screening portal. The portal is designed to extract and detect not only the more volatile explosives but also the low-vapor-pressure military explosives. In addition to these two mature technologies, the FAA is also funding research in new technologies for bulk and vapor detection of explosives to identify and refine approaches which will be more efficient and effective. The ultimate objective is to field systems to protect the traveling public from terrorist-placed explosives without interrupting the free flow of people and materials we have grown to expect.

  4. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  5. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  6. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  8. System for analysis of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA)

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analysis of explosives. Samples are spotted on a thin layer chromatography plate. Multi-component explosives standards are spotted on the thin layer chromatography plate. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in a solvent mixture and chromatography is allowed to proceed. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 1. The thin layer chromatography plate is heated. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 2.

  9. Physically based simulation of explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Matthew Douglas

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICALLY BASED SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIONS A Thesis by MATTHEW DOUGLAS ROACH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2005 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences PHYSICALLY BASED SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIONS A Thesis by MATTHEW DOUGLAS ROACH Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  10. Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

  11. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyburt, Richard H; Olive, Keith A; Yeh, Tsung-Han

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) describes the production of the lightest nuclides via a dynamic interplay among the four fundamental forces during the first seconds of cosmic time. We briefly overview the essentials of this physics, and present new calculations of light element abundances through li6 and li7, with updated nuclear reactions and uncertainties including those in the neutron lifetime. We provide fits to these results as a function of baryon density and of the number of neutrino flavors, N_nu. We review recent developments in BBN, particularly new, precision Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements that now probe the baryon density, helium content, and the effective number of degrees of freedom, n_eff. These measurements allow for a tight test of BBN and of cosmology using CMB data alone. Our likelihood analysis convolves the 2015 Planck data chains with our BBN output and observational data. Adding astronomical measurements of light elements strengthens the power of BBN. We include a ...

  12. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  13. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  14. Explosion at Ingham Colliery, Thornhill, Yorkshire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, A. M.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER EXPLOSION AT INGHAM COLLIERY, THORNHILL, YORKSHIRE REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending the Explosion which occurred at Ingham Colliery Thornhill, Yorkshire) on the 9th September, ...

  15. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  17. Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

  18. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  19. Removing High Explosives from Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

  20. Safety of Nuclear Explosive Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This directive establishes responsibilities and requirements to ensure the safety of routine and planned nuclear explosive operations and associated activities and facilities. Cancels DOE O 452.2A and DOE G 452.2A-1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.2C.

  1. Characterization of secondary grain dust explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulman, Cheryl Wendler

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    explosion These include& an ignition source; oxygeni s confined space; and fuel, which 1n most instances is grain dust held. in suspension at concentration levels in excess of the minimum explosive concentration (MEC) (Palmer, 197$). The MEC is defined.... as the minimum concentration of dust in a cloud. necessary for sustained flame propagation. The MEC is also sometimes referred to as the lower explosive limit (LZL). The lower level of explosibility for most dusts ranges from 20 to 70 This thesis follows...

  2. Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

  3. Seismic explosive charge loader and anchor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcreynolds, O.B.

    1981-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved seismic explosive charge loader and anchor for loading and anchoring explosives in cylindrical containers in bore holes is disclosed, which includes a snap in spring band shaped anchor which effectively anchors the loader in the well bore against upward movement, one aspect of the invention includes a snap lock threaded connection for securing an explosive container having interrupted threads to the loader and anchor, and the loader and anchor is constructed and arranged to maintain a detonator in place in the explosive container thereby assuring detonation of the explosive.

  4. 13-12-16 Big Data in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    13-12-16 1 Big Data in Social Networks Ivan Stojmenovic University of Ottawa December 2013 Outline Big Data Big Data in Social Networks 4V in Big Data from Social Networks Harnessing Big Data from Social Networks Small Social Data vs Big Data Community structure Space ­crossing community

  5. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  6. Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 3. Origins

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. If the LHC is successful, it will explain the nature of the Universe around us in terms of a few simple ingredients and a few simple rules. But the Universe now was forged in a Big Bang where conditions were very different, and the rules were very different, and those early moments were crucial to determining how things turned out later. At the LHC they can recreate conditions as they were billionths of a second after the Big Bang, before atoms and nuclei existed. They can find out why matter and antimatter didn't mutually annihilate each other to leave behind a Universe of pure, brilliant light. And they can look into the very structure of space and time - the fabric of the Universe

  7. Explosives detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  8. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Because calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae have become a major tool to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe and also its geometrical structure, considerable attention has been given to models of these events over the past couple of years. There are good reasons to believe that perhaps most Type Ia supernovae are the explosions of white dwarfs that have approached the Chandrasekhar mass, M_ch ~ 1.39 M_sun, and are disrupted by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen. However, the mechanism whereby such accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs explode continues to be uncertain. Recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae as well as several of the still open questions are addressed in this review. Although the main emphasis will be on studies of the explosion mechanism itself and on the related physical processes, including the physics of turbulent nuclear combustion in degenerate stars, we also discuss observational constraints.

  9. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise between optimizing the combustion performance and keeping the number of elementary charges low. Further tests in a barometric bomb calorimeter of 21.2 l volume were performed with four types of aluminum. The mass fraction burned in this case appeared to depend on the morphology of the aluminum particles. Flake aluminum exhibited a better performance than granulated aluminum with particle sizes ranging from below 25 {micro}m to 125 {micro}m for the coarsest material. In addition, a feasibility study on electro-magnetic effects from SDF charges detonated in a tunnel has been performed. A method was developed to measure the local, unsteady electro-conductivity in the detonation/combustion products cloud. This method proved to yield reproducible results. A variety of methods were tested with regard to probing electro-magnetic pulses from the detonation of SDF charges. The results showed little reproducibility and were small compared to the effect from pulsed high voltage discharges of comparatively small energy (around 32 J). Thus either no significant electromagnetic pulse is generated in our small-scale tests or the tested techniques have to be discarded as too insensitive or too limited in bandwidth to detect possibly very high frequency electro-magnetic disturbances.

  10. Regional Seismic Signals from Chemical Explosions, Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: Results from the Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W R; Gok, R; Mayeda, K; Sicherman, A; Bonner, J; Leidig, M

    2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Routine industrial mining explosions play two important roles in seismic nuclear monitoring research: (1) they are a source of background events that need to be discriminated from potential nuclear explosions; (2) as some of the only explosions occurring in the current de facto global moratoria on nuclear testing, their signals should be exploited to improve the calibration of seismic m monitoring systems. A common issue monitoring arising in both of these roles is our limited physical understanding of the causes behind observed differences and similarities in the seismic signals produced by routine industrial mining blasts and small underground nuclear tests. In 2003 a consortium (Weston, SMU, LLNL, LANL and UTEP) carried out a Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE), a series of dedicated explosions designed to improve this physical understanding, particularly as it relates to seismic methods of discriminating between signals from three different source types: earthquakes, industrial blasts, and nuclear tests. Here we very briefly review prior field experimental work that examined the seismic relationships between these source types.

  11. Data base of chemical explosions in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demin, V.N. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Malahova, M.N. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Martysevich, P.N. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Mihaylova, N.N. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Nurmagambetov, A. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Kopnichev, Yu.F. D. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan); Edomin, V.I. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan Institute of Geophysical Researches (Kazakhstan)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the bounds of this report, the following works were done: (1) Information about explosion quarries, located in Southern, Eastern and Northern Kasakstan was summarized. (2) The general information about seismicity of areas of location of explosion quarries was adduced. (3) The system of observation and seismic apparatus, recording the local earthquakes and quarry explosions at the territory of Kazakstan were described. (4) Data base of quarry explosions, that were carried out in Southern, Eastern and Northern Kazakstan during 1995 and first half of 1996 year was adduced. (5) Upon the data of registration of explosions in Southern Kazakstan the correlative dependences between power class of explosions and summary weight of charge were constructed. (6) Seismic records of quarry explosions were adduced. It is necessary to note, that the collection of data about quarry explosions in Kazakstan in present time is very difficult task. Organizations, that makes these explosions, are always suffering reorganizations and sometimes it is actually impossible to receive all the necessary information. Some quarries are situated in remote, almost inaccessible regions, and within the bounds of supplier financing not the every quarry was in success to visit. So the present data base upon the chemical explosions for 1995 is not full and in further it`s expansion is possible.

  12. Research on the mitigation of explosions on offshore oil and gas platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.M.; Shale, G.A. [British Gas plc, Loughborough (United Kingdom). Research and Technology Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of congestion, and confinement is characteristic of many offshore oil and gas platforms in the UK and Norwegian sectors of the North Sea. These conditions can result in severe explosion overpressures following the ignition of an accidental release of gas. The consequences of such an incident were illustrated by the Piper Alpha disaster in which an explosion initiated a sequence of events which rapidly lead to total destruction of the platform and the loss of 167 lives. A number of techniques can be considered for the control and mitigation of explosions on offshore platforms, including explosion relief, blast containment, explosion suppression, changes to platform layout and platform strengthening. These techniques are reviewed in the paper. However, many of them are difficult and expensive to implement on existing structures and, their use, even within new installations has limitations. Most offshore platforms are fitted with deluge systems for protection against fire. Recent research has shown that, under certain conditions, the water spray generated by a fire deluge system, typical of those currently installed on offshore platforms, can provide effective explosion mitigation. The paper describes the large-scale experimental research which has been carried out, and indicates the mechanisms by which water spray mitigates a gas explosion.

  13. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  14. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  15. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Ganesh

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution), high-temperature treatment, and freezing in water suspensions at -75 C (Millett, Baker, and Satter, 1975), Chemical pretreatments include alkali and ammonia swelling, dilute acid extraction, NO with alkali, explosive steam decompression, wet... for ruminants. Ammonia explosion pulping has been investigated as an approach to fiber separation in wood chips (O' Connor, 1971). Recent work on pretreatment techniques includes: pretreatment of cedar with peracetic acid and steam explosion to improve...

  16. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, David Steven (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1A Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Nuclear Safety,...

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  20. Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A Nuclear Explosive Safety Study (NESS) is performed on all DOE Nuclear Explosive Operations (NEOs) in accordance with DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program; DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety; and DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes.

  1. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF SEISMIC AND INFRASOUND SIGNALS FROM MINING EXPLOSIONS a) Explosion Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    MORENCIDATA TXARDATA Natural Gas Explosion and Burn in New Mexico 19 August 2000 180 km NE of site No Seismic at TXAR T. Wallace Natural Gas Explosion and Burn in New Mexico T. Wallace Ft. Hancock Infrasound ~ 180 km are illustrated below. Type 1 - Coal overburden casting (Black Thunder) where explosions are designed to expose

  2. Traffic information computing platform for big data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Zongtao, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn; Li, Ying, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn; Zheng, Xibin, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn; Liu, Yan, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn; Dai, Jiting, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn; Kang, Jun, E-mail: ztduan@chd.edu.cn [Chang'an University School of Information Engineering, Xi'an, China and Shaanxi Engineering and Technical Research Center for Road and Traffic Detection, Xi'an (China)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Big data environment create data conditions for improving the quality of traffic information service. The target of this article is to construct a traffic information computing platform for big data environment. Through in-depth analysis the connotation and technology characteristics of big data and traffic information service, a distributed traffic atomic information computing platform architecture is proposed. Under the big data environment, this type of traffic atomic information computing architecture helps to guarantee the traffic safety and efficient operation, more intelligent and personalized traffic information service can be used for the traffic information users.

  3. The mammals of Big Thicket National Preserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnette, Ralph Brian

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unit. . 102 Table 21. Track count results, Hickory Creek Savannah Unit 103 LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Map showing three different con- cepts of the Big Thicket Figure 2. Map of the units of Big Thicket National Preserve. Figure 3. The Beech... of the units of Big Thicket National Pre- serve. Cross-hatched areas indicate the individual units. CHESTER S 8) COLMESNEIL BA Ir LO Ste nhagen J Lake JASPER US e? W DVILLE BEEC CREEK UNIT TOWN BLUFF UPPER NECHE RIVER CORRIDOR UNIT BIG SANDY...

  4. Big Data Hits the Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science | StanfordBiddingBig Data Hits

  5. Big Sol - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science | StanfordBiddingBig Data

  6. Fun with Big Sky Learning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2: JetInnovationFun with Big

  7. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  8. Prediction of Fire Spread Following Nuclear Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Prediction of Fire Spread Following Nuclear Explosions Craig C. Chandler, Theodore G. Storey of Agriculture #12;Chandler, Craig C., Storey, Theodore G., and Tangren, Charles D. 1963. Prediction of fire spread following nuclear explosions. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Forest & Range Expt Sta. 110 pp

  9. Method for laser machining explosives and ordnance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muenchausen, Ross E.; Rivera, Thomas; Sanchez, John A.

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for laser machining explosives and related articles. A laser beam is directed at a surface portion of a mass of high explosive to melt and/or vaporize the surface portion while directing a flow of gas at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion. The gas flow sends the melted and/or vaporized explosive away from the charge of explosive that remains. The method also involves splitting the casing of a munition having an encased explosive. The method includes rotating a munition while directing a laser beam to a surface portion of the casing of an article of ordnance. While the beam melts and/or vaporizes the surface portion, a flow of gas directed at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion sends it away from the remaining portion of ordnance. After cutting through the casing, the beam then melts and/or vaporizes portions of the encased explosive and the gas stream sends the melted/vaporized explosive away from the ordnance. The beam is continued until it splits the article, after which the encased explosive, now accessible, can be removed safely for recycle or disposal.

  10. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  11. Explosions inside Ejecta and Most Luminous Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Blinnikov

    2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The extremely luminous supernova SN2006gy is explained in the same way as other SNIIn events: light is produced by a radiative shock propagating in a dense circumstellar envelope formed by a previous weak explosion. The problems in the theory and observations of multiple-explosion SNe IIn are briefly reviewed.

  12. Glass produced by underground nuclear explosions. [Rainier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.; Piwinskii, A.; Ryerson, F.; Tewes, H.; Beiriger, W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detonation of an underground nuclear explosive produces a strong shock wave which propagates spherically outward, vaporizing the explosive and nearby rock and melting, the surrounding rock. The vaporized material expands adiabatically, forming a cavity. As the energy is dissipated during the cavity formation process, the explosive and rock debris condense and mix with the melted rock. The melt flows to the bottom of the cavity where it is quenched by fractured rock fragments falling from above as the cavity collapses. Measurements indicate that about 740 tonnes of rock and/or soil are melted for every kiloton (10/sup 12/ calories) of explosive energy, or about 25% of the explosive energy goes to melting rock. The resulting glass composition reflects the composition of the unaltered rock with explosive debris. The appearance ranges from white pumice to dense, dark lava. The bulk composition and color vary with the amount of explosive iron incorporated into the glass. The refractory explosion products are mixed with the solidified melt, although the degree of mixing is variable. Electron microprobe studies of glasses produced by Rainier in welded tuff have produced the following results: glasses are dehydrated relative to the host media, glasses are extremely heterogeneous on a 20 ..mu..m scale, a ubiquitous feature is the presence of dark marble-cake regions in the glass, which were locally enriched in iron and may be related to the debris, optically amorphous regions provide evidence of shock melting, only limited major element redistribution and homogenization occur within the cavity.

  13. Models of Type Ia Supernova Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; M. Reinecke; W. Hillebrandt

    2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae have become an indispensable tool for studying the expansion history of the universe, yet our understanding of the explosion mechanism is still incomplete. We describe the variety of discussed scenarios, sketch the most relevant physics, and report recent advances in multidimensional simulations of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf explosions.

  14. Models of Type Ia Supernova Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, J C; Hillebrandt, W

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae have become an indispensable tool for studying the expansion history of the universe, yet our understanding of the explosion mechanism is still incomplete. We describe the variety of discussed scenarios, sketch the most relevant physics, and report recent advances in multidimensional simulations of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf explosions.

  15. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  16. NEW - DOE O 452.2E, Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  17. NERSC User Group 2013 Big Bang, Big Data, Big Iron Planck Satellite Data Analysis At NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events:00---9:30 Registration a ndDay2013 Big

  18. Astrophysical S-factor for destructive reactions of lithium-7 in big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Kwon, YoungKwan; Moon, JunYoung; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang-Bum [Hoseo University, Asan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ozawa, Akira; Sasa, Kimikazu; Onishi, Takahiro; Yuasa, Toshiaki; Okada, Shunsuke; Saito, Yuta [Division of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayakawa, Takehito; Shizuma, Toshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kubono, Shigeru [RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Kusakabe, Motohiko [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most prominent success with the Big Bang models is the precise reproduction of mass abundance ratio for {sup 4}He. In spite of the success, abundances of lithium isotopes are still inconsistent between observations and their calculated results, which is known as lithium abundance problem. Since the calculations were based on the experimental reaction data together with theoretical estimations, more precise experimental measurements may improve the knowledge of the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. As one of the destruction process of lithium-7, we have performed measurements for the reaction cross sections of the {sup 7}L({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction.

  19. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  20. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  1. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  2. The IIT Innovators Fueling Big Ideas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    Making things work. The IIT Innovators Fueling Big Ideas Winter 2012 John P. Calamos sr. Bold Thinking The PlanT How the Zero-Waste System Works researCh Neutron Detection, Dinosaur Collagen, Big Data in our next wave of innovators and leaders, some of whom are featured in this issue. Our students have

  3. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade...

  4. Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Sept...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Sept. 18 To highlight the Laboratory's work in the field of...

  5. Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Construction on Pantex High Explosives...

  6. Chemical analysis kit for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes; Peter J. (Danville, CA); Alcaraz, Armando (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A tester for testing for explosives associated with a test location comprising a first explosives detecting reagent; a first reagent holder, the first reagent holder containing the first explosives detecting reagent; a second explosives detecting reagent; a second reagent holder, the second reagent holder containing the second explosives detecting reagent; a sample collection unit for exposure to the test location, exposure to the first explosives detecting reagent, and exposure to the second explosives detecting reagent; and a body unit containing a heater for heating the sample collection unit for testing the test location for the explosives.

  7. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security The Order establishes...

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requiremen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety by Carl Sykes This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of...

  9. Transforming big data into knowledge : experimental techniques in dynamic visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Stephen James, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information visualizations, especially those utilizing web-based platforms, are becoming an increasingly common medium for exchanging ideas. This emergent class of tools enabling web-based, interactive platforms for ...

  10. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  11. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  12. EA-1880: Big Bend to Witten Transmission Line Project, South...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    880: Big Bend to Witten Transmission Line Project, South Dakota EA-1880: Big Bend to Witten Transmission Line Project, South Dakota Summary The USDA Rural Utilities Service, with...

  13. Pennsylvania State University Wins Big In Las Vegas: Energy Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pennsylvania State University Wins Big In Las Vegas: Energy Department Crowns Collegiate Wind Competition Champion Pennsylvania State University Wins Big In Las Vegas: Energy...

  14. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  15. Models and Analysis of Wire Explosions Using TRAC II Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekker, A.; Reisman, D.B.

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the dynamics of Z-pinch imposions of thin wires in pulse-power accelerators, it is necessary to understand the physical process by which the initially solid wires are converted into plasma by rising current. For this purpose, we model wire explosions using TRAC II, a two-dimensional MHD code, in three distinct cases: pure tungsten, impure tungsten, and gold-plated tungsten. We compare our results--overall picture of the process, corona linear density, corona mass, and core expansion rate--to actual experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratory and Cornell University and present some explanations for the disagreements between our model and experimental observations. In Chapter 1, we discuss model results for several current waveforms (consisting of a 5 kA 50-150 ns pre-pulse and 80 kA 80 ns main pulse) for a pure tungsten wire, showing that the initial temperature of the wire does not affect the dynamics of the explosion. This suggests that different experimental results for unheated and preheated tungsten wires are due to the expulsion of impurities in the preheated wire and not to a change in the material properties of tungsten. To match the experimental set-up more accurately, we model the explosion of a tungsten wire with impurities in Chapter 2. The overall process predicted by the model agrees with experiment, namely the shunting of the current through the impurities region before tungsten expansion begins; however, quantitative results disagree with experimental observations mostly because of the extreme shunting of the current through the impurities in our model. Finally, in Chapter 3, we compare the explosions in gold-plated tungsten, pure tungsten, and pure gold wires under high (100 kA in 60 ns) and low (2 kA in 270 ns) currents, finding general agreement with experiment in the high-current case and a disagreement by a factor of ten in the low-current case. In addition, due to the similar properties of the two metals, we find no vast differences among the three cases in the high-current case, while the single-metal wire expand faster and farther than the gold-plated wire in the low-current case. We believe that the disagreement between our model and experiment can be decreased by better modeling of tungsten impurities and by improvements in the conductivity and bonding models.

  16. In Defense of the National Labs and Big-Budget Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, J R

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present the unofficial and unsanctioned opinions of a Visiting Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the values of LLNL and the other National Labs. The basic founding value and goal of the National Labs is big-budget scientific research, along with smaller-budget scientific research that cannot easily be done elsewhere. The most important example in the latter category is classified defense-related research. The historical guiding light here is the Manhattan Project. This endeavor was unique in human history, and might remain so. The scientific expertise and wealth of an entire nation was tapped in a project that was huge beyond reckoning, with no advance guarantee of success. It was in many respects a clash of scientific titans, with a large supporting cast, collaborating toward a single well-defined goal. Never had scientists received so much respect, so much money, and so much intellectual freedom to pursue scientific progress. And never was the gap between theory and implementation so rapidly narrowed, with results that changed the world, completely. Enormous resources are spent at the national or international level on large-scale scientific projects. LLNL has the most powerful computer in the world, Blue Gene/L. (Oops, Los Alamos just seized the title with Roadrunner; such titles regularly change hands.) LLNL also has the largest laser in the world, the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has the most powerful microscope in the world. Not only is it beyond the resources of most large corporations to make such expenditures, but the risk exceeds the possible rewards for those corporations that could. Nor can most small countries afford to finance large scientific projects, and not even the richest can afford largess, especially if Congress is under major budget pressure. Some big-budget research efforts are funded by international consortiums, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, a magnetic-confinement fusion research project. The postWWII histories of particle and fusion physics contain remarkable examples of both international competition, with an emphasis on secrecy, and international cooperation, with an emphasis on shared knowledge and resources. Initiatives to share sometimes came from surprising directions. Most large-scale scientific projects have potential defense applications. NIF certainly does; it is primarily designed to create small-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L operates in part in service to NIF, and in part to various defense projects. The most important defense projects include stewardship of the national nuclear weapons stockpile, and the proposed redesign and replacement of those weapons with fewer, safer, more reliable, longer-lived, and less apocalyptic warheads. Many well-meaning people will consider the optimal lifetime of a nuclear weapon to be zero, but most thoughtful people, when asked how much longer they think this nation will require them, will ask for some time to think. NIF is also designed to create exothermic small-scale fusion explosions. The malapropos 'exothermic' here is a convenience to cover a profusion of complexities, but the basic idea is that the explosions will create more recoverable energy than was used to create them. One can hope that the primary future benefits of success for NIF will be in cost-effective generation of electrical power through controlled small-scale fusion reactions, rather than in improved large-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L also services climate research, genomic research, materials research, and a myriad of other computational problems that become more feasible, reliable, and precise the larger the number of computational nodes employed. Blue Gene/L has to be sited within a security complex for obvious reasons, but its value extends to the nation and the world. There is a duality here between large-scale scientific research machines and the supercomputers used

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  19. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

  20. Unreacted Hugoniots for porous and liquid explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous authors have measured the Hugoniots of a variety of granular explosives pressed to different densities. Each explosive at each density was typically then treated as a unique material having its own Hugoniot. By combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. We discuss application of this method to several materials including HMX, PETN, TNT, and Tetryl, as well as HNS. We also show that the ``Universal Liquid Hugoniot`` can be used to calculate the unreacted Hugoniot for liquid explosives. With this method only the ambient pressure sound speed and density are needed to predict the Hugoniot. Applications presented include nitromethane and liquid TNT.

  1. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

  2. High-explosive anti-tank warheads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 30, 2011 ... In Russian literature, this jet of steel formed by explosion, which pierces the armor, is called the “wire”. It is very thin indeed. You can see the.

  3. Explosive Safety Manual, to a New Order

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This memorandum provides justification for the conversion of Department of Energy (DOE) Manual (M) 440.1-1A, DOE Explosives Safety Manual, dated 1-9-06, into a new DOE Order.

  4. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D

  5. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D Admin Chg 1.

  6. The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

    triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations

  7. A theoretical model of the explosive fragmentation of vesicular magma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    fire fountaining to vigorous Vulcanian and Plinian eruptions. The range of different types of explosiveA theoretical model of the explosive fragmentation of vesicular magma A. C. Fowler, MACSI explosion can occur, and is motivated by the corresponding phenomenon of magmatic explosion during Vulcanian

  8. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  9. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  10. The control of confined vapor phase explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scilly, N.F. [Laporte plc, Widnes (United Kingdom); Owen, O.J.R. [Fine Organics, Ltd., Middlesborough (United Kingdom); Wilberforce, J.K. [Solvay SA, Brussels (Belgium)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability of, for example, a fire or explosion occurring during a process operation is related both to the fire-related properties of the materials used, such as flash point, flammable limits etc., i.e. the material or intrinsic factors, and the nature of the operation and the equipment used, i.e. the extrinsic factors. The risk, or frequency of occurrence, of other hazards such as reaction runaway, major toxic release etc. can be determined in a similar manner. For a vapor phase explosion (and a fire) the probability of the event is the product of the probability of generating a flammable atmosphere and the probability of ignition. Firstly, materials may be coded using properties that are relevant to the hazard in question. Secondly, different operations have different degrees of risk and these risks are assigned as Low, Medium, High etc. according to criteria outlined here. Combination of these two factors will then be a measure of the overall risk of the operation with the specified material and may be used to define operating standards. Currently, the hazard/risk of a vapor phase explosions is examined by this method but in due course dust explosions, fires, condensed phase explosions, reaction runaways, physical explosions, major toxic releases and incompatibility will be included.

  11. 11.123 Big Plans, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Monchaux, John

    This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's ...

  12. Use of explosives to demolish multistory steel frame buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Charles Vernon

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Explosives Engineers. The articles dealt with the state-of-the-art, covering many peripheral subjects of the use of explosives to demolish steel framed multistory buildings. The most extensive literature available on controlled demolition techniques... with the exception of several articles presented to the Annual Proceedings of the Society of Explosives Engineers and a few U. S. government studies on the use of explosives. In depth interviews were conducted with controlled explosive demolition companies...

  13. Stellar Explosions by Magnetic Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri A. Uzdensky; Andrew I. MacFadyen

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a magnetic mechanism for the collimated explosion of a massive star relevant for GRBs, XRFs and asymmetric supernovae. We apply Lynden-Bell's magnetic tower scenario to the interior of a massive rotating star after the core has collapsed to form a black hole with an accretion disk or a millisecond magnetar acting as a central engine. We solve the force-free Grad-Shafranov equation to calculate the magnetic structure and growth of a tower embedded in a stellar environment. The pressure of the toroidal magnetic field, continuously generated by differential rotation of the central engine, drives a rapid expansion which becomes vertically collimated after lateral force balance with the surrounding gas pressure is reached. The collimation naturally occurs because hoop stress concentrates magnetic field toward the rotation axis and inhibits lateral expansion. This leads to the growth of a self-collimated magnetic tower. When embedded in a massive star, the supersonic expansion of the tower drives a strong bow shock behind which an over-pressured cocoon forms. The cocoon confines the tower by supplying collimating pressure and provides stabilization against disruption due to MHD instabilities. Because the tower consists of closed field lines starting and ending on the central engine, mixing of baryons from the cocoon into the tower is suppressed. The channel cleared by the growing tower is thus plausibly free of baryons and allows the escape of magnetic energy from the central engine through the star. While propagating down the stellar density gradient, the tower accelerates and becomes relativistic. During the expansion, fast collisionless reconnection becomes possible resulting in dissipation of magnetic energy which may be responsible for GRB prompt emission.

  14. Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

  15. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  16. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  18. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  19. Damage predictions of aluminum thin-walled structures subjected to explosive loads.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saul, W. Venner; Reu, Phillip L.; Gruda, Jeffrey Donald; Haulenbeek, Kimberly K.; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Phelan, James M.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Corona, Edmundo; Gwinn, Kenneth West

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting failure of thin-walled structures from explosive loading is a very complex task. The problem can be divided into two parts; the detonation of the explosive to produce the loading on the structure, and secondly the structural response. First, the factors that affect the explosive loading include: size, shape, stand-off, confinement, and chemistry of the explosive. The goal of the first part of the analysis is predicting the pressure on the structure based on these factors. The hydrodynamic code CTH is used to conduct these calculations. Secondly, the response of a structure from the explosive loading is predicted using a detailed finite element model within the explicit analysis code Presto. Material response, to failure, must be established in the analysis to model the failure of this class of structures; validation of this behavior is also required to allow these analyses to be predictive for their intended use. The presentation will detail the validation tests used to support this program. Validation tests using explosively loaded aluminum thin flat plates were used to study all the aspects mentioned above. Experimental measurements of the pressures generated by the explosive and the resulting plate deformations provided data for comparison against analytical predictions. These included pressure-time histories and digital image correlation of the full field plate deflections. The issues studied in the structural analysis were mesh sensitivity, strain based failure metrics, and the coupling methodologies between the blast and structural models. These models have been successfully validated using these tests, thereby increasing confidence of the results obtained in the prediction of failure thresholds of complex structures, including aircraft.

  20. Report on the treatability study for inerting small quantities of radioactive explosives and explosive components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyola, V.M.; Reber, S.D.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of Sandia`s radiation hardening testing on a variety of its explosive components, radioactive waste streams were generated and have to be disposed of as radioactive waste. Due to the combined hazards of explosives and radioactivity, Sandia`s Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management organization did not have a mechanism for disposal of these waste streams. This report documents the study done to provide a method for the removal of the explosive hazard from those waste streams. The report includes the design of the equipment used, procedures followed, results from waste stream analog tests and the results from the actual explosive inerting tests on radioactive samples. As a result of the inerting treatment, the waste streams were rendered non-explosive and, thus, manageable through normal radioactive waste disposal channels.

  1. Big Data + Big Compute = An Extreme Scale Marriage for Smarter Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    University choudhar@eecs.northwestern.edu Founder and President Voxsup Inc: A Big Data Science Company +1 312 of new material © Alok Choudhary 3 #12;4© Alok Choudhary h8p://science.energy, application, storage? · An application can be data intensive without being I/O intensive · (Big) Data

  2. IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel By Clare Byrne Visitors to Madagascar, Senegal to South Africa, biofuels is the buzzword as African countries wake up to the possibility of using their vast spaces to grow crops that reduce their fossil fuel bill. Biofuels also carry

  3. Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

  4. Airport testing an explosives detection portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhykerd, C.; Linker, K.; Hannum, D.; Bouchier, F.; Parmeter, J.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the direction of the US Congress, following the Pan Am 103 and TWA 800 crashes, the Federal Aviation Administration funded development of non-invasive techniques to screen airline passengers for explosives. Such an explosives detection portal, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was field tested at the Albuquerque International airport in September 1997. During the 2-week field trial, 2,400 passengers were screened and 500 surveyed. Throughput, reliability, maintenance and sensitivity were studied. Follow-up testing at Sandia and at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was conducted. A passenger stands in the portal for five seconds while overhead fans blow air over his body. Any explosive vapors or dislodged particles are collected in vents at the feet. Explosives are removed from the air in a preconcentrator and subsequently directed into an ion mobility spectrometer for detection. Throughput measured 300 passengers per hour. The non-invasive portal can detect subfingerprint levels of explosives residue on clothing. A survey of 500 passengers showed a 97% approval rating, with 99% stating that such portals, if effective, should be installed in airports to improve security. Results of the airport test, as well as operational issues, are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferranti, L; Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J; Vandersall, K S

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity of fragmentation resulting from high velocity impact events. These parameters are necessary for developing and validating physically based material constitutive models that will characterize the safety and performance of energetic materials. The preliminary study uses a reverse Taylor impact configuration that was designed to measure the dynamic behavior of the explosive mock up to and including associated fragmentation. A stationary rod-shaped specimen was impacted using a compressed-gas gun by accelerating a rigid steel anvil attached to a sabot. The impact test employed high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry diagnostics for capturing the transient deformation of the sample at discrete times. Once established as a viable experimental technique with mock explosives, future studies will examine the dynamic response of insensitive high explosives and propellants.

  6. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  7. Phases of a Type Ia supernova explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer

    1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf model for Type Ia supernovae, various stages of the explosion are described in terms of the burning regimes of the thermonuclear flame front. In the early flamelet regime following the ``smoldering'' phase prior to the explosion, the flame is sufficiently thin and fast to remain laminar on small scales. As the white dwarf density declines, the thermal flame structure becomes subject to penetration by turbulent eddies, and it enters the ``distributed burning'' regime. A specific control parameter for this transition is proposed. Furthermore, we outline an argument for the coincidence of the transition between burning regimes with the onset of a deflagration-detonation-transition (DDT) in the late phase of the explosion.

  8. THE BIGGEST EXPLOSIONS IN THE UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jarrett L.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Group (T-2), Thermonuclear Applications Physics Group (XTD-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [Computational Physics and Methods Group (CCS-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alex [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Chen, Ke-Jung, E-mail: jlj@lanl.gov [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive primordial stars are expected to form in a small fraction of massive protogalaxies in the early universe, and are generally conceived of as the progenitors of the seeds of supermassive black holes (BHs). Supermassive stars with masses of ?55, 000 M{sub ?}, however, have been found to explode and completely disrupt in a supernova (SN) with an energy of up to ?10{sup 55} erg instead of collapsing to a BH. Such events, ?10, 000 times more energetic than typical SNe today, would be among the biggest explosions in the history of the universe. Here we present a simulation of such a SN in two stages. Using the RAGE radiation hydrodynamics code, we first evolve the explosion from an early stage through the breakout of the shock from the surface of the star until the blast wave has propagated out to several parsecs from the explosion site, which lies deep within an atomic cooling dark matter (DM) halo at z ? 15. Then, using the GADGET cosmological hydrodynamics code, we evolve the explosion out to several kiloparsecs from the explosion site, far into the low-density intergalactic medium. The host DM halo, with a total mass of 4 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}, much more massive than typical primordial star-forming halos, is completely evacuated of high-density gas after ?< 10 Myr, although dense metal-enriched gas recollapses into the halo, where it will likely form second-generation stars with metallicities of ? 0.05 Z{sub ?} after ?> 70 Myr. The chemical signature of supermassive star explosions may be found in such long-lived second-generation stars today.

  9. Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

    2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

  10. Little Big Horn River Water Quality Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bad Bear, D.J.; Hooker, D. [Little Big Horn Coll., Crow Agency, MT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Water Quality Project on the Little Big horn River during the summer of 1995. The majority of the summer was spent collecting data on the Little Big Horn River, then testing the water samples for a number of different tests which was done at the Little Big Horn College in Crow Agency, Montana. The intention of this study is to preform stream quality analysis to gain an understanding of the quality of selected portion of the river, to assess any impact that the existing developments may be causing to the environment and to gather base-line data which will serve to provide information concerning the proposed development. Citizens of the reservation have expressed a concern of the quality of the water on the reservation; surface waters, ground water, and well waters.

  11. Effective dynamics of the matrix big bang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rajaraman, Arvind [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the leading quantum effects in the recently introduced matrix big bang model. This amounts to a study of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory compactified on the Milne orbifold. We find a one-loop potential that is attractive near the big bang. Surprisingly, the potential decays very rapidly at late times where it appears to be generated by D-brane effects. Usually, general covariance constrains the form of any effective action generated by renormalization group flow. However, the form of our one-loop potential seems to violate these constraints in a manner that suggests a connection between the cosmological singularity and long wavelength, late time physics.

  12. Big Sky Wind Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBig SandySky

  13. Big Tree Climate Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBigWindTree

  14. aux explosions nucleaires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    essentially undisturbed, even if the explosion is strong enough to blow away all the gas located inside the halo at the onset of the explosion and reheat the IGM surrounding...

  15. Detection of Explosives via Photolytic Cleavage of Nitroesters and Nitramines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    The nitramine-containing explosive RDX and the nitroester-containing explosive PETN are shown to be susceptible to photofragmentation upon exposure to sunlight. Model compounds containing nitroester and nitramine moieties ...

  16. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 0: General introduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Recommendation has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres; It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas atmospheres. This particular...

  17. Intra- and interspecific responses to Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) social calls.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Britzke, Eric, R.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bats respond to the calls of conspecifics as well as to calls of other species; however, few studies have attempted to quantify these responses or understand the functions of these calls. We tested the response of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) to social calls as a possible method to increase capture success and to understand the function of social calls. We also tested if calls of bats within the range of the previously designated subspecies differed, if the responses of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats varied with geographic origin of the calls, and if other species responded to the calls of C. rafinesquii. We recorded calls of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats at two colony roost sites in South Carolina, USA. Calls were recorded while bats were in the roosts and as they exited. Playback sequences for each site were created by copying typical pulses into the playback file. Two mist nets were placed approximately 50–500 m from known roost sites; the net with the playback equipment served as the Experimental net and the one without the equipment served as the Control net. Call structures differed significantly between the Mountain and Coastal Plains populations with calls from the Mountains being of higher frequency and longer duration. Ten of 11 Rafinesque’s big-eared bats were caught in the Control nets and, 13 of 19 bats of other species were captured at Experimental nets even though overall bat activity did not differ significantly between Control and Experimental nets. Our results suggest that Rafinesque’s big-eared bats are not attracted to conspecifics’ calls and that these calls may act as an intraspecific spacing mechanism during foraging.

  18. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

  19. New Dark Matter Detector using Nanoscale Explosives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Tarle, Gregory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nanoscale explosives as a novel type of dark matter detector and study the ignition properties. When a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle WIMP from the Galactic Halo elastically scatters off of a nucleus in the detector, the small amount of energy deposited can trigger an explosion. For specificity, this paper focuses on a type of two-component explosive known as a nanothermite, consisting of a metal and an oxide in close proximity. When the two components interact they undergo a rapid exothermic reaction --- an explosion. As a specific example, we consider metal nanoparticles of 5 nm radius embedded in an oxide. One cell contains more than a few million nanoparticles, and a large number of cells adds up to a total of 1 kg detector mass. A WIMP interacts with a metal nucleus of the nanoparticles, depositing enough energy to initiate a reaction at the interface between the two layers. When one nanoparticle explodes it initiates a chain reaction throughout the cell. A number of possible thermite mat...

  20. NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Thomas

    NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS Thomas Rauscher 1 , Friedrich. of Astron. and Astroph., Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract The majority of nuclear­Feshbach). The global parametrizations of the nuclear properties needed for predictions far off stability probe our

  1. Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

  2. Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagadorn, Whitey

    4 Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom James W. Hagadorn T he middle cambrian burgess shale is one of the world's best-known and best-studied fossil deposits. The story of the discovery in the Burgess Shale Formation of the Canadian Rockies, Charles Walcott discovered a remarkable "phyl- lopod

  3. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  4. Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Plewa; Alan Calder; Don Lamb

    2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The proposed scenario follows from relaxing the assumption of symmetry in the model and involves a detonation created in an unconfined environment. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of stellar material initiating a deflagration. This deflagration results in the formation of a buoyantly-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout forms a strong pressure wave that laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface. The flow conditions at that moment support a detonation that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion following the deflagration redistributes stellar mass in a way that ensures production of intermediate mass and iron group elements consistent with observations. The ejecta will have a strongly layered structure with a mild amount of asymmetry following from the early deflagration phase. This asymmetry, combined with the amount of stellar expansion determined by details of the evolution (principally the energetics of deflagration, timing of detonation, and structure of the progenitor), can be expected to create a family of mildly diverse Type Ia supernova explosions.

  5. ANALYSIS OF MINING EXPLOSION PERFORMANCE WITH MULTIPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    Limitations of Video Data · Effect of Blast Design on Near-Source Seismograms · Different Types of Cast Blasts of Models in Visualization ß Two-Dimensional Blast Model ß Three-Dimensional Blast Models 3. Applications to Different Types of Mining Explosions · Single Shot · Cast Blast · Coal Fragmentation #12;Analysis of Mining

  6. Explosives Classifications Tracking System User Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genoni, R.P.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Explosives Classification Tracking System (ECTS) presents information and data for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) explosives classifications of interest to EM-561, Transportation Management Division, other DOE facilities, and contractors. It is intended to be useful to the scientist, engineer, and transportation professional, who needs to classify or transport explosives. This release of the ECTS reflects upgrading of the software which provides the user with an environment that makes comprehensive retrieval of explosives related information quick and easy. Quarterly updates will be provided to the ECTS throughout its development in FY 1993 and thereafter. The ECTS is a stand alone, single user system that contains unclassified, publicly available information, and administrative information (contractor names, product descriptions, transmittal dates, EX-Numbers, etc.) information from many sources for non-decisional engineering and shipping activities. The data is the most up-to-date and accurate available to the knowledge of the system developer. The system is designed to permit easy revision and updating as new information and data become available. These, additions and corrections are welcomed by the developer. This user manual is intended to help the user install, understand, and operate the system so that the desired information may be readily obtained, reviewed, and reported.

  7. Exploiting Variable Stiffness in Explosive Movement Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu

    robots. The proposed methodology is applied to a ball- throwing task where we demonstrate that: (i, with the motivation of (i) improving safety of robots and humans (by providing an intrinsic compliance) [26], (iiExploiting Variable Stiffness in Explosive Movement Tasks David J. Braun, Matthew Howard and Sethu

  8. A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabrey, Wayne Edward

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    perspective: (1) By simulating the explosion of a satellite we mean that: given the knowledge of' the number of pieces and the force vector of each piece, we will simulate the resulting trajectories. (2) The simulation of a satellite trajectory... classical elements of each debris piece as a function of: (1) the trajectory of the center of mass of *he explosion debris and (2) the explosive forces. Computer program modules are developed to create an explosion and calculate the elements of each...

  9. Determination of explosive blast loading equivalencies with an explosively driven shock tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values are then compared for different explosives of interest and to other methods of equivalency determination.

  10. BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain Berkeley Researchers and Supercomputers to Help Create a Standard 3D Neuron...

  11. The Politics of European Collaboration in Big Olof Hallonsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongartz, Klaus

    politics. Keywords Big Science · CERN · Common market · European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOMThe Politics of European Collaboration in Big Science Olof Hallonsten Abstract Intergovernmental outside of the political integration work of the European Community/Union, which has resulted

  12. Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Pagoria, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

  13. 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions October 25, 2013 During the Cold War, U) have partnered to develop a 3-D model of the Earth's mantle and crust called SALSA3D (Sandia-Los Alamos of explosions. Significance of the research After an explosion, the energy travels through the Earth as waves

  14. Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Simpson, Randall L.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

  15. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random process and the Brownian CRT. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th

  16. COUPLING AND COHERENCE ESTIMATES FROM SINGLE-FIRED CYLINDRICAL EXPLOSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    COUPLING AND COHERENCE ESTIMATES FROM SINGLE-FIRED CYLINDRICAL EXPLOSIONS Implications for Using 4 5 6 7 8 test bench pit charge depth burden charge length explosive stemming #12;Single shot) Modeling - Source a) Explosion Source Mueller-Murphy model b) Vertical Spall Opening of horizontal crack

  17. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  18. Space Time Quantization and the Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    1998-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent cosmological model is recapitulated which deduces the correct mass, radius and age of the universe as also the Hubble constant and other well known apparently coincidental relations. It also predicts an ever expanding accelerating universe as is confirmed by latest supernovae observations. Finally the Big Bang model is recovered as a suitable limiting case.

  19. EIS-0315-S1: SEIS on Caithness Big Sandy Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2001, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Western Area Power Administration (Western) issued the Big Sandy Energy Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (BLM and Western 2001). After June 2001, Caithness Big Sandy, L.L.C. (Caithness), revised aspects of the Big Sandy Energy Project (Project) described as the Proposed Action in the Draft EIS.

  20. Visualizing Distributed Data with BigWig and BigBed at UCSC (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kent, Jim [UCSC

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Kent from University of California, Santa Cruz presents on "Visualizing Distributed Data with BigWig and BigBed at UCSC" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  1. Distributed Explosive-Driven Six-foot Diameter by Two-Hundred Foot Long Shock Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VIGIL, MANUEL G.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blast parameters for the 6-foot diameter by 200-foot long, explosively driven shock tube are presented in this report. The purpose, main characteristics, and blast simulation capabilities of this PETN Primacord, explosively driven facility are included. Experimental data are presented for air and Sulfurhexaflouride (SF6) test gases with initial pressures between 0.5 to 12.1 psia (ambient). Experimental data are presented and include shock wave time of amval at various test stations, flow duration, static or side-on overpressure, and stagnation or head-on overpressure. The blast parameters calculated from the above measured parameters and presented in this report include shock wave velocity, shock strength, shock Mach number, flow Mach Number, reflected pressure, dynamic pressure, particle velocity, density, and temperature. Graphical data for the above parameters are included. Algorithms and least squares fit equations are also included.

  2. Explosive lithium production in the classical nova V339 Del (Nova Delphini 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tajitsu, Akito; Naito, Hiroyuki; Arai, Akir; Aoki, Wako

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of lithium (Li) and its production process have long been an unsettled question in cosmology and astrophysics. Candidates environments of Li production events or sites suggested by previous studies include big bang nucleosynthesis, interactions of energetic cosmic rays with interstellar matter, evolved low mass stars, novae, and supernova explosions. Chemical evolution models and observed stellar Li abundances suggest that at least half of the present Li abundance may have been produced in red giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and novae. However, no direct evidence for the supply of Li from stellar objects to the Galactic medium has yet been found. Here we report on the detection of highly blue-shifted resonance lines of the singly ionized radioactive isotope of beryllium, $^{7}$Be, in the near ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the classical nova V339 Del (Nova Delphini 2013). Spectra were obtained 38 to 48 days after the explosion. $^{7}$Be decays to form $^{7}$Li within a short time (half-li...

  3. Method and system for detecting explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  4. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  5. Experiments Upon the Explosions of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Fred

    1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appeared at i n t e r v a l s i n the s c i e n t i f i c papers and magazines on the heat and explosion engine, hut not u n t i l recently has the subject been considered of any great impor­ tance. After a time a magazine devoted excl u s i v e l y...

  6. DOE explosives safety manual. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual prescribes the Department of Energy (DOE) safety rules used to implement the DOE safety policy for operations involving explosives. This manual is applicable to all DOE facilities engaged in operations of development, manufacturing, handling, storage, transportation, processing, or testing of explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, or assemblies containing these materials. The standards of this manual deal with the operations involving explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, and the safe management of such operations. The design of all new explosives facilities shall conform to the requirements established in this manual and implemented in DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria Manual.`` It is not intended that existing physical facilities be changed arbitrarily to comply with these provisions, except as required by law. Existing facilities that do not comply with these standards may continue to be used for the balance of their functional life, as long as the current operation presents no significantly greater risk than that assumed when the facility was originally designed and it can be demonstrated clearly that a modification to bring the facility into compliance is not feasible. However, in the case of a major renovation, the facility must be brought into compliance with current standards. The standards are presented as either mandatory or advisory. Mandatory standards, denoted by the words ``shall,`` ``must,`` or ``will,`` are requirements that must be followed unless written authority for deviation is granted as an exemption by the DOE. Advisory standards denoted by ``should`` or ``may`` are standards that may be deviated from with a waiver granted by facility management.

  7. Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uni-axial Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material mixed with a polymeric binder. The behavior of each material is related to the type of explosive and to the percentage and type of binder. For any given plastic-bonded explosive, the creep behavior is also dependent on the stress level and test temperature. Experiments were conducted using a 3 x 3 stress-temperature matrix with a temperature range of 24 C to 70 C and with stresses ranging from 250-psi to 780-psi. Analysis of the data has shown that logarithmic curve fits provide an accurate means of quantification and facilitate a long-term predictive capability. This paper will discuss the design of the apparatus, experimental results, and analyses.

  8. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  9. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruhe, Thomas C. (Duquesne, PA); Rao, Pilaka P. (Baghlingampalli, IN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  10. THE BIGGEST EXPLOSIONS IN THE UNIVERSE. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L. [XTD-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the leading contenders for the origin of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z ?> 7 is catastrophic baryon collapse in atomically cooled halos at z ? 15. In this scenario, a few protogalaxies form in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner UV backgrounds that quench H{sub 2} formation in their constituent halos, preventing them from forming stars or blowing heavy elements into the intergalactic medium prior to formation. At masses of 10{sup 8} M{sub ?} and virial temperatures of 10{sup 4} K, gas in these halos rapidly cools by H lines, in some cases forming 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub ?} Population III stars and, a short time later, the seeds of SMBHs. Instead of collapsing directly to black holes (BHs), some of these stars died in the most energetic thermonuclear explosions in the universe. We have modeled the explosions of such stars in the dense cores of line-cooled protogalaxies in the presence of cosmological flows. In stark contrast to the explosions in diffuse regions in previous simulations, these supernovae briefly engulf the protogalaxy, but then collapse back into its dark matter potential. Fallback drives turbulence that efficiently distributes metals throughout the interior of the halo and fuels the rapid growth of nascent BHs at its center. The accompanying starburst and X-ray emission from these line-cooled galaxies easily distinguish them from more slowly evolving neighbors and might reveal the birthplaces of SMBHs on the sky.

  11. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... G-21 G.2.3.1 Normal Radiological Impacts from Detonations of Depleted Uranium at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility ......

  12. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  13. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  14. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  15. Quadractic Model of Thermodynamic States in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermodynamic states encountered during Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. Such explosions contain up to six components: three fuels (PETN, TNT and Aluminum) and their products corresponding to stoichiometric combustion with air. We establish the loci in thermodynamic state space that correctly describes the behavior of the components. Results are fit with quadratic functions that serve as fast equations of state suitable for 3D numerical simulations of SDF explosions.

  16. Mesoscale modeling of metal-loaded high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bdzil, John Bohdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lieberthal, Brandon [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Srewart, Donald S [UNIV OF ILLINOIS

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a 3D approach to modeling multi-phase blast explosive, which is primarily condensed explosive by volume with inert embedded particles. These embedded particles are uniform in size and placed on the array of a regular lattice. The asymptotic theory of detonation shock dynamics governs the detonation shock propagation in the explosive. Mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations are used to show how the particles are compressed, deformed, and accelerated by the high-speed detonation products flow.

  17. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  18. Producing a computer generated explosive effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Wei

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    real 3D object, C G glass must be created to render the reflection of the fire, rolling clouds, debris, etc. 1. Launch Alias, click on the Persp [Camera] window, and set the size to 645X486. This size must be set to the same size as the background.... The particles with fractal shader are illuminated by two volume lights which are scaled up during the explo sion to simulate the rolling dust clouds. Add Lights to Simulate Explosions 1. Create one point light and name it "Flash". This is the light...

  19. Detonation and incineration products of PBX explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, M.A.; Loughran, E.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments are planned to determine detonation product gases that are released into the environment when high explosives are tested. These experiments will be done in a 1.8-m-diam confinement vessel at ambient air pressure and partial vacuum. A matrix of four shots of PBX 9501, three shots of PBX 9502 and one shot of LX-10 are analyzed to determine the reproducibility and mass balance of materials in the detonation. This paper will only report on the detonation product gases as other experiments are planned.

  20. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mace, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pemberton, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Richard J [INDIAN HEAD DIVISION

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  1. Method and system for detecting an explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Bozeman, MT)

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting at least one explosive in a vehicle using a neutron generator and a plurality of NaI detectors. Spectra read from the detectors is calibrated by performing Gaussian peak fitting to define peak regions, locating a Na peak and an annihilation peak doublet, assigning a predetermined energy level to one peak in the doublet, and predicting a hydrogen peak location based on a location of at least one peak of the doublet. The spectra are gain shifted to a common calibration, summed for respective groups of NaI detectors, and nitrogen detection analysis performed on the summed spectra for each group.

  2. High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartmentAdministration Explosives Application

  3. Energetic Material - Explosives - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJaniceEnerG2 Develops NewExplosives

  4. Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility reaches...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Construction on Pantex High...

  5. Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

  6. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

  7. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requiremen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52.2E, Nuclear Explosive Safety by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Safety, Security This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear...

  9. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons...

  10. Big Thicket National Preserve: Trails to the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Luke; Allen, Chris; Elrod, Leah; Forbes, Melissa; Harbin, Hannah; Stromm, Diann

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , put timber companies out of business, and drive small towns to bankruptcy. 9 In 1964, the Big Thicket Association of Texas was formed to replace the failed East Texas Big Thicket Association. The new association worked hard to draw powerful...., 307. 16 Ibid., 336. 17 Ibid., 214-215. 18 Ibid., 298-299. 19 Gunter, The Big Thicket: An Ecological Reevaluation (Denton: University of North Texas Press), 48. 20 Cozine, 308. 21 Gunter, 76. 22 Ibid. 23 Ibid., 167. 24 Ibid., 109...

  11. Mathematical programming approach to tighten a Big-$M$ formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Crema

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 7, 2014 ... Abstract: In this paper we present a mathematical programming approach to tighten a Big-$M$ formulation ($P_M$) of a Mixed Integer Problem ...

  12. LDRD symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and energy use impacts | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing...

  13. Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings Fact sheet describes how the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved...

  14. aura laser big: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Build Data Sets for Data Mining, Data & Knowledge Engineering (DKE), 2014, Elsevier. DBMS 12 Ordonez, Carlos 208 Systems for Big-Graphs Arijit Khan Computer Technologies and...

  15. african big cities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Build Data Sets for Data Mining, Data & Knowledge Engineering (DKE), 2014, Elsevier. DBMS 12 Ordonez, Carlos 238 Systems for Big-Graphs Arijit Khan Computer Technologies and...

  16. assessment big canyon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Build Data Sets for Data Mining, Data & Knowledge Engineering (DKE), 2014, Elsevier. DBMS 12 Ordonez, Carlos 237 Systems for Big-Graphs Arijit Khan Computer Technologies and...

  17. The Next Big Thing - Eric Haseltine

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Haseltine

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Eric Haseltine, Haseltine Partners president and former chief of Walt Disney Imagineering, presented "The Next Big Thing," on Sept. 11, at the ORNL. He described the four "early warning signs" that a scientific breakthrough is imminent, and then suggested practical ways to turn these insights into breakthrough innovations. Haseltine is former director of research at the National Security Agency and associate director for science and technology for the director of National Intelligence, former executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering and director of engineering for Hughes Aircraft. He has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web and Discover Magazine.

  18. Big Geysers Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot

  19. Big Horn 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot2 Jump to:

  20. Big Brothers needed in Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycle SafetyBig Brothers

  1. Lecture 10: The European Bioinformatics Institute - "Big data" for biomedical sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva; Dana, Jose

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1: Big data for biomedical sciences (Tom Hancocks) Ten years ago witnessed the completion of the first international 'Big Biology' project that sequenced the human genome. In the years since biological sciences, have seen a vast growth in data. In the coming years advances will come from integration of experimental approaches and the translation into applied technologies is the hospital, clinic and even at home. This talk will examine the development of infrastructure, physical and virtual, that will allow millions of life scientists across Europe better access to biological data Tom studied Human Genetics at the University of Leeds and McMaster University, before completing an MSc in Analytical Genomics at the University of Birmingham. He has worked for the UK National Health Service in diagnostic genetics and in training healthcare scientists and clinicians in bioinformatics. Tom joined the EBI in 2012 and is responsible for the scientific development and delivery of training for the BioMedBridges pr...

  2. Surface detonation in type Ia supernova explosions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; S. E. Woosley

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the evolution of thermonuclear supernova explosions when the progenitor white dwarf star ignites asymmetrically off-center. Several numerical simulations are carried out in two and three dimensions to test the consequences of different initial flame configurations such as spherical bubbles displaced from the center, more complex deformed configurations, and teardrop-shaped ignitions. The burning bubbles float towards the surface while releasing energy due to the nuclear reactions. If the energy release is too small to gravitationally unbind the star, the ash sweeps around it, once the burning bubble approaches the surface. Collisions in the fuel on the opposite side increase its temperature and density and may -- in some cases -- initiate a detonation wave which will then propagate inward burning the core of the star and leading to a strong explosion. However, for initial setups in two dimensions that seem realistic from pre-ignition evolution, as well as for all three-dimensional simulations the collimation of the surface material is found to be too weak to trigger a detonation.

  3. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

  4. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  5. Estimation of scalar moments from explosion-generated surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.L.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh waves from underground nuclear explosions are used to estimate scaler moments for 40 Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions and 18 explosions at the Soviet East Kazakh test site. The Rayleigh wave spectrum is written as a product of functions that depend on the elastic structure of the travel path, the elastic structure of the source region and the Q structure of the path. Results are used to examine the worldwide variability of each factor and the resulting variability of surface wave amplitudes. The path elastic structure and Q structure are found by inversion of Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities and spectral amplitudes. The Green's function derived from this structure is used to estimate the moments of explosions observed along the same path. This procedure produces more consistent amplitude estimates than conventional magnitude measurements. Network scatter in log moment is typically 0.1. In contrast with time-domain amplitudes, the elastic structure of the travel path causes little variability in spectral amplitudes. When the mantle Q is constrained to a value of approximately 100 at depths greater than 120 km, the inversion for Q and moment produces moments that remain constant with distance. Based on the best models available, surface waves from NTS explosions should be larger than surface waves from East Kazakh explosions with the same moment. Estimated scaler moments for the largest East Kazakh explosions since 1976 are smaller than the estimated moments for the largest NTS explosions for the same time period.

  6. Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

  7. Acoustic Methods for Evaluation of High Energy Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobanovsky, Yury I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two independent acoustic methods were used to verify the results of earlier explosion energy calculations of Chelyabinsk meteoroid. They are: estimations through a path length of infrasound wave and through maximum concentration of the wave energy. The energy of this explosion turned out the same as in earlier calculations, and it is close to 58 Mt of TNT. The first method, as well as evaluations through seismic signals and barograms, have confirmed the energy of Tunguska meteoroid explosion at 14.0 - 14.5 Mt level. Moreover, there is a good agreement between acoustic estimations and other data for the explosion energy of another meteoroid that was ended its flight over the southern part of Indian Ocean, and for two catastrophic volcanoes explosions - Bezymyanny and Krakatoa.

  8. GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

  9. US/RUSSIAN COLLABORATION; EXPERIMENTS WITH EXPLOSIVE PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. GOFORTH; I. LINDEMUTH; ET AL

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through conferences and technical publications, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) learned of each other's interests in both high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) systems and their applications to fusion and high magnetic field research. The principle forum for contact was the Megagauss (MG) Conference series, becoming visible in 1979 at the MG-II Conference in Washington DC and culminating in Novosibirsk at MG-V in 1989. Conversations at MG-V led to a proposal, advanced by VNIIEF in 1991, to form a collaborative research agreement. After further preliminary conversations, a contingent from VNIIEF arrived at the MG-VI conference in Albuquerque in 1992 with plans to visit Los Alamos after the conference and finalize an agreement. The two laboratories signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at this time, November of 1992, agreeing to conduct joint experiments using at least two HEPP systems developed by VNIIEF. Since that time, joint experiments have been conducted both at LANL and VNIIEF facilities using a variety of HEPP systems. On a few occasions, the effort has focused on the HEPP system itself, but more often it has focused on scientific applications of mutual interest.

  10. Review: Eco-Business: A Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability By Peter Dauvergne andA Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability. Cambridge, MA: MITA Big-Brand Takeover of Sustainability is a very important

  11. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Observatory in China, and will explore collaboration with observatories in Canary Island to extendSynoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA Abstract. New Jersey

  12. Antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. In the second part, the technologies for producing antiprotons with high energy accelerator systems and the means for manipulating and storing microgram amounts of antihydrogen are examined. While there seems to be no theoretical obstacles to the production of 10^{18} antiprotons per day (the amount required for triggering one thermonuclear bomb), the construction of such a plant involves several techniques which are between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude away from present day technology.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacobexposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Sinceto nuclear explo ions or medical radiation, describes the

  14. C-Safe Image Gallery from the Center for the Simulation of Accidental Fires and Explosions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The University of Utah created an alliance with the DOE Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program to form the Center for the Simulation of Accidental Fires and Explosions (C-SAFE). The Center focuses specifically on providing state-of-the-art, science-based tools for the numerical simulation of accidental fires and explosions, especially within the context of handling and storage of highly flammable materials. The objective of C-SAFE is to provide a system comprising a problem-solving environment in which fundamental chemistry and engineering physics are fully coupled with non-linear solvers, optimization, computational steering, visualization and experimental data verification. The availability of simulations using this system will help to better evaluate the risks and safety issues associated with fires and explosions. The scientific images at this website provide technical views of various flame types and configurations (http://www.csafe.utah.edu/Information/summary.html). See also the Container Dynamics presentations at http://www.csafe.utah.edu/Teams/ContainerDynamics/cd_presentations.html.

  15. Big Problems. Big Results. Energy demands, environmental impacts, and national security are some of America's toughest challenges.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Problems. Big Results. Energy demands, environmental impacts, and national security are some interaction physics. » PNNL is driven to help increase U.S. energy capacity and reduce our dependence on imported oil. Collaborating with our partners, we are developing ways to use today's energy sources more

  16. Astrogenomics: big data, old problems, old solutions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ominous warnings of a `data deluge' in the life sciences from high-throughput DNA sequencing data are being supplanted by a second deluge, of cliches bemoaning our collective scientific fate unless we address the genomic data `tsunami'. It is imperative that we explore the many facets of the genome, not just sequence but also transcriptional and epigenetic variability, integrating these observations in order to attain a genuine understanding of how genes function, towards a goal of genomics-based personalized medicine. Determining any individual's genomic properties requires comparison to many others, sifting out the specific from the trends, requiring access to the many in order to yield information relevant to the few. This is the central big data challenge in genomics that still requires some sort of resolution. Is there a practical, feasible way of directly connecting the scientific community to this data universe? The best answer could be in the stars overhead.

  17. A simple line wave generator using commercial explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple and inexpensive explosive line wave generator has been designed using commercial sheet explosive and plane wave lens concepts. The line wave generator is constructed using PETN and RDX based sheet explosive for the slow and fast components respectively. The design permits the creation of any desired line width. A series of experiments were performed on a 100 mm design, measuring the detonation arrival time at the output of the generator using a streak camera. An iterative technique was used to adjust the line wave generator's slow and fast components, so as to minimize the arrival time deviation. Designs, test results, and concepts for improvements will be discussed.

  18. Research Activities at Fermilab for Big Data Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Wu, Wenji; Kim, Hyun W; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko; DeMar, Phil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptation of 100GE Networking Infrastructure is the next step towards management of Big Data. Being the US Tier-1 Center for the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the central data center for several other large-scale research collaborations, Fermilab has to constantly deal with the scaling and wide-area distribution challenges of the big data. In this paper, we will describe some of the challenges involved in the movement of big data over 100GE infrastructure and the research activities at Fermilab to address these challenges.

  19. Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

  20. Simulation of turbulent explosion of hydrogen-air mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

    2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    ]. Also, fundamental understanding of hydrogen combustion is important from safety view points, for example generation and accumulation of hydrogen in nuclear reactors [7] and rupturing of a pressurised hydrogen storage tank can lead to explosions. A...

  1. A parametric pressing study using a plastic-bonded explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, D. J. (David J.); Maez, L. R. (Leland R.); Olinger, B. W. (Barton W.); Powell, S. J. (Sandra J.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressed plastic-bonded explosives, PBXs, are commonly used by defense and private industry. PBX 9501 is composed of HMX crystals held together with a plastic binder 'softened' with plasticizers. The detonation behavior of any explosive is very dependent upon its density, with the desire to have a uniform, high density throughout the explosive component. A parametric study has been performed pressing PBX 9501 hydrostatically and uniaxially. The effects of several pressing parameters on the bulk density and density profile, as well as mechanical properties, have been measured. The parameters investigated include pressure, temperature, number of cycles, dwell time, rest time, sack thickness, and particle distribution and size. Density distributions within the pressed explosives were also compared.

  2. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  3. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  4. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  5. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

  6. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  7. High-speed cinematography of internal explosions for aviation security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    High-speed cinematography of internal explosions for aviation security G.S. Settles1 , J.R. Benwood of a program to remedy this were shown. Having demonstrated high-speed schlieren shock wave cinematography

  8. Program to Prevent Accidental or Unauthorized Nuclear Explosive Detonations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the DOE program to prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear explosive detonations, and to define responsibilities for DOE participation in the Department of Defense program for nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system safety. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  10. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism, and thereby design full-scale systems with greatly improved explosive efficiency.

  11. Reagent Selection Methodology for a Novel Explosives Detection Platform

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Marvin Warner, a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in the individual pieces of antibodies used to set up a chemical reaction that will give off light just by mixing reagents together with a sample that contains an explosive molecule. This technology would help detect if explosives are present with just the use of a handheld system or container.

  12. People's Physics Book Ch 7-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 7-1 The Big Idea The universe has many remarkable qualities, among them;People's Physics Book Ch 7-2 as just the two cars. In this case, internal forces include

  13. Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A small New York City startup is hoping it has the next big solution in energy storage. A video documents what the company's breakthrough means for the future of grid-scale energy storage.

  14. Joint NSRC Workshop 2015: Big, Deep, and Smart Data Analytics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Break 11:00 - 12:30 Morning session 2 T4 (i): E. Stach (BNL), Creating a Big Data Ecosystem at the Brookhaven National Laboratory: Successes, challenges and needs T5 (i): J....

  15. Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE hosted the "Big & Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs" breakout session during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum. This session explored a range of...

  16. Demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Big Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert DeCarrera

    2007-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Technical Report provides an account of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific LLC's Big Island, VA facility. This report covers the period from May 5, 2000 through November 30, 2006.

  17. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  18. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  19. Condensed-phase decomposition in thermally-aged explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work, the isothermal decomposition of nitrocellulose (NC) was examined using two substantially different experimental techniques that are being developed to investigate condensed-phase chemistry occurring during the thermal decomposition of a variety of explosives. The confined isothermal aging technique involved confined thin-film samples heated to temperatures of 150 to 170{degrees}C, for 1 to 72 hours. Condensed-phase chemistry was monitored real-time using FTIR. Results indicated that the first step in decomposition was scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond and subsequent formation of carbonyl and hydroxyl products. Scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond appeared to occur by a first-order reaction. Additional unconfined rapid isothermal decomposition experiments with NC have been completed and are described in this paper. Those additional experiments extended the previous work and investigated the effect of varying film thickness (from about 0.2 to 0.6 microns), varying temperature (from about 420 to 640{degrees}C), and using {sup 15}NO{sub 2}-labled NC. The results indicated that decomposition of NC appears to involve at least two principal mechanisms: (1) O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, which is accompanied by carbonyl or hydroxyl formation, and (2) polymer fragmentation. These two mechanisms occur simultaneously. At temperatures of 170{degrees}C, or lower, polymer fragmentation appears negligible, but at temperatures of 420{degrees}C, or higher, polymer fragmentation is appreciable and occurs at rates comparable to those for O-NO{sub 2} bond scission. While polymer fragmentation may be associated with O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, at higher temperatures, additional steps must be involved in the fragmentation mechanism. At each end of the temperatures range from about 150 to 420{degrees}C, the rate of O-NO{sub 2} bond scission appears reasonably consistent with a mechanism dominated by a first-order decomposition step.

  20. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

  1. Effects of a torsion field on Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brüggen

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper it is investigated whether torsion, which arises naturally in most theories of quantum gravity, has observable implications for the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Torsion can lead to spin flips amongst neutrinos thus turning them into sterile neutrinos. In the early Universe they can alter the helium abundance which is tightly constrained by observations. Here I calculate to what extent torsion of the string theory type leads to a disagreement with the Big Bang nucleosynthesis predictions.

  2. An examination of blast and impulse effects from the metal loading of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Victor E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zucker, Jonathan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Afee, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Asay, Blaine W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive compositions loaded with various metal particulates were produced and tested using a unique experimental configuration. The high explosive HMX was used as the standard and was tested over a range of mass loading fractions using tungsten and tantalum as metal additives. The diagnostics used in this set of experiments included free-field blast sensors, dynamic force sensors, time-of-arrival sensors, and a high-speed digital camera. The experimental arrangement allowed for concurrent spatial measurements of the static pressure from expanding gaseous detonation products, along with the total force from the combination of gaseous products and solid particles. The total pressure from the multi-phase products was calculated by measuring the total force applied to the surface of a newly developed force sensor. The results from the force sensor and other measurement techniques were validated against existing numerical methods. The relationship between static and dynamic pressures as a function of metal loading fraction was examined empirically at several distances from the charge for two distinct metal additives.

  3. Does Big Oil Collude and Price Gouge? Big Oil came back into the headlines in recent weeks with another spike in gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    with another spike in gasoline prices and their reported record profits. Some months ago, during the last gasoline price spike, Congress summoned the executives of the Big Oil companies to testify aboutDoes Big Oil Collude and Price Gouge? Big Oil came back into the headlines in recent weeks

  4. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  5. UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzati, Davide; Blackwell, Christopher H. [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Morsony, Brian J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison WI 53706-1582 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

  6. Study of the core-corona structure formed during the explosion of an aluminum wire in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, S. I. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Mingaleev, A. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Pikuz, S. A.; Romanova, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Khattatov, T. A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Shelkovenko, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Ol'khovskaya, O. G.; Gasilov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Kalinin, Yu. G. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time evolution of the matter parameters and current distribution in the discharge channel formed during a nanosecond explosion of a 25-{mu}m-diameter 12-mm-long aluminum wire was studied in a series of experiments with the following parameters: the discharge voltage was U{sub 0} = 20 kV, the current amplitude was I{sub max} {approx} 8 kA, and the current rise rate was dI/dt {approx} 40 A/ns. Optical shadow and schlieren images of the discharge channel were obtained using the second harmonic of a YAG: Nd{sup +3} laser, and UV images of the discharge channel self-radiation were recorded using a four-frame camera with a microchannel plate. The process of aluminum wire explosion was simulated numerically (including simulations performed from the 'cold start'). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data.

  7. Title: Experimental Platform for Novel Distributed Microgrids Control Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Title: Experimental Platform for Novel Distributed Microgrids Control Solutions Principal Investigator: Wenxin Liu Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense Office of Naval Research Summary: Microgrid can, and can operate autonomously without connecting to power grid. The microgrid concept is a big step toward

  8. Development of a trace explosives detection portal for personnel screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Linker, K.L.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.; Bouchier, F.A.; Hannum, D.W.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the development, design, and operation of a walk-through trace detection portal designed to screen personnel for explosives. Developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with primary funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and additional support from the Department of Energy office of Safeguards and Security, this portal is intended primarily for use in airport terminals and in other localities where a very high throughput of pedestrian traffic is combined with stringent security requirements. The portal is capable of detecting both vapor and particulate contamination, with the collection of explosive material being based upon the entrainment of that material in air flows over the body of the person being screened. This portal is capable of detecting most types of common high explosives of interest to the FAA. The authors discuss the results of field testing of the portal in the Albuquerque International Airport in September, 1997 and more recent steps towards commercialization of the portal.

  9. Method for loading explosive laterally from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. At least one void is excavated in the formation, leaving zones of unfragmented formation adjacent the void. An array of main blastholes is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation and at least one explosive charge which is shaped for forming a high velocity gas jet is placed into a main blasthole with the axis of the gas jet extending transverse to the blasthole. The shaped charge is detonated for forming an auxiliary blasthole in the unfragmented formation adjacent a side wall of the main blasthole. The auxiliary blasthole extends laterally away from the main blasthole. Explosive is placed into the main blasthole and into the auxiliary blasthole and is detonated for explosively expanding formation towards the free face for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the in situ oil shale retort.

  10. GRBs and Hypernova Explosions of Some Galactic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Brown; C. -H. Lee; E. Moreno Mendez

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing the Kerr parameters we can make quantitative calculations of the rotational energy of black holes. We show that Nova Sco (GRO J1655 - 40), Il Lupi (4U 1543 - 47), XTE J1550 - 564 and GS 2023 + 338 are relics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) and Hypernova explosions. They had more than enough rotational energy to power themselves. In fact, they had so much energy that they would have disrupted the accretion disk of the black hole that powered them by the communicated rotational energy, so that the energy delivery was self limiting. The most important feature in producing high rotational energy in the binary is low donor (secondary star) mass. We suggest that V4641 Sgr (XTE J1819 - 254) and GRS 1915 + 105 underwent less energetic explosions; because of their large donor masses. These explosions were one or two orders of magnitude lower in energy than that of Nova Sco. Cyg X - 1 (1956 + 350) had an even less energetic explosion, because of an even larger donor mass. We find that in the evolution of the soft X-ray transient sources the donor (secondary star) is tidally locked with the helium star, which evolved from the giant, as the hydrogen envelope is stripped off in common envelope evolution. The tidal locking is transferred from the helium star to the black hole into which it falls. Depending on the mass of the donor, the black hole can be spun up to the angular momentum necessary to power the GRB and Hypernova explosion. The donor decouples, acting as a passive witness to the explosion which, for the given angular momentum, then proceeds as in the Woosley Collapsar model. High mass donors which tend to follow from low metallicity give long GRBs because their lower energy can be accepted by the central engine.

  11. Thermodynamic Model of Aluminum Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, . L

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic states encountered during combustion of Aluminum powder in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions were analyzed with the Cheetah code. Results are displayed in the Le Chatelier diagram: the locus of states of specific internal energy versus temperature. Accuracy of the results was confirmed by comparing the fuel and products curves with the heats of detonation and combustion, and species composition as measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Results were fit with analytic functions u = f(T) suitable for specifying the thermodynamic properties required for gas-dynamic models of combustion in explosions.

  12. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  13. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A. [DOE/NNSA

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  14. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracht, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F. [AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  15. Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carles Badenes; Eduardo Bravo; Kazimierz J. Borkowski

    2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

  16. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  17. Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

  18. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  19. Experimental Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainton, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights at the 13th International Conference on Elastic & Diffractive Scattering (EDS09) of the presentations of new experimental results and developments are presented and discussed.

  20. Near-field dispersal modeling for liquid fuel-air explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.R.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-field, explosive dispersal of a liquid into air has been explored using a combination of analytical and numerical models. The near-field flow regime is transient, existing only as long as the explosive forces produced by the detonation of the burster charge dominate or are approximately equal in magnitude to the aerodynamic drag forces on the liquid. The near-field model provides reasonable initial conditions for the far-field model, which is described in a separate report. The near-field model consists of the CTH hydrodynamics code and a film instability model. In particular, the CTH hydrodynamics code is used to provide initial temperature, pressure, and velocity fields, and bulk material distribution for the far-field model. The film instability model is a linear stability model for a radially expanding fluid film, and is used to provide a lower bound on the breakup time and an upper and lower bound on the initial average drop diameter for the liquid following breakup. Predictions of the liquid breakup time and the initial arithmetic average drop diameter from the model compare favorably with the sparse experimental data. 26 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Development of ab initio techniques critical for future science-based explosives R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has emerged as an indispensable tool in materials research, since it can accurately predict properties of a wide variety of materials at both equilibrium and extreme conditions. However, for organic molecular crystal explosives, successful application of DFT has largely failed due to the inability of current exchange-correlation functionals to correctly describe intermolecular van der Waals' (vdWs) forces. Despite this, we have discovered that even with no treatment of vdWs bonding, the AM05 functional and DFT based molecular dynamics (MD) could be used to study the properties of molecular crystals under compression. We have used DFT-MD to predict the unreacted Hugoniots for PETN and HNS and validated the results by comparison with crystalline and porous experimental data. Since we are also interested in applying DFT methods to study the equilibrium volume properties of explosives, we studied the nature of the vdWs bonding in pursuit of creating a new DFT functional capable of accurately describing equilibrium bonding of molecular crystals. In this report we discuss our results for computing shock Hugoniots of molecular crystals and also what was learned about the nature of bonding in these materials.

  2. Analysis of Subsidence Data for the Big Hill Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Stephen J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elevation change data measured at the Big Hill SPR site over the last 10 years has been studied and a model utilized to project elevation changes into the future. The subsidence rate at Big Hill is low in comparison with other Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites and has decreased with time due to the maintenance of higher operating pressures and the normal decrease in creep closure rate of caverns with time. However, the subsidence at the site is projected to continue. A model was developed to project subsidence values 20 years into the future; no subsidence related issues are apparent from these projections.

  3. Big Bend Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance | OpenBetterBiBBBigBigBig

  4. Big Flat Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot SpringsBig

  5. Big Sandy Rural Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBig Sandy Rural

  6. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBig Sandy

  7. Big Smile Wind Farm (Dempsey Ridge) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBig

  8. Big Spring I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBigWind Farm

  9. Big Spring II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big CreekBigWind

  10. Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy (Great

  11. STANDARD BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS UP TO CNO WITH AN IMPROVED EXTENDED NUCLEAR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Batiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Goriely, Stephane; Xu, Yi [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP 226, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Saimpert, Matthias; Vangioni, Elisabeth [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three strong pieces of evidence for the big bang model together with the expansion of the universe and cosmic microwave background radiation. In this study, we improve the standard BBN calculations taking into account new nuclear physics analyses and enlarge the nuclear network up to sodium. This is, in particular, important to evaluate the primitive value of CNO mass fraction that could affect Population III stellar evolution. For the first time we list the complete network of more than 400 reactions with references to the origin of the rates, including Almost-Equal-To 270 reaction rates calculated using the TALYS code. Together with the cosmological light elements, we calculate the primordial beryllium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen nuclei. We performed a sensitivity study to identify the important reactions for CNO, {sup 9}Be, and boron nucleosynthesis. We re-evaluated those important reaction rates using experimental data and/or theoretical evaluations. The results are compared with precedent calculations: a primordial beryllium abundance increase by a factor of four compared to its previous evaluation, but we note a stability for B/H and for the CNO/H abundance ratio that remains close to its previous value of 0.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15}. On the other hand, the extension of the nuclear network has not changed the {sup 7}Li value, so its abundance is still 3-4 times greater than its observed spectroscopic value.

  12. Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Changquan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

  13. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 10: Classification of hazardous areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres. It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas atmospheres. ...

  14. SciTech Connect: Some past and present uses of nuclear-explosion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Some past and present uses of nuclear-explosion sources in physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Some past and present uses of nuclear-explosion sources in physics...

  15. Exoplanets from supernova explosions Shlomo Dado, Arnon Dar and Erez N Ribak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribak, Erez

    Exoplanets from supernova explosions Shlomo Dado, Arnon Dar and Erez N Ribak Physics Department disks (few) More? See "Misaligned And Alien Planets From Explosive Death Of Stars" by Dado, Dar

  16. Precise and Accurate Density Determination of Explosives Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise and accurate density determination requires weight measurements in air and water using sufficiently precise analytical balances, knowledge of the densities of air and water, knowledge of thermal expansions, availability of a density standard, and a method to estimate the time to achieve thermal equilibrium with water. Density distributions in pressed explosives are inferred from the densities of elements from a central slice.

  17. The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

    The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li2DT is found to be about 10 21 /k 2, where

  18. Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Cathy

    Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits Peter Kokelaar and Cathy Busby fabrics indicative of welding of glass shards and pumice at temperatures >500"C. The occurrence emplacement temperature in pyroclas- tic deposits is welding. Welding is hot-state viscous deformation

  19. Geothermics 34 (2005) 518526 Evolution of hydrothermal explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    to predict possible future explosions as a natural hazard, we have monitored noble gas isotopes and gas, Tengchong volcanic region, China Zhiguan Shangguana,, Ciping Zhaob, Hengzhong Lic, Qingwu Gaoa, Mingliang Sund a Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100029, China b Earthquake

  20. An Alternate Approach to Determine the Explosibility of Dusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Balaji

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    protocol that more accurately characterizes the explosibility of dusts. The CAAQES protocol for determining MEC is to test a wide range of concentrations of a dust in a 28.3-L (1 ft^(3)) Plexiglas chamber with a diaphragm and a stationary ignition source...

  1. An explosive acoustic telemetry system for seabed penetrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, G.C.; Hickerson, J.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the design and past applications of an explosive acoustic telemetry system (EATS) for gathering and transmitting data from seabed penetrators. The system was first fielded in 1982 and has since been used to measure penetrator performance on three other occasions. Descriptions are given of the mechanical hardware, system electronics, and software.

  2. Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures GREGG R. GITSCHLAG and BRYAN A. HERCZEG Introduction In July 1992 the total number of oil and gas production platformsI in the Gulfof. In that year 51 dead sea turtles were found on upper Texas beaches during mid-March to mid-April following

  3. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of 2 on vent simulations were used to test the effect of 3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see to underground explosions that blast the overlaying rock formations [e.g., Gisler, 2009]. This phenomenon occurs

  4. Identification of process controls for nuclear explosive operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Houghton, K.; Wilson, M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear explosive assembly/disassembly operations that are carried out under United States Department of Energy (DOE) purview are characterized by activities that primarily involve manual tasks. These process activities are governed by procedural and administrative controls that traditionally have been developed without a formal link to process hazards. This work, which was based on hazard assessment (HA) activities conducted as part of the W69 Integrated Safety Process (ISP), specifies an approach to identifying formal safety controls for controlling (i.e., preventing or mitigating) hazards associated with nuclear explosive operations. Safety analysis methods are used to identify controls, which then are integrated into a safety management framework to provide assurance to the DOE that hazardous activities are managed properly. As a result of the work on the W69 ISP dismantlement effort, the authors have developed an approach to identify controls and safety measures to improve the safety of nuclear explosive operations. The methodology developed for the W69 dismantlement effort is being adapted to the W76 ISP effort. Considerable work is still ongoing to address issues such as the adequacy or effectiveness of controls. DOE nuclear explosive safety orders and some historical insights are discussed briefly in this paper. The safety measure identification methodology developed as part of the W69 ISP dismantlement process then is summarized.

  5. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in GRB Jets Accompanied by Hypernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mizuta, Akira; /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Sato, Katsuhiko; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., RESCEU

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a collapsar using the model of MacFadyen and Woosley (1999). It is shown that {sup 56}Ni is not produced in the jet of the collapsar sufficiently to explain the observed amount of a hypernova when the duration of the explosion is {approx} 10 sec, which is considered to be the typical timescale of explosion in the collapsar model. Even though a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized if all explosion energy is deposited initially, the opening angles of the jets become too wide to realize highly relativistic outflows and gamma-ray bursts in such a case. From these results, it is concluded that the origin of {sup 56}Ni in hypernovae associated with GRBs is not the explosive nucleosynthesis in the jet. We consider that the idea that the origin is the explosive nucleosynthesis in the accretion disk is more promising. We also show that the explosion becomes bi-polar naturally due to the effect of the deformed progenitor. This fact suggests that the {sup 56}Ni synthesized in the accretion disk and conveyed as outflows are blown along to the rotation axis, which will explain the line features of SN 1998bw and double peaked line features of SN 2003jd. Some fraction of the gamma-ray lines from {sup 56}Ni decays in the jet will appear without losing their energies because the jet becomes optically thin before a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni decays as long as the jet is a relativistic flow, which may be observed as relativistically Lorentz boosted line profiles in future. We show that abundance of nuclei whose mass number {approx} 40 in the ejecta depends sensitively on the energy deposition rate, which is a result of incomplete silicon burning and alpha-rich freezeout. So it may be determined by observations of chemical composition in metal poor stars which model is the proper one as a model of a gamma-ray burst accompanied by a hypernova.

  6. Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City Addthis Duration 2:08 Topic Smart Grid Storage Innovation...

  7. First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for Energy Sector First-Ever Energy Open Data Roundtable Catalyzes Value of Big Data Revolution for...

  8. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  9. OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets August 27, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy...

  10. Energy Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organizati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organization Energy Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organization Photo of a man and woman standing outside...

  11. Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs April 16, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis Located near...

  12. Aftershock Characteristics as a Means of Discriminating Explosions from Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of aftershock sequences around the Nevada Test Site in the southern Great Basin is characterized as a potential discriminant between explosions and earthquakes. The aftershock model designed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989, 1994) allows for a probabilistic statement of earthquake-like aftershock behavior at any time after the mainshock. We use this model to define two types of aftershock discriminants. The first defines M{sub X}, or the minimum magnitude of an aftershock expected within a given duration after the mainshock with probability X. Of the 67 earthquakes with M > 4 in the study region, 63 of them produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} within the first seven days after a mainshock. This is contrasted with only six of 93 explosions with M > 4 that produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} for the same period. If the aftershock magnitude threshold is lowered and the M{sub 90} criteria is used, then no explosions produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 90} for durations that end more than 17 days after the mainshock. The other discriminant defines N{sub X}, or the minimum cumulative number of aftershocks expected for given time after the mainshock with probability X. Similar to the aftershock magnitude discriminant, five earthquakes do not produce more aftershocks than N{sub 99} within 7 days after the mainshock. However, within the same period all but one explosion produce less aftershocks then N{sub 99}. One explosion is added if the duration is shortened to two days after than mainshock. The cumulative number aftershock discriminant is more reliable, especially at short durations, but requires a low magnitude of completeness for the given earthquake catalog. These results at NTS are quite promising and should be evaluated at other nuclear test sites to understand the effects of differences in the geologic setting and nuclear testing practices on its performance.

  13. Reaction rates from pressure-gauge measurements in reacting explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, M.J.; Anderson, A.B.; Wackerle, J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proper hydrodynamic data and an equation of state are sufficient to describe quantitatively the reaction rates of explosives during the shock-to-detonation transition. Manganin pressure gauges embedded in the reacting explosive have provided these data for the explosives PETN, PBX 9404, TATB, and TNT. Once a pressure-field history has been assembled from individual pressure histories at different depths in the explosive, the conservation equations can be applied in a Lagrangian analysis of the data. The combination of a reactant-product equation of state with this analysis then allows the calculation of the extent of reaction and reaction rate. Successful correlation of the calculated reaction rate values with other thermodynamic variables, such as pressure or temperature, allows formulation of a rate law and the prediction of initiation behavior under circumstances quite different from the experiments that led to the rate law. The best dynamic piezoresistive pressure gauge for most applications would have a substantial output voltage and present negligible disturbance to the flow. In explosives, however, requirements for survival in the extreme temperature and pressure environment encountered by the gauge dictate compromise. Low electrical resistance (approx. 20 m..cap omega..) helps to minimize shunt conductivity failures, but this drastically reduces output and demands that much attention be given to reducingnoise. Although relatively thick insulation perturbs the flow to some extent, survivability requirements dictate its use. Pressure measurements in reactive flow can now be made routinely with gauges that successfully produce data leading to a description of the flow and a powerful predictive capability.

  14. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banker, John G. [Dynamic Materials Corp., 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Massarello, Jack [Global Metallix, Consultant to DMC, 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Pauly, Stephane [DMC., Nobelclad Business Unit, 1 Allee Alfred NOBEL, 66600 Rivesaltes (France)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  15. THE GROOVE MORTAR, A REUABLE METHOD FOR TESTING THE FLAMEPROOFNESS OF CERTAIN EXPLOSIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    explosives, such äs slurries and emulsions, is somewhat problematical. Taking into aecount the Polish and a summary of the results obtained so far. Explosives in French coal mines Under French regulations, explosives designed for use in Underground coal mines can be divided into three groups : - group l (in French

  16. Flying-plate detonator using a high-density high explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stroud, John R. (Livermore, CA); Ornellas, Donald L. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flying-plate detonator containing a high-density high explosive such as benzotrifuroxan (BTF). The detonator involves the electrical explosion of a thin metal foil which punches out a flyer from a layer overlying the foil, and the flyer striking a high-density explosive pellet of BTF, which is more thermally stable than the conventional detonator using pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  17. The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry Farid by the domino effect are the most destructive accidents related to industrial plants. Fire and explosion; Quantitative risk assessment; Explosions; Fires; Storage areas. 1. Introduction The accidents caused

  18. Ignition and explosion of nanopowders: something new under Olivier Dufaud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ones concern nanopowders fires and explosions [1]. In fact, since 2002 [2], one could quote the recent of micron-sized powders do not enable to evaluate the fire and explosion risk probabilities and gravitiesIgnition and explosion of nanopowders: something new under the dust Olivier Dufaud1 , Alexis Vignes

  19. Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Walter W.

    Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion is `physically unreasonable'. © 1999 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved. Keywords: Steam explosions

  20. Analysis of geothermal electric-power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, Lemhi County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struhsacker, D.W. (ed.)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Creek Hot Springs was evaluated as a source of electrical power for the Blackbird Cobalt Mine, approximately 13 miles south of the hot spring. An evaluaton of the geothermal potential of Big Creek Hot Springs, a suggested exploration program and budget, an engineering feasibility study of power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, an economic analysis of the modeled power generating system, and an appraisal of the institutional factors influencing development at Big Creek Hot Springs are included.

  1. Illegal Pathways to Illegal Profits: The Big Cigarette Companies and International Smuggling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Illegal Pathwaysto Illegal Profits The Big Cigarette Companies andfor Tobacco-Free Kids Illegal Pathways to Illegal Profits

  2. President's Teaching Scholar Program Big Ideas Program: An Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    (if there is interest in doing so.) Phase I of our process is taking stock. What germs of Big Ideas to try to push the idea process at this year's Fall retreat, and thereafter. We'll take some time are we all carrying around? Are their past or current projects we can build on? We'll do this stock

  3. People's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas: The name electric current is given to the phenomenon of the power source, you need the total resistance of the circuit and the total current: Vtotal = ItotalRtotal. · Power is the rate that energy is released. The units for power are Watts (W), which equal Joules per

  4. People's Physics Book Ch 21-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 21-1 The Big Idea The nuclei of atoms are affected by three forces, the breaking apart of nuclei and it is responsible for atom bombs and nuclear power. A form of fission, where/tH #12;People's Physics Book Ch 21-2 Key Concepts · Some of the matter on Earth is unstable

  5. People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea Energy is a measure of the amount of, or potential for, often by heat or sound waves. #12;People's Physics book Ch 2-2 Key Applications · In "roller coaster of the bonding energy into energy that is used to power the body. This energy goes on to turn into kinetic energy

  6. People's Physics Book Ch 16-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 16-1 The Big Idea Modern circuitry depends on much more than just elements. An active circuit element needs an external source of power to operate. This differentiates them. base emitter collector Diodes have an arrow showing the direction of the flow. #12;People's Physics

  7. People's Physics Book Ch 8-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book Ch 8-1 The Big Idea When any two bodies in the universe interact, they can an initial configuration and the final configuration · P = E/t Power delivered to or from a system components are conserved. #12;People's Physics Book Ch 8-2 Key Concepts · Impulse is how momentum

  8. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  9. Big Data ja vakuutustoiminta Oulun yliopisto 28.1.2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemelä, Jussi

    Frame insurance Analysis mProfit performance analysis OneFactor asset management mRisk market risk management 3 #12;Data-driven Decisions (1/2) · McKinsey Global Institute: "Big Data: The next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity," June 2011: · Visualization, a key tool for understanding very

  10. Original article Energy balance storage terms and big-leaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Energy balance storage terms and big-leaf evapotranspiration in a mixed deciduous radiometer, which seems to be a good method. The often neglected photosynthetic heat storage may heat storage are a re- sult of complex changes of several climatic parameters. Due to the high degree

  11. Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co...

  12. Bringing Big Systems to Small Schools: Distributed Systems for Undergraduates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Jeannie

    Bringing Big Systems to Small Schools: Distributed Systems for Undergraduates Jeannie R. Albrecht Williams College Williamstown, MA 01267 jeannie@cs.williams.edu ABSTRACT Distributed applications have, especially at small colleges, do not offer courses that focus on the design and implementation of distributed

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  14. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. SHADING CALCULATIONS FOR THE BIG DISH Jeff Cumpston1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], building the 'SG4' 500m2 Big Dish solar paraboloidal concentrator for solar-thermal to electric energy shading fraction in an array of two-axis tracking collectors. Annual shading on the SG4 dish included transport network, these losses may be reduced by closely spacing collectors within the array. Another form

  16. How Big Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Big Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra Department of Statistics Carnegie Mellon University of sound proce­ dures for assessing the size of the World Wide Web. The problem is compounded by the fact that sampling directly from the Web is not possible. Several groups of re­ searchers have found sampling schemes

  17. The Social Consequences of Keeping a BIG Secret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    The Social Consequences of Keeping a BIG Secret Yla R. Tausczik Cindy K. Chung James W. Pennebaker Secret? #12;Secrets #12;Hypotheses Individual Level Social Withdrawal Hypothesis OR Hypervigilance Hypothesis System Level Secrets will alter relationships, with or without others knowing about the secret

  18. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  19. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory C. Denkera, P. R, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A. bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, U.S.A. cSeoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Science, Seoul, 151-742 Republic

  20. How to use Big Data technologies to optimize operations in Upstream Petroleum Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    How to use Big Data technologies to optimize operations in Upstream Petroleum Industry Abdelkader generated by the Petroleum Industry and particularly its upstream segment? Upstream is no stranger to Big the desired outcomes? Keywords Big Data; Analytics; Upstream Petroleum Industry; Knowledge Management; KM

  1. Experimental simulations of explosive loading on structural components : reinforced concrete columns with advanced composite jackets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez-Nikl, Tonatiuh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5]. 3.A.4 Material Testing Concrete Concrete cylinders wereConcrete Institute ANFO Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil ASTM ASTM International (American Society for Testing

  2. Experimental and numerical simulations of explosive loading on structural components : composite sandwich connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huson, Peter N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction block layout for Composite Joint Tests 3, 4 andof reaction block design for Composite Joint Tests 3, 4 and3.74: Reaction block layout for Composite Joint Tests 3, 4

  3. 2013 Mark S. Fox City Data: Big, Open and Linked 1 City Data: Big, Open and Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . They are publishing data using Open Data standards, linking data from disparate sources, allowing the crowd to update their data with Smart Phone Apps that use Open APIs, and applying "Big Data" analytics to discover on data. They are publishing data using Open Data standards, linking data from disparate sources, allowing

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  5. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  6. A HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  7. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hendrik Schatz

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  8. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  9. Sub-sonic thermal explosions investigated by radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, Laura B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Jerry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Asay, Blaine W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the past 5 years of experiments utilizing radiographic techniques to study defiagration in thermal explosions in HMX based formulations. Details of triggering and timing synchronization are given. Radiographic images collected using both protons and x-rays are presented. Comparisons of experiments with varying size, case confinement, binder, and synchronization are presented. Techniques for quantifying the data in the images are presented and a mechanism for post-ignition burn propagation in a thermal explosion is discussed. From these experiments, we have observed a mechanism for sub-sonic defiagration with both gas phase convective and solid phase conductive burning. The convective front velocity is directly measured from the radiographic images and consumes only a small fraction of the HE. It lights the HE as it passes beginning the slower solid state conductive burn process. This mechanism is used to create a model to simulate the radiographic results and a comparison will be shown.

  10. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN); McCoig, Thomas M. (Maryville, TN); Dooley, Joseph B. (Kingston, TN); Smith, Cyrus M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent.

  11. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and explosives containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN); McCoig, Thomas M. (Maryville, TN); Dooley, Joseph B. (Kingston, TN); Smith, Cyrus M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent.

  12. Prediction of crystal densities of organic explosives by group additivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stine, J R

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molar volume of crystalline organic compound is assumed to be a linear combination of its constituent volumes. Compounds consisting only of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine are considered. The constituent volumes are taken to be the volumes of atoms in particular bonding environments and are evaluated from a large set of crystallographic data. The predicted density has an expected error of about 3%. These results are applied to a large number of explosives compounds.

  13. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.; Smith, C.M.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent. 10 figs.

  14. Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Plewa

    2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

  15. Pre-explosion companion stars in Type Iax supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Abate, Carlo; Wang, Bo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are proposed as one new sub-class of SNe Ia since they present sufficiently distinct observational properties from the bulk of SNe Ia. SNe Iax are the most common of all types of peculiar SNe by both number and rate, with an estimated rate of occurrence of about 5-30% of the total SN Ia rate. However, the progenitor systems of SNe Iax are still uncertain. Analyzing pre-explosion images at SN Iax positions provides a direct way to place strong constraints on the nature of progenitor systems of SNe Iax. In this work, we predict pre-explosion properties of binary companion stars in a variety of potential progenitor systems by performing detailed binary evolution calculations with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code STARS. This will be helpful for constraining progenitor systems of SNe Iax from their pre-explosion observations. With our binary evolution calculations, it is found that the non-degenerate helium (He) companion star to both a massive C/O WD (> 1.1 solar mass) and ...

  16. Signatures of Explosion Models for SN ~Ia & Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview of the current understanding of Type Ia supernovae relevant for their use as cosmological distance indicators. We present the physical basis to understand their homogeneity of the observed light curves and spectra and the observed correlations. SNe Ia have been well established as distance indicators on the 10 % level. However, the quest for the nature of the dark energy requires improvements in the accuracy to the 2 to 3 % level, we must understand the diversity within the SNe Ia population, and its evolution with redshift. Based on detailed models for the progenitors, explosions, light curves and spectra, we discuss signatures of thermonuclear explosions, and the implications for cosmology. We emphasize the relation between LC properties and spectra because, for local SNe~Ia, the diversity becomes apparent the combination of spectra and LCs whereas, by enlarge, we have to for high-z objects. At some examples, we show how we can actually probe the properties of the progenitor, its environment, and details of the explosion physics.

  17. Metallicity at the explosion sites of interacting transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Pastorello, A; Leloudas, G; Fransson, C; Nyholm, A; Stritzinger, M D; Ergon, M; Roy, R; Migotto, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Some circumstellar-interacting (CSI) supernovae (SNe) are produced by the explosions of massive stars that have lost mass shortly before the SN explosion. There is evidence that the precursors of some SNe IIn were luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. For a small number of CSI SNe, outbursts have been observed before the SN explosion. Eruptive events of massive stars are named as SN impostors (SN IMs) and whether they herald a forthcoming SN or not is still unclear. The large variety of observational properties of CSI SNe suggests the existence of other progenitors, such as red supergiant (RSG) stars with superwinds. Furthermore, the role of metallicity in the mass loss of CSI SN progenitors is still largely unexplored. Aims. Our goal is to gain insight on the nature of the progenitor stars of CSI SNe by studying their environments, in particular the metallicity at their locations. Methods. We obtain metallicity measurements at the location of 60 transients (including SNe IIn, SNe Ibn, and SN IMs), via...

  18. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. I. PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Lovekin, C. C. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Frey, Lucille H. [HPC-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L.; Hungerford, Aimee L. [XTD-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The first stars are the key to the formation of primitive galaxies, early cosmological reionization and chemical enrichment, and the origin of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their extreme luminosities, individual Population III (Pop III) stars will likely remain beyond the reach of direct observation for decades to come. However, their properties could be revealed by their supernova explosions, which may soon be detected by a new generation of near-IR (NIR) observatories such as JWST and WFIRST. We present light curves and spectra for Pop III pair-instability supernovae calculated with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. Our numerical simulations account for the interaction of the blast with realistic circumstellar envelopes, the opacity of the envelope, and Lyman absorption by the neutral intergalactic medium at high redshift, all of which are crucial to computing the NIR signatures of the first cosmic explosions. We find that JWST will detect pair-instability supernovae out to z ?> 30, WFIRST will detect them in all-sky surveys out to z ? 15-20, and LSST and Pan-STARRS will find them at z ?< 7-8. The discovery of these ancient explosions will probe the first stellar populations and reveal the existence of primitive galaxies that might not otherwise have been detected.

  19. Trigger - and heat-transfer times measured during experimental molten-fuel-interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitznagel, N.; Dürig, T.; Zimanowski, B. [Physikalisch-Vulkanologisches Labor, Universität Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Vulkanologisches Labor, Universität Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified setup featuring high speed high resolution data and video recording was developed to obtain detailed information on trigger and heat transfer times during explosive molten fuel-coolant-interaction (MFCI). MFCI occurs predominantly in configurations where water is entrapped by hot melt. The setup was modified to allow direct observation of the trigger and explosion onset. In addition the influences of experimental control and data acquisition can now be more clearly distinguished from the pure phenomena. More precise experimental studies will facilitate the description of MFCI thermodynamics.

  20. Experimental Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Gasification is that any type of biomass (including low cost feedstocks like agricultural residues, forest waste, etc) can be converted to syngas. Pyrolysis and Char gasification proceed sequentially) To obtain experimental data and develop mathematical models on intrinsic char gasification kinetics, free

  1. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  2. Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis verifies classical Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Q. Hou; J. J. He; A. Parikh; K. Daid; C. Bertulani

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide the most stringent constraint to date on possible deviations from the usually-assumed Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) velocity distribution for nuclei in the Big-Bang plasma. The impact of non-extensive Tsallis statistics on thermonuclear reaction rates involved in standard models of Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) has been investigated. We find that the non-extensive parameter $q$ may deviate by, at most, $|\\delta q|$=6$\\times$10$^{-4}$ from unity for BBN predictions to be consistent with observed primordial abundances; $q$=1 represents the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics. This constraint arises primarily from the {\\em super}sensitivity of endothermic rates on the value of $q$, which is found for the first time. As such, the implications of non-extensive statistics in other astrophysical environments should be explored. This may offer new insight into the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements.

  3. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  4. The State of the Art in Supporting "Big Data"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    of investigation · Startups in this space · If there is any achilles heel in big data, this is it! #12;10 DBMS Security · Works well -- i.e. I have never heard of the DBMS screwing up in this area. #12;11 Encryption · Can be entrusted to the DBMS -- Appropriate when there are many clients sharing data -- Don't want

  5. Constraining Big Bang lithium production with recent solar neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takács, Marcell P; Szücs, Tamás; Zuber, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be reaction affects not only the production of 7Li in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, but also the fluxes of 7Be and 8B neutrinos from the Sun. This double role is exploited here to constrain the former by the latter. A number of recent experiments on 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be provide precise cross section data at E = 0.5-1.0 MeV center-of-mass energy. However, there is a scarcity of precise data at Big Bang energies, 0.1-0.5 MeV, and below. This problem can be alleviated, based on precisely calibrated 7Be and 8B neutrino fluxes from the Sun that are now available, assuming the neutrino flavour oscillation framework to be correct. These fluxes and the standard solar model are used here to determine the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be astrophysical S-factor at the solar Gamow peak, S(23+6-5 keV) = 0.548+/-0.054 keVb. This new data point is then included in a re-evaluation of the 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be S-factor at Big Bang energies, following an approach recently developed for this reaction in the c...

  6. Three dimensional simulation for Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Sobolik, Steven Ronald (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Moo Yul (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of caverns located at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's Big Hill site. State-of-art analyses simulated the current site configuration and considered additional caverns. The addition of 5 caverns to account for a full site and a full dome containing 31 caverns were modeled. Operations including both normal and cavern workover pressures and cavern enlargement due to leaching were modeled to account for as many as 5 future oil drawdowns. Under the modeled conditions, caverns were placed very close to the edge of the salt dome. The web of salt separating the caverns and the web of salt between the caverns and edge of the salt dome were reduced due to leaching. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence and infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified. The analyses included recently derived damage criterion obtained from testing of Big Hill salt cores. The results show that from a structural view point, many additional caverns can be safely added to Big Hill.

  7. Demonstrated Wavelength Portability of Raman Reference Data for Explosives and Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Su, Yin-Fong; Jarman, Kristin H.; Kunkel, Brenda M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Joly, Alan G.; Stephan, Eric G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ewing, Robert G.; Dunham, Glen C.

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As Raman spectroscopy continues to evolve, questions arise as to the portability of Raman data: dispersive versus Fourier transform, wavelength calibration, intensity calibration, and in particular the frequency of the excitation laser. While concerns about fluorescence arise in the visible or ultraviolet, most modern (portable) systems use near-infrared excitation lasers, and many of these are relatively close in wavelength. We have investigated the possibility of porting reference data sets from one NIR wavelength system to another. We have constructed a reference library consisting of 145 spectra, including 20 explosives, as well as sundry other compounds and materials using a 1064 nm spectrometer. These data were used as a reference library to evaluate the same 145 compounds whose experimental spectra were recorded using a second 785 nm spectrometer. In 128 cases of 145 (or 88.3% including 20/20 for the explosives) the compounds were correctly identified with a mean 'hit score' of 954 of 1000. Adding in criteria for when to declare a correct match versus when to declare uncertainty, the approach was able to correctly categorize 134 out of 145 spectra, giving a 92.4% accuracy. For the few that were incorrectly identified, either the matched spectra were spectroscopically similar to the target or the 785 nm signal was degraded due to fluorescence. The results indicate that imported data recorded at a different NIR wavelength can be successfully used as reference libraries, but key issues must be addressed: The reference data must be of equal or higher resolution, the systems require rigorous wavelength calibration, and wavelength-dependent intensity response should be accounted for in the different systems.

  8. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  9. Method for the decontamination of soil containing solid organic explosives therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Corey W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Roberto, Francisco F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for decontaminating soil containing organic explosives ("TNT" and others) in the form of solid portions or chunks which are not ordinarily subject to effective bacterial degradation. The contaminated soil is treated by delivering an organic solvent to the soil which is capable of dissolving the explosives. This process makes the explosives more bioavailable to natural bacteria in the soil which can decompose the explosives. An organic nutrient composition is also preferably added to facilitate decomposition and yield a compost product. After dissolution, the explosives are allowed to remain in the soil until they are decomposed by the bacteria. Decomposition occurs directly in the soil which avoids the need to remove both the explosives and the solvents (which either evaporate or are decomposed by the bacteria). Decomposition is directly facilitated by the solvent pre-treatment process described above which enables rapid bacterial remediation of the soil.

  10. Extraction of the pretzelosity distribution from experimental data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lefky, Christopher; Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt an extraction of the pretzelosity distribution ($h^{\\perp}_{1T}$) from preliminary COMPASS, HERMES, and JLAB experimental data on $\\sin(3\\phi_h - \\phi_S)$ asymmetry on proton and deuteron targets. The resulting distributions, albeit big errors, show tendency for up quark pretzelosity to be positive and down quark pretzelosity to be negative. A model relation of pretzelosity distribution and Orbital Angular Momentum of quarks is used to estimate contributions of up and down quarks.

  11. Thermal X-ray emission of the remnants of ashperical Supernova explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Petruk

    2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of adiabatic remnants of an aspherical supernova explosion in uniform medium are considered. Thermal X-ray emission of such remnants are investigated. It is shown that integral thermal X-ray characteristics (X-ray luminosity and spectrum) of the objects do not allow us to reveal the assymetry in the explosion because these characteristics are close to their Sedov counterparts. Surface distribution of X-ray emission is sensitive to anisotropy of the explosion and nonuniformity of the interstellar medium.

  12. Parameters of Chelyabinsk and Tunguska Objects and their Explosion Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobanovsky, Yu I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes briefly a mathematical model that relates the parameters of celestial body motion in spheres of activity of the Sun and the Earth with mass-energy characteristics of these celestial bodies and their explosion modes during destruction in the Earth atmosphere, that in turn are linked with phenomena observed on the underlying surface. This model was used to calculate the characteristics of the objects which are causes of Chelyabinsk and Tunguska incidents. Thus, the basic data characterizing these two outstanding phenomena were obtained with using a regular physical-mathematical procedure without any speculative hypotheses and/or assumptions.

  13. Conductivity Histories Measured in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Explosion Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Beside the scientific aspects at least two questions appear to be of practical interest: (1) Does the detonation of an SDF charge create electro-magnetic disturbances strong enough to affect the operation of electrical infrastructure in for example a tunnel system? (2) Does the detonation of an SDF charge in a tunnel system create an electromagnetic signature that relays information of the charge performance to the outside environment?

  14. Compact Object Formation and the Supernova Explosion Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryer, C L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a massive star ends its life, its core collapses, forming a neutron star or black hole and producing some of the most energetic explosions in the universe. Core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts are the violent signatures of compact remnant formation. As such, both fields are intertwined and, coupled with theory, observations of transients can help us better understand compact remnants just as neutron star and black hole observations can constrain the supernova and gamma-ray burst engine. We review these ties in this paper.

  15. The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either D or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. We conclude that the financial and energy investments needed to produce such amounts of antiprotons would confine applications of antimatter triggered thermonuclear devices to the military domain.

  16. A Model for Multidimensional Delayed Detonations in SN Ia Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Golombek; J. C. Niemeyer

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a flame tracking/capturing scheme originally developed for deflagration fronts can be used to model thermonuclear detonations in multidimensional explosion simulations of type Ia supernovae. After testing the accuracy of the front model, we present a set of two-dimensional simulations of delayed detonations with a physically motivated off-center deflagration-detonation-transition point. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of the front model to reproduce the full range of possible interactions of the detonation with clumps of burned material. This feature is crucial for assessing the viability of the delayed detonation scenario.

  17. Thermonuclear Explosions of Chandrasekhar-Mass White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, consisting of carbon and oxygen, undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is a front capturing/tracking hybrid scheme, based on a level set method, which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. First results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are discussed. It will be shown that even in 2-D and even with a physically motivated sub-grid model numerically ``converged'' results are difficult to obtain.

  18. Operating Experience Level 3, Explosives Safety | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online ClassifiedExplosives Safety

  19. Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Sept. 18

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids1spectroscopiesExplosives

  20. Proceedings of the 24th Seismic Research Review: Nuclear Explosion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,Speeding access toExplosion Monitoring Technologies

  1. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,Speeding access toExplosion Monitoring TechnologiesMonitoring:

  2. C-CAMP BIRAC-BIG 1st CALL ENTREPRENEUR VALEDICTORY MENTORING PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, Upinder S.

    .05: Introductions 7.05 ­ 7.35: 5 minute Presentations by BIG Grantees o Achira Labs o Codon Biosciences o Pandorum.30 ­ 1.00 pm: Presentations by BIG Grantees 15 mins each followed by 15 mins of interactions Scientific.30: Vikas Mehra 12.30 ­ 1.00: Sea6 Energy 1.00 ­ 2.00: Lunch 2.00 ­ 3.30: Presentations by BIG Grantees (con

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFICATION AT BIG ISLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert DeCarrera

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Progress Report provides an account of the status of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific Corporation's Big Island, VA facility. The report also includes budget information and a milestone schedule. The project to be conducted by G-P is a comprehensive, complete commercial-scale demonstration that is divided into two phases. Phase I is the validation of the project scope and cost estimate. Phase II is project execution, data acquisition and reporting, and consists of procurement of major equipment, construction and start-up of the new system. Phase II also includes operation of the system for a period of time to demonstrate the safe operation and full integration of the energy and chemical recovery systems in a commercial environment. The objective of Phase I is to validate the process design and to engineer viable solutions to any technology gaps. This phase includes engineering and planning for the integration of the full-scale MTCI/StoneChem PulseEnhanced{trademark} black liquor steam-reformer chemical recovery system into G-P's operating pulp and paper mill at Big Island, Virginia. During this phase, the scope and cost estimate will be finalized to confirm the cost of the project and its integration into the existing system at the mill. The objective of Phase II of the project is the successful and safe completion of the engineering, construction and functional operation of the fully integrated full-scale steam reformer process system. This phase includes installation of all associated support systems and equipment required for the enhanced recovery of both energy and chemicals from all of the black liquor generated from the pulping process at the Big Island Mill. The objective also includes operation of the steam reformer system to demonstrate the ability of the system to operate reliably and achieve designed levels of energy and chemical recovery while maintaining environmental emissions at or below the limits set by the environmental permits.

  4. Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

  5. THE IMPACT OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS ON HELIUM COMPANIONS IN THE CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS EXPLOSION SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhengwei; Wang, B.; Han, Z. W. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Edelmann, P.; Taubenberger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Roepke, F. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeda, K., E-mail: zwliu@ynao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli-IPMU), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study (TODIAS), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the version of the single-degenerate scenario of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) studied here, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf explodes close to the Chandrasekhar limit after accreting material from a non-degenerate helium (He) companion star. In the present study, we employ the STELLAR GADGET code to perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of the SN Ia ejecta with the He companion star taking into account its orbital motion and spin. It is found that only 2%-5% of the initial companion mass is stripped off from the outer layers of He companion stars due to the supernova (SN) impact. The dependence of the unbound mass (or the kick velocity) on the orbital separation can be fitted to a good approximation by a power law for a given companion model. After the SN impact, the outer layers of a He donor star are significantly enriched with heavy elements from the low-expansion-velocity tail of SN Ia ejecta. The total mass of accumulated SN-ejecta material on the companion surface reaches about {approx}> 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} for different companion models. This enrichment with heavy elements provides a potential way to observationally identify the surviving companion star in SN remnants. Finally, by artificially adjusting the explosion energy of the W7 explosion model, we find that the total accumulation of SN ejecta on the companion surface is also dependent on the explosion energy with a power-law relation to a good approximation.

  6. Historical narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance and Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Mary Ann; Matz, Mike

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passage on Upper Butte Creek: An Assessment of the NaturalHistorical Narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Allianceand Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy Mary Ann King and Mike

  7. Black Rocks, Brown Clouds and the Borderlands: Air Quality and the Making of the Big Bend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donez, Francisco

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nick. 2005. Far Out Far West Texas. Texas Observer, Decembervarious locations in west Texas (Green et al. 2000, Faulknerthe Big Bend,” or “west Texas,” referring to this extensive

  8. Performance of First- and Second-Order Methods for Big Data ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimon Fountoulakis

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 11, 2015 ... Performance of First- and Second-Order Methods for Big Data Optimization. Kimon Fountoulakis(K.Fountoulakis ***at*** sms.ed.ac.uk)

  9. Science DMZ-Based Big-Science Pacific Research Platform Debuts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science DMZ-Based Big-Science Pacific Research Platform Debuts at CENIC 2015 Annual Conference News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries...

  10. af low-tar big: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Build Data Sets for Data Mining, Data & Knowledge Engineering (DKE), 2014, Elsevier. DBMS 12 Ordonez, Carlos 333 Systems for Big-Graphs Arijit Khan Computer Technologies and...

  11. Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the baryonic content of the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. X. Thuan; Y. I. Izotov

    2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the latest measurements of the primordial abundances of the light nuclei D, 3He, 4He and 7Li is given. We discuss in particular the primordial abundance Yp of 4He as measured in blue compact dwarf galaxies. We argue that the best measurements now give a ``high'' value of Yp along with a ``low'' value of D/H, and that the two independent measurements are consistent within the framework of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis with a number of light neutrino species Nnu = 3.0+/-0.3 (2sigma).

  12. Big Savings on Outdoor Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained CoordinationWater10Big Savings on

  13. Next Big Idea coming September 14-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2April 2013 ESH&SNext Big Idea Coming

  14. The Big Picture on Process Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for Pumping System EfficiencyRole(EAP)Energy TheThe Big

  15. Big Bend Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance | OpenBetterBiBBBigBig

  16. Big Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot Springs

  17. Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot2 Jump

  18. Big Horn Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot2 JumpRural

  19. Big Horn Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot2

  20. Big Rapids, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek Hot2(Redirected

  1. Big River, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big Creek

  2. Big Wind Power Project (Lanai) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |Big

  3. Big Hopes for Little Tubes: Local Collaboration Produces Nanotubes That

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycle SafetyBigCould Work

  4. Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycleBig Science:Program

  5. Big changes for the Jefferson Lab campus | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycleBig

  6. Big wins at NERSC hack-a-thon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrenceDepartment ofBicycleBigOptimization

  7. Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked

  8. Big Things from Small Beginnings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplicationCommittee | DepartmentDesign BasisBig Savings on

  9. The Big Picture on Process Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest(EAP)Summer 2011June 2012The Big

  10. BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science | StanfordBiddingBig

  11. Models from Big Molecules Captured in a Flash

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.Model Verification andModelingModels from Big

  12. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radioactive materials obtained by chance, a turntable employing gears from Heidelberg's mechanical toy shops, and other minimal equipment available in post World War II Germany, in 1959 Rudolf Moessbauer confirmed his suspicion that his graduate research had yielded ground-breaking results. He published his conclusion: an atomic nucleus in a crystal undergoes negligible recoil when it emits a low energy gamma ray and provides the entire energy to the gamma ray. In the beginning Moessbauer's news might have been dismissed. As Argonne nuclear physicist Gilbert Perlow noted: ''Everybody knew that nuclei were supposed to recoil when emitting gamma rays--people made those measurements every day''. If any such effect existed, why had no one noticed it before? The notion that some nuclei would not recoil was ''completely crazy'', in the words of the eminent University of Illinois condensed matter physicist Frederich Seitz. Intrigued, however, nuclear physicists as well as condensed matter (or solid state) physicists in various locations--but particularly at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Britain and at Argonne and Los Alamos in the U.S.--found themselves pondering the Moessbauer spectra with its nuclear and solid state properties starting in late 1959. After an exciting year during which Moessbauer's ideas were confirmed and extended, the physics community concluded that Moessbauer was right. Moessbauer won the Nobel Prize for his work in 1961. In the 1960s and 1970s Argonne physicists produced an increasingly clear picture of the properties of matter using the spectroscopy ushered in by Moessbauer. The scale of this traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy, which required a radioactive source and other simple equipment, began quite modestly by Argonne standards. For example Argonne hosted traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy research using mostly existing equipment in the early days and equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows national laboratory scientists working at a variety of scales to produce both technological and

  13. The detection of bulk explosives using nuclear-based techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgado, R.E.; Gozani, T.; Seher, C.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986 we presented a rationale for the detection of bulk explosives based on nuclear techniques that addressed the requirements of civil aviation security in the airport environment. Since then, efforts have intensified to implement a system based on thermal neutron activation (TNA), with new work developing in fast neutron and energetic photon reactions. In this paper we will describe these techniques and present new results from laboratory and airport testing. Based on preliminary results, we contended in our earlier paper that nuclear-based techniques did provide sufficiently penetrating probes and distinguishable detectable reaction products to achieve the FAA operational goals; new data have supported this contention. The status of nuclear-based techniques for the detection of bulk explosives presently under investigation by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reviewed. These include thermal neutron activation (TNA), fast neutron activation (FNA), the associated particle technique, nuclear resonance absorption, and photoneutron activation. The results of comprehensive airport testing of the TNA system performed during 1987-88 are summarized. From a technical point of view, nuclear-based techniques now represent the most comprehensive and feasible approach for meeting the operational criteria of detection, false alarms, and throughput. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models: Homogeneity versus Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer; M. Reinecke

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are generally believed to be the result of the thermonuclear disruption of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, mainly because such thermonuclear explosions can account for the right amount of Ni-56, which is needed to explain the light curves and the late-time spectra, and the abundances of intermediate-mass nuclei which dominate the spectra near maximum light. Because of their enormous brightness and apparent homogeneity SN Ia have become an important tool to measure cosmological parameters. In this article the present understanding of the physics of thermonuclear explosions is reviewed. In particular, we focus our attention on subsonic (``deflagration'') fronts, i.e. we investigate fronts propagating by heat diffusion and convection rather than by compression. Models based upon this mode of nuclear burning have been applied very successfully to the SN Ia problem, and are able to reproduce many of their observed features remarkably well. However, the models also indicate that SN Ia may differ considerably from each other, which is of importance if they are to be used as standard candles.

  15. The Thermonuclear Explosion Of Chandrasekhar Mass White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; S. E. Woosley

    1996-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The flame born in the deep interior of a white dwarf that becomes a Type Ia supernova is subject to several instabilities. We briefly review these instabilities and the corresponding flame acceleration. We discuss the conditions necessary for each of the currently proposed explosion mechanisms and the attendant uncertainties. A grid of critical masses for detonation in the range $10^7$ - $2 \\times 10^9$ g cm$^{-3}$ is calculated and its sensitivity to composition explored. Prompt detonations are physically improbable and appear unlikely on observational grounds. Simple deflagrations require some means of boosting the flame speed beyond what currently exists in the literature. ``Active turbulent combustion'' and multi-point ignition are presented as two plausible ways of doing this. A deflagration that moves at the ``Sharp-Wheeler'' speed, $0.1 g_{\\rm eff} t$, is calculated in one dimension and shows that a healthy explosion is possible in a simple deflagration if the front moves with the speed of the fastest floating bubbles. The relevance of the transition to the ``distributed burning regime'' is discussed for delayed detonations. No model emerges without difficulties, but detonation in the distributed regime is plausible, will produce intermediate mass elements, and warrants further study.

  16. BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

  17. Primordial Lithium Abundance in Catalyzed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Bird; Kristen Koopmans; Maxim Pospelov

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a well known problem with the Li7+Be7 abundance predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis being larger than the value observed in population II stars. The catalysis of big bang nucleosynthesis by metastable, \\tau_X \\ge 10^3 sec, charged particles X^- is capable of suppressing the primordial Li7+Be7, abundance and making it consistent with the observations. We show that to produce the correct abundance, this mechanism of suppression places a requirement on the initial abundance of X^- at temperatures of 4\\times 10^8 K to be on the order of or larger than 0.02 per baryon, which is within the natural range of abundances in models with metastable electroweak-scale particles. The suppression of Li7+Be7, is triggered by the formation of (Be7X^-), compound nuclei, with fast depletion of their abundances by catalyzed proton reactions, and in some models by direct capture of X^- on Be7. The combination of Li7+Be7 and Li6 constraints favours the window of lifetimes, 1000s \\la tau_X \\leq 2000 s.

  18. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly s...

  19. DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100211 Atomistic Simulation of the Explosion Welding Process**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100211 Atomistic Simulation of the Explosion Welding Process** By Ossi Saresoja, Antti Kuronen* and Kai Nordlund Explosive welding (EXW) is an industrial process used to join. In the process, welding occurs in a high velocity collision between metal plates, achieved by using chemical

  20. IS THE DRAGON LEARNING TO FLY? AN ANALYSIS OF THE CHINESE PATENT EXPLOSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    IS THE DRAGON LEARNING TO FLY? AN ANALYSIS OF THE CHINESE PATENT EXPLOSION Markus EBERHARDT of the recent explosion of patent filings by Chinese firms both in China and the United States. We construct a firm-level dataset by matching USPTO and SIPO patents to Chinese manufacturing census data

  1. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  2. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale. Report of Investigations/1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil-shale rocks and dust. Three areas were examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil-shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil-shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles.

  3. Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, 2003 Animating Suspended Particle Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    , or other events. The blast wave is an explosion's pri- mary effect, but it moves at supersonic speeds. By design, the real explosions employed for visual effects typically minimize blast strength while the numerically trou- blesome, and largely invisible blast wave, the method uses a relatively stable

  4. SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Alert people in the immediate area to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVACUATE · Alert people in the immediate area producing devices · Do not try to locate the source of the explosion · Evacuate and move to designated as OUTAGE EVALUATE · Remain calm and move cautiously to a lighted area · If the fire alarm sounds or upon

  5. Infrasonic and Seismic Signals from Earthquake and Explosions in Arequipa, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Infrasonic and Seismic Signals from Earthquake and Explosions in Arequipa, Peru J. Chilo, A. Jabor in characterization of infrasonic and seismic signals from mining explosions and an earthquake. Wavelet transform infrasonic and seismic signals. The ampligram may be considered as an analogy to signal decomposition

  6. Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides guidance on the application of requirements for nonreactor nuclear facilities and explosives facilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.1, Nuclear and Explosives Safety Design Criteria. No cancellation.

  7. EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility to treat explosive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence...

  8. Too Big or Too Small? The PTB-PTS ICMP-based Attack against IPsec Gateways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Too Big or Too Small? The PTB-PTS ICMP-based Attack against IPsec Gateways Ludovic Jacquin Inria the "Packet Too Big"-"Packet Too Small" ICMP based attack against IPsec gateways. We explain how an attacker in use, the attack either creates a Denial of Service or major performance penalties. This attack

  9. The Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mirror (M1) and its alignment with the secondary mirror (M2) will be actively controlled. HighThe Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory G. Yang*a, J of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd., Newark, NJ 07104; bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore

  10. Effects of humidity on storing big sagebrush seed. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, B.L.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data support the conclusion that big sagebrush seed should not be stored in environments having humidities above 32 to 40 percent. Some humidities may even dry seed to a greater degree than when first placed in storage. Force-air seed driers should not heat big sagebrush seed over 60 degrees C.

  11. HoustonChronicle.com -Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    HoustonChronicle.com - Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist HoustonChronicle. com Section-mail this story June 18, 2005, 5:48PM Tiny honor a big deal for algae scientist By DAVID A. FAHRENTHOLD Washington Post Sometimes, algae can be the highest form of flattery. ADVERTISEMENTSo it was for Diane K. Stoecker

  12. Yale's Environment School Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Introduction Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    Yale's Environment School · Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Introduction Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Related Topics: News Releases; Publications winters and a correspondent decrease in the need for regional power plants to burn coal could partially

  13. How to use Big Data technologies to optimize operations in Upstream Petroleum Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    How to use Big Data technologies to optimize operations in Upstream Petroleum Industry Abdelkader for it to have value. But what about Big Data generated by the Petroleum Industry and particularly its upstream; Analytics; Upstream Petroleum Industry; Knowledge Management; KM; Business Intelligence; BI; Innovation

  14. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  15. Merger Driven Explosive Evolution of Distant Galaxies (Minor Mergers)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kats, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derived solutions for the Smoluchowski kinetic equation for the mass function of galaxies, which describes mergers in differential approximation, where mergers with low-mass galaxies are the dominant factor. The evolution of the initial distribution is analyzed as well as the influence of the source represented by galaxies (halos) that separate from the global cosmological expansion. It is shown that the evolution of the slope of the power-law part of the luminosity function at a constant mass-to-luminosity ratio observed in the Ultra Deep Hubble Field can be described as a result of explosive evolution driven by galaxy mergers. In this case the exponent depends exclusively on the uniformity degree of merger probability as a function of mass.

  16. Asymmetric explosion of clusters in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine asymmetric expansion of argon clusters illuminated by 800 nm laser pulses of duration Almost-Equal-To 23fs, using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. For this short pulse duration, laser energy absorption by cluster electrons is dominated by the nonlinear resonance (NLR) absorption process [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)]. In this work, we concentrate, particularly, on the ionic outcome in the NLR regime and show that higher charge states of argon ions are produced along the laser polarization than in the transverse directions leading to the anisotropy (asymmetry) in the ion energy distribution. This anisotropy already established during the short pulse duration (or in the early duration of a long pulse) may contribute to the anisotropic ion emission reported in cluster experiments with pulse duration longer than 100 fs. Our PIC results are compared with a charged-sphere model showing that cluster explosion is mainly due to Coulomb repulsion between the cluster ions.

  17. Polarisation spectral synthesis for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulla, M; Kromer, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte Carlo radiative transfer technique for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry for multi-dimensional supernova explosion models. The approach utilises "virtual-packets" that are generated during the propagation of the Monte Carlo quanta and used to compute synthetic observables for specific observer orientations. Compared to extracting synthetic observables by direct binning of emergent Monte Carlo quanta, this virtual-packet approach leads to a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise. This is vital for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry (since the degree of polarisation is typically very small) but also useful for calculations of light curves and spectra. We first validate our approach via application of an idealised test code to simple geometries. We then describe its implementation in the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS and present test calculations for simple models for Type Ia supernovae. Specifically, we use the well-known one-dimensional W7 model to verify tha...

  18. Explosive flux compression generators for rail gun power sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; King, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of explosive magnetic flux compression generators is described that has been used successfully to power rail guns. A program to increase current magnitudes and pulse lengths is outlined. Various generator loss terms are defined and plans to overcome some of them are discussed. Included are various modifications of the conventional strip generators that are more resistant to undesirable expansion of generator components from magnetic forces. Finally, an integral rail gun is discussed that has coaxial geometry. Integral rail guns utilize the rails themselves as flux compression generator elements and, under ideal conditions, are theoretically capable of driving projectiles to arbitrarily high velocities. Integral coaxial rail guns should be superior in some regards to their square bore counterparts.

  19. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  20. The Soviet program for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordyke, M.D.

    1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of utilizing the weapons of war to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind is as old as civilization itself. Perhaps the most famous reference to this basic desire is recorded in the Book of Micah where the great prophet Isiah called upon his people `to turn your spears into pitchforks and your swords into plowshares.` As the scientists at Los Alamos worked on developing the world`s first atomic bomb, thoughts of how this tremendous new source of energy could be used for peaceful purposes generally focused on using the thermal energy generated by the slow fission of uranium in a reactor, such as those being used to produce Plutonium to drive electric power stations. However, being scientists in a new, exciting field, it was impossible to avoid letting their minds wander from the task at hand to other scientific or non-military uses for the bombs themselves. During the Manhattan Project, Otto Frisch, one of the pioneers in the development of nuclear fission process in the 1930s, first suggested using an atomic explosion as a source for a large quantities of neutrons which could used in scientific experiments designed to expand their understanding of nuclear physics. After the war was over, many grandiose ideas appeared in the popular press on how this new source of energy should be to serve mankind. Not to be left out of the growing enthusiasm for peaceful uses of atomic energy, the Soviet Union added their visions to the public record. This document details the Soviet program for using nuclear explosions in peacetime pursuits.

  1. Building Simulation Modelers are we big-data ready?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in computing and sensor technologies have pushed the amount of data we collect or generate to limits previously unheard of. Sub-minute resolution data from dozens of channels is becoming increasingly common and is expected to increase with the prevalence of non-intrusive load monitoring. Experts are running larger building simulation experiments and are faced with an increasingly complex data set to analyze and derive meaningful insight. This paper focuses on the data management challenges that building modeling experts may face in data collected from a large array of sensors, or generated from running a large number of building energy/performance simulations. The paper highlights the technical difficulties that were encountered and overcome in order to run 3.5 million EnergyPlus simulations on supercomputers and generating over 200 TBs of simulation output. This extreme case involved development of technologies and insights that will be beneficial to modelers in the immediate future. The paper discusses different database technologies (including relational databases, columnar storage, and schema-less Hadoop) in order to contrast the advantages and disadvantages of employing each for storage of EnergyPlus output. Scalability, analysis requirements, and the adaptability of these database technologies are discussed. Additionally, unique attributes of EnergyPlus output are highlighted which make data-entry non-trivial for multiple simulations. Practical experience regarding cost-effective strategies for big-data storage is provided. The paper also discusses network performance issues when transferring large amounts of data across a network to different computing devices. Practical issues involving lag, bandwidth, and methods for synchronizing or transferring logical portions of the data are presented. A cornerstone of big-data is its use for analytics; data is useless unless information can be meaningfully derived from it. In addition to technical aspects of managing big data, the paper details design of experiments in anticipation of large volumes of data. The cost of re-reading output into an analysis program is elaborated and analysis techniques that perform analysis in-situ with the simulations as they are run are discussed. The paper concludes with an example and elaboration of the tipping point where it becomes more expensive to store the output than re-running a set of simulations.

  2. Big Data Frequent Pattern Mining David C. Anastasiu and Jeremy Iverson and Shaden Smith and George Karypis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karypis, George

    Big Data Frequent Pattern Mining David C. Anastasiu and Jeremy Iverson and Shaden Smith and George with today, the so-called "Big Data". Web log data from social media sites such as Twitter produce over one

  3. Assessing decision inputs in drug development between small, early stage companies and big pharma : is there is a difference?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rippy, Daniel S. (Daniel Spensley)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pipeline productivity challenge facing large, publicly traded pharmaceutical companies, collectively referred to as "Big Pharma," is well known. The unprecedented success Big Pharma achieved over the past few decades ...

  4. 9/18/09 2:09 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy -Physical Science Page 1 of 3http://scienceblips.dailyradar.com/story/big_wave_theory_offers_alternative_to_dark_energy/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    9/18/09 2:09 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy - Physical Science Page 1 of 3http://scienceblips.dailyradar.com/story/big_wave_theory_offers_alternative_to_dark_energy/ Gadget.com - 30 days ago 'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy -- Mathematicians have proposed

  5. Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Richard

    Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives Problem presented by John Curtis Atomic Weapons Establishment, based on the compression of a sample of the explosive. The study group identified frictional heating

  6. Source Scaling of Single-Fired and Delay-Fired Explosions Constrained by In-Mine and Regional Seismograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    Source Scaling of Single-Fired and Delay-Fired Explosions Constrained by In-Mine and Regional (simultaneously detonated) explosions observed in the mine and at regional distances. These single-fired (360 km) using a seismic array near Pinedale, Wyoming (PDAR). The single-fired explosions ranged

  7. Wideband terahertz spectroscopy of explosives M.R. Leahy-Hoppa a,b,*, M.J. Fitch a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, L. Michael

    to be a promising tool in detection of explosives and explosive related compounds. To date, TDTS for many explosives radiation, we report the THz absorption spectra over an extended frequency band from 0.5 to 6 THz for four], and non-destructive imaging of illicit drugs using spectral fin- gerprints [19]. The THz region

  8. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-e Storms:  The Next “Big Thing” in Window RetrofitsOfficial Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014)

  9. Impact hazard mitigation: understanding the effects of nuclear explosive outputs on comets and asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, Ralph R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conlon, Leann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NASA 2007 white paper ''Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives'' affirms deflection as the safest and most effective means of potentially hazardous object (PHO) impact prevention. It also calls for further studies of object deflection. In principle, deflection of a PHO may be accomplished by using kinetic impactors, chemical explosives, gravity tractors, solar sails, or nuclear munitions. Of the sudden impulse options, nuclear munitions are by far the most efficient in terms of yield-per-unit-mass launched and are technically mature. However, there are still significant questions about the response of a comet or asteroid to a nuclear burst. Recent and ongoing observational and experimental work is revolutionizing our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of these bodies (e.g ., Ryan (2000) Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). The combination of this improved understanding of small solar-system bodies combined with current state-of-the-art modeling and simulation capabilities, which have also improved dramatically in recent years, allow for a science-based, comprehensive study of PHO mitigation techniques. Here we present an examination of the effects of radiation from a nuclear explosion on potentially hazardous asteroids and comets through Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) simulation techniques. MCNP is a general-purpose particle transport code commonly used to model neutron, photon, and electron transport for medical physics reactor design and safety, accelerator target and detector design, and a variety of other applications including modeling the propagation of epithermal neutrons through the Martian regolith (Prettyman 2002). It is a massively parallel code that can conduct simulations in 1-3 dimensions, complicated geometries, and with extremely powerful variance reduction techniques. It uses current nuclear cross section data, where available, and fills in the gaps with analytical models where data are not available. MCNP has undergone extensive verification and validation and is considered the gold-standard for particle transport. (Forrest B. Brown, et al., ''MCNP Version 5,'' Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc., 87, 273, November 2002.) Additionally, a new simulation capability using MCNP has become available to this collaboration. The first results of this new capability will also be presented.

  10. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  11. Constraints on Neutrino Oscillations from Big Bang Nucleosynethesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Shi; D. N. Schramm; B. D. Fields

    1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss in detail the effect of neutrino oscillations in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, between active and sterile neutrinos, as well as between active and active neutrinos. We calculate the constraints on mixings between active and sterile neutrinos from the present observation of the primordial helium abundance and discuss the potential implications on various astrophysical and cosmological problems of such oscillations. In particular, we show that large angle sterile neutrino mixing seems to be excluded as a MSW solution to the solar neutrino situation or a solution to the atmospheric neutrino mixing hinted at in some underground experiments. We show how with this constraint, the next generation of solar neutrino experiments should be able to determine the resolution of the solar neutrino problem. It is also shown how sterile neutrinos remain a viable dark matter candidate.

  12. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Independent Neutrino Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christel J. Smith; George M. Fuller; Michael S. Smith

    2008-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations which employ arbitrarily-specified, time-dependent neutrino and antineutrino distribution functions for each of up to four neutrino flavors. We self-consistently couple these distributions to the thermodynamics, the expansion rate and scale factor-time/temperature relationship, as well as to all relevant weak, electromagnetic, and strong nuclear reaction processes in the early universe. With this approach, we can treat any scenario in which neutrino or antineutrino spectral distortion might arise. These scenarios might include, for example, decaying particles, active-sterile neutrino oscillations, and active-active neutrino oscillations in the presence of significant lepton numbers. Our calculations allow lepton numbers and sterile neutrinos to be constrained with observationally-determined primordial helium and deuterium abundances. We have modified a standard BBN code to perform these calculations and have made it available to the community.

  13. Anti-Proton Evolution in Little Bangs and Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Schade; B. Kampfer

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundances of anti-protons and protons are considered within momentum-integrated Boltzmann equations describing Little Bangs, i.e., fireballs created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Despite of a large anti-proton annihilation cross section we find a small drop of the ratio of anti-protons to protons from 170 MeV (chemical freeze-out temperature) till 100 MeV (kinetic freeze-out temperature) for CERN-SPS and BNL-RHIC energies thus corroborating the solution of the previously exposed "ani-proton puzzle". In contrast, the Big Bang evolves so slowly that the anti-baryons are kept for a long time in equilibrium resulting in an exceedingly small fraction. The adiabatic path of cosmic matter in the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter is mapped out.

  14. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionizataion and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for explosives vapor detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Glish, G.L.; Grant, B.C.; Chambers, D.M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection and identification of trace vapors of hidden high explosives is an excellent example of a targeted analysis problem. It is desirable to push to ever lower levels the quantity or concentration of explosives material that provides an analytical signal, while at the same time discriminating against all other uninteresting material. The detection system must therefore combine high sensitivity with high specificity. This report describes the philosophy behind the use of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, which is a sensitive, rugged, and convenient means for forming anions from explosives molecules, with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides unparalleled specificity in the identification of explosives-related ions. Forms of tandem mass spectrometry are compared and contrasted to provide a summary of the characteristics to be expected from an explosives detector employing mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The instrument developed for the FAA, an atmospheric sampling glow discharge/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is described in detail with particular emphasis on the ion source/spectrometer interface and on the capabilities of the spectrometer. Performance characteristics of the system are also described as they pertain to explosives of interest including a description of an automated procedure for the detection and identification of specific explosives. A comparison of various tandem mass spectrometers mated with atmospheric sampling glow discharge is then described and preliminary studies with a vapor preconcentration system provided by the FAA will be described.

  15. Method for explosive expansion toward horizontal free faces for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E. (Bakersfield, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation is excavated from within a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming a plurality of vertically spaced apart voids extending horizontally across different levels of the retort site, leaving a separate zone of unfragmented formation between each pair of adjacent voids. Explosive is placed in each zone, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for forming an in situ retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The same amount of formation is explosively expanded upwardly and downwardly toward each void. A horizontal void excavated at a production level has a smaller horizontal cross-sectional area than a void excavated at a lower level of the retort site immediately above the production level void. Explosive in a first group of vertical blast holes is detonated for explosively expanding formation downwardly toward the lower void, and explosive in a second group of vertical blast holes is detonated in the same round for explosively expanding formation upwardly toward the lower void and downwardly toward the production level void for forming a generally T-shaped bottom of the fragmented mass.

  16. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly sensitive explosives can be also caused by intense charge-dipole attacks of surrounding water vapor molecules electrostatically attracted from ambient humid air and strongly accelerated towards charged sites on explosive surfaces. Emission of electrons, photons and heat from ionized hot spots randomly migrating on charged surface of highly sensitive explosive aerosol nanoparticles converts such particles into the form of short-circuited thermionic nanobatteries.

  17. Observation of shells in Coulomb explosions of rare-gas clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erk, B.; Hoffmann, K.; Kandadai, N.; Helal, A.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T. [Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The explosions of noble gas clusters from argon and xenon irradiated by intense 35-fs infrared laser pulses have been studied. The kinetic energy spectra of ions produced in small clusters (<700 atoms) show a two-mode shell structure that is attributed to originating from a radial charge distribution. With a simple classical particle simulation of Coulomb explosions, the energy structure was reproduced using information on the arrangement of charge in the cluster. It was found that, during the explosion, the inner atoms of the clusters were less ionized than the outer atoms.

  18. A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research performed under Laboratory Research and Development Project 05-ERD-019, entitled ''A New Capability for Regional High-Frequency Seismic Wave Simulation in Realistic Three-Dimensional Earth Models to Improve Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. A more appropriate title for this project is ''A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. This project supported research for a radically new approach to nuclear explosion monitoring as well as allowed the development new capabilities in computational seismology that can contribute to NNSA/NA-22 Programs.

  19. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.

  20. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.