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Sample records for bhp billiton olympic

  1. A jewel in the desert: BHP Billiton's San Juan underground mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-12-15

    The Navajo Nation is America's largest native American tribe by population and acreage, and is blessed with large tracks of good coal deposits. BHP Billiton's New Mexico Coal Co. is the largest in the Navajo regeneration area. The holdings comprise the San Juan underground mine, the La Plata surface mine, now in reclamation, and the expanding Navajo surface mine. The article recounts the recent history of the mines. It stresses the emphasis on sensitivity to and helping to sustain tribal culture, and also on safety. San Juan's longwall system is unique to the nation. It started up as an automated system from the outset. Problems caused by hydrogen sulfide are being tackled. San Juan has a bleederless ventilation system to minimise the risk of spontaneous combustion of methane and the atmospheric conditions in the mine are heavily monitored, especially within the gob areas. 3 photos.

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2012-14 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. American Fuel Resources, LLC AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ARMZ (AtomRedMetZoloto) BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd CAMECO

  3. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. American Fuel Resources, LLC AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ARMZ (AtomRedMetZoloto) BHP Billiton Olympic Dam

  4. 2012 London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient, Sustainable, and Recyclable Design 2012 London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient, Sustainable, and ...

  5. The Olympics of science knowledge at DOE's New Jersey Regional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Olympics of science knowledge at DOE's New Jersey Regional Science Bowl at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J...

  6. PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP Presidential permit authorizing Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP More Documents & Publications PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc PP-10 Bonneville Power Administrator PP-10-1

  7. 2012 London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sustainable, and Recyclable Design | Department of Energy London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient, Sustainable, and Recyclable Design 2012 London Olympics Go for the Green with Its Energy Efficient, Sustainable, and Recyclable Design July 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Olympic stadium, with a roof made of 2,500 tons of steel tubing from recycled gas pipelines, is one example of sustainable design that is part of London's 500-acre Olympic Park. | Photo courtesy of iStock user

  8. UPF takes Polar Plunge for Special Olympics | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex UPF takes Polar Plunge for ... UPF takes Polar Plunge for Special Olympics Posted: March 9, 2016 - 7:02pm UPF employees collected donations to determine who would take the Polar Plunge, a leap into the University of Tennessee's outdoor swimming pool. Managers from the Uranium Processing Facility raised nearly $9,000 for Special Olympics Tennessee by leaping into ice cold water on Feb. 27 as part of the Polar Plunge, an annual fundraising effort. UPF was the top fundraising team in

  9. The Olympics of science knowledge at DOE's New Jersey Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab The Olympics of science knowledge at DOE's New Jersey Regional Science Bowl at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J Droids, a science club in Warren, N.J., at the end of a long day of competing with the Science Bowl trophies in the foreground. They took home the largest of the trophies after winning the U.S. Department of Energy's New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Feb. 21. (Photo

  10. The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J Droids, a science club in Warren, N.J., at the end of a long day of competing with the Science Bowl trophies in the foreground. They took home the largest of the trophies after winning the U.S. Department of Energy's New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Feb. 21. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL

  11. Mines in the Four Corners anticipate growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2008-02-15

    Productive mines in the southwest deplete reserves, while the government drags its heels on new power projects. Production in Arizona and New Mexico has fallen 18% over the last four years to 34.1 million tons. With Chevron Mining's McKinley mine rapidly depleting its reserves the industry will continue to contract. In the last three years at least three large mines in the Four Corners have terminated operations. Three others remain captive operations: BHP Billiton's San Juan Underground and Navajo Surface operations and Peabody Energy's Kayenta surface mine. In 2006 the Black Mesa mine stopped producing coal. These four mines are isolated from the national railways. Peabody's new El Segundo surface mine near Grants, NM is increasing production. If the planned $3 billion Desert Rock coal-fired power plant is built this will present a new market for the Navajo mine. The article gives details about the state of the aforementioned mines and of the new King II coal mine on the northern periphery of the San Juan basin and discusses the state of plans for the Desert Rock Energy Project. 5 photos.

  12. Development of a Cummins Westport SI-EGR Natural Gas Engine at 0.2 g/bhp-hr NOx: February 2, 2005 - July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel, M.

    2006-10-01

    Discusses development and demonstration of advanced vehicle technologies for controlling exhaust emissions in a medium-duty natural gas engine to meet 2010 federal standards.

  13. Photo of the Week: I, Robot Olympics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In this photo, graduate student Alina Campbell is removing damaged leaves from Eastern Cottonwood trees, which helps stimulate the trees' growth.| Photo courtesy of Jason Richards. ...

  14. NOx Emission Reduction and its Effects on Ozone during the 2008 Olympic Games

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yuhang; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Zhen; Gustafson, William I.; Shao, Min

    2011-07-15

    We applied a daily-assimilated inversion method to estimate NOx (NO+NO2) emissions for June-September 2007 and 2008 on the basis of the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and model simulations using the Regional chEmistry and trAnsport Model (REAM). Over urban Beijing, rural Beijing, and the Huabei Plain, OMI column NO2 reductions are approximately 45%, 33%, and 14%, respectively, while the corresponding anthropogenic NOx emission reductions are only 28%, 24%, and 6%, during the full emission control period (July 20 Sep 20, 2008). The emission reduction began in early July and was in full force by July 20, corresponding to the scheduled implementation of emission controls over Beijing. The emissions did not appear to recover after the emission control period. Meteorological change from summer 2007 to 2008 is the main factor contributing to the column NO2 decreases not accounted for by the emission reduction. Model simulations suggest that the effect of emission reduction on ozone concentrations over Beijing is relatively minor using a standard VOC emission inventory in China. With an adjustment of the model emissions to reflect in situ observations of VOCs in Beijing, the model simulation suggests a larger effect of the emission reduction.

  15. Pacific Northwest GridWise Testbed Demonstration Projects; Part I. Olympic Peninsula Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Ambrosio, Ron; Carlon, Teresa A.; DeSteese, John G.; Horst, Gale R.; Kajfasz, Robert; Kiesling, Laura L.; Michie, Preston; Pratt, Robert G.; Yao, Mark; Brous, Jerry; Chassin, David P.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Jarvegren, Olof M.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Le, N. T.; Oliver, Terry V.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-01-09

    This report describes the implementation and results of a field demonstration wherein residential electric water heaters and thermostats, commercial building space conditioning, municipal water pump loads, and several distributed generators were coordinated to manage constrained feeder electrical distribution through the two-way communication of load status and electric price signals. The field demonstration took place in Washington and Oregon and was paid for by the U.S. Department of Energy and several northwest utilities. Price is found to be an effective control signal for managing transmission or distribution congestion. Real-time signals at 5-minute intervals are shown to shift controlled load in time. The behaviors of customers and their responses under fixed, time-of-use, and real-time price contracts are compared. Peak loads are effectively reduced on the experimental feeder. A novel application of portfolio theory is applied to the selection of an optimal mix of customer contract types.

  16. CX-012728: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BHP-3 Offsite Bump Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41885 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  17. EA-1576: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympic Peninsula Transmission Line Reinforcement Project, Clallam, Jefferson, Kitsap, Harbor, Mason, and Thurston Counties, Washington

  18. 2002 - 06 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2002 Mon, 06/17/2002 - 12:00am The Olympics of Particle Research (Daily Press

  19. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applied low temperature combustion to the Navistar 6.4L V8 engine with 0.2g NOx/bhp-hr operation attained at the rated 16.5 BMEP

  20. EIS-0378: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0378: Final Environmental Impact Statement Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has...

  1. Solar reserve | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reserve Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Reserve Address 2425 Olympic Blvd. Place Santa Monica, CA Zip 90404 Country United States Sector Solar Website http:...

  2. US Renewables Group (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewables Group (California) Address: 2425 Olympic Boulevard, Suite 4050 West Place: Santa Monica, California Zip: 90404 Region: Southern CA Area Product: Private equity firm...

  3. GE to provide data, analytics to Brazilian Canoe Confederation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative partnership will pair GE software scientists with athletes to explore how big data can help them optimize their performance for the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic...

  4. sr0926.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over five billion gallons of groundwater - enough to fill 7,575 Olympic sized swimming pools - has been successfully extracted and remediated from Savannah River Site's...

  5. High productivity in Australian blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nightingale, R.J.; Mellor, D.G.; Jelenich, L.; Ward, R.F.

    1995-12-01

    Since the emergence of the Australian domestic economy from recession in 1992, the productivity of BHP`s blast furnace has increased significantly to meet the demands of both domestic and export markets. BHP Steel operates six blast furnaces at its three Australian integrated plants. These furnaces vary widely in their size, feed, technology and current campaign status. This paper reviews the principal issues associated with productivity improvements over recent years. These gains have been achieved through activities associated with a wide range of process, equipment and human resource based issues.

  6. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  7. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,000 3,500 4,000 XOM CHK APC DVN SWN BP SWN ECA COP BHP SWN RDSA CVX WPX SWN COG EOG APA EQT OXY SWN RRC QEP UPL EP XCO CNX SWN NBL PXD SM NFX XEC MRO SD KWK PXP EGN CRK BBG FST ...

  8. Welcome

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LES' URENCO-USA Facility January 2011 2 Uranium Cylinders Operation & Construction parallel Separations Building Module 1003 Utility Fuel Cycle Management Diverse Contract Portfolio Cameco, Areva, Kazatomprom, BHP, RTU, Palladin Cameco, Areva, ConverDyn URENCO, Areva, USEC, AEP, CNEIC GE, Areva, Westinghouse Utility Customer

  9. Traveling to Princeton (NEW) - Combustion Energy Frontier Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may take a van shuttle service http:olympic-limo.com or 1-800-822-9797. From Newark Airport, the fare is 40one way. From Philadelphia International Airport, the fare is 89...

  10. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS) sluicer assembly test reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, T.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-26

    The sluicer test report documents the results of the Project W-320 factory testing conducted at the Olympic Tool and Engineering facility. Included are background information, test goals, a brief discussion on the sluicer hose problem, and conclusions.

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, 2006 (Next Release on February 15, 2006) Hello, Winter As if on cue, with the opening ceremony for the Winter Olympics just two days away, winter weather has returned to many...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expensive If someone asks Michael Phelps where he is going to go after winning eight gold medals at the Olympics and he responds, Im going to Disney World, it would cost...

  13. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1, 2004 (Next Release on August 18, 2004) The Quest for Gold As athletes from all over the world gather in Athens, Greece on a quest for gold medals in the Summer Olympics, so too...

  14. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size swimming pools in one of the largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site to prepare the...

  15. Go for the Gold in Energy-Efficient Home Heating | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As the Olympics strive to be more energy efficient, we can champion the same effort in our homes and become energy saving Olympians. One of the biggest places to save energy (and ...

  16. CX-006788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympic Pipeline Company Fence Upgrade at South Tacoma SubstationCX(s) Applied: B1.11Date: 09/07/2011Location(s): Pierce County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. Washoe Tribe - Alternative Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Clear Creek Parcel 229 Mica 0.91 Olympic Valley 2.79 Silverado 160 Skunk Harbor 24 Stewart Community 292 Stewart Ranch 2,098 Uhalde 38.948 Upper Clear Creek Parcel 157.14 ...

  18. SERI biomass program annual technical report: 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, P.W.; Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.

    1983-02-01

    The biomass with which this report is concerned includes aquatic plants, which can be converted into liquid fuels and chemicals; organic wastes (crop residues as well as animal and municipal wastes), from which biogas can be produced via anerobic digestion; and organic or inorganic waste streams, from which hydrogen can be produced by photobiological processes. The Biomass Program Office supports research in three areas which, although distinct, all use living organisms to create the desired products. The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) supports research on organisms that are themselves processed into the final products, while the Anaerobic Digestion (ADP) and Photo/Biological Hydrogen Program (P/BHP) deals with organisms that transform waste streams into energy products. The P/BHP is also investigating systems using water as a feedstock and cell-free systems which do not utilize living organisms. This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1982.

  19. EIA Energy Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tinker, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 Shale Gas Plays Inevitable Updates Bureau of Economic Geology University of Texas at Austin Tinker, 2015 Acknowledgements and Disclosures Acknowledgements and Disclosures  Alfred P. Sloan Foundation  IHS and DrillingInfo  EIA  BHP, ExxonMobil, Southwestern Energy, Devon, Range Resources, Cimarex, Carrizo for discussions ----------------------------------------  Potential conflicts of interest have been

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office | Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 3, 2014 CX-012728: Categorical Exclusion Determination BHP-3 Offsite Bump Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 41885 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office September 2, 2014 CX-012731:

  1. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II )

    1992-03-01

    Operations involving sand or solids washing are the most common of today's coiled tubing workover services. Wellbore cleanouts require pumping fluid that will entrain solids and return them to the surface. In most cases, wash fluids and solids are captured in surface tanks of sufficient volume to allow solids to settle out. Where practical, fluids are recirculated to reduce cost. An important concern when designing sand wash programs is correct fluid system selection. Wash fluids should closely balance BHP and provide piston like displacement for solids removal. This paper is an overview of compressible and incompressible fluids commonly used for coiled tubing services.

  2. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  3. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  4. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  5. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalifa, H.E.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an evaluation of Brayton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. It is also shown that, if installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or $170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that would hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified.

  6. High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-31

    This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well-to-wheels analysis of the energy flows in a mobile vehicle system and a 2nd Law thermodynamic analysis of the engine system were also completed under this program.

  7. EERE Success Story-Washington: Community Power Works is Building a More

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficient Seattle | Department of Energy Washington: Community Power Works is Building a More Efficient Seattle EERE Success Story-Washington: Community Power Works is Building a More Efficient Seattle July 26, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Wedged between the Cascade and Olympic Mountain ranges and buffeted by lakes, rivers, and the awe-inspiring Puget Sound, Seattle has a legacy of environmental stewardship and a culture of innovation. Combined with thoughtful leadership on climate change, these

  8. Project Reports for Makah Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Makah Nation, located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, has determined that the most expedient way to ensure the success of developing a commercial wind project on native lands, while simultaneously maintaining an economically and politically advantageous position for the tribe, is by setting up the Makah Utility Authority as a vehicle for finance, business, and development. In this project, the Makah will complete the predevelopment tasks for the planned Makah 30-MW wind project and associated infrastructure.

  9. Makah Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Makah Nation, located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, has determined that the most expedient way to ensure the success of developing a commercial wind project on native lands, while simultaneously maintaining an economically and politically advantageous position for the tribe, is by setting up the Makah Utility Authority as a vehicle for finance, business, and development. In this project, the Makah will complete the predevelopment tasks for the planned Makah 30-MW wind project and associated infrastructure.

  10. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc Presidental Permit authorizing Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc More Documents & Publications PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 25, 2009 [Feature Stories and Releases] Nature Magazine Features Mobile Facility Deployment In China Bookmark and Share A news feature published in Vol. 461 of Nature magazine covers the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in China. A news feature published in Vol. 461 of Nature magazine covers the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in China. In 2008, with all eyes on Beijing during the Olympics, the ARM Mobile Facility quietly obtained eight months of climate data from the city of Shouxian,

  12. LANL: AOT and LANSCE The Pulse August 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2010 I N S I D E continued on page 6 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division By Francisco Ojeda ADEPS Communications Katharine Page fnds several similarities between the two passions in her life-Olympic- style weightlifting and materials science. While one is more physically grueling and the other more mentally demanding, Page enjoys the benefts of both. "They both take

  13. Quinault Comprehensive Biomass Strategy Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comprehensive Biomass Strategy Project In partnership with Columbia-Pacific RC&EDD Jesse Cardenas Executive Director Quinault Indian Reservation Overview n The Quinault Indian Reservation (QIR) contains 208,105 acres of forested land in a single, triangular block n Located in the southwest corner of the Olympic Peninsula in Western Washington and includes the villages of Taholah, Queets, and Amanda Park n It is bounded on the west by the Pacific Ocean and 28 miles of preserved shoreline,

  14. Washington: Community Power Works is Building a More Efficient Seattle |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Wedged between the Cascade and Olympic Mountain ranges and buffeted by lakes, rivers, and the awe-inspiring Puget Sound, Seattle has a legacy of environmental stewardship and a culture of innovation. Combined with thoughtful leadership on climate change, these are the driving forces behind the city's aggressive goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. The city of Seattle partnered with EERE and several community organizations to meet its energy efficiency and carbon reduction

  15. EIS-0378: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0378: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has applied to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for authorizations and approvals necessary to construct the U.S. portion of a proposed international electric power transmission cable. Specifically, Sea Breeze has applied to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), an organizational

  16. Model based control of a coke battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, P.M.; Srour, J.M.; Zulli, P.; Cunningham, R.; Hockings, K.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a model-based strategy for coke battery control at BHP Steel`s operations in Pt Kembla, Australia. The strategy uses several models describing the battery thermal and coking behavior. A prototype controller has been installed on the Pt Kembla No. 6 Battery (PK6CO). In trials, the new controller has been well accepted by operators and has resulted in a clear improvement in battery thermal stability, with a halving of the standard deviation of average battery temperature. Along with other improvements to that battery`s operations, this implementation has contributed to a 10% decrease in specific battery energy consumption. A number of enhancements to the low level control systems on that battery are currently being undertaken in order to realize further benefits.

  17. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.

  18. Field test comparison of natural gas engine exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bicknell, W.B.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N.; Statler, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    As part of a product improvement program, an extensive spark-ignited, turbocharged, natural gas engine exhaust valve test program was conducted using laboratory and field engines. Program objectives were to identify a valve and seat insert combination that increased mean time between overhauls (MTBO) while reducing the risk of premature valve cracking and failure. Following a thorough design review, a large number of valve and seat insert configurations were tested in a popular 900 RPM, 166 BHP (0.123 Mw) per cylinder industrial gas engine series. Material, head geometry, seat angle and other parameters were compared. Careful in-place measurements and post-test inspections compared various configurations and identified optimal exhaust valving for deployment in new units and upgrades of existing engines.

  19. Post waterflood CO2 miscible flood in light oil fluvial - dominated deltaic reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 30, 1994. 1st Quarter, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-15

    Production is averaging about 450 BOPD for the quarter. The fluctuation was primarily due to a temporary shutdown of CO{sub 2} delivery and maturing of the first WAG cycle. CO{sub 2} and water injection were reversed again in order to optimize changing yields and water cuts in the producing wells. Measured BHP was close to the anticipated value. A limited CO{sub 2} volume of 120 MMCF was injected to stimulate well Kuhn No. 6 to test the Huff-Puff process, since the well did not respond to CO{sub 2} injection from the main reservoir. The well will be placed on February 1, 1995. Total CO{sub 2} injection averaged this quarter about 8.8 MMCFD, including 3.6 MMCFD purchased CO{sub 2} from Cardox. The stratigraphy of the sand deposits is also discussed.

  20. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  2. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  3. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-17

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

  4. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-04-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Soviet Union to build Iran nuclear plant; Dension announces cuts in Elliot Lake production; Soviet environmental study delays Rostov startup; Cogema closes two mines; Namibian sanctions lifted by USA and Canada; US Energy and Kennecott restructors joint venture; Australians reelect Hawke; China to buy Soviet nuclear plant; Olympic Dam`s first sale of concentrates to USA; Uranevz buys one-third of Cogema`s Rabbit Lake operations; East and West Germany forming joint nuclear law; and Nova Scotia extends uranium exploration plan.

  5. The Story of NIFFY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Story of NIFFY When NIF was being planned and built, we got a big surprise. In 1997, while removing 210,000 cubic yards of earth-enough to fill 2½ Olympic-size swimming pools-for utility trenches at the site, we discovered the oldest known Livermore Valley resident: a prehistoric elephant called a mammoth. We assembled a team of experts. Archeologist Dr. Roger Kelly from the Department of the Interior and Scott Samuelson of the Department of Energy worked together with LLNL scientists to

  6. Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM’s Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of DOE’s CANstruction Sculpture Contest for its entry, shown here, inspired by London’s Tower Bridge during the 2012 Summer Olympics. EM's Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of

  7. Offsite Source Recovery Program (OSRP) Workshop Module: Tianjin, China, July 16-July 17, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlton, Robert J.

    2012-07-11

    Recovering and disposal of radioactive sources that are no longer in service in their intended capacity is an area of high concern Globally. A joint effort to recover and dispose of such sources was formed between the US Department of Energy and the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), in preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. LANL involvement in this agreement continues today under the DOE-Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program. LANL will be presenting overview information on their Offsite Source Recovery (OSRP) and Source Disposal programs, in a workshop for the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) at Tianjin, China, on July 16 and 17, 2012.

  8. Go for the Gold and Save Energy at Home | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Go for the Gold and Save Energy at Home Go for the Gold and Save Energy at Home August 15, 2012 - 4:53pm Addthis Amanda McAlpin The Olympic games just drew to a close; it's been an exciting time to be a citizen of the world. Watching them is always inspiring and energizing to me. It's motivation to go to the gym, learn something new, or revisit my own goals. Saving energy has always been an important goal for me, but it can be easy to lose be less mindful of it as I go about my daily life. Why

  9. QIN Renewable Energy Feasibility Study - Catching the Power of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    QIN Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Catching the Power of Energy 11/1/2004 2 11/1/2004 3 11/1/2004 4 Presented by... Natalie Charley, Project Coordinator, Quinault Nation Don Hopps, Director, Institute for Washington's Future Mark Pokryska, Project Manager, WorldWater Corporation and Ocean Power Technologies 11/1/2004 5 About the Quinault Indian Nation Southwest corner of the Olympic Peninsula in Western Washington 208,105 acres of land Over 2,980 tribal members Located on the Pacific Ocean

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in 2013 | Department of Energy Since WIPP became operational in March 1999, it has surpassed receiving 11,000 shipments, which traveled over 14 million safe loaded miles over the nation’s highways through WIPP’s transportation program — equal to about 29 trips around the moon. WIPP has permanently disposed of more than 89,000 cubic meters of TRU waste — enough to fill more than 35 Olympic-size swimming pools. In 2013, WIPP is on course in support of the Los Alamos

  11. What Motivates You to Save Energy? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Amanda wrote about how the Olympics could remind us to revisit our energy-saving goals. But you can find inspiration to save energy anywhere! And that's our question this week. What motivates you to save energy? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles What Are Your Reasons for Saving Energy? Question of the Week:

  12. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designer; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) Cost Effective High Performance Materials and Processing; (2) Advanced Manufacturing Technology; (3)Testing and Characterization; and (4) Materials and Testing Standards.

  13. Thurston Energy Outreach Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, P.; Young, M.

    1984-09-01

    In Olympia, the Washington Energy Extension Service program is provided by the Olympic Renewable Resources Association's Energy Outreach Center. The Center has provided Thurston County residents with consistent and reliable information on energy conservation and renewable resources since 1980. During those four years, a seasonal pattern of activities has developed which reflects strong shifts in class attendance and inquiries by EOC users over the course of the year. Classes include: design of superinsulated passive solar and earth sheltered homes; sunspace design, coldframe construction and tax credits for solar energy systems; caulking, weatherstripping, storm windows and chimney cleaning; and solar and wood hot water systems. All are scheduled according to dictates of seasonal needs and interests.

  14. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energys Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  15. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington States Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  16. Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigel N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) generated by internal combustion (IC) engines are implicated in adverse environmental and health effects. Even though lean-burn natural gas engines have traditionally emitted lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions compared to their diesel counterparts, natural gas engines are being further challenged to reduce NOx emissions to 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) approach for NOx reduction involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the NOx from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By sending the desorbed NOx back into the intake and through the engine, a percentage of the NOx can be decomposed during the combustion process. SNR technology has the support of the Department of Energy (DOE), under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program to reduce NOx emissions to under 0.1 g/bhp-hr from stationary natural gas engines by 2010. The NO decomposition phenomenon was studied using two Cummins L10G natural gas fueled spark-ignited (SI) engines in three experimental campaigns. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio ({lambda}), injected NO quantity, added exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) percentage, and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates within the engine. Chemical kinetic model predictions using the software package CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with established rate and equilibrium models. The model was used to predict NO decomposition during lean-burn, stoichiometric burn, and slightly rich-burn cases with added EGR. NOx decomposition rates were estimated from the model to be from 35 to 42% for the lean-burn cases and from 50 to 70% for the rich-burn cases. The modeling results provided an insight as to how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for the experimental engine. Results from this experiment along with chemical kinetic modeling solutions prompted the investigation of rich-burn operating conditions, with added EGR to prevent preignition. It was observed that the relative air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity, added EGR fraction, and engine operating points affected the NO decomposition rates. While operating under these modified conditions, the highest NO decomposition rate of 92% was observed. In-cylinder pressure data gathered during the experiments showed minimum deviation from peak pressure as a result of NO injections into the engine. A NOx adsorption system, from Sorbent Technologies, Inc., was integrated with the Cummins engine, comprised a NOx adsorbent chamber, heat exchanger, demister, and a hot air blower. Data were gathered to show the possibility of NOx adsorption from the engine exhaust, and desorption of NOx from the sorbent material. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a benchtop adsorption system was constructed. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while data were gathered on the characteristics of the sorbent material for development of a system model. A simplified linear driving force model was developed to predict NOx adsorption into the sorbent material as cooled exhaust passed over fresh sorbent material. A mass heat transfer analysis was conducted to analyze the possibility of using hot exhaust gas for the desorption process. It was found in the adsorption studies, and through literature review, that NO adsorption was poor when the carrier gas was nitrogen, but that NO in the presence of oxygen was adsorbed at levels exceeding 1% by mass of the sorbent. From the three experimental campaigns, chemical kinetic modeling analysis, and the scaled benchtop NOx adsorption system, an overall SNR system model was developed. An economic analysis was completed, and showed that the system was impractical in cost for small engines, but that economies of scale favored the technology.

  17. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

  18. Conversion of a diesel engine to a spark ignition natural gas engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Requirements for alternatives to diesel-fueled vehicles are developing, particularly in urban centers not in compliance with mandated air quality standards. An operator of fleets of diesel- powered vehicles may be forced to either purchase new vehicles or equip some of the existing fleets with engines designed or modified to run on alternative fuels. In converting existing vehicles, the operator can either replace the existing engine or modify it to burn an alternative fuel. Work described in this report addresses the problem of modifying an existing diesel engine to operate on natural gas. Tecogen has developed a technique for converting turbocharged automotive diesel engines to operate as dedicated spark-ignition engines with natural gas fuel. The engine cycle is converted to a more-complete-expansion cycle in which the expansion ratio of the original engine is unchanged while the effective compression ratio is lowered, so that engine detonation is avoided. The converted natural gas engine, with an expansion ratio higher than in conventional spark- ignition natural gas engines, offers thermal efficiency at wide-open- throttle conditions comparable to its diesel counterpart. This allows field conversion of existing engines. Low exhaust emissions can be achieved when the engine is operated with precise control of the fuel air mixture at stoichiometry with a 3-way catalyst. A Navistar DTA- 466 diesel engine with an expansion ratio of 16.5 to 1 was converted in this way, modifying the cam profiles, increasing the turbocharger boost pressure, incorporating an aftercooler if not already present, and adding a spark-ignition system, natural gas fuel management system, throttle body for load control, and an electronic engine control system. The proof-of-concept engine achieved a power level comparable to that of the diesel engine without detonation. A conversion system was developed for the Navistar DT 466 engine. NOx emissions of 1.5 g/bhp-h have been obtained.

  19. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally, the transient demonstration was performed in Phase IV. The project demonstrated the achievement of meeting US10 emissions without NOx aftertreatment. The successful execution of the project has served to highlight the effectiveness of closely matched combustion predictive tools to engine testing. It has further served to highlight the importance of key technologies and future areas of research and development. In this regard, recommendations are made towards further improvements in the areas of engine hardware, fuel injection systems, controls and fuels.

  20. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  1. "Ask Argonne" - Edwin Campos, Research Meteorologist, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin Campos

    2013-05-08

    Dr. Edwin Campos is a Research Meteorologist at Argonne National Laboratory. For the last two decades, he has studied weather, and in particular, clouds. Clouds are one of the most uncertain variables in climate predictions and are often related to transportation hazards. Clouds can also impact world-class sporting events like the Olympics. You may have questions about the role of clouds, or weather, on our daily lives. How is severe weather monitored for airports? What is the impact of clouds and wind on the generation of electricity? One of the projects Edwin is working on is short-term forecasting as it relates to solar electricity. For this, Edwin's team is partnering with industry and academia to study new ways of forecasting clouds, delivering technologies that will allow the incorporation of more solar power into the electric grid. Post a question for Edwin as a comment below, and it might get answered in the follow-up video we'll post in the next few weeks.

  2. "Ask Argonne" - Edwin Campos, Research Meteorologist, Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Edwin Campos

    2013-06-10

    Dr. Edwin Campos is a Research Meteorologist at Argonne National Laboratory. For the last two decades, he has studied weather, and in particular, clouds. Clouds are one of the most uncertain variables in climate predictions and are often related to transportation hazards. Clouds can also impact world-class sporting events like the Olympics. You may have questions about the role of clouds, or weather, on our daily lives. How is severe weather monitored for airports? What is the impact of clouds and wind on the generation of electricity? One of the projects Edwin is working on is short-term forecasting as it relates to solar electricity. For this, Edwin's team is partnering with industry and academia to study new ways of forecasting clouds, delivering technologies that will allow the incorporation of more solar power into the electric grid. Post a question for Edwin as a comment below, and it might get answered in the follow-up video we'll post in the next few weeks.

  3. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to these same feature surfaces to withstand the pulsating UHIP diesel injection without fatigue failure, through the expected life of the fuel system's components (10,000 hours for the pump and common rail, 5000 hours for the injector). The potential to Caterpillar of this fueling approach and the overall emissions reduction system is the cost savings of the fuel, the cost savings of not requiring a full emissions module and other emissions hardware, and the enabling of the use of biodiesel fuel due to the reduced dependency on after-treatment. A proprietary production CRS generating process was developed to treat the interior of the sac-type injector nozzle tip region (particularly for the sac region). Ninety-five tips passed ultra high pulsed pressure fatigue testing with no failures assignable to treated surfaces or materials. It was determined that the CRS impartation method does not weaken the tip internal seat area. Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development accepts that the CRS method initial production technical readiness level has been established. A method to gage CRS levels in production was not yet accomplished, but it is believed that monitoring process parameters call be used to guarantee quality. A precision profiling process for injector seat and sac regions has been shown to be promising but not yet fully confirmed. It was demonstrated that this precision profiling process can achieve form and geometry to well under an aggressively small micron peak-to-valley and that there are no surface flaws that approach an even tighter micron peak-to-valley tolerance. It is planned to purchase machines to further develop and move the process towards production. The system is targeted towards the high-power diesel electric power generators and high-power diesel marine power generators, with displacement from 20 liters to 80 liters and with power from 800 brake horsepower (BHP) to 3200BHP (0.6 megawatts to 2.4 megawatts). However, with market adoption, this system has the potential to meet EPA exhaust standards for all diesel engines nine liters and up, or 300B

  4. Communication Simulations for Power System Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-05-29

    New smart grid technologies and concepts, such as dynamic pricing, demand response, dynamic state estimation, and wide area monitoring, protection, and control, are expected to require considerable communication resources. As the cost of retrofit can be high, future power grids will require the integration of high-speed, secure connections with legacy communication systems, while still providing adequate system control and security. While considerable work has been performed to create co-simulators for the power domain with load models and market operations, limited work has been performed in integrating communications directly into a power domain solver. The simulation of communication and power systems will become more important as the two systems become more inter-related. This paper will discuss ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to create a flexible, high-speed power and communication system co-simulator for smart grid applications. The framework for the software will be described, including architecture considerations for modular, high performance computing and large-scale scalability (serialization, load balancing, partitioning, cross-platform support, etc.). The current simulator supports the ns-3 (telecommunications) and GridLAB-D (distribution systems) simulators. Ongoing and future work will be described, including planned future expansions for a traditional transmission solver. A test case using the co-simulator, utilizing a transactive demand response system created for the Olympic Peninsula and AEP gridSMART demonstrations, requiring two-way communication between distributed and centralized market devices, will be used to demonstrate the value and intended purpose of the co-simulation environment.

  5. Courts and Commissions: Fish or foul

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radford, B.W.

    1993-10-15

    Hydropower is under attack everywhere you look. It started back in the sixties during the battle over Arizona's Glen Canyon Dam. That case purportedly ended in a compromise with the Sierra Club to save the Grand Canyon from hydro development. But once built, the dam played havoc with Colorado River levels, disrupting rafting trips for Grand Canyon tourists. Even Barry Goldwater was later heard to rue the Glen Canyon project. Marc Reisner's 1986 book, Cadillac Desert, galvanized the antihydro faction. A few years later, calls arose for the City of San Francisco to dismantle its O'Shaughnessy Dam across the Hetch Hetchy Valley in the Sierra Nevada, just 15 miles north of famed Yosemite. That move failed. (Maybe San Francisco's oddball reputation had something to do with the result). But now we hear of plans underway to tear down dams on the Elwah River in Washington State's Olympic National Park, to reclaim lost salmon spawning grounds and return the parks to its natural state. This time the dam busters may win. These events are not unconnected. Strung together, they reveal a change in the popular opinion of how rivers, streams, and coastlines contribute to our economic well-being, and how the federal government should manage those economic resources. Federal hydropower control was born to govern our navigable waterways. It grew up as a tool to speed electrification and develop mining and logging. But forces today are seeking to make federal hydropower law more sympathetic to wildlife preservation. They argue that wildlife represents a national economic resource - no less so than timber, minerals, and shipping. This view is winning support from those in high positions, including the Chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Elizabeth Moler.

  6. Utilization of the St. Peter Sandstone in the Illinois Basin for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, Robert; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This project is part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under cooperative agreement DE-FE0002068 from 12/08/2009 through 9/31/2014. The study is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. This report evaluates the potential injectivity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data acquired through funding in this project as well as existing data from two additional, separately funded projects: the US DOE funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which received a phase two award from DOE. This study addresses the question of whether or not the St. Peter Sandstone may serve as a suitable target for CO2 sequestration at locations within the Illinois Basin where it lies at greater depths (below the underground source of drinking water (USDW)) than at the IBDP site. The work performed included numerous improvements to the existing St. Peter reservoir model created in 2010. Model size and spatial resolution were increased resulting in a 3 fold increase in the number of model cells. Seismic data was utilized to inform spatial porosity distribution and an extensive core database was used to develop porosity-permeability relationships. The analysis involved a Base Model representative of the St. Peter at in-situ conditions, followed by the creation of two hypothetical models at in-situ + 1,000 feet (ft.) (300 m) and in-situ + 2,000 ft. (600 m) depths through systematic depthdependent adjustment of the Base Model parameters. Properties for the depth shifted models were based on porosity versus depth relationship extracted from the core database followed by application of the porosity-permeability relationship. Each of the three resulting models were used as input to dynamic simulations with the single well injection target of 3.2 million tons per annum (MTPA) for 30 years using an appropriate fracture gradient based bottom hole pressure limit for each injection level. Modeling results are presented in terms of well bottomhole pressure (BHP), injection rate profiles, and three-dimensional (3D) saturation and differential pressure volumes at selected simulation times. Results suggest that the target CO2 injection rate of 3.2 MTPA may be achieved in the St. Peter Sandstone at in-situ conditions and at the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) depth using a single injector well. In the latter case the target injection rate is achieved after a ramp up period which is caused by multi-phase flow effects and thus subject to increased modeling uncertainty. Results confirm that the target rate may not be achieved at the in-situ +2,000 ft. (600 m) level even with multiple wells. These new modeling results for the in-situ case are more optimistic than previous modeling results. This difference is attributed to the difference in methods and data used to develop model permeability distributions. Recommendations for further work include restriction of modeling activity to the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) and shallower depth interval, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and refinement of porosity and permeability estimates through depth and area selective querying of the available core database. It is also suggested that further modeling efforts include scope for evaluating project performance in terms of metrics directly related to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Class VI permit requirements for the area of review (AoR) definition and post injection site closure monitoring.

  7. SELECTIVE NOx RECIRCULATION FOR STATIONARY LEAN-BURN NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Chamila Tissera; Matt Swartz; Emre Tatli; Ramprabhu Vellaisamy

    2005-01-01

    The research program conducted at the West Virginia University Engine and Emissions Research Laboratory (EERL) is working towards the verification and optimization of an approach to remove nitric oxides from the exhaust gas of lean burn natural gas engines. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under contract number: DE-FC26-02NT41608. Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves three main steps. First, NOx is adsorbed from the exhaust stream, followed by periodic desorption from the aftertreatment medium. Finally the desorbed NOx is passed back into the intake air stream and fed into the engine, where a percentage of the NOx is decomposed. This reporting period focuses on the NOx decomposition capability in the combustion process. Although researchers have demonstrated NOx reduction with SNR in other contexts, the proposed program is needed to further understand the process as it applies to lean burn natural gas engines. SNR is in support of the Department of Energy goal of enabling future use of environmentally acceptable reciprocating natural gas engines through NOx reduction under 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The study of decomposition of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) during combustion in the cylinder was conducted on a 1993 Cummins L10G 240 hp lean burn natural gas engine. The engine was operated at different air/fuel ratios, and at a speed of 800 rpm to mimic a larger bore engine. A full scale dilution tunnel and analyzers capable of measuring NOx, CO{sub 2}, CO, HC concentrations were used to characterize the exhaust gas. Commercially available nitric oxide (NO) was used to mimic the NOx stream from the desorption process through a mass flow controller and an injection nozzle. The same quantity of NOx was injected into the intake and exhaust line of the engine for 20 seconds at various steady state engine operating points. NOx decomposition rates were obtained by averaging the peak values at each set point minus the baseline and finding the ratio between the injected NO amounts. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity and engine operating points affected the NOx decomposition rates of the natural gas engine. A highest NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine. A separate exploratory tests conducted with a gasoline engine with a low air/fuel ratio yielded results that suggested, that high NOx decomposition rates may be possible if a normally lean burn engine were operated at conditions closer to stoichiometric, with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a brief period of time during the NOx decomposition phase and with a wider range of air/fuel ratios. Chemical kinetic model predictions using CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with the established rate and equilibrium models. NOx decomposition rates from 35% to 42% were estimated using the CHEMKIN software. This provided insight on how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for a large bore engine. In the future, the modeling will be used to examine the effect of higher NO{sub 2}/NO ratios that are associated with lower speed and larger bore lean burn operation.

  8. Real-time measurements of particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil and gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. w. Hahn; K. r. Hencken; H. A. Johnsen; J. R. Ross; P. M. Walsh

    1998-12-10

    Particulate matter emissions and some components of the particles were measured in the exhaust from combustion equipment used in oil and gas production operations near Bakersfield, California. The combustion sources included a 22.5 MW (electric) turbine generator, a 342-Bhp rich-burn spark ignition engine, and a 50 million Btu/h steam generator, all fired using natural gas. The particle components and measurement techniques were as follows: (1) Calcium, magnesium, sodium, silicon, and iron were measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), (2) particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were detected using the charge produced by photoionization, (3) particles having sizes between 0.1 and 7.5 {micro}m were counted using an instrument based on light scattering, and (4) total particulate matter was measured according to US EPA Method 5. Not all of the methods were applied to all of the sources. Measurements were also made in the ambient air near the combustion air inlets to the units, for comparison with the concentrations in the exhaust, but the inlet and outlet measurements were not done simultaneously. Calcium, sodium, and silicon were found in the exhaust from the steam generator at concentrations similar to those in the ambient air near the inlet to the burner. Sodium and silicon were observed in the engine exhaust at levels a factor of four higher than their concentrations in the air. The principal metal observed in the engine exhaust was calcium, a component of the lubricating oil, at a concentration of 11.6 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The air entering the gas turbine is filtered, so the average concentrations of metals in the turbine exhaust under steady operating conditions were even lower than in the air. During start-up following a shut-down to wash the turbine, silicon and iron were the major species in the stack, at concentrations of 6.4 and 16.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. A possible source of silicon is the water injected into the turbine for NO{sub x} control. Iron-containing particles are expected to be scale from ferrous metals. A commercial photoelectric aerosol sensor was used to measure PAH adsorbed on particles in the exhaust from the steam generator and the rich-burn engine. The conversion of the instrument readings to PAH concentrations is dependent upon the specific distribution of PAH species present. Using the typical calibration factor recommended by the instrument manufacturer, the estimated average concentration of particle-bound PAH was below the instrument detection limit (3--10 ng/m{sup 3}) in the stack gas from the steam generator, and was estimated to be 0.045--0.15 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in the exhaust from the rich-burn engine. Particle mass concentrations estimated from number concentrations determined using the particle counting and sizing instrument were only small fractions of the concentrations measured using Method 5. This is thought to be due primarily to the limited range over which size was quantified (0.1 to 7.5 {micro}m) and the poor efficiency with which the sampling system transferred large particles.

  9. Distributed Smart Grid Asset Control Strategies for Providing Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Moya, Christian; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2013-10-30

    With large-scale plans to integrate renewable generation driven mainly by state-level renewable portfolio requirements, more resources will be needed to compensate for the uncertainty and variability associated with intermittent generation resources. Distributed assets can be used to mitigate the concerns associated with renewable energy resources and to keep costs down. Under such conditions, performing primary frequency control using only supply-side resources becomes not only prohibitively expensive but also technically difficult. It is therefore important to explore how a sufficient proportion of the loads could assume a routine role in primary frequency control to maintain the stability of the system at an acceptable cost. The main objective of this project is to develop a novel hierarchical distributed framework for frequency based load control. The framework involves two decision layers. The top decision layer determines the optimal gain for aggregated loads for each load bus. The gains are computed using decentralized robust control methods, and will be broadcast to the corresponding participating loads every control period. The second layer consists of a large number of heterogeneous devices, which switch probabilistically during contingencies so that aggregated power change matches the desired amount according to the most recently received gains. The simulation results show great potential to enable systematic design of demand-side primary frequency control with stability guarantees on the overall power system. The proposed design systematically accounts for the interactions between the total load response and bulk power system frequency dynamics. It also guarantees frequency stability under a wide range of time varying operating conditions. The local device-level load response rules fully respect the device constraints (such as temperature setpoint, compressor time delays of HVACs, or arrival and departure of the deferrable loads), which are crucial for implementing real load control programs. The promise of autonomous, Grid Friendly response by smart appliances in the form of under-frequency load shedding was demonstrated in the GridWise Olympic Peninsula Demonstration in 2006. Each controller monitored the power grid voltage signal and requested that electrical load be shed by its appliance whenever electric power-grid frequency fell below 59.95 Hz. The controllers and their appliances responded reliably to each shallow under-frequency event, which was an average of one event per day and shed their loads for the durations of these events. Another objective of this project was to perform extensive simulation studies to investigate the impact of a population of Grid Friendly Appliances (GFAs) on the bulk power system frequency stability. The GFAs considered in this report are represented as demonstration units with water heaters individually modeled.

  10. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine youre at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (Youve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your homes energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100 homes on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State receive energy price information through a broadband Internet connection and have received automated demand-response thermostats and water heaters that can adjust energy use based on price. Fifty of those homes and an additional 50 homes in Yakima, Washington, and 50 homes in Gresham, Oregon, have computer chips helping control their dryers. These chips sense when the power transmission system is under stress and automatically turn off certain functions briefly until the grid can be stabilized by power operators.

  11. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,000 kWh and the plant would have a cost-of-energy of approximately 65 cents per kWh, substantially above market rates. The Waatch site would also be a combination water supply and power generation facility. It would have a rated capacity of 935 kW and would cost approximately $16,400,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 3,260,000 kWh and the plant would have a cost-of-energy of approximately 38 cents per kWh, also substantially above market rates. Recommendation: Stand-alone hydroelectric development is not commercially viable. The Tribal Council should not pursue development of hydroelectric facilities on the Makah Reservation unless they are an adjunct to a water supply development, and the water supply systems absorbs almost all the capital cost of the project.