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1

Thermodynamic Studies of [H2Rh(diphosphine)2]+ and [HRh(diphosphine)2(CH3CN)]2+ Complexes in Acetonitrile  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermodynamic studies of a series of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ and [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes have been carried out in acetonitrile. Seven different diphosphine (PP) ligands were selected to allow variation of the electronic properties of the ligand substituents, the cone angles, and the natural bite angles (NBAs). Oxidative addition of H2 to [Rh(PP)2]+ complexes is favored by diphosphine ligands with large NBAs, small cone angles, and electron donating substituents, with the NBA being the dominant factor. Large pKa values for [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes are favored by small ligand cone angles, small NBAs, and electron donating substituents with the cone angles playing a major role. The hydride donor abilities of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ complexes increase as the NBAs decrease, the cone angles decrease, and the electron donor abilities of the substituents increase. These results indicate that if solvent coordination is involved in hydride transfer or proton transfer reactions, the observed trends can be understood in terms of a combination of two different steric effects, NBAs and cone angles, and electron-donor effects of the ligand substituents.

Aaron D. Wilson; Alexander J. M. Miller; Daniel L. DuBois; Jay A. Labinger; John E. Bercaw

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Solar BG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BG - 1784 Sector Wind energy Product Bulgarian based company investing into hybrid wind-PV plants. References Solar BG1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

3

Adsorption and decomposition of Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 3} at platinum surfaces: An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an attractive power source for mobile applications due to the high-energy density of methanol, the portability and ease of distribution of liquid rather than gaseous fuel, and elimination of the need for a bulky, power-consuming fuel reformer. There are several factors limiting the power output of polymer electrolyte DMFCs. One of the major factors is the slow kinetics of the methanol electrooxidation reaction on the conventional platinum catalyst material. A CH{sub 3}CN-modified triruthenium carbonyl cluster, Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 3}(I), has been adsorbed on platinum and platinum oxide surfaces from dichloromethane solutions. The modified surface has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and polarized grazing angle Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microscopy. The proposed mechanism for the adsorption of I involves the chemisorption of the metal cluster at the platinum surface by losing the acetonitrile ligand. The original cluster, Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}, could not be adsorbed under the same experimental conditions used for cluster I. The cluster-modified surface was treated with hydrogen for the reduction of the cluster to its metallic state on the Pt surface. This was done at different temperatures. The XPS results show the formation of a complex Ru-RuO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 3}/Pt surface.

Fachini, E.R.; Cabrera, C.R. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

Comparison of Cobalt and Nickel Complexes with Sterically Demanding Cyclic Diphosphine Ligands: Electrocatalytic H2 Production by [Co(PtBu2NPh2)(CH3CN)3](BF4)2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cyclic diphosphine ligands PtBu2NPh2 and PtBu2NBz2 have been synthesized and used to prepare new complexes of Co(II) and Ni(II) with the formula [M(PtBu2NR2)(CH3CN)n](BF4)2 (n = 2, 3). The products have been characterized by variable temperature NMR data, X-ray diffraction studies, and cyclic voltammetry, and properties of the new complexes have been compared with previously studied complexes containing PPh2NR2 ligands. The variation of either phosphorus or nitrogen substituents in these ligands can result in significant differences in the structure, electrochemistry and reactivity of the metal complexes. [Co(PtBu2NPh2)(CH3CN)3](BF4)2 is found to be an effective electrocatalyst for the formation of hydrogen using bromoanilinium tetrafluoroborate as the acid, with a turnover frequency of 62 s-1 and an overpotential of 160 mV, and these cobalt derivatives are a promising class of catalysts for further study and optimization. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Wiedner, Eric S.; Yang, Jenny Y.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place Norcross, Georgia Zip 30092 Sector Biomass Product Project developer...

6

Production of carrier-free H.sup.11 CN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of synthesizing H.sup.11 CN involving the proton irradiation of N.sub.2 + H.sub.2 to produce a mixture of .sup.11 CH.sub.4 and NH.sub.3 followed by the reaction of .sup.11 CH.sub.4 and NH.sub.3 to produce H.sup.11 CN and the separation of carrier free H.sup.11 CN.

Christman, David R. (Setauket, NY); Finn, Ronald D. (Westhampton Beach, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

BG/Q Performance Project: porting -Performance Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Libraries ALCF Performance Engineering #12;BG/Q Performance Tools Early efforts were ini8ated with Spiral Gen 7 #12;ALCF Supported BG/Q Libraries on VEAS Library Name Source Provides Graph ParAAoning 4.0.2 8 Located in /soft/libraries/alcf Maintained in

Kemner, Ken

8

Tuning MPI on BG/Q | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Debugging & Profiling Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Tuning MPI on BG/Q MPI Standard The MPI standard is a formal specification document that is backed by the MPI Forum, but no official standardization body (e.g. ISO or ANSI). Fortunately, it has wide vendor support in HPC and is available on all common platforms. Please see this page for all of the MPI standardization documents,

9

Prior BG/P Driver Information | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview BG/P Driver Information Prior BG/P Driver Information Internal Networks Machine Environment FAQs Block and Job State Documentation Machine Partitions Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Prior BG/P Driver Information Prior BGP Driver Information This page contains information about the drivers and efixes currently installed on the ALCF resources Intrepid and Surveyor, as well as

10

BG/Q Parallel Debugging Ready to Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BG/Q Parallel Debugging Ready to Scale ALCF MiraCon March 4, 2013 Ray Loy Applica8ons Performance Engineering ALCF #12;Outline § bgq_stack § coreprocessor § gdb seSngs for core files ­ hTps://www.alcf.anl.gov/resource-guides/vesta-debugging- core

Kemner, Ken

11

CnLrJGD  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l&o-1760 l&o-1760 CnLrJGD 8CURCEN4%4UALLfCE!8SE Licenee Bo. c-3862 tnted: J. T. Baker Chemical Compfuq Phillipsburg, New Jersey Attention: Mr. Joseph L. MetcenQrf Osntlewn: Rvsunnt to the Attalc &orgy Act of 1954 au4 Section 40.21 of t& &&e of Federal Negulationr, Title 10 Control of &urea Matsrial, -Atomic !Znergy, Chapter 1, part40 - P me hereby llc need to nc lve poere of and title to up to one ld ogrem of urai~~ t t&SIG gradef for use slou R etndier on the pmparatlon of sodium diurenetar You are further liceneed-~~tnmef~~~~~-Qe~i~r-~~~e~:lq?l of an& title to refined source maataried to any pereon licensed. by the Atalc Baergy ~emionj within the llmlte of his license. ?hie llccnee fe eubject to all the provieione of the Atopic Energy Act of

12

SF6432-CN Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/31/13 7/31/13 Page 1 of 31 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CN (07/2013) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIRM-FIXED PRICE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS DEFINITIONS DIFFERING SITE CONDITIONS DISPUTES

13

CN Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name CN Solar Co Ltd Place Sangju, North Gyeongsang, Korea (Republic) Sector Solar Product Korean solar project developer. References CN Solar Co...

14

Genome Sequence of the Obligate Gammaproteobacterial Methanotroph Methylomicrobium album strain BG8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complete genome sequence of Methylomicrobium album BG8, a methane-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium isolated from freshwater, is reported. Aside from conserved inventory for growth on single-carbon compounds, M. album BG8 encodes a range of inventory for additional carbon and nitrogen transformations, but no genes for growth on multi-carbon substrates or for N-fixation.

Kits, K. Dimitri [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Jetten, MSM [Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; DiSpirito, Alan [Iowa State University; Murrell, Colin [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Stein, Lisa Y [University of California, Riverside

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Common Debugging Issues on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Common Debugging Issues on BG/P Systems Common Debugging Issues on BG/P Systems What does "Cannot allocate memory" error mean when starting up a debug job? {0}.0: ciod: Error forking external debugger process: Cannot allocate memory The IO node is what loads the executable on the compute nodes, but it is running out of memory during job startup. An alternate IO node kernel profile may solve the problem. This is set by running a cobalt job with --kernel . Please contact support@alcf.anl.gov for assistance. Signals If your stderr file indicates your run terminated due to a signal, the signal names and numbers are listed in the manpage for signal. On the login node, type "man 7 signal" to see this information. ‹ Allinea DDT on BG/P Systems up Core File Settings on BG

16

Machine Environment FAQs on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BG/P Driver Information Prior BG/P Driver Information Internal Networks Machine Environment FAQs Block and Job State Documentation Machine Partitions Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Machine Environment FAQs on BG/P Systems What is the /proc filesystem? The CNK OS on the compute nodes does not provide a standard /proc file system with information about the processes running on the compute node. A /jobs directory does however exist which provides limited information about

17

Quick Reference Guide for BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Quick Reference Guide for BG/P Systems Contents Hardware Description Compiling/Linking Running/Queuing Libraries/Applications Performance Tools Debugging Back to top Hardware Description Surveyor - 13.6 TF/s 1 rack BG/P (1024 compute nodes/4096 CPUs) Intrepid - 557.1 TF/s 40 rack BG/P (40960 compute nodes/163840 CPUs) Front-end nodes (FENs), or login nodes - Regular Linux-based computers for

18

FAQs Data Management on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BG/P File Systems FAQs Data Management on BG/P Systems I O Tuning Using HPSS Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] FAQs Data Management on BG/P Systems Contents Why is the ALCF implementing /home quotas on Intrepid? When will the quotas take effect? What is the quota amount? How can I find out how much data I have? Where/how can I find out how much data my project members each have? What will happen when I reach the quota limit? How will I know I've hit it? Will ALCF implement quotas on /intrepid-fs0?

19

Scalable DNS code for high Reynolds number channel flow simulation on BG/Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scalable Scalable DNS code for high Reynolds number channel flow simulation on BG/Q MyoungKyu Lee mk@ices.utexas.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Texas at Austin MiraCon Mar, 2013 M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) DNS code for high Re flow on BG/Q MiraCon Mar, 2013 1 / 35 Contents Project Overview Performance Optimization Early Result Conclusion M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) DNS code for high Re flow on BG/Q MiraCon Mar, 2013 2 / 35 Project Overview Project Title ◮ Petascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Channel Flow Goal ◮ Expand our understand of wall-bounded turbulence Personnel ◮ P.I. : Robert Moser ◮ Primary Developer : M.K.Lee ◮ Software Engineering Support : Nicholas Malaya ◮ Catalyst : Ramesh Balakrishnan M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) DNS code for high Re flow on BG/Q MiraCon Mar, 2013 3 / 35 Overlap Region Connection between near-wall

20

Methane (CH4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) Gateway Pages to Methane Data Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimizing the FLASH code: preparing for Mira BG/Q and improving the laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing FLASH Optimizing FLASH Optimizing the FLASH code: preparing for Mira BG/Q and improving the laser ray trace April 30, 2013 6km25100off0650 CS Seminar: Optimizing the FLASH code: preparing for Mira BG/Q and improving the laser ray trace Christopher Daley The Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago Tuesday, April 30, 2013 10:00-11:00 PDT Oakland Scientific Facility Room 238 FLASH is a multi-physics, component-based scientific code which has been used on the largest HPC platforms over the last decade. It has been cumulatively used by over a thousand researchers to investigate problems in astrophysics, cosmology, and in some areas of basic physics, such as turbulence. The core capabilities in FLASH include Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) and solvers for hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics. There are

22

Job Scheduling Policy on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on BG/P Systems on BG/P Systems Contents Intrepid Job Scheduling Intrepid Queue User interface Backfill queue Big Run Monday Challenger Scheduling Policy Surveyor Job Scheduling General Scheduling Guidelines System Maintenance Day Reservations Back to top Intrepid Job Scheduling Back to top Intrepid Queue User Queue Queue Nodes Wall-clock Time (hours) Maximum Jobs Per User Maximum Jobs Per Project prod prod-short 512 - 4096 0 - ≤6 5 20 prod-long 512 - 4096 >6 - 12 5 20 prod-capability 4097 - 32768 0 - 24 2 2 prod-bigrun 32769 - 40960 0 - 24 1 1 backfill (‡) 512 - 8192 0 - 6 5 10 (per user) ‡: Depending on the type of project (INCITE, ALCC, Director's Discretionary), this queue may be automatically selected if a project's allocation is negative. Back to top

23

Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Tools and APIs Performance Tools and APIs Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) Rice HPC Toolkit IBM HPCT Mpip gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI High Level UPC API Low Level UPC API UPC Hardware BG/P dgemm Performance Tuning MPI on BGP Performance FAQs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems MPI and OpenMP Options Tuning MPI on BGP Performance Tools Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) - Instruments applications and gathers information on timings, MPI activity, and hardware performance counter events Rice HPCToolkit- Performs sample based profiling of applications and

24

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems References TAU Project Site TAU Instrumentation Methods TAU Compilation Options TAU Fortran Instrumentation FAQ TAU Leap to Petascale 2009 Presentation TAU Workshop 2009 Introduction The TAU (Tuning and Analysis Utilities) Performance System is a portable profiling and tracing toolkit for performance analysis of parallel programs written in Fortran, C, C++, Java, Python. TAU gathers performance information while a program executes through instrumentation of functions, methods, basic blocks, and statements. The instrumentation consists of calls to TAU library routines which can be incorporated into a program in several ways: automatic instrumentation of the code at the source level using the Program Database Toolkit (PDT)

25

Machine Partitions on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machine Partitions on BG/P Systems Machine Partitions on BG/P Systems Partitions of the machine In the prod-devel queue (on Challenger), partition sizes of 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 nodes are available. Of these, only the 512 node partition has a torus network; the others have mesh networks. In the prod queue (on Intrepid), partitions of 512, 1K, 2K, 4K, 8K, 16K, 24K, 32K, and 40K are available. You can see the partitions in the output of partlist, along with whether they are free, busy, or blocked by other partitions: intrepid$ partlist Name Queue State Backfill ============================================================================= ANL-R00-R47-40960 off blocked (ANL-R00-R17-16384) - ANL-R00-R37-32768 prod blocked (ANL-R00-R17-16384) -

26

HPCT MPI Profiling and Tracing Library on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MPI Profiling and Tracing Library on BG/P Systems MPI Profiling and Tracing Library on BG/P Systems References IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue Gene/P - IBM Redbook describing HPCT and other performance tools Introduction The HPC Toolkit provides a mechanism for obtain information about the use of MPI routines during a programs execution. This is done through the use of a library which intercepts calls to MPI routines, records information about the call, and then continues with the MPI call. When the program terminates use of MPI by calling MPI_Finalize the data gathered by the library is written to one or more files in the program execution directory. The the primary types of information that are gathered and writen by the library are: MPI Profile Data- A summary of MPI usage information typically

27

Example Program and Makefile for BG/P | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Example Program and Makefile for BG/P FAQs Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Example Program and Makefile for BG/P Program Example Here's an example of compiling a simple MPI program on ALCF Blue Gene/P systems: > cat pi.c #include "mpi.h" #include #include int main(int argc, char** argv)

28

Measuring Flops on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) Rice HPC Toolkit IBM HPCT Mpip gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI High Level UPC API Low Level UPC API UPC Hardware BG/P dgemm Performance Tuning MPI on BGP Performance FAQs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Measuring Flops on BG/P Systems Generally speaking, BlueGene/P does not have a single command to return the job's number of floating point operations per second (Flops). The problem can partly be solved by using high-level hardware counter interface library, located in /soft/apps/UPC. An example program measures performance of a simple Y(N) = Y(N) + a * X(N)

29

Ferrenberg Swendsen Analysis of LLNL and NYBlue BG/L p4rhms Data  

SciTech Connect

These results are from the continuing Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics runs on BG/L. These results are from the Ferrenberg-Swendsen analysis [?] of the combined data from LLNL and NYBlue BG/L runs for 32{sup 3} x 8 runs with the p4rhmc v2.0 QMP-MPI.X (semi-optimized p4 code using qmp over mpi). The jobs include beta values ranging from 3.525 to 3.535 with an alternate analysis extending to 3.540. The NYBlue data sets are from 9k trajectories from Oct 2007, and the LLNL data are from two independent streams of {approx}5k each, taking from the July 2007 runs. The following outputs are produced by the fs-2+1-chiub.c program. All outputs have had checksums produced by addCks.pl and checked by the checkCks.pl perl script after scanning.

Soltz, R

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

UPC Events All on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events All on BG/P Systems Events All on BG/P Systems BG/P Hardware Events - Complete List Event Number Mode Counter Number Name Hardware Unit Description 0 0 0 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU J-pipe instructions 1 0 1 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in J-pipe 2 0 2 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in J-pipe 3 0 3 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU J-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 4 0 4 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU I-pipe instructions 5 0 5 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_MULT_DIV P0 CPU Mult/Div in I-pipe 6 0 6 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in I-pipe 7 0 7 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in I-pipe 8 0 8 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU I-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 9 0 9 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_BRANCHES P0 CPU Branches

31

Characterization of BG28 and KG3 filter glass for Drive Diagnostic Attenuators  

SciTech Connect

BG28 and KG3 filter glasses were tested for use as attenuators in the NIF drive diagnostic (DrD) systems. Tests were performed in the Optical Sciences Laser facility with a 351 nm, 2-step, 3-nsec pulse at fluences ranging up to {approx} 1 J/cm{sup 2}. Single-shot measurements showed no solarization when the samples were allowed to relax for a week after exposure. KG3 filters exhibited no luminescence and no transient pulse distortion. BG28 filters luminesced appreciably and imposed a 'droop' (similar to 'square-pulse distortion') on the signals. The droop parameter is estimated at 0.50 {+-} 0.11 cm{sup 2}/J. Droop is explained in terms of known copper-doped-glass spectroscopy and kinetics (buildup of triplet-state populations, with excited-state absorption). Simulation of the distortion ({approx}1.6%) expected on a 1.8 MJ Haan pulse led to a minor redesign of the Drive Diagnostic with reduced fluence on the BG28 filters to reduce the droop distortion to 0.5%.

Page, R H; Weiland, T; Folta, J

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

Debugging & Profiling on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core File Settings Using VNC with a Debugger Allinea DDT bgp_stack Coreprocessor gdb TotalView Determining Memory Use Common Debugging Issues FAQs Debugging Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Debugging & Profiling on BG/P Systems This information is for Intrepid and Challenger. Initial setups Core File Settings - this page contains some environment variables that allow you to control code file creation and contents. Using VNC with a Debugger - when displaying an X11 client (e.g. Totalview) remotely over the network, interactive response is typically slow. Using the VNC server can often help you improve the situation.

40

FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Queueing Running Jobs HTC Mode MPMD and MPIEXEC FAQs Queueing and Running Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems Contents Is there a limit on stack size? What are typical boot times for a job My job had empty stdout, and the stderr looks like it died immediately after it started. What happened? Where can I find the details of a job submission? Back to top Is there a limit on stack size? There is no strict limit on the stack size. The stack and heap grow towards each other until a collision occurs. If your job terminates with an error

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nr. 255 / 2013 // 4. Oktober 2013 Ausstellungsstation ,,Totholz lebt: Holzpilze und Insekten" im kologisch-Botanischen Garten (BG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?kologisch-Botanischen Garten (?BG) 2.610 Zeichen Abdruck honorarfrei Beleg wird erbeten Internationale Auszeichnung: Die Ausstellung ,,Biodiversität und Artenschutz im Garten" im ?kologisch- Botanischen Garten ist Projekt der UN-Dekade ,,Biologische Vielfalt" Die Ausstellung ,,Biodiversität und Artenschutz im Garten

Ullmann, G. Matthias

42

SF6432-CN (02-02-12) Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the SCR shall determine the extent that contract Control : SF 6432-CN Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Firm-Fixed Price Commercial Construction Contracts Owner:...

43

Performance Analysis of and Tool Support for Transactional Memory on BG/Q  

SciTech Connect

Martin Schindewolf worked during his internship at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the guidance of Martin Schulz at the Computer Science Group of the Center for Applied Scientific Computing. We studied the performance of the TM subsystem of BG/Q as well as researched the possibilities for tool support for TM. To study the performance, we run CLOMP-TM. CLOMP-TM is a benchmark designed for the purpose to quantify the overhead of OpenMP and compare different synchronization primitives. To advance CLOMP-TM, we added Message Passing Interface (MPI) routines for a hybrid parallelization. This enables to run multiple MPI tasks, each running OpenMP, on one node. With these enhancements, a beneficial MPI task to OpenMP thread ratio is determined. Further, the synchronization primitives are ranked as a function of the application characteristics. To demonstrate the usefulness of these results, we investigate a real Monte Carlo simulation called Monte Carlo Benchmark (MCB). Applying the lessons learned yields the best task to thread ratio. Further, we were able to tune the synchronization by transactifying the MCB. Further, we develop tools that capture the performance of the TM run time system and present it to the application's developer. The performance of the TM run time system relies on the built-in statistics. These tools use the Blue Gene Performance Monitoring (BGPM) interface to correlate the statistics from the TM run time system with performance counter values. This combination provides detailed insights in the run time behavior of the application and enables to track down the cause of degraded performance. Further, one tool has been implemented that separates the performance counters in three categories: Successful Speculation, Unsuccessful Speculation and No Speculation. All of the tools are crafted around IBM's xlc compiler for C and C++ and have been run and tested on a Q32 early access system.

Schindewolf, M

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical Transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical of diphenyldiazomethane with [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIII ] (1) results in an 2 -bound diphenyldiazomethane uranium complex-shell ligand, [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIV (2 -NNCPh2)] (2). Treating Ph2CN2 with a uranium complex that contains

Meyer, Karsten

45

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

49

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

CH 338 Winter 2008 CH 338 (CRN 21222)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructor: Dr. Michael E. Koscho 175 Onyx / 346-2924 koscho@uoregon.edu [please use CH 338 as the subject-line, finding immeasurable utility in our everyday lives. The isolation, preparation, purification times. The chemical laboratory is a safe place to work when everyone in the laboratory is dedicated

Richmond, Geraldine L.

66

ChIP-PED enhances the analysis of ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Although chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) or tiling array hybridization (ChIP-chip) is increasingly used to map genome-widebinding sites of transcription factors (TFs), it still ...

George Wu, Jason T. Yustein, Matthew N. McCall, Michael Zilliox, Rafael A. Irizarry, Karen Zeller, Chi V. Dang, Hongkai Ji

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

trans-K3[TcO2(CN)4  

SciTech Connect

The dioxotetracyanotechnetate anion, [TcO2(CN)4]3-, of the title complex has octahedral symmetry. The technetium is located on a center of inversion and is bound by two oxygen atoms and four cyano ligands. The Tc?O bond distance of 1.7721 (12) is consistent with double bond character. The potassium cations [located on special (1/2,0,1) and general positions] reside in octahedral or tetrahedral environments; interionic KO and KN interactions occur in the 2.7877 (19)-2.8598 (15) range.

Chatterjee, Sayandev; Del Negro, Andrew S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Twamley, Brendan; Krause, Jeanette A.; Bryan, Samuel A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ion imaging study of reaction dynamics in the N{sup +}+ CH{sub 4} system  

SciTech Connect

The velocity map ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions of N{sup +} with CH{sub 4}. The velocity space images are collected at collision energies of 0.5 and 1.8 eV, providing both product kinetic energy and angular distributions for the reaction products CH{sub 4}{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +}, and HCNH{sup +}. The charge transfer process is energy resonant and occurs by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The formation of the most abundant product, CH{sub 3}{sup +}, proceeds by dissociative charge transfer rather than hydride transfer, as reported in earlier publications. The formation of HCNH{sup +} by C-N bond formation appears to proceed by two different routes. The triplet state intermediates CH{sub 3}NH{sup +} and CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{sup +} that are formed as N{sup +}({sup 3}P) approaches CH{sub 4} may undergo sequential loss of two hydrogen atoms to form ground state HCNH{sup +} products on a spin-allowed pathway. However, the kinetic energy distributions for formation of HCNH{sup +} extend past the thermochemical limit to form HCNH{sup +}+ 2H, implying that HCNH{sup +} may also be formed in concert with molecular hydrogen, and requiring that intersystem crossing to the singlet manifold must occur in a significant ({approx}25%) fraction of reactive collisions. We also report GAUSSIAN G2 calculations of the energies and structures of important singlet and triplet [CNH{sub 4}{sup +}] complexes that serve as precursors to product formation.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

UMCP-BG and E collaboration in nuclear power engineering in the framework of DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program has been established to support the education of students in Nuclear Engineering Programs to maintain a knowledgeable workforce in the United States in order to keep nuclear power as a viable component in a mix of energy sources for the country. The involvement of the utility industry ensures that this grant program satisfies the needs and requirements of local nuclear energy producers and at the same time establishes a strong linkage between education and day-to-day nuclear power generation. As of 1997, seventeen pairs of university-utility partners existed. UMCP was never a member of that group of universities, but applied for the first time with a proposal to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in January 1999 [1]. This proposal was generously granted by BG&E [2,3] in the form of a gift in the amount of $25,000 from BG&E's Corporate Contribution Program. Upon the arrival of a newly appointed Director of Administration in the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, the BG&E check was deposited into the University's Maryland Foundation Fund. The receipt of the letter and the check enabled UMCP to apply for DOE's matching funds in the same amount by a proposal.

Wolfe, Lothar PhD

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

C-C and C-Heteroatom Bond Dissociation Energies in CH3R?C(OH)2: Energetics for Photocatalytic Processes of Organic Diolates on TiO2 Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The bond energies of a range of gem-diols, CH3R?C(OH)2 (R? = H, F, Cl, Br, CN, NO2, CF3, CH3CH2, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH2CH2, ((CH3)2)CH, (CH3)3C, ((CH3)2CH)CH2, (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH, C6H5 (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH) which serve as models for binding to a surface have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) and the molecular orbital G3(MP2) methods to provide thermodynamic data for the analysis of the photochemistry of ketones on TiO2. The ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced photodecomposition of adsorbed acetone and 3,3-dimethylbutanone on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface have been investigated with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The C-CH3 and C-C(R?) bond dissociation energies in CH3R?C(OH)2 were predicted, and our calculated bond dissociation energies are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. We used a series of isodemic reactions to provide small corrections to the various bond dissociation energies. The calculated bond dissociation energies are in agreement with the observed photodissociation processes except for R? = CF3, suggesting that these processes are under thermodynamic control. For R? = CF3, reaction dynamics also play a role in determining the photodissociation mechanism. The gas phase Brnsted acidities of the gem-diols were calculated. For three molecules, R? = Cl, Br, and NO2, loss of a proton leads to the formation of a complex of acetic acid with the anion Cl-, Br-, and NO2-. The acidities of these three species are very high with the former two having acidities comparable to CF3SO3H. The ketones (R?RC(=O)) are weak Lewis acids except where addition of OH- leads to the dissociation of the complex to form an anion bonded to acetic acid, R' = NO2, Cl, and Br. The X-C bond dissociation energies for a number of X-CO2- species were calculated and these should be useful in correlating with photochemical reactivity studies.

Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Dixon, David A.; Henderson, Michael A.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

SC-CH FACTS Customer Service  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SC-CH FACTS SC-CH FACTS Customer Service Office of Communications P (630) 252-2110 F (630) 252-9473 Address 9800 South Cass Ave. Argonne, Illinois 60439 Websites Chicago Office www.ch.doe.gov Office of Science http://science.energy.gov/ U.S. Department of Energy http://energy.gov/ CH Factoids Who We Are ... Our Mission The Office of Science - Chicago Office (SC-CH) is a field office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Cabinet-level agency with

72

Enhancement of CN Tower lightning current derivative signals using a modified power spectral subtraction method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lightning current measurements are possible using instrumental tall structures or rocket-triggered lightning. The CN Tower has been a source of lightning current data for the (more)

Mehmud, Huma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

CN Neutrinos and the Sun's Primordial Core Metalicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss the use of neutrinos from the CN cycle and pp chain to constrain the primordial solar core abundances of C and N at an interesting level of precision. A comparison of the Sun's deep interior and surface compositions would test a key assumption of the standard solar model (SSM), a homogeneous zero-age Sun. It would also provide a cross-check on recent photospheric abundance determinations that have altered the once excellent agreement between the SSM and helioseismology. Motivated by the discrepancy between convective-zone abundances and helioseismology, I discuss the possibility that a two-zone Sun could emerge from late-stage metal differentiation in the solar nebula connected with formation of the gaseous giant planets.

Haxton, W C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

AOCS Recommended Practice Ch 2a-94  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

trans Unsaturated Fatty Acids by Capillary Column Gas Chromatography AOCS Recommended Practice Ch 2a-94 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFINITI

76

CN-Cycle Solar Neutrinos and Sun's Primordial Core Metalicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that it may be possible to exploit neutrinos from the CN cycle and pp chain to determine the primordial solar core abundances of C and N at an interesting level of precision. Such a measurement would allow a comparison of the Sun's deep interior composition with it surface, testing a key assumption of the standard solar model (SSM), a homogeneous zero-age Sun. It would also provide a cross-check on recent photospheric abundance determinations that have altered the once excellent agreement between the SSM and helioseismology. As further motivation, we discuss a speculative possibility in which photospheric abundance/helioseismology puzzle is connected with the solar-system metal differentiation that accompanied formation of the gaseous giant planets. The theoretical relationship between core C and N and the 13N and 15O solar neutrino fluxes can be made more precise (and more general) by making use of the Super-Kamiokande and SNO 8B neutrino capture rates, which calibrate the temperature of the solar core. The primordial C and N abundances can then be obtained from these neutrino fluxes and from a product of nuclear rates, with little residual solar model dependence. We describe some of the recent experimental advances that could allow this comparison to be made (theoretically) at about the 9% level, and note that this uncertainty may be reduced further due to ongoing work on the S-factor for 14N(p,gamma). The envisioned measurement might be possible in deep, large-volume detectors using organic scintillator, e.g., Borexino or SNO+

W. C. Haxton; A. M. Serenelli

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Multi-Ligand Based Pd Catalyst for CN Cross-Coupling Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An alternative approach to catalyst development, which led to a Pd catalyst based on two biarylphosphine ligands for C?N cross-coupling reactions, is reported. By effectively being able to take the form of multiple catalysts ...

Fors, Brett P.

79

Estimates of Cn2 from Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output and Comparison with Thermosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged estimates of Cn2 from high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model output are produced from local estimates of the spatial structure functions of refractive index with corrections for the inherent smoothing and filtering ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Francois Vandenberghe; Wei Yu; Yubao Liu; Jason Knievel; George Jumper

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

IAEA-CN-SO/G-I-2 DESIGN STUDY OF FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. IAEA-CN-SO/G-I-2 305304 11.5MA ====3 low beto Mox size (Ip=l.5) ====+ intermediate R = 4.5m 0 high beta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

AOCS Official Method Ch 1-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preparation of Methyl Esters of Long-Chain Fatty Acids AOCS Official Method Ch 1-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method provides a means

82

AOCS Official Method Ch 2-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Fatty Acids in Olive Oils by Capillary GLC AOCS Official Method Ch 2-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method is for the d

83

AOCS Official Method Ch 8-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Wax Content by Capillary Column Gas-Liquid Chromatography AOCS Official Method Ch 8-02 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Addition

84

AOCS Official Method Ch 6-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the Composition of the Sterol Fraction of Animal and Vegetable Oils and Fats by TLC and Capillary GLC AOCS Official Method Ch 6-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS ...

85

AOCS Official Method Ch 7-09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Trade Standard Applying to Olive and Olive-Pomace Oils AOCS Official Method Ch 7-09 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION These analytica

86

AOCS Official Method Ch 3-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Fatty Acids in the 2-Position in the Triglycerides of Oils and Fats AOCS Official Method Ch 3-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION ...

87

Linear growth for Ch\\^atelet surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An upper bound of the expected order of magnitude is established for the number of rational points of bounded height on Ch\\^atelet surfaces defined over the rationals.

Browning, T D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

AOCS Official Method Ch 4-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorophyll Pigments AOCS Official Method Ch 4-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method is used to determine mg/kg of chlorophyll-related p

89

AOCS Official Method Ch 5-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Specific Extinction of Oils and Fats, Ultraviolet Absorption AOCS Official Method Ch 5-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This m

90

NMR Study of the Dynamics of ILs with -CH2Si(CH3)3 vs CH2C(CH3)3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Resonance Study of the Dynamics of Imidazolium Ionic Magnetic Resonance Study of the Dynamics of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids with -CH2Si(CH3)3 vs CH2C(CH3)3 Substituents S. H. Chung, R. Lopato, S. G. Greenbaum, H. Shirota, E. W. Castner, Jr. and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 4885-4893 (2007). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Trimethylsilylmethyl (TMSiM)-substituted imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2-), and tetrafluoroborate (BF4-) ionic liquids (ILs) have lower room-temperature viscosities by factors of 1.6 and 7.4, respectively, than isostructural neopentylimidazolium ILs. In an attempt to account for the effects of silicon substitution in imidazolium RTILs and to investigate the ion dynamics, we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of 1H (I = 1/2) and 19F (I = 1/2)

91

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4/Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for Investigating Vortex Flame Interactions Title Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for...

92

50 2sBe?t3X%7%s%]%8%&%`!&FAEgBg3X!$2005 G/8 7n2 F--GLn N g I/j Langlands BP1~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(K/Q) $NCf$G6&Lr$G$"$k$+$i!$$H$/$KK/Q Abel 3H Bg$J$i$PFrP HGP p N GDj j rGp, Frp GI/ Frp Gp N G j p OK G [K

Yoshino, Yuji

93

Co-composting of green waste and food waste at low C/N ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, co-composting of food waste and green waste at low initial carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios was investigated using an in-vessel lab-scale composting reactor. The central composite design (CCD) and response surface method (RSM) were applied to obtain the optimal operating conditions over a range of preselected moisture contents (45-75%) and C/N ratios (13.9-19.6). The results indicate that the optimal moisture content for co-composting of food waste and green waste is 60%, and the substrate at a C/N ratio of 19.6 can be decomposed effectively to reduce 33% of total volatile solids (TVS) in 12 days. The TVS reduction can be modeled by using a second-order equation with a good fit. In addition, the compost passes the standard germination index of white radish seed indicating that it can be used as soil amendment.

Kumar, Mathava; Ou, Y.-L. [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001, University Road, Hsinchu City 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.-G., E-mail: jglin@mail.nctu.edu.t [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001, University Road, Hsinchu City 30010, Taiwan (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

www.ethz.ch Dear reader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy economy. With the necessary reduction in overall energy consumption, the demand for electricity in electrical energy technology, with the aim of gaining wider knowledge on high voltage net- works and energy emissions in electricity generation by 2050. Info: www.esc.ethz.ch #12;ElEkTRoTECHNoloGIE IN SHoRT FRESH FRo

95

Making CN2-SD subgroup discovery algorithm scalable to large size data sets using instance selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subgroup discovery, domain of application of CN2-SD, is defined as: ''given a population of individuals and a property of those individuals, we are interested in finding a population of subgroups as large as possible and have the most unusual statistical ... Keywords: Instance selection, Scaling down, Subgroup discovery

Jos-Ramn Cano; Francisco Herrera; Manuel Lozano; Salvador Garca

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Variations of Cn2 Between 4 and 18 km above Sea Level as Measured over 5 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We computed the monthly average backscattered power over a five-year period for the Fleming 50 MHz wind profiler, which is proportional to CN2. We found that in addition to seasonal cycle in CN2 below the tropopause, there was a year-to-year ...

A. S. Frisch; B. L. Weber; D. B. Wuertz; R. G. Strauch; D. A. Merritt

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CH-ANL Report.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 2.0 STATUS AND RESULTS ..................................................................... 1 3.0 CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................... 5 4.0 RATING ................................................................................................. 5 5.0 OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT .......................................... 6 APPENDIX A: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ................................... 7 APPENDIX B: SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS ................................................. 8 Abbreviations Used in This Report ANL Argonne National Laboratory CH Offi ce of Science Chicago Offi ce CIC Classifi cation and Information Control DOE U.S. Department of Energy NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration

98

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill- October 4, 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to CH2M Hill related to at a Lapse in Dosimetry Accreditation at the Separations Process Research Unit

99

Chemical Engineering Education150 ChE department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Engineering Education150 ChE department ChE at... The University of Houston C hemical engineering at the Uni- versity of Houston has reflected the growth and diversification of the field: from. The Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (ChBE) at the University of Houston started as a program

Azevedo, Ricardo

100

Comparison Between Dust Particle Generation In CH4 or CH4/N2 Mixing RF Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Dust particles have been spontaneously generated either in pure CH4 or in CH4/N2 r.f. plasmas. The dust particle formation results from homogeneous nucleation in the plasma and is detected by laser light scattering (Ar+, {lambda} = 514.5 nm). The temporal and spatial behaviour of dust particles is studied. In pure methane gas, particles are trapped in well defined clouds at the plasma sheath boundaries. In a CH4/N2 mixture, the nitrogen addition leads to an expansion of the clouds. For nitrogen contents higher than 50%, the space between the electrodes is nearly completely filled with dust particles leading to plasma instabilities and a void appears in the center of the discharge. The particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.8-2 {mu}m. For nitrogen-rich plasmas, the particles growth is improved and leads to a rough shape with an orange-peel-type surface texture.

Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences, Universite d'Orleans, Site de Bourges, rue G.Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SF 6432-CN Standard Terms and Conditions for Fixed Price Commercial Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CN (04-95) CN (04-95) Sections II & III SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIXED PRICE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS INDEX OF CLAUSES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS REQUEST FOR QUOTATION AND CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I. No. Title Page "A" Clauses apply to Requests for Quotation and Contracts at any value. A10 Definitions 3 A11 Unclassified Contract 3 A12 Assignment 3 *A13 Releases Void 3 *A14 Notice of Labor Disputes 3 *A15 Delivery of Excess Quantities $250 or less 3 *A16 Contractor's Information 3 A17 Delegated Representatives 3 *A18 Defense Priority and Allocation 3 Requirements A19 Terms and Conditions 4

102

Dynamics of CN+alkane reactions by crossed-beam dc slice imaging  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with alkanes have been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 7.5 and 10.8 kcal/mol. The product alkyl radical images were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm for the reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. From analysis of the images, we obtained the center-of-mass frame product angular distributions and translational energy distributions directly. The results indicate that the products are largely backscattered and that most of the available energy ({approx}80%-85%) goes to the internal energy of the products. The reaction dynamics is discussed in light of recent kinetics data, theoretical calculations, and results for related halogen and oxygen atom reactions.

Huang Cunshun; Li Wen; Estillore, Armando D.; Suits, Arthur G. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Future of Fusion Jiangang Li (j_li@ipp.ac.cn)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 5,2kW JP: 6.3kW China:1.5kW (growing 10% /y) India: 0.7kW Bangladesh: 210 Watts RenewableThe Future of Fusion Jiangang Li (j_li@ipp.ac.cn) Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei, China 38MillionTCE Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Renewable 16.13 Billion TCE 29.01 Billion TCE 2005--2050average annual

104

Anomalous Stoichiometry Layered Structure and Magnetic Ordering of the Prussian Blue Analog [NEt4]2MnII3(CN)8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atypical of Prussian blue structured materials, Mn{sup II} and [NEt{sub 4}]CN react to form [NEt{sub 4}]{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}(CN){sub 8} possessing layers of octahedral [Mn{sup II}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-} bonded to two high-spin tetrahedral Mn{sup II} sites.

J Her; P Stephens; C Kareis; J Moore; J Miller

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Temperature Characterization of SiCN Ceramics for Wireless...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Si12B1 Si6B1 Si4B1 Si2B1 CHCH 2 Si-H N-H Toluene-H Toluene-CH 3 S-CH 3 B-H BDS 1 H NMR 6.2 6.0 5.8 5.6 CHCH 2 Chemical Shift (ppm) HT1800 Si16B1 Si12B1 x 0.1 1....

106

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 January 2011 Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003] The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Procedure. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 More Documents & Publications CX-009415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011

107

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

A CH-type Inequality For Real Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive an efficient CH-type inequality. Quantum mechanics violates our proposed inequality independent of the detection-efficiency problem.

Afshin Shafiee

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Atmospheric CH4 Concentrations from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH4 Concentrations from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network image Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Ferguson, Australia Cape Grim, Australia Estevan Point, BC, Canada Macquarie...

111

CH4 sources estimated from atmospheric observations of CH4 and its C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios: 2. Inverse modeling of CH4 fluxes from geographical regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmosphere, and CH 4 from fossil fuels such as coal andTermites Biomass burning Fossil Fuels Coal Natural gas andbiomass burning and fossil fuel source processes to the a

Mikaloff Fletcher, S.E.; Tans, P P; Bruhwiler, L M; Miller, J B; Heimann, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Potential energy surfaces for CH bond cleavage reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ab initio, multi-reference, configuration interaction calculations are reported for CH{sub 4}{leftrightarrow}CH{sub 3}+H, CH{sub 3}F{leftrightarrow}CH{sub 2}F+H, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}{leftrightarrow}CHF{sub 2}+H, and CHF{sub 3}{leftrightarrow}CF{sub 3}+H. Two equivalent, barrier-less paths are found for the CH{sub 3}+H recombination, two inequivalent, barrier-less paths are found for the CH{sub 2}F+H and CHF{sub 2}+H recombinations (depending on which side of the radical the H atom approaches), and only one barrier-less path is found for the CF{sub 3}+H recombination. Minimum energy path for H atom approaching CF{sub 3} from the concave side is predicted to have a barrier of 27 kcal/mole. Both minimum energy path energies and transitional frequencies as function of R{sub CH} for all 4 reactions are predicted to be similar.

Harding, L.B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electron-Impact Dissociation of CD3+ and CH3+ Ions Producing CD2+, CH+ and C+ Fragment Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a crossed electron-ion beams method, we measured absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of the CD3+ molecular ions producing CD2+ fragment ions and CH3+ ions yielding CH+ and C+ fragment ions over a collision energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. The total experimental uncertainties are about 12% at the maximum of the curves of cross sections (peak of the cross section, for the CH+ channel). The obtained results suggest important roles played by pre-dissociation of bound states in the production of both the CH+ and C+ fragment ions. Good agreement is found with other results reported for the CH+ fragment, but some differences are found for the CD2+ and C+.

Bahati Musafiri, Eric [ORNL; Fogle, Jr., Michael R [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Bannister, Mark E [ORNL; Thomas, R. D. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Collisional and Radiative Effects in Transient sub-Doppler Hole Burning: Double Resonance Measurements in CN  

SciTech Connect

We report transient hole-burning and saturation recovery measurements in the CN radical with MHz frequency resolution and 20 ns time resolution. Narrow velocity groups of individual hyperfine levels of selected rotational states in CN (X{sup 2} {Sigma}{sup +}) are depleted and excited (A{sup 2}{pi}{sub i}) with a saturation laser and probed by a counterpropagating, frequency modulated probe beam. Recent work in our lab has used this method to measure and characterize the hyperfine splittings for a set of rotational, fine structure, and parity components of CN (A{sup 2}{pi}{sub i}, v=1). Extending this work, we report time and frequency dependence of the saturation signals following abrupt switching of the CW saturation beam on and off with an electro-optic amplitude modulator. Recovery of the unsaturated absorption following the turnoff of the saturation beam follows pressure-dependent kinetics, driven by collisions with the undissociated NCCN precursor with a rate coefficient of 2 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} molec{sup -1}. Similar recovery kinetics are observed for two-level saturation resonances, where the signal observed is a combination of X- and A-state kinetics, as well as for three-level crossover resonances, which can be chosen to probe selectively the holefilling in the X state or the decay of velocity-selected A state radicals. The observed recovery rates are 8-10 times faster than the estimated rotationally inelastic contribution. The observed recovery rates are likely dominated by velocity-changing collisions in both X and A states, occurring with similar rates, despite the large difference in the properties of these electronic states. Transient signal risetimes following the turning on of the saturation pulse are consistent with the expected Rabi frequency. At lower pressures ({approx}50 mTorr) and higher beam power ({approx}200 mW), we can observe multiple Rabi cycles before collisions disrupt the coherent excitation and the transient signal reaches a steady state.

Hause,M.L.; Hall,G.; Sears, T.J.

2009-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aniline hydrogenolysis on the Pt(111) single crystal surface: Mechanisms for C-N bond activation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenolysis of C-N bond on transition metals is a crucial step in hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) reactions. Despite the overall complexity of HDN processes, the details of important surface reactions can be characterized using model reactions of organonitrogen compounds on single crystal model catalysts. The structure and reactivity of well characterized aniline monolayers on the Pt(111) surface both in vacuum and in the presence of hydrogen is discussed here. Adsorption and reactions of aniline were studied by Gland and Somorjai on the Pt(111) and Pt(100) surfaces, and more recently by Benziger`s group on the Ni(111) and Ni(100) surfaces. On both Pt and Ni surfaces, aniline {pi} bonds through the aromatic ring with its ring parallel to the substrate surface.

Huang, S.X.; Gland, J.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Fischer, D.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Dept.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Surveillance Report S-11-SED-CHP~C-PFP-002, Planning and Execution of Radiological Work. S-11-SED-CHPRC-PFP-002 documented four examples where inadequate hazard analysis resulted in airborne radioactivity that exceeded the limits of the controlling radiological work permit.

117

A parallel algorithm for computing the spectrum of CH5+  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a parallelized contracted basis-iterative calculation of vibrational energy levels of CH$_5^+$ (a 12D calculation). We use Radau polyspherical coordinates and basis functions that are products of eigenfunctions of bend and stretch Hamiltonians. ...

Xiao-Gang Wang; Tucker Carrington

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC More Documents & Publications...

119

China to strengthen joint research in fusion power www.chinaview.cn 2005-02-06 23:29:49  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China to strengthen joint research in fusion power www.chinaview.cn 2005-02-06 23:29:49 BEIJING cooperation in research on fusion power plants, one of China's top science and technology decision makers said of Sciences (CAS), said fusion power plants will be final result of today's studies of plasma physics. China

120

Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

Mathur, Divya

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Title Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Volume 117 Issue D11 Keywords atmospheric transport, emission inventory, greenhouse gas, inverse model, methane Abstract We estimate seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from central California from December 2007 through November 2008 by comparing CH4 mixing ratios measured at a tall tower with transport model predictions based on a global 1° a priori CH4emissions map (EDGAR32) and a 10 km seasonally varying California-specific map, calibrated to statewide by CH4emission totals. Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models. Uncertainties due to wind velocity and boundary layer mixing depth are evaluated using measurements from radar wind profilers. CH4signals calculated using the EDGAR32 emission model are larger than those based on the California-specific model and in better agreement with measurements. However, Bayesian inverse analyses using the California-specific and EDGAR32 maps yield comparable annually averaged posterior CH4emissions totaling 1.55 ± 0.24 times and 1.84 ± 0.27 times larger than the California-specific prior emissions, respectively, for a region of central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. If these results are applicable across California, state total CH4 emissions would account for approximately 9% of state total greenhouse gas emissions. Spatial resolution of emissions within the region near the tower reveal seasonality expected from several biogenic sources, but correlations in the posterior errors on emissions from both prior models indicate that the tower footprints do not resolve spatial structure of emissions. This suggests that including additional towers in a measurement network will improve the regional specificity of the posterior estimates.

122

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg Jump to: navigation, search Name CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg Place Hamburg, Germany Zip 20457 Sector Solar Product Germany-based firm that sets up closed-end funds for investor-capital market products and projects, including solar. Coordinates 53.553345°, 9.992455° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.553345,"lon":9.992455,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

124

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes

125

THE DETECTION OF INTERSTELLAR ETHANIMINE (CH{sub 3}CHNH) FROM OBSERVATIONS TAKEN DURING THE GBT PRIMOS SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We have performed reaction product screening measurements using broadband rotational spectroscopy to identify rotational transition matches between laboratory spectra and the Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS radio astronomy survey spectra in Sagittarius B2 North (Sgr B2(N)). The broadband rotational spectrum of molecules created in an electrical discharge of CH{sub 3}CN and H{sub 2}S contained several frequency matches to unidentified features in the PRIMOS survey that did not have molecular assignments based on standard radio astronomy spectral catalogs. Several of these transitions are assigned to the E- and Z-isomers of ethanimine. Global fits of the rotational spectra of these isomers in the range of 8-130 GHz have been performed for both isomers using previously published mm-wave spectroscopy measurements and the microwave measurements of the current study. Possible interstellar chemistry formation routes for E-ethanimine and Z-ethanimine are discussed. The detection of ethanimine is significant because of its possible role in the formation of alanine-one of the twenty amino acids in the genetic code.

Loomis, Ryan A.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Steber, Amanda L.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matthew T.; Harris, Brent J.; Pate, Brooks H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Hollis, Jan M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jewell, Philip R.; Remijan, Anthony J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904-2475 (United States); Lattanzi, Valerio; Martinez, Oscar Jr.; McCarthy, Michael C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lovas, Frank J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Corby, Joanna F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma CVD of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) Films Using Triethylsilane and Nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor (AP-PECVD) deposition using the Surfx Atomflow{trademark} 250D APPJ source with triethylsilane (HSiEt{sub 3}, TES) and nitrogen as the precursor and the reactive gases, respectively. The effect of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the growth characteristics and the properties of a-SiCN:H films was evaluated. The properties of the films were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphological analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chemical and compositional analyses; spectroscopic ellipsometry for optical properties and thickness determination and nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the a-SiCN:H films. Films deposited at low T{sub s} depict organic like features, while the films deposited at high T{sub s} depict ceramic like features. FTIR and XPS studies reveal that an increases in T{sub s} helps in the elimination of organic moieties and incorporation of nitrogen in the film. Films deposited at T{sub s} of 425 C have an index of refraction (n) of 1.84 and hardness (H) of 14.8 GPa. A decrease in the deposition rate between T{sub s} of 25 and 250 C and increase in deposition rate between T{sub s} of 250 and 425 C indicate that the growth of a-SiCN:H films at lower T{sub s} are surface reaction controlled, while at high temperatures film growth is mass-transport controlled. Based on the experimental results, a potential route for film growth is proposed.

Srinivasan Guruvenket; Steven Andrie; Mark Simon; Kyle W. Johnson; Robert A. Sailer

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

Twenty-Seventh Symposium (International) on Combustion/The Combustion Institute, 1998/pp. 615623 EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF CH, CH*, AND OH* IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and modeled. CH* and OH* number densities are deconvoluted from line-of-sight flame-emission mea- surements recognized as a key reactant in NOx formation through the prompt NO mechanism. Given that CH is a short-lived]. Despite the prevalence of CH* and OH* chemiluminescence, little quantitative work has been done either

Long, Marshall B.

132

People's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the mismatched frame rates of the camera and TV screen.) Electrical current coming out of your plug is an examplePeople's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas: The name electric current is given to the phenomenon that occurs when an electric field moves down a wire at close to the speed of light. Voltage is the electrical

California at Santa Cruz, University of

133

Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;Learning Objective One: The Solar System Sun Earth,083,000 km #12;Learning Objective Two: The Solar Energy Solar Radiation #12;What is Solar Energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. The unit is Joule (J). Solar energy is radiant energy (i

Pan, Feifei

134

People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea Energy is a measure of the amount of, or potential for, dynamical activity in something. The total amount of energy in the universe is always the same universe. A group of things (we'll use the word system) has a certain amount of energy. Energy can be added

California at Santa Cruz, University of

135

Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Pairs of hydrogen nuclei are joined, form helium, and emit large amount of energy. Solar energy-Output Energy=Storage Change #12;Learning Objective Four: The Seasons #12;The Seasons SeasonalityCh.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;Learning Objective One: The Solar System #12;Milky

Pan, Feifei

136

HIGH-RESOLUTION CH OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSLUCENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution (1.'3 x 1.'6) observations of the CH {sup 2}{pi}{sub 1/2} (F = 1-1) emission line at 3335 MHz in two high-latitude translucent clouds, MBM 3 and 40. At the assumed cloud distances, the angular resolution corresponds to {approx}0.05 pc, nearly an order of magnitude better than previous studies. Comparisons of the CH emission with previously obtained CO(1-0) data are difficult to interpret: the CO and CH line emission correlates in MBM 40 but not in MBM 3. In both clouds, there is a spatial offset in the peak emission, and perhaps in velocity for MBM 40. The difference in emission characteristics for the two tracers are noticeable in these two nearby clouds because of the high spatial resolution. Since both CH and CO are deemed to be reliable tracers of H{sub 2}, our results indicate that more care should be taken when using one of these tracers to determine the mass of a nearby molecular cloud.

Chastain, Raymond J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 368 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr. Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Cotten, David; Magnani, Loris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

SciTech Connect

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables accounted for 94 percent of the variability in the isotope fractionation data, suggesting that both factors are important in determining the extent of isotopic fractionation (P < 0.002, r{sup 2} = 0.94). The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. These results challenge the assumption that the isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation remains constant, regardless of metabolic activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DE-AC02-09CH11466  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-09CH11466 2-09CH11466 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be made by telegram or letter, provided each telegram or letter makes reference to the solicitation and this amendment, and is received prior to the opening hour and date specified. Word Modification PRINCETON NJ 085442020 002484665 TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, THE

139

Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

Gland, J.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

Gland, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its...

142

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc - December 22, 2004...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc - December 22, 2004 December 22, 2004 Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at...

143

Salinity-induced hydrate dissociation: A mechanism for recent CH4 release on Mars  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere suggest that CH4 has been added relatively recently. Several mechanisms for recent CH4 release have been proposed including subsurface biological methanogenesis, abiogenic hydrothermal and/or volcanic activity, dissociation of CH4 hydrates, atmospheric photolysis, or addition of organics via bolide impact. This study examines the effects of increasing salinity on gas hydrate stability and compares estimates of the Martian geothermal gradient to CH4 and CO2 hydrate stability fields in the presence of high salinity brines. The results demonstrate that salinity increases alone result in a significant decrease in the predicted hydrate stability zone within the Martian subsurface and may be a driving force in CH4 hydrate destabilization. Active thermal and/or pressure fluctuations are not required in order for CH4 hydrates to be the source of atmospheric CH4.

Madden, Megan Elwood [ORNL; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Onstott, Tullis [Princeton University; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Special Report Order, Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- October 22, 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site

145

Observation of a remarkable temperature effect in the hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics of the CN-(H2O) cluster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CN-(H2O) cluster represents a model diatomic monohydrate with multiple solvation sites. We report joint experimental and theoretical studies of its structure and dynamics using temperature-controlled photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. The observed PES spectra of CN-(H2O) display a remarkable temperature effect, namely that the T=12 K spectrum shows an unexpectedly large blue shift of 0.25 eV in the electron binding energy relative to the Room Temperature (RT) spectrum. Extensive theoretical analysis of the potential energy function (PEF) of the cluster at the CCSD(T) level of theory reveal the existence of two nearly isoenergetic isomers corresponding to H2O forming a H-bond with either the C or the N atom, respectively. This results in four topologically distinct minima, i.e., CN-(HaOHb), CN-(HbOHa), NC-(HaOHb) and NC-(HbOHa). There are two main pathways connecting these minima: (i) CN- tumbling relative to water and (ii) water rocking relative to CN-. The relative magnitude of the barriers associated with these two motions reverses between low [pathway (i) is preferred] and high [pathway (ii) is preferred] temperatures. As a result, at T=12 K the cluster adopts a structure that is close to the minimum energy CN-(H2O) configuration, while at RT it can effectively access regions of the PEF close to the transition state for pathway (ii), explaining the surprisingly large spectral shift between the 12 K and RT PES spectra. This work was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

Wang, Xue B.; Werhahn, Jasper C.; Wang, Lai S.; Kowalski, Karol; Laubereau, Alfred; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Efficiency of formation of CH{sub 3}O in the reaction of CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} with ClO  

SciTech Connect

Employing a discharge-flow apparatus the authors measure the branching ratio for the reaction of ClO with CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} to the formation of CH{sub 3}O. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} is formed in the stratosphere from the reaction of Cl with CH{sub 4}. This branching ratio is of interest to determine if a chain of reactions through it could be a contributor to the stratospheric decomposition of ozone.

Biggs, P.; Canosa-Mas, C.E.; Frachebound, J.M. [Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom)

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

A sensitive survey for 13CO, CN, H2CO and SO in the disks of T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the IRAM 30-m telescope to perform a sensitive search for CN N=2-1 in 42 T Tauri or Herbig Ae systems located mostly in the Taurus-Auriga region. $^{13}$CO J=2-1 is observed simultaneously to indicate the level of confusion with the surrounding molecular cloud. The bandpass also contains two transitions of ortho-H$_2$CO, one of SO and the C$^{17}$O J=2-1 line which provide complementary information on the nature of the emission. While $^{13}$CO is in general dominated by residual emission from the cloud, CN exhibits a high disk detection rate $> 50$% in our sample. We even report CN detection in stars for which interferometric searches failed to detect $^{12}$CO, presumably because of obscuration by a foreground, optically thick, cloud. Comparison between CN and o-H$_2$CO or SO line profiles and intensities divide the sample in two main categories. Sources with SO emission are bright and have strong H$_2$CO emission, leading in general to [H$_2$CO/CN]$ > 0.5$. Furthermore, their line profiles, combined...

Guilloteau, S; Dutrey, A; Simon, M; Grosso, N; Pitu, V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

BG/Q Performance Tools Sco$ Parker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................... 17 5 IMPLICATIONS OF EVOLUTION OF CNG VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY IN EUROPE ........................................... 8 3 Monthly Average Price of CNG at Public and Private Stations.............................................. 18 iv #12; TABLES (CONT.) 8 Fuel Use and CO2 Tailpipe Emissions of Selected European LDVs: CNG

Kemner, Ken

150

Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests  

SciTech Connect

This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Molecke, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

152

Synthesis and characterization of T[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz with T=Fe, Ni; pyz=pyrazine: Formation of T-pyz-Ni bridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of T-pyz-Ni bridges (pyz=pyrazine) in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz series is known for T=Mn, Zn, Cd and Co but not with T=Fe, Ni. In this contribution the existence of such bridges also for T=Fe, Ni is discussed. The obtained pillared solids, T[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz, were characterized from XRD, TG, UV-Vis, IR, Raman, Moessbauer and magnetic data. Their crystal structures were refined in the orthorhombic Pmna space group from XRD powder patterns. The structural behavior of these solids on cooling down to 77 K was also studied. In the 180-200 K temperature range the occurrence of a structural transition to a monoclinic structure (P2{sub 1}/c space group) was observed. No temperature induced spin transition was observed for Fe[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz. The iron (II) was found to be in high spin electronic state and this configuration is preserved on cooling down to 2 K. The magnetic data indicate the occurrence of a low temperature weak anti-ferromagnetic interaction between T metal centers within the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the paramagnetic region for Ni[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz, a reversible temperature induced spin transition for the inner Ni atom was detected. - Graphical abstract: Rippled sheets structure for the pillared solids T[Ni(CN){sub 4}].2pyz. The pyrazine molecule is found forming T-pyz-Ni bridges between neighboring layers. Highlights: > Pillared 2D solids. > Inorganic-organic solids. > Assembling of molecular blocks. > From 1D and 2D building blocks to 3D solids.

Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Legaria Unit, National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Hernandez, J. [Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Legaria Unit, National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Institute of Materials Science and Technology, University of Havana (Cuba); Gonzalez, M. [Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Legaria Unit, National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Demeshko, S. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Avila, M. [Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Legaria Unit, National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: ereguera@yahoo.com [Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Legaria Unit, National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

From semiconductor-semiconductor transition (42 K) to the highest- Tc organic superconductor,. kappa. -(ET) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Cl ( Tc = 12. 5 K)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of an organic superconductor with the highest transition temperature (125 K) recorded following the suppression of a semiconductor-semiconductor transition (42 K) is reported. The reported compound is a kappa-phase superconductor, kappa-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Cl, which is isostructural with the recently prepared ambient-pressure superconductor kappa-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br with a transition temperature of 11.5 K that has been previously reported. Band electronic structural calculations show the newly discovered compound to be a two-dimensional metal. 15 refs., 2 figs.

Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Montgomery, L.K.; Pyrka, G.J.; Watkins, D.M.; Kommers, J.M.; Boryschuk, S.J.; Strieby Crouch, A.V.; Kwok, W.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schirber, J.E.; Overmyer, D.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Jung, D.; Whangbo, Myunghwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1990-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Incoherent interplane conductivity of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interplane optical spectrum of the organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br was investigated in the frequency range from 40 to 40 000 cm{sup -1}. The optical conductivity was obtained by Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance. The absence of a Drude peak at low frequency is consistent with incoherent conductivity but in apparent contradiction to the metallic temperature dependence of the dc resistivity. We set an upper limit to the interplane transfer integral of t{sub b}{sup 2}/t{sub ac}{approx}10{sup -7} eV. A model of defect-assisted interplane transport can account for this discrepancy. We also assign the phonon lines in the conductivity to the asymmetric modes of the BEDT-TTF molecule.

McGuire, J. J.; Room, T.; Pronin, A.; Timusk, T.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kelly, M. E.; Kini, A. M.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Anisotropic thermopower of the organic superconductor. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermopower of the organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br single crystals has been measured in two crystallographic directions {bold a} and {bold c} within the most conducting organic donor molecule plane. (Here BEDT-TTF represents bis(ethylenethio)-tetrathiafulvalene.) While the thermopower in the {bold a} direction is positive, the thermopower in the {bold c} direction is negative. The drastic anisotropy in thermopower reveals that the carriers in the {bold a} direction are holelike, whereas the carriers in the {bold c} direction are electronlike. A calculation based on the tight-binding electronic band structure is able to describe the temperature dependence of the anisotropic thermopower, but with a much reduced band dispersion.

Yu, R.C. (Department of Physics and Material Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (USA)); Williams, J.M.; Wang, H.H.; Thompson, J.E.; Kini, A.M.; Carlson, K.D. (Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (USA)); Ren, J.; Whangbo, M. (Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (USA)); Chaikin, P.M. (Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (USA) Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey (USA))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ChIP-seq Identification of Weakly Conserved Heart Enhancers  

SciTech Connect

Accurate control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role in heart development, but few cardiac transcriptional enhancers have thus far been identified. Extreme non-coding sequence conservation successfully predicts enhancers active in many tissues, but fails to identify substantial numbers of heart enhancers. Here we used ChIP-seq with the enhancer-associated protein p300 from mouse embryonic day 11.5 heart tissue to identify over three thousand candidate heart enhancers genome-wide. Compared to other tissues studied at this time-point, most candidate heart enhancers are less deeply conserved in vertebrate evolution. Nevertheless, the testing of 130 candidate regions in a transgenic mouse assay revealed that most of them reproducibly function as enhancers active in the heart, irrespective of their degree of evolutionary constraint. These results provide evidence for a large population of poorly conserved heart enhancers and suggest that the evolutionary constraint of embryonic enhancers can vary depending on tissue type.

Blow, Matthew J.; McCulley, David J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Bristow, James; Ren, Bing; Black, Brian L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M HILL CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to enhance teaming to further execute the Plateau Remediation Contract. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company

159

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Justice Department, in conjunction with the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Colorado-based CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. (CHG) and its parent company, CH2M Hill Companies Ltd. (CH2M Hill) have agreed that CHG committed federal criminal violations, defrauding the public by engaging in years of widespread time

160

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Deepening Treatment of the Low C/N Ratio Biogas Slurry at Mountainous Region Livestock Farming by Using Modified Two-Stage A/O System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive and fast development of livestock farming with ecological pattern of raisingCbiogasCirrigating is widely applied in China. After anaerobic fermentation the agricultural wastes can provides clean energy. However, there is problem by lacking ... Keywords: livestock farming, biogas slurry, low C/N ratio, deepening treatment

Wei-wei Yu; Zhi Zhang; Sheng-lan Bi; Shu-yang Li; Chao Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Draft Genome sequence of Frankia sp. strains CN3 , an atypical, non-infective (Nod-) ineffective (Fix-) isolate from Coriaria nepalensis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here the genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, which was isolated from Coriaria nepalensis. This genome sequence is the first from the fourth lineage of Frankia, that are unable to re-infect actinorhizal plants. At 10 Mb, it represents the largest Frankia genome sequenced to date.

Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten [University of New Hampshire; Beauchemin, Nicholas [University of New Hampshire; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Furnholm, Teal [University of New Hampshire; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gtari, Maher [University of New Hampshire; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nouioui, Imen [University of Tunis-El Manar, Tunisia; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Santos, Catarina [Instiuto Celular e Aplicada, Portugal; Sen, Arnab [University of North Bengal, Siliguri, India; Sur, Saubashya [University of North Bengal, Siliguri, India; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tavares, Fernando [Instiuto Celular e Aplicada, Portugal; Hazuki, Teshima [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thakur, Subarna [University of North Bengal, Siliguri, India; Wall, Luis [University of Quilmes, Argentina; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tisa, Louis S. [University of New Hampshire

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Two interesting features in the infrared and raman spectra of the 12K organic superconductor {chi}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

SciTech Connect

Two of the larger features in the infrared conductivity spectra of {chi}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are analyzed and one is reassigned with the aid of infrared and Raman spectra of isotopically substituted compounds.

Eldridge, J.E.; Xie, Y. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Wang, H.H.; Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Schlueter, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Technical Standards, DOE-HDBK-1145-2001 (CH-1)- December 08, 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE-HDBK-1145-2001 (CH-1): Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities; Replaced by DOE-HDBK-1145-2008

165

TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

Patra, P. K.

166

The large-scale ionised outflow of CH Cygni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HST and ground-based [OII} and [NII] images obtained from 1996 to 1999 reveal the existence of a ionised optical nebula around the symbiotic binary CH Cyg extending out to 5000 A.U. from the central stars. The observed velocity range of the nebula, derived from long-slit echelle spectra, is of 130 km/s. In spite of its complex appearence, the velocity data show that the basic morphology of the inner regions of the optical nebula is that of a bipolar (or conical) outflow extending nearly along the plane of the sky out to some 2000 A.U. from the centre. Even if the extension of this bipolar outflow and its position angle are consistent with those of the radio jet produced in 1984 (extrapolated to the time of our optical imagery), no obvious counterpart is visible of the original, dense radio bullets ejected by the system. We speculate that the optical bipolar outflow might be the remannt of the interaction of the bullets with a relatively dense circumstellar medium.

Corradi, R L M; Livio, M; Mampaso, A; Gonalves, D R; Schwarz, H E; Corradi, Romano L.M.; Munari, Ulisse; Livio, Mario; Mampaso, Antonio; Goncalves, Denise R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The large-scale ionised outflow of CH Cygni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HST and ground-based [OII} and [NII] images obtained from 1996 to 1999 reveal the existence of a ionised optical nebula around the symbiotic binary CH Cyg extending out to 5000 A.U. from the central stars. The observed velocity range of the nebula, derived from long-slit echelle spectra, is of 130 km/s. In spite of its complex appearence, the velocity data show that the basic morphology of the inner regions of the optical nebula is that of a bipolar (or conical) outflow extending nearly along the plane of the sky out to some 2000 A.U. from the centre. Even if the extension of this bipolar outflow and its position angle are consistent with those of the radio jet produced in 1984 (extrapolated to the time of our optical imagery), no obvious counterpart is visible of the original, dense radio bullets ejected by the system. We speculate that the optical bipolar outflow might be the remannt of the interaction of the bullets with a relatively dense circumstellar medium.

Romano L. M. Corradi; Ulisse Munari; Mario Livio; Antonio Mampaso; Denise R. Goncalves; Hugo E. Schwarz

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method of preparing (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and byproducts thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy.

Spicer, Leonard D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Bennett, Dennis W. (Clemson, SC); Davis, Jon F. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nano-Tera.CH: Nano-technologies for Tera-scale Problems Giovanni De Micheli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-Tera.CH: Nano-technologies for Tera-scale Problems Giovanni De Micheli EPF Lausanne 1015, Switzerland ABSTRACT -- The Nano-Tera.CH initiative is a broad engineering program in Switzerland for health is rooted in advances in engineering nano-scale materials and their exploitation in a variety of systems

De Micheli, Giovanni

170

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient in Switzerland. These are the first results of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs at high elevations

Wehrli, Bernhard

171

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 19 GRANT SOLICITATION CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PON-11 and Power (DG/CHP/CCHP) Systems Research, Development and Demonstration PIER Renewable Energy and Advanced Generation APPLICATIONPACKAGE Date: January, 2012 EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor #12;Hybrid CH&P PON-11

172

Aquatic Sources and Sinks of CO2 and CH4 in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highest concentration and greatest seasonal amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 occur at 6070N, outside the 3060N band where the main sources of anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 are located, indicating that the northern environment is a ...

I. P. Semiletov

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 Special Report Order ssued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site On September 18, 2001, the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) in coordination with the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) conducted a review of the actions taken by CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) in response to an Enforcement Letter dated April 24, 2001. This Enforcement Letter referenced three Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) reports submitted by CHG which collectively suggested weaknesses in your nuclear safety operations related to (1) corrective action management, (2) worker training

174

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to enhance teaming to further execute the Plateau Remediation Contract. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement

175

Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energys (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 July 25, 2000 Price-Anderson Enforcement Consent Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Problems at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, (EA-2000-09) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of an internal investigation conducted by CH2M Hill Group, Inc. (CHG) in February 2000. The investigation examined the facts and circumstances surrounding quality problems with the procurement of safety class piping for the W-314 Project at the Tank Farm Waste Remediation System. Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 More Documents & Publications Consent Order, Fluor Federal Services - EA-2000-10 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001

177

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to a recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE), regarding potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management," occurring at the Hanford Tank Farms. The investigation reviewed three issues that were reported into the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Two of the NTS reports involve the failure to perform the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) for [ ] gas monitoring. The initial potential noncompliance occurred in January 2000, in which a Zip Cord was installed

178

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning quality assurance issues affecting nuclear safety at the Hanford Tank Farms. These issues involve the inadvertent deenergization of annulus leak detectors, dilution tank overfills, and dome loading control, over the period August 2002 to November 2002. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 More Documents & Publications

179

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site CH2M Hill Plateau Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the independent review of implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company that were conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), which is within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The onsite review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from August 13 to17, 2012. The objective of this assessment was to evaluate

180

www.cepe.ethz.ch A Real Options Evaluation Model for the Diffusion Prospects of New Renewable Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.cepe.ethz.ch A real options evaluation model for the diffusion prospects of new renewable power generation technologies

Grkan Kumbaroglu; Reinhard Madlener; Mustafa Demirel; Grkan Kumbaroglu; Reinhard Madlener; Mustafa Demirel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CH4) » Ice Cores (CH4) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric methane (CH4) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A spline function has

182

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and CH2M and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 April 2012 Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), was to observe and shadow1 a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) assessment of its contractors at the Hanford Site. The HSS reviewer observed the implementation and effectiveness of the DOE-RL assessment of two of the contractors (CHPRC and

183

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc. - Inc. - EA-2003-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning quality assurance issues affecting nuclear safety at the Hanford Tank Farms. These issues involve the inadvertent deenergization of annulus leak detectors, dilution tank overfills, and dome loading control, over the period August 2002 to November 2002. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06

184

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory This letter refers to the investigation of events at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP) by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement. The investigation summary report, Multiple Radiological Protection Program Deficiencies and Safety Culture Concerns, was provided to you in a letter dated February 20, 2007. An enforcement conference to discuss these findings was held on March

185

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office and CH2M Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 April 2012 Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), was to observe and shadow1 a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) assessment of its contractors at the Hanford Site. The HSS reviewer observed the implementation and effectiveness of the DOE-RL assessment of two of the contractors (CHPRC and

186

800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) This page introduces ice-core records of methane (CH4) extending back 800,000 years at Dome C, Antarctica and over 400,000 years at the Vostok site. Links are also provided to shorter records from other Antarctic locations. The 2000-year record from Law Dome, Antarctica, has been merged with modern records to create a long-term record to the present. These records are maintained by the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and have graciously been made freely available for access and distribution. The original investigators made the effort to obtain the data and assure their quality. To assure proper credit is given, please follow the citation instructions

187

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and

188

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

189

CH Activation and Oxidation of Methane to Methanol in High Yield...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH Activation and Oxidation of Methane to Methanol in High Yield with Novel Pt Complexes Speaker(s): Roy Periana Date: April 27, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

190

C-H functionalisation through singlet chlorocarbenes insertions MP2 and DFT investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The insertion reactions of singlet mono and dichlorocarbenes (1CHCl and 1CCl2) into primary, secondary and tertiary C-H bonds of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane have been investigated at ...

M. Ramalingam; K. Ramasami; P. Venuvanalingam; V. Sethuraman

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil...

192

CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

The CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project

NELSON, R.L.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules March 10, 2005 - 10:44am Addthis Hanford Tank Farm Contractor Faces Fine of more than $300,000 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified the CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M Hill) - that it will fine the company $316,250 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. CH2M Hill is the department's contractor responsible for storage of highly radioactive and hazardous liquid waste at the Hanford Tank Farms near Richland, Wash. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today, cites four events that took place in 2003 and 2004. These events include the contamination of several workers while removing equipment from a valve pit

194

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 1 ATTACHMENT I Prevailing Wage Special Condition Template Public this Agreement, the Recipient shall submit to the Energy Commission a certificate signed by the Recipient and all

195

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3) CSCI-585 , Cyrus Shahabi · Example ER to no subclass. EER-to-Relational Mapping · Option 1: One table for superclass + two tables for subclasses (one

Shahabi, Cyrus

196

{sup 13}C NMR line-shape studies of the organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

SciTech Connect

The authors report {sup 13}C NMR line position, line shape, and spin-spin relaxation rate data for the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}=11.6 K), for an aligned single crystal. The data make possible identification of the crystallographic site responsible for the NMR lines, clarify a line broadening transition near 150 K, and probe the nature of the fluxoid lattice below {ital T}{sub {ital c}}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

De Soto, S.M.; Slichter, C.P. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 (United States); Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Geiser, U.; Williams, J.M. [Chemistry and Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

198

Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 June 2013 Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation The purpose of this set of facility specific Independent Oversight targeted reviews is to evaluate the flowdown of occupational radiation protection requirements, as expressed in facility RPPs, to work planning, control, and execution processes, such as radiological work authorizations, including radiological work permits (RWPs) and other technical work documents (TWDs). This targeted review was performed at Oak Ridge during the period of March 3-22, 2013. This report discusses the background, scope, methodology, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as items identified for

199

Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 October 6, 2011 Consent Order issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to a Hoisting Incident that occurred at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory The Office of Health Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the October 4, 2010, hoisting incident that occurred when a telescopic hydraulic gantry system tipped while lifting a 7,800-pound shield plug at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory. The results of the investigation were provided to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) in an Investigation Report, dated April 20, 2011, and

200

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Inc, - September 6, Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 September 6, 2007 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Hanford Tank Farms The Department of Energy (DOE) held an Enforcement Conference on August 29, 2006, with CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) to discuss potential violations of nuclear safety requirements described in our Investigation Summary Report dated July 26, 2006. At that time, DOE elected to defer a decision on a potential quality improvement violation related to recurring radiological events and deficiencies in the identification and control of radiological hazards at the Tank Farms. This decision was based upon the fact that CHG senior management had initiated radiological work

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201

Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 May 20, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, for Electrical Safety Deficiencies at the Idaho National Laboratory In July 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's, Office of Enforcement was made aware of numerous, longstanding electrical safety deficiencies associated with electrical equipment located on the east side of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The Office of Enforcement is also aware that shortly after electrical safety issues with this equipment were identified by a CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC (CWI) worker in May 2007, CWI completed an Engineering Design File

202

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 May 4, 2012 Issued to URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, related to a Security Incident involving the Protection and Control of Classified Information at the East Tennessee Technology Park The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has completed its evaluation of a security incident involving the protection and control of classified information at the East Tennessee Teclmology Park (ETTP) (Local Tracking System Report No. II-IOSC-0576-13). Based on this evaluation, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified concerns that warrant management attention by URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), the responsible contractor for ETTP. The specific concerns stem from the number of classified components that

203

Enforcement Letter, CH2M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 Enforcement Letter, CH2M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 September 28, 2011 Issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to Quality Assurance and Work Control Issues during Construction of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the facts and circumstances associated with quality assurance and work control deficiencies that occurred during the construction of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory. On February 9, 2011, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC (CWI) reported noncompliances associated with these deficiencies in DOE's Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) in reports NTS-ID--CWI-IWTU-2010-0002

204

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 June 5, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to a Radioactive Waste Spill at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the July 27, 2007, spill of radioactive waste in the vicinity of the S-102 retrieval pump discharge at the Hanford Tank Farm. The results of the onsite investigation were provided in an Investigation Report dated March 5, 2008. Press Release Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel National, Inc. - NEA-2008-04

205

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc. - April 24, 2001 Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to a recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE), regarding potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management," occurring at the Hanford Tank Farms. The investigation reviewed three issues that were reported into the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Two of the NTS reports involve the failure to perform the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) for [ ] gas monitoring. The initial potential noncompliance occurred in January 2000, in which a Zip Cord was installed

206

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evidence for structural and electronic instabilities at intermediate temperatures in K-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}X for X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and Cu(NCS){sub 2} : implications for the phase diagram of these quasi-2D organic superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion {alpha}(T)={partial_derivative} ln l(T)/{partial_derivative}T of the quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) salts {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}X with X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and Cu(NCS){sub 2} in the temperature range T<{approx}150 K. Three distinct kinds of anomalies corresponding to different temperature ranges have been identified. These are (A) phase-transition anomalies into the superconducting (X=Cu(NCS){sub 2}, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br) and antiferromagnetic (X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl) ground state, (B) phase-transition-like anomalies at intermediate temperatures (30-50) K for the superconducting salts, and (C) kinetic, glasslike transitions at higher temperatures, i.e., (70-80) K for all compounds. By a thermodynamic analysis of the discontinuities at the second-order phase transitions that characterize the ground state of system (A), the uniaxial-pressure coefficients of the respective transition temperatures could be determined. We find that in contrast to what has been frequently assumed, the intraplane-pressure coefficients of Tc for this family of quasi-2D superconductors do not reveal a simple form of systematics. This demonstrates that attempts to model these systems by solely considering in-plane electronic parameters are not appropriate. At intermediate temperatures (B), distinct anomalies reminiscent of second-order phase transitions have been found at T*=38 K and 45 K for the superconducting X=Cu(NCS){sub 2} and Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br salts, respectively. Most interestingly, we find that the signs of the uniaxial pressure coefficients of T*, {partial_derivative}T*/{partial_derivative}p{sub i} (i=a,b,c), are strictly anticorrelated with those of {Tc}. Based on comparative studies including the nonsuperconducting X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl salt as well as isotopically labeled compounds, we propose that T* marks the transition to a density-wave state forming on minor, quasi-1D parts of the Fermi surface. Our results are compatible with two competing order parameters that form on disjunct portions of the Fermi surface. At elevated temperatures (C), all compounds show {alpha}(T) anomalies that can be identified with a kinetic, glasslike transition where, below a characteristic temperature T{sub g}, disorder in the orientational degrees of freedom of the terminal ethylene groups becomes frozen in. Our results provide a natural explanation for the unusual time- and cooling-rate dependences of the ground-state properties in the hydrogenated and deuterated Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br salts reported in the literature.

Muller, J.; Lang, M.; Steglich, F.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Sasaki T.; Materials Science Division; Max-Planck-Inst. fur Chemische Physik fester Stoffe; Physikalisches Inst. der Univ. Frankfurt; Tohoku Univ.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A facility design for repackaging ORNL CH-TRU legacy waste in Building 3525  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last 25 years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted operations which have generated solid, contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. At present the CH-TRU waste inventory at ORNL is about 3400 55-gal drums retrievably stored in RCRA-permitted, aboveground facilities. Of the 3400 drums, approximately 2600 drums will need to be repackaged. The current US Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for disposal of these drums is to transport them to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico which only accepts TRU waste that meets a very specific set of criteria documented in the WIPP-WAC (waste acceptance criteria). This report describes activities that were performed from January 1994 to May 1995 associated with the design and preparation of an existing facility for repackaging and certifying some or all of the CH-TRU drums at ORNL to meet the WIPP-WAC. For this study, the Irradiated Fuel Examination Laboratory (IFEL) in Building 3525 was selected as the reference facility for modification. These design activities were terminated in May 1995 as more attractive options for CH-TRU waste repackaging were considered to be available. As a result, this document serves as a final report of those design activities.

Huxford, T.J.; Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Davis, L.E.; Fuller, A.B.; Gabbard, W.A.; Smith, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guay, K.P. [S. M. Stroller Corp. (United States); Smith, L.C. [United Energy Services Corp. (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production. estiMateD cost The estimated cost to implement the Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project is $15,582,600. (Estimated costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERPLouisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion The Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project

210

Applications of the InChI in cheminformatics with the CDK and Bioclipse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to enable exchange and linking of chemical information. The IUPAC Chemi- cal Identifier (InChI) [1] is such a standardized identifier for chemical structures, which lately has seen a great adoption in the cheminformatics community [2]. A recent special issue...

Spjuth, Ola; Berg, Arvid; Adams, Samuel; Willighagen, Egon L

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project waste tank farm.

NELSON, R.L.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Study on CO2 Reforming of CH4 by Dielectric Barrier Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article it is demonstrated that DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) is an effective tool to convert CH4 and CO2 to synthesis gas (syngas, H2/CO) at low temperature and ambient pressure. The DBD is performed in the co-axial quartz cube by using ... Keywords: methane, carbon dioxide, syngas, dielectric barrier discharge

Zhao Yuhan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pressure-temperature phase diagram, inverse isotope effect, and superconductivity in excess of 13 K in. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Cl, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene  

SciTech Connect

The pressure-temperature phase diagram of the highest-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} organic superconductor, {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Cl is determined, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene. Semiconducting, insulating, metallic, and superconducting regimes are seen at pressures below 1 kbar. Superconductivity at 12.5 K and 0.3 kbar {ital increases} by 0.5--1.5 K upon deuteration of BEDT-TTF, in striking contrast to the normal isotope effect determined previously for {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br.

Schirber, J.E.; Overmyer, D.L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA)); Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Charlier, H.A.; Love, B.J.; Watkins, D.M.; Yaconi, G.A. (Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (USA))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dzialoshinskii-Moriya interaction in the organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]C1.  

SciTech Connect

The authors report {sup 13}C NMR and magnetization measurements on the magnetic state of oriented single crystals of the organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl. To understand these data a spin Hamiltonian based on the Pnma symmetry of the crystal is developed. When interpreted in the context of this Hamiltonian, the measurements provide a detailed picture of the spin ordering. It is found that the Dzialoshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction is largely responsible for the details of the ordering above the spin-flop field. Of particular note, the interplane correlations are determined by the intraplane DM interactions and the direction of the applied field.

Smith, D. F.; De Soto, S. M.; Slichter, C. P.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Daugherty, R. G.; University of Illinois

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

80 K anomaly and its effect on the superconducting and magnetic transition in deuterated {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report careful transport and magnetic measurements on single crystals of deuterated {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. By cooling the sample at different rates, it is found that cooling through 80K has a dramatic effect on the normal state metal-insulator transition and the superconducting transition temperatures. In-plane resistivity depends strongly on the cooling rate for temperatures below 80K, above which all resistivity curves cooled at different rates converge. By comparing it with the nondeuterated salt and the quasi-1D Bechgaard salt, we speculate that 80K corresponds to a structural phase transition in the anion chain. Fast cooling through 80K will freeze the high temperature magnetic phase to low temperatures and the presence of local magnetic moments suppresses the superconducting T{sub c}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Su, X.; Zuo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 (United States); Schlueter, J.A.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M. [Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

{sup 13}C NMR studies of the normal and superconducting states of the organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/{ital T}{sub 1} and Knight shifts {ital K}{sub {ital S}} in the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}=11.6 K), for an aligned single crystal. The normal-state behavior is reminiscent of the high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} cuprates, in which antiferromagnetic fluctuations and spin-gap behavior dominate. In the superconducting state, the data rule out the BCS electron-phonon mechanism as the source of the superconductivity, but support an unconventional pairing state with possible nodes in the gap function.

De Soto, S.M.; Slichter, C.P. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 (United States); Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Geiser, U.; Williams, J.M. [Chemistry and Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ch_5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

160 160 Environmental Consequences Under Clean Closure, radioactive and hazardous constituents would be removed from the site or treated so that residual contamination is no higher than background levels. This could require removal of all buildings, vaults, tanks, transfer piping, and contaminated soil. No post- closure monitoring would be required because potential sources of contamination would no longer be present. Unrestricted industrial use of clean-closed facilities and sites will be permissi- ble. Impacts to water resources would not be expected from the disposition of new facilities. For Performance-Based Closure, most above- ground structures would be razed and most below-ground structures (tanks, vaults, and transfer piping) would be decontaminated, stabi-

218

ch_3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS has been provided to the public, committed DOE to restoring the existing contaminated groundwater plume outside the INTEC security fence to meet the current drinking water stan- dard of 4 millirem per year. A performance assessment would be developed for each facility or group of facilities under consideration for disposition, to determine which of the three disposition alternatives would be implemented. The performance assessment results would be used to identify the impact on the limited cumulative risk in the INTEC area resulting from residual contami- nation from all facilities. For facilities where a performance assessment is not necessary, resid- ual waste left in place would also be used to identify impacts on the limited cumulative risk

219

ch_2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Background 2.2 High-Level Waste Overview 2.2.1 HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DESCRIPTION According to Section 2(12) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (42 USC 10101), high-level radioac- tive waste means: In July 1999, DOE issued Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management. This Order and its associated Manual and Guidance set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and requirements for the management of DOE's inventory of HLW, transuranic waste, and low-level waste. Specific to HLW, DOE uses the Nuclear Waste Policy Act definition but has jurisdictional authority consistent with existing law to deter- mine if the waste requires permanent isolation as the appropriate disposal mechanism. This authority is based on enabling legislation in the Atomic Energy Act, sections 202(3) and 202(4)

220

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Affected Environment 4.6 Geology and Soils This section describes the geological, mineral resources, seismic, and volcanic characteristics of INEEL, INTEC, and surrounding areas. A more detailed description of geology at INEEL can be reviewed in the SNF & INEL EIS, Volume 2, Part A, Section 4.6 (DOE 1995). 4.6.1 GENERAL GEOLOGY INEEL occupies a relatively flat area on the northwestern edge of the Eastern Snake River Plain. Figure 4-4 shows important geological features of the INEEL area. The area consists of a broad plain that has been built up from the eruptions of multi- ple flows of basaltic lava, which is shown on Figure 4-5. The flows at the surface range in age from 1.2 million to 2,100 years. The Plain is bounded on the north and south by the north-to-north-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ch_5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HLW & FD EIS HLW & FD EIS 5-73 DOE/EIS-0287 tion dose to the nonin- volved worker and maximally exposed offsite individual and the collective dose to the population residing within 50 miles of INTEC. The radiation dose values for the var- ious alternatives were then multiplied by the dose-to-risk conversion factors, which are based on the 1993 Limitations of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (NCRP 1993). DOE has adopted these risk fac- tors of 0.0005 and 0.0004 latent cancer fatality (LCF) for each person-rem of radiation exposure to the general public and worker popu- lation, respectively, for doses less than 20 rem. The factor for the population is slightly higher due to the presence of infants and children who are more sensitive to radiation than the adult worker population. DOE used radiation dose information provided

222

ch_5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 45 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3.4.2 Existing Facilities Associated with High-Level Waste Management The facilities in this group are those that have historically been used at the INTEC to generate, treat, and store HLW. Because of the number of facilities involved, DOE has grouped them in functional groups for purposes of analysis (see Table 3-3). DOE analyzed the HLW tanks and bin sets for closure under all five disposition sce- narios; however, facilities that support the Tank Farm and bin sets were analyzed under a single disposition alternative. As shown in Table 3-3, the facility disposition alternative for most sup- porting facilities is Closure to Landfill Standards. (Two exceptions are the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Building and

223

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 40 Affected Environment playas 15 to 20 miles northeast of INTEC, where the water infiltrates. The water in Birch Creek and the Little Lost River is diverted in summer months for irriga- tion prior to reaching INEEL. During periods of unusually high precipitation or rapid snow melt, water from Birch Creek and the Little Lost River may enter INEEL from the northwest and infil- trate the ground, recharging the underlying aquifer. 4.8.1.2 Local Drainage INTEC is located on an alluvial plain approxi- mately 200 feet from the Big Lost River channel near the channel intersection with Lincoln Boulevard on INEEL. INTEC is surrounded by a stormwater drainage ditch system (DOE 1998). Stormwater runoff from most areas of INTEC flows through the ditches to an abandoned gravel

224

ch_13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 13.0 Index Index 13-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 13-2 Index A aesthetics - 3-54, 4-18, 4-35, 5-17, 5-18, 5-214, 5-232, 5-233, 9-9, 10-3, 10-7, C.2-4, C.8-13, C.8-32, C.8-46 airborne releases - 4-32, 4-71, 4-72, 5-48, 5-74, 5-87, 5-184, 5-225, C.2-13, C.2-17, C.8-16, C.8-36 aquifer - 2-30, 2-32, 2-33, 4-40, 4-47, 4-48, 4-49, 4-50, 4-51, 4-53, 4-54, 4-55, 4-56, 4-57, 4-72, 4-79, 5-2, 5-20, 5-44, 5-45, 5-107, 5-121, 5-122, 5-161, 5-165, 5-180, 5-212, 5-221, 5-222, 5-225, 5-227, 5-233, 5-234, 5-235, 6-15, 6-31, 6-32, 6-37, 7-3, 7-20, 7-24, 7-27, 7-29, 9-13, 9-14, 9-15, 11-18, 11-23, 11-24, 11-31, 11-54, 11-65, 11-73, 11-78, 11-79, 11-80, 11-82, 11-83, 11-84, 11-85, A-1, A-3, A-4, A-8, A-12, B-4, B-10, C.4-39, C.4-41, C.6-97, C.8-8, C.8-18, C.8-46, C.9-4, C.9-6, C.9-7, C.9-9, C.9-10,

225

ch_9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 9.0 Re Re f f er er ences ences 9-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 9-2 References Chapter 1 DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1999, Record of Decision Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Operable Unit 3-13, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, DOE/ID-10660, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, Idaho, October. Kelly, K. B., 1999, State of Idaho, Office of Attorney General, Boise, Idaho, letter to B. Bowhan, U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, Idaho, transmitting "Third Modification to Consent Order," Idaho Code §39-4413, April 20. USDC (U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho), 1995, Public Service Company of Colorado v. Philip E. Batt, Civil No. 91-0035-S-EJL (Lead Case), Consent Order, October

226

ch_5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 44 Environmental Consequences 5.2.7 WATER RESOURCES This section presents potential water resource impacts from implement- ing the proposed waste processing alternatives described in Chapter 3. Section 5.2.14 dis- cusses potential impacts to INEEL water resources from accidents or unusual natural phe- nomena such as earth- quakes. Appendix C.9 discusses potential long- term impacts to INEEL water resources from facility closure. Because the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative would involve shipment of mixed HLW to the Hanford Site for treat- ment, possible impacts to water resources at Hanford were also evalu- ated (see Appendix C.8). Unless otherwise noted, however, the discussion of impacts presented in this section applies specifically to INEEL. 5.2.7.1 Methodology DOE assessed potential impacts by reviewing

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0 0 7.0 Glossar Glossar y y 7-1 DOE/EIS-0287 Terms in this glossary are defined based on the context in which they are to be used in this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). - New Information - DOE/EIS-0287 7-2 Glossary 100-year flood A flood that occurs, on average, every 100 years (equates to a 1 percent probability of occurring in any given year). 500-year flood A flood that occurs, on average, every 500 years (equates to a 0.2 percent probability of occurring in any given year). accident An unplanned sequence of events that results in undesirable consequences. actinide Any of a series of chemically similar, mostly synthetic, radioactive elements with atomic numbers ranging from 89 (actinium-89) through 103 (lawrencium-103). Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP)

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47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated soil and material above the aquifer). This section describes the regional and local hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, perched water, and subsurface water quality. 4.8.2.1 Regional Hydrogeology INEEL overlies the Snake River Plain Aquifer as shown in Figure 4-12. This aquifer is the major source of drinking water for southeast- ern Idaho and has been desig- nated a Sole Source Aquifer by EPA. The aquifer flows to the south and southwest and covers an area of 9,611 square miles. Water storage in the aquifer is estimated at 2 billion acre-feet, and irrigation wells can yield 7,000 gallons per minute (DOE 1995). Depth to the

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0 0 11.0 Response Response to to P P ublic ublic Comment Comment 11-1 DOE/EIS-0287 11.1 Introduction This chapter provides responses from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho to public comments on the Draft Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (HLW & FD EIS) and identifies where those public comments led to changes to the EIS. The State of Idaho, a cooperating agency in the preparation of the EIS, participated in the process of reviewing, summarizing, and responding to comments. In addition, the State of Idaho responded to the comments that were directed specifically to the State. The following information identifies the opportunities for public comment and response format and provides information on how to find responses to each of the com-

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1998, INEEL 1998, INEEL contracts paid $1.4 million to the State of Idaho in Idaho sales taxes and an additional $0.9 million in Idaho franchise tax. 4.4 Cultural Resources 4.4.1 CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSULTATION AT INEEL Cultural resources at INEEL include archaeolog- ical and historic resources, such as prehistoric camp sites and historic buildings and trails, as well as the plants, animals, physical locations, and other features of INEEL environment impor- tant to the culture of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and to national, regional and local history. Several Federal laws, which are described in Chapter 6, govern the protection of archaeologi- cal and historic resources on lands managed by Federal agencies. These and other laws also require consultations among Federal agencies,

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0 0 3.0 Alterna Alterna tiv tiv es es 3-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter describes the alternatives for waste processing and facility disposi- tion analyzed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) as well as alter- natives eliminated from detailed analy- sis. As required by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regula- tions implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a No Action alternative is also included. This chapter identifies the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Preferred Alternative as well as the State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative, which is different from that identified by DOE. Some of the alternatives include one or more options. The options are described in the context of the alternative(s) they fall under, but could be used or com-

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0 0 5.0 E E nvir nvir onmental onmental Consequences Consequences 5-1 DOE/EIS-0287 5.1 Introduction Chapter 5 describes the potential environ- mental consequences of implementing each of the alternatives described in Chapter 3. This Final EIS analyzes the alternatives in the Draft EIS and provides corrections and updates as needed. In addition, it analyzes the State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative, Direct Vitrification, and a new option of the Non-Separations Alternative, the Steam Reforming Option. Furthermore, the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative has been modified, and other changes have been made to the analyses based on information received during the public comment period. DOE/EIS-0287 5-2 Environmental Consequences Environmental consequences of actions could include direct physical disturbance of resources,

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3-34 3-34 Alternatives transuranic waste/SBW. The EIS also presents the impacts for a grout facility (see Project P2001 in Appendix C.6) that could be used to treat the waste generated after 2005. For pur- poses of assessing transportation impacts, DOE assumed the grouted waste would be character- ized as remote-handled transuranic waste and transported to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal (see Appendix C.5). 3.2 Facility Disposition Alternatives The waste processing alternatives described in Section 3.1 do not include any specific facility disposition alternatives except for those cases where facility disposition is an integral part of implementation of the option (e.g., disposal of low-level waste Class A or Class C type grout in the Tank Farm and bin sets). However, DOE

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4 4 Background 2.1.3 CURRENT MISSION The current INEEL mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced engineering technology and systems to improve national competitiveness and security, to make the pro- duction and use of energy more efficient, and to improve the quality of the environment. Areas of primary emphasis at INEEL include waste management and waste minimization, environ- mental engineering and restoration, energy effi- ciency, renewable energy, national security and defense, nuclear technologies, and advanced technologies and methods. INEEL is the lead laboratory for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program, which sets standards for developing and maintaining the capability to safely manage DOE's spent nuclear fuel. DOE considers the Environmental Management

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0 0 12.0 Distribution Distribution List List - New Information - 12-1 DOE/EIS-0287 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pro- vided copies of this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Federal, state, and local elected and appointed officials and agencies of government; Native American groups; national, state, and local environmental and public interest groups; and other organizations and individuals list- ed below. In addition, DOE sent copies of the Final EIS to all persons who comment- ed on the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement; these individuals are list- ed in the Index (Alphabetical List of Commentors by Name) in Chapter 11 of this Final EIS. Other groups that received copies of the Final EIS but are not listed

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71 71 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS university research programs and private con- tractors. Ongoing studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, also carefully tracks possible health effects from past activities at INEEL. 4.11.1.1 Radiological Health Risk Very low doses of radiation are not known to cause health effects in humans; however, extrapolation of the dose-response relationship from high doses indicates that statistical effects might be observed in large populations. The doses reported in this EIS from INEEL opera- tions are in this very low category. This EIS reports two values: col- lective dose (in person- rem) and the hypothetical number of latent cancer fatalities. For effects on

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0 0 6.0 Sta Sta tutes tutes , , Regula Regula tions tions , , Consulta Consulta tions tions , , and Other and Other Requir Requir ements ements 6-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter discusses the consultations and coordination the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has had with various agen- cies during the preparation of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This chapter also analyzes the complex regulatory issues that arise when consider- ing the various alternatives discussed pre- viously. When reviewing this chapter, it is impor- tant to remember the following: in the Purpose and Need discussion in Chapter 2 of this EIS, DOE has described the chal- lenges it faces with its mixed high-level waste (HLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and its additional

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22 22 5.2.6 AIR RESOURCES Air pollutant emissions associated with construction and operation of facilities to support the waste processing al- ternatives could affect the air resources in the region of the INEEL. DOE characterized air emission rates and calculated maximum consequences at onsite and offsite locations from projects associated with proposed waste processing alternatives. The assessments include emis- sions from stationary sources (facility stacks); fugitive sources from construction activities; and mobile sources (trucks, cranes, tractors, etc.) that would operate in sup- port of projects under each waste processing alternative. The types of emissions assessed are the same as those in the baseline assessment in Section 4.7, Air Resources, namely, radionuclides, criteria pollutants (carbon

239

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ansuranic w a s t e M i x e d tr ansuranic w a s t e LEGEND Mixed transuranic waste sodium-bearing waste Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Newly generated liquid waste NGLW SBW...

240

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S1W Naval Nuclear Reactor Prototype Project Officer 29 years; including experience in Nuclear Power Plant Operations and maintenance, radioactive and hazardous materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ch_2  

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near the site are Idaho Falls and Rexburg to the east, Blackfoot to the southeast, Atomic City to the south, Pocatello and the Fort Hall Indian Reservation to the...

242

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include Mud Lake and Terreton to the east; Arco, Butte City, and Howe to the west; and Atomic City to the south. The larger com- munities of Idaho Falls, Rexburg, Rigby,...

243

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13 DOEEIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS except the pillar and panel tanks) would be full of mixed transuranic waste in approximately 2017. Other facilities depending on the capacity of...

244

ch_9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agency: The State of Idaho Title: Contact: For additional information on this EIS and the tribal, agency and...

245

ch_1  

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of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies reprocessed spent nuclear reac- tor fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, located on the Snake River Plain in the desert...

246

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58 58 Affected Environment 4.9.1 PLANT COMMUNITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS INEEL lies within a cool desert ecosystem dom- inated by shrub-steppe vegetation. The area is relatively undisturbed, providing important habi- tat for species native to the region. Vegetation and habitat on INEEL can be grouped into six types: shrub-steppe, juniper woodlands, native grasslands, modified ephemeral playas, lava, and wetland-like areas. Figure 4-16 shows these areas. More than 90 percent of INEEL falls within the shrub-steppe vegetation type. The shrub-steppe vegetation type is dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), saltbush (Atriplex spp.), and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus spp.). Grasses found on INEEL include cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.), and

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25 25 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3 Facility Disposition Impacts Section 5.3 presents a discussion of potential impacts associated with the disposition of exist- ing HLW management facilities at INEEL and disposition of new facilities that would be built in support of the proposed waste processing alternatives. The discussion includes (1) the potential impacts of short-term actions in dispo- sitioning new and existing HLW management facilities, (2) the potential long-term impacts from the disposal of the grouted low-level waste fraction in either a new disposal facility at INTEC or in the Tank Farm and bin sets, and (3) the potential long-term impacts of residual con- tamination in closed HLW management facili- ties. The six facility disposition alternatives are

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towers that reach 250 feet. 4.5 Aesthetic and Scenic Resources This section describes a baseline visual character of INEEL and the surrounding area, including designated scenic...

249

Determining the CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2} barrier from methylsulfonyl chloride photodissociation at 193 nm using velocity map imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These imaging experiments study the formation of the methylsulfonyl radical, CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}, from the photodissociation of CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl at 193 nm and determine the energetic barrier for the radical's subsequent dissociation to CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2}. We first state-selectively detect the angular and recoil velocity distributions of the Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and Cl({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms to further refine the distribution of internal energy partitioned to the momentum-matched CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} radicals. The internal energy distribution of the radicals is bimodal, indicating that CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} is formed in both the ground state and low-lying excited electronic states. All electronically excited CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} radicals dissociate, while those formed in the ground electronic state have an internal energy distribution which spans the dissociation barrier to CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2}. We detect the recoil velocities of the energetically stable methylsulfonyl radicals with 118 nm photoionization. Comparison of the total recoil translational energy distribution for all radicals to the distribution obtained from the detection of stable radicals yields an onset for dissociation at a translational energy of 70{+-}2 kcal/mol. This onset allows us to derive a CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2} barrier height of 14{+-}2 kcal/mol; this determination relies on the S-Cl bond dissociation energy, taken here as the CCSD(T) predicted energy of 65.6 kcal/mol. With 118 nm photoionization, we also detect the velocity distribution of the CH{sub 3} radicals produced in this experiment. Using the velocity distributions of the SO{sub 2} products from the dissociation of CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} to CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2} presented in the following paper, we show that our fastest detected methyl radicals are not from these radical dissociation channels, but rather from a primary S-CH{sub 3} bond photofission channel in CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl. We also present critical points on the ground state potential energy surface of CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} at the //CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)ZCCSD(T)/6-311++G(2df,p) level. We include harmonic zero-point vibrational corrections as well as core-valence and scalar-relativistic corrections. The CCSD(T) predicted barrier of 14.6 kcal/mol for CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}+SO{sub 2} agrees well with our experimental measurement. These results allow us to predict the unimolecular dissociation kinetics of CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2} radicals and critique the analysis of prior time-resolved photoionization studies on this system.

Ratliff, Britni J.; Tang Xiaonan; Butler, Laurie J. [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Szpunar, David E. [Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173 (United States); Lau, Kai-Chung [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group for Price-Anderson Violations Group for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations November 17, 2006 - 9:25am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) that it will fine the company $82,500 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CHG is the prime contractor responsible for managing the storage and retrieval of highly radioactive and hazardous waste at the DOE Hanford Tank Farm site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today cited a series of violations associated with two separate events involving the radioactive contamination of multiple CHG employees. The first event occurred on September 21, 2005, during disassembly and removal of auxiliary equipment

251

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc. - Inc. - EA-2006-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06 November 16, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological Contamination Events at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation at the Hanford Tank Farms by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement, now within the Office of Health, Safety and Security. The investigation involved (1) the September 2005 Tank C-202 Mobile Retrieval System (MRS) multi-personnel contamination event, (2) the March 2006 ER-311 catch tank camera removal radiological event, and (3) additional radiological contamination events that occurred between 2003-2006 as they relate to quality improvement

252

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER OF DOM ESTIC N'l'D FOREIGN RJG HTS TO AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION ENTITLED ''EXOTEN SIONED STRU CTURE AND METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTION," DEVELOPED UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC5-- 06N..-.\25396; DOE INVENTION DISCLOSU RE NO. S- H 2,784; DOE \V"ATVER NO. W(l) 201 1-005 The Petitioner, Midmel BrockweH (Inventor), has requested a waiver of the Government' s domestic and _oreig:n patent rights in an invention entitled "Exotensioned Structure and Method for Construction." The subject invention was conceived by the Inventor (an employee of Los Alamos National Security, LLC). Los Alamos N ational Security, LLC (L.f\:"'\jS) is the M&O Contractor for the Los Alamos Natjonal Laboratory (LANL), a govemment~ovroed, contractor-

253

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory This letter refers to the investigation of events at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP) by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement. The investigation summary report, Multiple Radiological Protection Program Deficiencies and Safety Culture Concerns, was provided to you in a letter dated February 20, 2007. An enforcement conference to discuss these findings was held on March

254

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations June 5, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) for nuclear safety violations. CHG is the tank operations contractor for the tank farms located at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The PNOV cites a series of violations that occurred on July 27, 2007, when waste being pumped out of tank S-102 spilled in the vicinity of the tank's retrieval pump. During waste transfer operations, a supply line became over-pressurized with tank waste, causing a rupture in the dilution water supply line and resulted in a spill of approximately 85 gallons of

255

DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) cites violations associated with radiation safety and quality improvement deficiencies identified during a DOE Idaho Operations Office May 2006 assessment of radioactive waste processing activities at the Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP). The

256

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - March 10,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc - Inc - March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - March 10, 2005 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and

257

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc - Inc - EA-2005-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and (4) the July 2004 extremity exposure during hermocouple removal activities.

258

New directions for QA in basic research: The Fermilab/DOE-CH experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the underlying problems involved in developing institution-wide QA programs at DOE funded basic research facilities, and suggests concrete ways in which QA professionals and basic researchers can find common ground in describing and analyzing those activities to the satisfaction of both communities. The paper is designed to be a springboard into workshop discussions which can define a path for developing institution-wide QA programs based on the experience gained with DOE-CH and Fermilab.

Bodnarczuk, M.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Instructor's Name Email Address Office Hours Allen, Chris christopherallen@pdx.edu W 3:00-4:00pm CH 366  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructor's Name Email Address Office Hours Office Location Allen, Chris christopherallen CH 361 Fall 2011 Instructor Office Hours #12;Pickett-Cooper, Patty pickettp@pdx.edu F 11:30-1:30pm CH

260

Instructor's Name Email Address Office Hours Alvarado, Jimena jimena@pdx.edu W 9:00-10:00am CH 368  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00-5:30pm CH 366 Olmsted, John (TA - Chris Harper) olmstedj@pdx.edu M 4:30-5:30pm CH 311 Spring 2011 Instructor Office Hours #12;Patka, Mazna (TA - Colleen Kidney) mpatka@pdx.edu TR 10:00-11:00am CH 367 Pickett

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

[(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

Wang, Xiqu

262

Energy use and peak power for new commercial buildings from the BECA-CN (Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis) data compilation: Key findings and issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data have been collected and analyzed for 152 new commercial buildings from the US and abroad. Each building has some energy-saving or load-shaping features, including techniques such as solar heating and cooling, thermal storage, load management, daylighting, efficient HVAC, and sophisticated control strategies. The data base covers energy and cost data, architectural and system characteristics, building operations, and special features. In this paper, quantitative parameters covering energy use, peak demand, occupancy, operating conditions, construction costs, and energy costs are discussed. About two-thirds of the buildings are offices. The average BECA-CN office uses 66 kBtu/ft/sup 2/-year, which is about half the national office stock average. Measured energy use for these efficient buildings is roughly comparable to computer predictions for buildings designed to comply with the new ASHRAE Standard 90.1P. The average maximum peak electric demand is 5.5 W/ft/sup 2/ for the offices. Peak demand charges account for about 20 to 30% of annual electricity charges. Energy costs an average of $1.02/ft/sup 2/-year (in 1985 dollars) for the offices.

Piette, M.A.; Riley, R.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

T{sub c}-dependent Raman scattering from a high-frequency phonon in {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the temperature dependence of the frequencies of two high-frequency intramolecular modes in {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br measured by resonant Raman scattering, with the use of a Fourier-transform spectrometer equipped with an infrared laser. One of these modes, that at 892cm{sup {minus}1} and assigned to {nu}{sub 60}(B{sub 3g}) exhibits an increase below T{sub c} of 2.2{plus_minus}0.7cm{sup {minus}1} and 2.2{plus_minus}0.4cm{sup {minus}1} when measured in a Janis Dewar and in a Heli-Tran refrigerator, respectively. A smaller increase is observed in the deuterated sample and no increase is observed at all if the samples are cooled too rapidly. Two other modes, {nu}{sub 3}(A{sub g}) at 1474cm{sup {minus}1} and {nu}{sub 9}(A{sub g}) at 503cm{sup {minus}1}, show no such increase below T{sub c} in the slowly cooled samples. We speculate that the normal electron-phonon interaction may not be responsible for the frequency increase but that the superconducting transition may involve a change in either the geometry or the arrangement of the BEDT-TTF molecules to which the particular mode is sensitive. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Eldridge, J.E.; Lin, Y. [Physics Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T1Z1 (CANADA); Wang, H.H.; Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M. [Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement The Partnering Team will complete the cleanup, reindustrialize ETTP and continue Environmental Management (EM) activities currently ongoing at ORNL and Y-12. This work will be accomplished in a safe and quality manner with a goal of completion under budget and ahead of schedule. U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement More Documents & Publications Contractor Fee Payments - Oak Ridge Operations

265

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Stability of metal nanowires at ultrahigh current densities C.-H. Zhang, J. Brki, and C. A. Stafford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Stafford Department of Physics, University of Arizona, 1118 E. 4th Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA by an effective one-dimensional potential C.-H. ZHANG, J. B?RKI AND C. A. STAFFORD PHYSICAL REVIEW B 71, 235404 of the wire. C.-H. ZHANG, J. B?RKI AND C. A. STAFFORD PHYSICAL REVIEW B 71, 235404 2005 235404-4 #12;GS = G0 k

Stafford, Charles

267

Thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 {mu}s after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 {mu}Torr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 {mu}s) are identified: H, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, CO, CH{sub 2}=CHOH, HC{identical_to}CH, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 2}=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH{sub 3}CHO (+M) {yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH{sub 2}CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

Vasiliou, AnGayle K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Zhang Xu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg [Chemical Sciences Division, LBNL MS 6R-2100, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9055, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); David, Donald E. [Integrated Instrument Design Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W. [Center for Combustion and Environmental Research, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Competition between C-C and C-H Activation in Reactions of Neutral Yttrium Atoms with Cyclopropane and Propene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology, Cornell UniVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853 ReceiVed: February 22, 2003; In Final Form: August 25, 2003 Branching ratios between C-C and C-H bond activation were measured for reactions of ground-state Y to or even lower than those for C-H insertion.8 For example, reactions of Fe+, Co+, and Ni+ with propane led

Davis, H. Floyd

269

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form the basis of a new street light that would not only beefficient white light alternative to street lighting, CECstreet lighting design is best performed using scotopic lumens as the key design variable (i.e. , scotopic light

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other hand, if research shows that street lighting design isresearch shows that the old way of designing street lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Darshan on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the Guide to darshan-parser output page. Disabling Darshan Darshan can be disabled entirely by adding +mpiwrappers to your .softenvrc file before the @default....

272

BG/P Driver Information | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to automatically recover from this condition but deadlock could occur. Try enlarging your remote get fifos." serviceaction"(NoService)" > Fixes for the GNU toolchain and Python...

273

Decommissioning of BG/P Systems and Resources | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. Feedback Form Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources On December 31 at 23:59:59 GMT (6PM Central),...

274

Performance FAQs on BG/Q Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetusVesta IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System...

275

BG/P File Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetusVesta IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System...

276

Software and Libraries for BG/P | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allinea DDT +ddt L Multithreaded, multiprocess source code debugger for high performance computing. TotalView +totalview L Multithreaded, multiprocess source code debugger for...

277

IBM References for BG/P | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneP System Administration, SG24-7417 IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue GeneP Universal Performance Counters Unit User Manual V3.0...

278

HPCT Xprofiler on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPCT Xprofiler on BGP Systems References IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue GeneP - IBM Redbook describing HPCT and other performance...

279

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because CFL fixtures have much higher efficiencies than theenergy efficiency and longer life of the CFL. Despite thisCFL fixtures . This element aims to replace high-use fixtures (including halogen torchieres) with high-efficiency,

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial and residential buildings would have a major positive impact on energy use and environmental quality in California.

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

System Overview for BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Allocations, Balance, and Job Charges Use the cbank command to query allocations. Please refer to this page: Query Allocations with cbank Large File...

282

gdb on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After booting & initial startup you will get a prompt from the gdb server. You need to query it for the IP and port numbers that correspond to each rank you want to attach the...

283

Vibrational relaxation of matrix-isolated CH/sub 3/F and HCl  

SciTech Connect

Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on CH/sub 3/F and HCl as a function of host matrix and temperature. Temporally and spectrally resolved infrared fluorescence was used to monitor the populations of both the initially excited state and the lower lying levels which participate in the relaxation process. For CH/sub 3/F, relaxation from any of the levels near 3.5 ..mu.., i.e. the CH stretching fundamentals or bend overtones, occurs via rapid (< 5 ns) V ..-->.. V transfer to 2..nu../sub 3/ with subsequent relaxation of the ..nu../sub 3/ (CF stretch) manifold. Lifetimes of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ were determined through overtone, ..delta..V = 2, and fundamental fluorescence. These lifetimes show a dramatic dependence on host lattice, an increase of two orders of magnitude in going from Xe and Ar matrices. Lifetimes depend only weakly on temperature. The relaxation of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ is consistent with a model in which production of a highly rotationally excited guest via collisions with the repulsive wall of the host is the rate limiting step. For HCl, lifetimes of v = 1,2,3 have been determined. In all hosts, the relaxation is non-radiative. For a given vibrational state, v, the relaxation rate increases in the series k(Ar) < k(Kr) < k(Xe). The dependence of the relaxation rate; on v is superlinear in all matrices, the deviation from linearity increasng in the order Ar < Kr < Xe. The relaxation rates become more strongly temperature dependent with increasing vibrational excitation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which complex formation introduces the anisotropy necessary to induce a near resonant V ..-->.. R transition in the rate limiting step.

Young, L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

;/:4,4 (; . 1.; ;/:4,4 (; . 1.; e octo: ' J : 18, 1976 Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION During the discussions on October 8, 1976, you iquired about information relative to work done by MIT as background infomation for survey planning. The enclosed information is parephrased frorc an unpublished history of program work carried out by the Process Eevclopncnt Group of the Dl.ti,si.on of Raw Katerids, I believe this work was done under contract nuder AT(30-1)956. Robert IE. Allen Process Facilities Safety Branch Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance Fnclosure: As stated I I . ..--@q$?.. .... ............................................ ........ ..- .......................... . ... ... .- ................... .._ ................ .... ..__ ..............

285

The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.

Benallal, R. [Theoretical physics Laboratory, Physics Department of University Aboubekr Belkaied Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Liani, B. [Science Faculty, Hassiba Benbouali University, Chlef 02000 (Algeria)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

The kaon mass in 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass Wilson ChPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the chiral low-energy effective theory for 2+1+1 flavor lattice QCD with twisted mass Wilson fermions. In contrast to existing results we assume a heavy charm quark mass such that the D mesons are too heavy to appear as degrees of freedom in the effective theory. As an application we compute the kaon mass to 1-loop order in the LCE regime. The result contains a chiral logarithm involving the neutral pion mass which has no analogue in continuum ChPT.

Bar, Oliver

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A new ambient-pressure organic superconductor,. kappa. -(ET) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br, with the highest transition temperature yet observed (inductive onset T sub c = 11. 6 K, resistive onset = 12. 5 K)  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of a new ambient-pressure organic superconductor, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br (BEDT-TTF or ET = bis(ethylenedithio)tetrafulvalene) is reported. This compounds exhibits the highest inductive onset temperature, T{sub c} = 11.6K (resistive onset = 12.5K) yet reported. The crystallographic and bond electron structure, ESR characteristics, and its superconductivity transition have all been measured, and the results are reported. 28 refs., 3 figs.

Kini, A.M.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H.H.; Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Kwok, W.K.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Thompson, J.E.; Stupka, D.L. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Jung, D.; Whangbo, Myunghwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1990-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

289

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

290

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

291

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

292

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

293

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

294

Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH{sub 4} oxidation in landfill soil covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane (CH{sub 4}), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH{sub 4} is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH{sub 4} oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} (V{sub max}) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O{sub 2} from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH{sub 4} slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O{sub 2} decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O{sub 2} under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O{sub 2} into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH{sub 4}.

Im, J.; Moon, S.; Nam, K.; Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.Y. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jaeykim@snu.ac.kr

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

artment of Energy artment of Energy Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 OCT 2 1 1980 Ki.lliam E. Mott, Director Environmental Cinttol Technology Division, KC! SUBJECT I PREHIER MANUFACTURING - SPRINGDALE, PEhVSYLVA?UA A visit to Premier Manufacturing, 644 Garfield, Springdalc, Pennsylvania, was made en October 6, 1980, by Edward J. Jascewsky and Art Whitman, Department of Energy, and Walter R. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory. The group met with Edward McClesky, Premier Manufacturing and Bud Schnoor, PPG Industries, Inc. The purpose of the visit was to perform a cursory radiological survey of the facility at the above location. In addition, discussions were held with Mr. Schnoor whose family previously owned the facility and performed the

296

10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B must meet the applicable electrical safety codes and standards referenced in § 851.23. 11. NANOTECHNOLOGY SAFETY-RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since policy and procedures for nano- technology safety are currently being devel- oped. Once these policies and procedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rulemaking con- sistent with the Administrative Procedure Act. 12. WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION- RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since the policy and procedures for workplace violence prevention are currently being developed. Once these policies and pro- cedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rule-

297

MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2, .* 2, .* -' .l-.; . . *' ,. .:, ,-i&CLEAR METALS, INC. MA ,y 155 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r, 4-5200 blr. Saul Strauch Technical Liason Division United States Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office 70 Columbus Avenue New York 23, New York SUBJECT:- Program for Uranium Recovery (Ref: S. Strauch to A. R. Kaufmnnn, B/30/55) Dear Mr. Strauch: With reference to Mr. K. E. Field's confidential memorandum of August 22, 1956, this is to advise tha.t Nuclea,r l,':etals, Inc., has no facilities for scrap recovery. Also, our reply to Section III of the memorandum must be based .on our operations during the fiscal year recently ended. During that period, normal uranium 3cra.p material3 were returned to the i\'ational Lead Company of Ohio, and enriched scrap materials

298

Final Report for DOE Project DE-FC07-99CH11010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Department of Energy award number DE-FC07-99CH11010, Enhanced Utilization of Corn Based Biomaterials, supported a technology development program sponsored by Cargill Dow LLC from September 30, 1999 through June 30, 2003. The work involved fundamental scientific studies on poly lactic acid (PLA), a new environmentally benign plastic material from renewable resources. DOE funds supported academic research at the Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and industry cost share was directed towards applied research into new product development utilizing the fundamental information generated by the academic partners. Under the arrangement of the grant, the fundamental information is published so that other companies can utilize it in evaluating the applicability of PLA in their own products. The overall project objective is to increase the utilization of PLA, a renewable resource based plastic, currently produced from fermented corn sugar.

Jed Randall; Robert Kean

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked Views  

SciTech Connect

Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of whether genomic regions are bound or not. There is increasing evidence, however, that factors bind in a highly overlapping manner to the same genomic regions and that it is quantitative differences in occupancy on these commonly bound regions that are the critical determinants of the different biological specificity of factors. As a result, it is critical to have a tool to facilitate the quantitative visualization of differences between transcription factors and the genomic regions they bind to understand each factor's unique roles in the network. We have developed a framework which combines several visualizations via brushing-and-linking to allow the user to interactively analyze and explore in vivo DNA binding data of multiple transcription factors. We describe these visualization types and also provide a discussion of biological examples in this paper.

Huang, Min-Yu; Weber, Gunther; Li, Xiao-Yong; Biggin, Mark; Hamann, Bernd

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation  

SciTech Connect

Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has seen widespread success involves the use of a proximal heteroatom that serves as a directing group for the selective functionalization of a specific C-H bond. In a survey of examples of heteroatom-directed Rh catalysis, two mechanistically distinct reaction pathways are revealed. In one case, the heteroatom acts as a chelator to bind the Rh catalyst, facilitating reactivity at a proximal site. In this case, the formation of a five-membered metallacycle provides a favorable driving force in inducing reactivity at the desired location. In the other case, the heteroatom initially coordinates the Rh catalyst and then acts to stabilize the formation of a metal-carbon bond at a proximal site. A true test of the utility of a synthetic method is in its application to the synthesis of natural products or complex molecules. Several groups have demonstrated the applicability of C-H bond functionalization reactions towards complex molecule synthesis. Target-oriented synthesis provides a platform to test the effectiveness of a method in unique chemical and steric environments. In this respect, Rh-catalyzed methods for C-H bond functionalization stand out, with several syntheses being described in the literature that utilize C-H bond functionalization in a key step. These syntheses are highlighted following the discussion of the method they employ.

Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Plasma 2D modeling and diagnostics of DLC deposition on PET E. Amanatides, P. Gkotsis, Ch. Syndrevelis, D. Mataras *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensional (2D) emission spectra of short-lived excited species for estimating the uniformity of production substrates was investigated. Images of the a- balmer line of atomic hydrogen in CH4/H2 discharges were and fast way control and optimization of such processes. In this direction, the present work is focused

302

Physical and chemical properties of dust produced in a N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} RF plasma discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated using a Capacitively Coupled Plasma discharge produced in a N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture. The produced solid particles are analysed ex-situ. Chemical properties are deduced from: elemental composition, FTIR and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Optical properties are deduced from reflectivity in visible and IR range.

Ouni, F.; Alcouffe, G.; Szopa, C.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G. [Universite de Versailles St Quentin, Service d'Aeronomie, BP 3-91371 Verrieres le Buisson (France); Adande, G.; Thissen, R.; Quirico, E.; Brissaud, O. [LPG-BP 5338041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Laprevote, O. [ICSN-CNRS Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract DE-AC02-76-CH03073. #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

304

Assessment of kinetic modeling for lean H2/CH4/O2/diluent flames at high pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Hydrogen; Methane; Syngas; Flame speed; Chemical mechanism 1. Introduction The H2/O2 reaction system CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other small hydrocarbons (synthetic gas or "syngas") from coal or biomass gasification [2]. Typical syngas mixtures can contain significant amounts of small molecular weight

Ju, Yiguang

305

Quantum computing applied to calculations of molecular energies: CH2 benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computers are appealing for their ability to solve some tasks much faster than their classical counterparts. It was shown in [Aspuru-Guzik et al., Science 309, 1704 (2005)] that they, if available, would be able to perform the full configuration interaction (FCI) energy calculations with a polynomial scaling. This is in contrast to conventional computers where FCI scales exponentially. We have developed a code for simulation of quantum computers and implemented our version of the quantum full configuration interaction algorithm. We provide a detailed description of this algorithm and the results of the assessment of its performance on the four lowest lying electronic states of CH2 molecule. This molecule was chosen as a benchmark, since its two lowest lying 1A1 states exhibit a multireference character at the equilibrium geometry. It has been shown that with a suitably chosen initial state of the quantum register, one is able to achieve the probability amplification regime of the iterative phase estimation algorithm even in this case.

Libor Veis; Ji? Pittner

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Supported Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Membranes for CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} Separation  

SciTech Connect

Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are organic salts which are liquid at or around room temperature. These compounds exhibit many outstanding physical properties such as great thermal stability and no measurable vapor pressure. In this work supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were prepared by impregnating pores of ?-alumina inorganic supports with various ionic liquids. In addition to membranes prepared with pure RTILs we were able to synthesize membranes with RTIL mixtures using 1-aminopyridinium iodide dissolved in 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate or methyltrioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. This combination of an RTIL with an organic salt containing an amine group dramatically improved the membrane separation properties. The SILMs displayed CO{sub 2} permeance on the order of 5 10{sup ?10} to 5 10{sup ?9} mol m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} Pa{sup ?1} combined with CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity of 530. Although these values are comparable with the current systems for CO{sub 2} purification, CO{sub 2} permeance is still rather low for these compounds.

Iarikov, D. D.; Hacarlioglu, P.; Oyama, S. T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Call for Proposals for SystemsX.ch Projects In the Messages on Education, Research and Innovation for 2008-2011 and 2012, the Fed-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the SystemsX.ch initiative. The Mes- sage on Education, Research and Innovation for 2013-2016 envisages- view, for the period of 2013-2016. Teams of scientists from all SystemsX.ch partner institu- tions ................................................................................................12 3.1.10 Annual Scientific and Financial Reporting

Glinz, Martin

308

Remote Sensing D/H Ratios in Methane Ice: Temperature-Dependent Absorption Coefficients of CH3D in Methane Ice and in Nitrogen Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of strong absorption bands of singly deuterated methane (CH3D) at wavelengths where normal methane (CH4) absorbs comparatively weakly could enable remote measurement of D/H ratios in methane ice on outer solar system bodies. We performed laboratory transmission spectroscopy experiments, recording spectra at wavelengths from 1 to 6 \\mum to study CH3D bands at 2.47, 2.87, and 4.56 \\mum, wavelengths where ordinary methane absorption is weak. We report temperature-dependent absorption coefficients of these bands when the CH3D is diluted in CH4 ice and also when it is dissolved in N2 ice, and describe how these absorption coefficients can be combined with data from the literature to simulate arbitrary D/H ratio absorption coefficients for CH4 ice and for CH4 in N2 ice. We anticipate these results motivating new telescopic observations to measure D/H ratios in CH4 ice on Triton, Pluto, Eris, and Makemake.

Grundy, W M; Bovyn, M J; Tegler, S C; Cornelison, D M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Enforcement Letter, September 6, 2007, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Potential Violations of Nuclear Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2007 6, 2007 Mr. John Fulton Chief Executive Officer CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. 2440 Stevens Drive Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Fulton: The Department of Energy (DOE) held an Enforcement Conference on August 29, 2006, with CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) to discuss potential violations of nuclear safety requirements described in our Investigation Summary Report dated July 26, 2006. At that time, DOE elected to defer a decision on a potential quality improvement violation related to recurring radiological events and deficiencies in the identification and control of radiological hazards at the Tank Farms. This decision was based upon the fact that CHG senior management had initiated radiological work improvements but insufficient data was available to assess their effectiveness. On July 12, 2007, Office of Enforcement

310

NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00088 I. Project Title: CH2f"JHill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Number: 10 Number: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00088 I. Project Title: CH2f"JHill Plateau Remediation Company - Cleanup Actions, December 2012 to December 2013 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions. e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) will be conducting cleanup actions on the Hanford Site in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) referenced in 10 CFR 1021, B, CX B6.1 ''Cleanup actions". PRC Projects include all those identified Sections . 3 and J.l4 of the PRC Contract, DE-AC06-08RL14788. Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions, under RCRA, Atomic Energy Act, or other

311

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes, November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

312

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes, November 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

313

Description of the FCUP code used to compute currents due to recoil protons from CH/sub 2/ foils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code, FCUP, was developed at EG and G during the period from 1973 to the present to compute proton currents produced by a time- and energy-dependent neutron flux striking a CH/sub 2/ foil and knocking protons into a detector placed at an angle with respect to the target foil and the neutron beam. This report describes the methods of calculation used and the physical assumptions and limitations involved and suggests possibilities for improving the calculations.

Stelts, M.L.; Glasgow, D.W.; Wood, B.E.; Craft, A.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Polyacetylene, (CH){sub x}, as an Emerging Material for Solar Cell Applications. Final Technical Report, March 19, 1979 - March 18, 1980  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Despite great theoretical and technological interest in polyacetylene, (CH){sub x}, the basic features of its band structure have not been unambiguously resolved. Since photoconductivity and optical absorption data have frequently been used to infer information on the band structure of semiconductors, such measurements were carried out on (CH){sub x}. The main results of an extensive study of the photoconductivity (..delta.. sigma{sub ph}) and absorption coefficient (..cap alpha..) in (CH){sub x} are presented. The absence of photoconductivity in cis-(CH){sub x}, despite the similarity in optical properties indicates that ..delta.. sigma/sub ph/ in trans-(CH){sub x} is induced by isomerization. It is found that isomerization generates states deep inside the gap that act as safe traps for minority carriers and thereby enhance the photoconductivity. Compensation of trans-(CH){sub x} with ammonia appears to decrease the number of safe traps, whereas acceptor doping increases their number. Thus, chemical doping can be used to control the photoconductive response. The energy of safe traps inside the gap is independent of the process used to generate them; indicative of an intrinsic localized defect level in trans-(CH){sub x}. A coherent picture based on the soliton model can explain these results, including the safe trapping.

Heeger, A. J.; MacDiarmid, A. G.

1980-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Subtask 1.22 - Microbial Cycling of CH4, CO2, and N2O in a Wetlands Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil microbial metabolic activities play an important role in determining CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems. To verify and evaluate CO{sub 2} sequestration potential by wetland restoration in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), as well as to address concern over restoration effects on CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, laboratory and in situ microcosm studies on microbial cycling of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O were initiated. In addition, to evaluate the feasibility of the use of remote sensing to detect soil gas flux from wetlands, a remote-sensing investigation was also conducted. Results of the laboratory microcosm study unequivocally proved that restoration of PPR wetlands does sequester atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Under the experimental conditions, the simulated restored wetlands did not promote neither N{sub 2}O nor CH{sub 4} fluxes. Application of ammonia enhanced both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission, indicating that restoration of PPR wetlands may reduce both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission by cutting N-fertilizer input. Enhancement of CO{sub 2} emission by the N-fertilizer was observed, and this observation revealed an overlooked fact that application of N-fertilizer may potentially increase CO{sub 2} emission. In addition, the CO{sub 2} results also demonstrate that wetland restoration sequesters atmospheric carbon not only by turning soil conditions from aerobic to anoxic, but also by cutting N-fertilizer input that may enhance CO{sub 2} flux. The investigation on microbial community structure and population dynamics showed that under the experimental conditions restoration of the PPR wetlands would not dramatically increase population sizes of those microorganisms that produce N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}. Results of the in situ study proved that restoration of the PPR wetland significantly reduced CO{sub 2} flux. Ammonia enhanced the greenhouse gas emission and linearly correlated to the CO{sub 2} flux within the experimental rate range (46-200 kg N ha{sup -1}). The results also clarified that the overall reduction in global warming potential (GWP) by the PPR wetland restoration was mainly contributed from reduction in CO{sub 2} flux. These results demonstrate that restoration of currently farmed PPR wetlands will significantly reduce the overall GWP budget. Remote sensing investigations indicate that while the 15-meter resolution of the imagery was sufficient to delineate multiple zones in larger wetlands, it was not sufficient for correlation with the ground-based gas flux measurement data, which were collected primarily for smaller wetland sites (<250 meters) in the areas evaluated by this task. To better evaluate the feasibility of using satellite imagery to quantify wetland gas flux, either higher-resolution satellite imagery or gas flux data from larger wetland sites is needed.

Dingyi Ye; Bethany Kurz; Marc Kurz

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low-Temperature Penetration Depth of {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN) {sub 2}]Br and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present high-precision measurements of the penetration depth of single crystals of {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} at temperatures down to 0.4 K. We find that, at low temperatures, the in-plane penetration depth ({lambda}{sub (parallel} {sub sign)}) varies as a fractional power law, {lambda}{sub (parallel} {sub sign)}{approx}T{sup (3/2)}. While this may be taken as evidence for novel pair excitation processes, we show that the data are also consistent with a quasilinear variation of the superfluid density, as is expected for a d -wave superconductor with impurities or a small residual gap. Our data for the interplane penetration depth show similar features and give a direct measurement of the absolute value, {lambda}{sub (perpendicular} {sub sign)}(0)=100{+-}20 {mu}m . (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

Carrington, A.; Bonalde, I. J.; Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Kini, A. M.; Schlueter, J.; Wang, H. H.; Geiser, U.; Williams, J. M.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Muon-spin-relaxation measurements of magnetic penetration depth in organic superconductors (BEDT-TTF) sub 2 - X : X =Cu(NCS) sub 2 and Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic-field penetration depth {lambda} in the organic superconductors {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2} Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2} Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br has been measured over a wide temperature region 20 mK{le}{ital T}{le}15 K via the muon-spin-relaxation technique. Linear variation of {lambda} with {ital T} at low temperatures, found in both systems, is consistent with anisotropic superconducting pairings with line nodes in the energy gap. In the latter compound, we observe flux depinning at {ital T}{similar to}5 K, well below {ital T}{sub {ital c}}=12 K.

Le, L.P.; Luke, G.M.; Sternlieb, B.J.; Wu, W.D.; Uemura, Y.J. (Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)); Brewer, J.H.; Riseman, T.M. (Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)); Stronach, C.E. (Department of Physics, Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia 23803 (United States)); Saito, G.; Yamochi, H. (Department of Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606 (Japan)); Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M. (Chemistry and Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States))

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisCh 6 Regiospecific Analysis of Triacylglycerols using Hi Performance Liquid Chromatography/AtmosphericPressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Ch 6 Regiospecific Analysis of Triacylglycerols using Hi Performance Liquid Chromatography/AtmosphericPressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books

319

Dry etching of CoFe films using a CH{sub 4}/Ar inductively coupled plasma for magnetic random access memory application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the CoFe thin film was studied using an inductively coupled plasma system in CH{sub 4}-based gas chemistries. The etch rate of the CoFe thin film was systemically studied by the process parameters including the gas mixing ratio, the rf power, the dc-bias power, and the process pressure. The best gas composition for etching was in CH{sub 4} (20%)/Ar (80%) ratio. As the rf power and the dc-bias voltage were increased, the etch rate of the CoFe thin film increased in a CH{sub 4}/Ar inductively coupled plasma system. The best process pressure condition for etching was 10 mTorr in the CH{sub 4}/Ar inductively coupled plasma system. The changes in the components on the surface of the CoFe thin film were investigated with energy dispersive x ray.

Um, Doo-Seung; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Woo, Jong-Chang; Kim, Chang-Il; Lee, Sung-Kwon; Jung, Tae-Woo; Moon, Seung-Chan [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1, Ami-ri, Bubal-eub, Icheon-si, Kyoungki-do 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & PracticeCh 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & Practice Ch 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Dete

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseCh 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Ch 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

322

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6 Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Book

323

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH[subscript 3]CCl[subscript 3] using atmospheric trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its amendments came into effect, growth rates of the major ozone depleting substances (ODS), particularly CFC-11, -12 and -113 and CH[subscript ...

O'Doherty, S.

324

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsCh 15 High-Oleic, Low-Saturate Soybeans Offer a Sustainable and Nutritionally Enhanced Solution for Food Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Ch 15 High-Oleic, Low-Saturate Soybeans Offer a Sustainable and Nutritionally Enhanced Solution for Food Applications Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Food Science Health Nutrition Bi

325

C?H Bond Activation by Pd-substituted CeO[subscript 2]: Substituted Ions versus Reduced Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substituted metal oxides containing ionic species have been attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential ability to reduce the usage of precious metals in heterogeneous catalysts. We investigate Pd-substituted CeO{sub 2} for C-H bond activation reactions including the partial oxidation and dry reforming of CH{sub 4}. This catalyst has been previously studied for CO oxidation, NO{sub x} reduction, and the water-gas shift reaction. Pd-substituted CeO{sub 2}, Ce{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}}, was prepared as a powder with high surface area and a hollow sphere morphology using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The catalysts were extensively characterized using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and other techniques, confirming phase pure samples up to 10 mol % Pd substitution. Ce{sub 0.95}Pd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2-{delta}} was found to be active for partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} around 500 C and higher. Our studies, including postcatalytic synchrotron diffraction, suggest that the single-phase Ce{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} material is not the active species and that catalysis occurs instead over the reduced two-phase Pd{sup 0}/CeO{sub 2}. This observation has been further confirmed by verifying the activity of the reduced Pd{sup 0}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation, a reaction that is known to require Pd{sup 0}.

Misch, Lauren M.; Kurzman, Joshua A.; Derk, Alan R.; Kim, Young-Il; Seshadri, Ram; Metiu, Horia; McFarland, Eric W.; Stucky, Galen D. (Yeungnam); (UCSB)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

MonChER: Monte-Carlo generator for CHarge Exchange Reactions. Version 1.1. Physics and Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MonChER is a Monte Carlo event generator for simulation of single and double charge exchange reactions in proton-proton collisions at energies from 0.9 to 14 TeV. Such reactions, $pp\\to n+X$ and $pp\\to n+X+n$, are characterized by leading neutron production. They are dominated by $\\pi^+$ exchange and could provide us with more information about total and elastic $\\pi^+ p$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^+$ cross sections and parton distributions in pions in the still unexplored kinematical region.

R. A. Ryutin; A. E. Sobol; V. A. Petrov

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo SinaL report, pattisulerly dfh, raqmot b dto evaluation. 8. A eixdtoirth~atension primarily to inauro havlrg Chealeo &&able . fbroowultationonWtj0 ~itoevaluation~rkforthet&wto Bsddw Timoveoy ?lant, but 980 to keep Chemioo avsilable for dmelopm~t ark on the alternate oatbanatie mtoolaw leaoh proosa80 DIECDBfiIOH Be are requesting anamndcmntto o&end CoatmotAT(W&-1489 with the Chmaloal Qonstruobloon Cor;orhlon. 455 L(adloonAve., !JewYork, P, York. This lr a CPFF Coatmot primarily for reaenrgh and devolopnmt to prorLdo l proossr for our 'IFas% Reeldues Reomery Program. VIWZ haa beenpo3Qo~~urderbhllCo~tatthsLin&rm, RuuJerseylabomt.ory of the Cheaical ConatruotionCorporation mad at Chctnioal Construotlon

328

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Title Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Cheng, Robert K., David Littlejohn, P. A. Strakey, and T. Sidwell Journal Science Direct Abstract Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P0 < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T0 < 580K, 18 < U0 < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H2 at up to f = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H2 fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H2. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H2. The change in the flame position with increasing H2 concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NOx emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

329

Unusual behavior in the upper critical magnetic fields of the ambient-pressure organic superconductor. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br (where BEDT-TTF represents bis(ethylenedithio) tetrathiofulvalene)  

SciTech Connect

We report a determination of the temperature dependence of the upper critical magnetic fields {ital H}{sub {ital c}2} for {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br, with the use of dc-magnetization measurements that show a well-defined diamagnetic onset. We find large slopes of {minus}20 T/K and {minus}2.2 T/K for {bold H}{parallel}{ital ac} and {bold H}{parallel}{ital b}, respectively, which lead to coherence lengths of 37 and 4 A. There is unusual structure in the critical fields and a possible dimensional crossover at {ital T}/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{approximately}0.97 for {bold H}{parallel}{ital ac}. Neither the slopes nor the structure are observable in the superconducting transition measured by ac magnetoresistance, which exhibits strong magnetic-field broadening similar to that of the high-{Tc} copper oxide superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}. We find a strong depression of {ital T}{sub {ital c}}, as large as 1.2 K, when the sample is rapidly cooled.

Kwok, W.K.; Welp, U.; Carlson, K.D.; Crabtree, G.W.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M.; Stupka, D.L.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA) Chemistry Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Structure-property relationships for. beta. - and. kappa. -phase BEDT-TTF salts and their use in the synthesis of. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ambient pressure organic superconductor, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br, has been discovered with an inductive onset {Tc} = 11.6 {plus minus} 0.1 K (resistive onset = 12.5 {plus minus} 0.1 K). The anion in the new salt consists of a polymeric mixed (halide)(pseudohalide)cuprate(I) species. Because of the large number of metal/halide/pseudohalide substitutions that can be made in this anionic species, it opens up an entirely new conceptual approach to the design of additional conducting and superconducting (with even higher {Tc}'s) cation-radical salts by use of planar polymeric anions. Studies along these lines are currently under way in our laboratory. It is also becoming increasingly clear that in terms of structure (both are layered superconductors) and the physics (both are type II-superconductors with anisotropic coherence lengths, anisotropic H{sub c2}, and in which superconductivity is competing with magnetic ground states, etc.),the organic superconductors are more similar to the high-{Tc} oxide superconductors than to other classes of superconductors. Thus, the prospects for discovering high-{Tc} in organic systems appear very bright

Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Geiser, U.; Wang, Hau H.; Carlson, K.D.; Kwok, W.K.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Thompson, J.E.; Stupka, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Jung, D.; Whangbo, M.H. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in Air Samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Montaña de Oro, California, USA (January 2004) image Abstract graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Stanley C. Tyler Department of Earth System Science University of California Irvine, CA DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1022 Description and Methods Air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado (41°N, 105°W) and Montaña de Oro, CA (35°N, 121°W) have been collected at approximately semi-monthly to monthly intervals since the mid 1990s. The beginning dates for each gas and isotope analyzed are as follows: GASLAB Flask Sampling Network Data Available (April 2003) Gas or isotope Niwot Ridge Montaña de Oro

332

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and CO-CH{sub 4} systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH{sub 2}N{sub 2}), and its radical fragment (HCN{sub 2}); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the azide radical (N{sub 3}). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

Influence of the Particle Formation and Behavior on the Electrical Parameters in Low Pressure Radio-Frequency CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle formation in low pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} discharges results from the gas decomposition and from the sputtering of the powered electrode. The particle formation and behavior are strongly modified with the nitrogen amount increase in the mixture. The observation of the particles in the CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} mixture containing 70% of N{sub 2} reveals a particular particle behavior. The particle behavior is correlated with the electrical parameters of the discharge.

Pereira, J.; Massereau-Guilbaud, V.; Geraud-Grenier, I.; Plain, A. [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences, Universite d'Orleans, Site de Bourges, rue G. Berger, BP 4043, 18028 BOURGES CEDEX (France)

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Books and book chapters (last 10 years only) 16. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. Ch. 5 (invited). Forages in Organic Crop-Livestock Systems. pp. 85-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Books and book chapters (last 10 years only) 16. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. Ch. 5 (invited). Forages, Agriculture, and Engineering Service, Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. (Peer-reviewed book chapter) 12 Service, Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. (Peer-reviewed book chapter) 11. Clark, E. Ann. 2004 . GM

Clark, E. Ann

335

New k-phase materials, k-(ET) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )X: X = Cl, Br and I: The synthesis, structure and superconductivity above 11 K in the Cl ( Tc = 12. 8 K, 0. 3 kbar) and Br( Tc = 11. 6 K) salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The syntheses, structures, selected physical properties, and band electronic structures of three copper (I) dicyanamide halide salts of bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene ({kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})X, where X = Cl, Br, and I) are discussed. X-ray crystallographic studies demonstrate that the three derivatives are isostructural. The bromide salt is an ambient pressure superconductor with an inductive onset at 11.6 K and a resistive onset at 12.5 K. {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Cl exhibits the highest reported superconducting transition temperature ({Tc} = 12.8 K, 0.3 kbar) for an organic superconductor, once a semiconductor-semiconductor transition (42 K) is suppressed. The application of GE varnish or Apiezon N grease to crystals of {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Cl provides sufficient stress to induce superconductivity at ambient pressure.'' Crystals of the iodide remain metallic to {approximately}150 K, where they become weakly semiconductive. No sign of superconductivity was detected at pressures (hydrostatic and shearing) up to 5.2 kbar and at temperatures as low as 1.1 K. The band electronic structures of the three salts are essentially identical. The differences in superconducting properties are explained in terms of differences in lattice softness, which are strongly influenced by short C-H{hor ellipsis}donor and C-H{hor ellipsis}anion contacts. 17 refs., 2 figs.

Wang, H.H.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Schultz, A.J.; Williams, J.M.; Montgomery, L.K.; Kwok, W.K.; Welp, U.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Boryschuk, S.J.; Strieby Crouch, A.V.; Kommers, J.M.; Watkins, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schirber, J.E.; Overmyer, D.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Jung, D.; Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, M.H. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Senetas Corporation Ltd. CN6000 Series Encryptors:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Entries do not age and will remain in the ... The module does not support a maintenance role. ... used to encrypt and decrypt all subsequent directives. ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Microsoft Word - IN_CN.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL STRATEGY AND WORKFORCE HUMAN CAPITAL STRATEGY AND WORKFORCE PLAN OFFICE OF INTELLIGENCE and COUNTERINTELLIGENCE SEPTEMBER 8, 2006 SUMMARY Several significant changes have taken place during this fiscal year that have driven changes in the human capital arena. A new director for the Office of Intelligence came on board in November of 2005. On March 9, 2006, the Deputy Secretary approved the consolidation of the Office of Intelligence with the Office of Counterintelligence to form the new Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence. This initiative more than doubled the size of the former Office of Intelligence and brought intelligence operations in the Department into conformity with organization trends in the rest of the Intelligence Community. The consolidation placed all intelligence oversight in the Department under one

338

Microsoft Word - long-cn.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Flux Analysis: Adding Clear-Sky LW Next Generation Flux Analysis: Adding Clear-Sky LW and LW Cloud Effects, Cloud Optical Depths, and Improved Sky Cover Estimates C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The original Shortwave Flux Analysis (SWFA), based on Long and Ackerman (2000) and Long et al. (1999), deals only with daylight shortwave (SW) data. The SWFA algorithm produces continuous estimates of clear-sky downwelling diffuse, direct, and total SW; estimated fractional sky cover; and identification of when the sky was cloudless. This algorithm package is being produced as an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) value-added product (VAP), as described in Long and Gaustad (2001). Subsequent efforts for analysis of surface broadband radiation and meteorological measurements now

339

The European land and inland water CO2, CO, CH4 and N2O balance between 2001 and 2005  

SciTech Connect

Globally, terrestrial ecosystems have absorbed about 30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions over the period 2000-2007 and inter-hemispheric gradients indicate that a significant fraction of terrestrial carbon sequestration must be north of the Equator. We present a compilation of the CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O balances of Europe following a dual constraint approach in which (1) a land-based balance derived mainly from ecosystem carbon inventories and (2) a land-based balance derived from flux measurements are compared to (3) the atmospheric data-based balance derived from inversions constrained by measurements of atmospheric GHG (greenhouse gas) concentrations. Good agreement between the GHG balances based on fluxes (1294 {+-} 545 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}), inventories (1299 {+-} 200 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) and inversions (1210 {+-} 405 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) increases our confidence that the processes underlying the European GHG budget are well understood and reasonably sampled. However, the uncertainty remains large and largely lacks formal estimates. Given that European net land to atmosphere exchanges are determined by a few dominant fluxes, the uncertainty of these key components needs to be formally estimated before efforts could be made to reduce the overall uncertainty. The net land-to-atmosphere flux is a net source for CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, because the anthropogenic emissions by far exceed the biogenic sink strength. The dual-constraint approach confirmed that the European biogenic sink removes as much as 205 {+-} 72 Tg C yr{sup -1} from fossil fuel burning from the atmosphere. However, This C is being sequestered in both terrestrial and inland aquatic ecosystems. If the C-cost for ecosystem management is taken into account, the net uptake of ecosystems is estimated to decrease by 45% but still indicates substantial C-sequestration. However, when the balance is extended from CO{sub 2} towards the main GHGs, C-uptake by terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is offset by emissions of non-CO{sub 2} GHGs. As such, the European ecosystems are unlikely to contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

Luyassaert, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Abril, G [Laboratoire EPOC, CNRS; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Bastviken, D [Linkoping University; Bellassen, V [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Bergamaschi, P [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Bousquet, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Chevallier, F [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Ciais, P. [LSCE/CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Corazza, M [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Dechow, R [Johann Heinrich von Thnen Institute; Erb, K-H [Alpen-Adria Universitaet Klagenfurt-Vienna-Graz; Etiope, G [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia; Fortems-Cheiney, A [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Grassi, G [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Hartmann, J [University of Hamburg; Jung, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Lathiere, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Lohila, A [Finnish Meteorological institute; Mayorga, E [University of Washington; Moosdorf, N [University of Hamburg; Njakou, D [University of Antwerp; Otto, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; Peters, W [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Peylin, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Raymond, Peter A [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; Rodenbeck, C [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Saarnio, S [University of Eastern Finland; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Szopa, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Thompson, R [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Verkerk, P [European Forest Institute; Vuichard, N [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Wang, R [Peking University; Wattenbach, M [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre For Geosciences; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Photoelectron imaging of atomic chlorine and bromine following photolysis of CH{sub 2}BrCl  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoionization of chlorine and bromine atoms following photodissociation of CH{sub 2}BrCl was studied in the wavelength range of 231-238 nm by photoelectron imaging technique. Final state-specific speed and angular distributions of the photoelectron were recorded. Analysis of relative branching ratios to different levels of Cl{sup +} and Br{sup +} revealed that the final ion level distributions are generally dominated by the preservation of the ion-core configuration of the intermediate resonant state. Some J{sub c} numbers of the intermediate states were newly assigned according to this regulation. The configuration interaction between resonant states and the autoionization in the continuum were also believed to play an important role in the ionization process since some ions that deviate from the regulation mentioned ahead were observed. The angular distributions of the electrons were found to be well characterized by {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 4}, although the ionization process of chlorine and bromine atoms involves three photons.

Hua Linqiang; Shen Huan; Hu Changjin; Zhang Bing [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China) and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Polarization effects in low-energy electron-CH sub 4 elastic collisions in an exact exchange treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the polarization effects in very-low-energy (below 1 eV) electron- CH{sub 4} collisions in an exact-exchange treatment. The two models of the parameter-free polarization potential are employed; one, the {ital V}{sub pol}{sup JT} potential, introduced by Jain and Thompson (J. Phys. B 15, L631 (1982)), is based on an approximate polarized-orbital method, and two, the correlation-polarization potential {ital V}{sub pol}{sup CP}, first proposed by O'Connel and Lane (Phys. Rev. A 27, 1893 (1983)), is given as a simple analytic form in terms of the charge density of the target. In this rather very low-energy region, the polarization effects play a decisive role, particularly in creating structure in the differential cross section (DCS) and producing the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the total cross section. Our DCS at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 eV are compared with recent measurements. We found that a local parameter-free approximation for the polarization potential is quite successful if it is determined under the polarized-orbital-type technique rather than based on the correlation-polarization approach.

Jain, A.; Weatherford, C.A. (Department of Physics, Box 981, Florida A M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307 (USA)); Thompson, D.G.; McNaughten, P. (Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics The Queen's University, Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern (Ireland))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Photochemistry in a dense manifold of electronic states: Photodissociation of CH{sub 2}ClBr  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report electronically nonadiabatic dynamics calculations including spin-orbit coupling for the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}ClBr to yield Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}), Cl({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}), Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}), and Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}). The potential energy is a 24 Multiplication-Sign 24 matrix (divided up here into four 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 blocks in a first approximation to the problem), in a spin-coupled fully diabatic representation obtained by combining the spin-free fourfold way with single-center spin-orbit coupling constants. The spin-free calculations are carried out by multiconfiguration quasidegenerate perturbation theory, and the fully diabatic potentials including spin-orbit coupling are fit to a matrix reactive force field. The dynamics are carried out by the coherent switches with decay of mixing method in the diabatic representation. The results show qualitative agreement with experiment.

Valero, Rosendo [Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Truhlar, Donald G. [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States)

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Standort Treibstoff Abteilung Inverkehrssetzung Verantwortlich E-Mail Telefon Einstellhalle Chemie Nr. 95 Benzin Synkologie 01.11.2000 Alexander Strauss alex.strauss@iee.unibe.ch 031 631 3035  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie Nr. 95 Benzin Synökologie 01.11.2000 Alexander Strauss alex.strauss@iee.unibe.ch 031 631 3035 3035 Einstellhalle Chemie Nr. 92 Diesel Evolutionsökologie 8.02 Eduard Jutzi eduard.wymann@iee.unibe.ch 031 631 9135 Einstellhalle Chemie ? Populationsgenetik ?? 13.9.05 Susanne Tellenbach susanne

Richner, Heinz

344

269_CH06.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2013 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS prod-

345

CH Packaging Maintenance Manual  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions for performing inner containment vessel (ICV) and outer containment vessel (OCV) maintenance and periodic leakage rate testing on the following packaging seals and corresponding seal surfaces using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test. In addition, this procedure provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV structural pressure tests.

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

CH Packaging Program Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT Shipping Package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SAR P charges the WIPP Management and Operation (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize these operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the user with instructions for assembling a payload. All the steps in Subsections 1.2, Preparing 55-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.3, Preparing "Short" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT); 1.4, Preparing "Tall" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (HalfPACT only); 1.5, Preparing 100-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.6, Preparing SWB Payload Assembly; and 1.7, Preparing TDOP Payload Assembly, must be completed, but may be performed in any order as long as radiological control steps are not bypassed.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

CH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the WIPP management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document provides the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

CH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ch7_Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... enable Prototypes and pilot models of flat ... Distributed Multi-agent-based optimization Real-time Control ... a generic mathematical model of process ...

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling of microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} for diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} in a moderate-pressure quartz bell jar reactor used for diamond deposition are studied numerically. Special attention was devoted to high-power densities which provide the most effective way for producing high-quality diamond films. First, a one-dimensional radial model describing the coupled phenomena of chemistry, energy transfer, as well as species and energy transport along the reactor's radial coordinate was developed. Species densities predicted with the model were compared with measurements with infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy, resulting in validation of the model. Second, a one-dimensional axial model was used to describe the plasma flow along the reactor axis in a region between the reactor end wall and the substrate surface. This model was particularly useful for studying the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the substrate surface, where thermal and composition gradients are large. Both the radial and axial transport models are based on the same discharge model in which the plasma is described as a thermochemically nonequilibrium flow with different energy distributions for heavy species and electrons. The chemistry was described with a model containing 28 species and 131 reactions. The electron temperature, the gas temperature, and the species concentration were determined by solving a coupled set of equations. A wide range of experimental conditions used for diamond deposition was simulated, from low microwave power density (9 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 600 W, 2500 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}2200 K) to high-power density (30 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 2 kW, 12 000 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}3200 K). The main chemical paths were identified, and the major species, transport effects, and reaction pathways that govern diamond deposition plasmas are discussed.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Stancu, G.-D.; Mechold, L.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laser Components GmbH, 82140 Olching, Werner-von-Siemens-Strasse 15 (Germany); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations, April 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of Independent Oversight Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

353

Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations, April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Review of Oversight Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

354

Carbon isotopes in peat, DOC, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} in a Holocene peatland on Dartmoor, southwest England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon gases with younger {sup 14}C ages than those of the surrounding peat have been reported from continental boreal peatlands, a fact which suggests that significant movement of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and export of C via subsurface processes are not accounted for in most estimates of contributions to the C cycle. This paper tests the hypothesis that similar processes can occur in oceanic ombrotrophic mires where water and gas movement is theoretically minimal. Measurements of {sup 14}C and {delta}{sup 13}C in CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and DOC, and of tritium, are reported from depths to 250 cm at Tor Royal, a raised mire in southwest England. Radiocarbon ages of gases are 1,460 to 500 yr younger than those of peat from the same depths, and CO{sub 2} is consistently younger than CH{sub 4}. DOC is 1,260 to 830 yr younger than the peat, and significant amounts of tritium were found at all depths. Gas ages are mostly intermediate between the age of the peat and that of the DOC, which suggests that C is principally transported as DOC. However, some gases are younger than their associated DOC, which implies that movement of dissolved gases may also take place. {delta}{sup 13}C values in gases suggest that CO{sub 2} reduction is the major pathway for CH{sub 4} production. Transport of C in deep peats is likely to be a significant component in the overall C budget of ombrotrophic oceanic peatlands, and C export via discharge to ground or surface waters may be an important mechanism for gaseous C emissions.

Charman, D.J. [Univ. of Plymouth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geographical Sciences; Aravena, R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Bryant, C.L.; Harkness, D.D. [Natural Environment Research Council Radiocarbon Lab., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Microsoft PowerPoint - Energy Needs_rev2bg.pptx [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How much energy do we really need? How much energy do we really need? How much energy do we really need? Modern societies use an unbelievable amount of energy. Not just our houses and our gas tanks, but every thing we buy, eat, or use requires a lot of energy to make it available to us. Predicting future energy demand Information 1973 2011 Average Annual Growth Rate Energy - all types (million BTU per capita) 360 310 -0.36% Energy - all types (Quadrillion BTU) 76 97 0.66% Electrical energy (kW-hr per capita) 8,000 12,000 1.1% Electrical energy (GW-yr) 200 440 2.2% Population (million) 210 310 1.0% A lot of people with a lot of knowledge and expertise spend a lot of time trying to understand and predict this accurately in the near future. Their predictions vary widely. It doesn't take a crystal ball to understand roughly what we need decades from now. You only need to know the current situation and reasonable

356

ZooNotes 4: 1-4 (2009) ...4... www.zoonotes.bio.uni-plovdiv.bg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-optimal design in the regression context with uncorrelated measurement errors (see, e.g., Atkinson and Donev in Gaussian stochastic processes. Canadian Journal of Statistics 26: 127­137. Atkinson AC, Donev AN. 1992

Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

357

A Raw processor interface to an 802.11b/g RF front end  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Raw microprocessor is a tiled architecture processor designed by the Computer Architecture Group at MIT. Raw was designed in part to be extremely good at performing streaming-type algorithms such as those found in ...

Walker, Benjamin Philip Eugene Zaks

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Compiling and Linking on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetusVesta IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System...

359

Allinea DDT on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems...

360

Low Level UPC API on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetusVesta IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

HPCT HPM on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPM on BGP Systems References IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue GeneP - IBM Redbook describing HPCT and other performance tools High...

362

HTC Mode on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P compute nodes normally run parallel programs in a mode referred to as High Performance Computing (HPC) Mode. In HPC mode, a physical partition may run only one (1) parallel...

363

IBM HPCT on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBM HPCT on BGP Systems References IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue GeneP - IBM Redbook describing HPCT and other performance tools...

364

UPC Hardware on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V3.0 Overview of the IBM Blue GeneP project IBM System Blue Gene Solution: High Performance Computing Toolkit for Blue GeneP Introduction This section gives a low level...

365

The universe at extreme scale: multi-petaflop sky simulation on the BG/Q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Next-generation sky surveys will map billions of galaxies to ...

Salman Habib; Vitali Morozov; Hal Finkel; Adrian Pope; Katrin Heitmann; Kalyan Kumaran; Tom Peterka; Joe Insley; David Daniel; Patricia Fasel; Nicholas Frontiere; Zarija Luki?

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Running Jobs on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the OS, in which case the program continues to execute, but likely with a large performance penalty, or it may be left unhandled, in which case execution of the program is...

367

Activity of tungsten and rhenium filaments in CH sub 4 /H sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 /H sub 2 mixtures: Importance for diamond CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The resistance R, spectral emissivity {epsilon}, and power consumption of W and Re filaments heated to 2500 {degree}C in mixtures of CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} have been measured in a series of experiments focusing on the state of the filament activity, i.e., its ability to dissociate the reactant gases. It has been found that these properties of the filaments, as well as the partial pressures of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the reaction chamber, depend critically on both the filament temperature and the reactant ratio, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}. Specifically, both W and Re filaments show sharp jumps in power consumption at essentially the same temperature, signaling strong increases in filament activity and, hence, production of atomic hydrogen. These results are proposed to be due to the removal of non-reactive carbon from the surface of the filament via etching by atomic hydrogen and are consistent with the predictions of our thermodynamic model for the C-H system. Evidence for gas phase reactions is presented and the role of thermal diffusion is discussed. The emissivities of the W and Re filaments are observed to have significantly different temperature dependences which are attributed to differences in the phase diagrams for the W-C and Re-C systems. The implications of these results for hot-filament diamond CVD are discussed.

Sommer, M.; Smith, F.W. (Department of Physics, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nitrogen effect on the dust presence and behavior in a radio frequency CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we have studied the effects of the nitrogen percentage on particles generated in low pressure radio frequency CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} discharges. The particle behavior has been analyzed by laser beam extinction and scattering. The nitrogen percentage in the mixture influences the particle presence, behavior, and size in the discharge. For nitrogen percentages greater than 50%, we have evidenced a particle multigeneration and oscillations in particle clouds. These oscillations have been correlated with the discharge electrical parameters.

Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences, Universite d'Orleans, Site de Bourges, rue G. Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France)

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved biogenic gases (DMS, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}) in the equatorial Pacific during the SAGA 3 experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial Pacific Ocean is a source of both sulfur and carbon to the atmosphere. In February and March 1990, as part of the Soviet-American Gases and Aerosols (SAGA 3) expedition, dimethylsulfide (DMS), methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) partial pressures were determined in both surface seawater and the overlying atmosphere of the central equatorial Pacific Ocean (15{degrees}N to 10{degrees}S, 145{degrees}W to 165{degrees}W). The partial pressures were used to calculate the net flux of these gases from the ocean to the atmosphere. The average regional DMS and CO fluxes were similar, 7.1 and 4.2 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/d, respectively. The mixing ratio of CH{sub 4} in surface seawater was close to equilibrium with the overlying atmosphere and hence the average flux was only 0.39 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/d. The flux of CO{sub 2} clearly dominated the air-sea carbon exchange with an average regional flux of 5.4 mmol/m{sup 2}/d. 64 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Bates, T.S.; Johnson, J.E. [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kelly, K.C. [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Piloted jet flames of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/air: Experiments on localized extinction in the near field at high Reynolds numbers  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of temperature and major species concentrations, based on the simultaneous line-imaged Raman/Rayleigh/CO-LIF technique, are reported for piloted jet flames of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} fuel with varying amounts of partial premixing with air (jet equivalence ratios of {phi}{sub j} = 3.2, 2.5, 2.1 corresponding to stoichiometric mixture fraction values of {xi}{sub st} = 0.35, 0.43, 0.50, respectively) and varying degrees of localized extinction. Each jet flame is operated at a fixed and relatively high exit Reynolds number (60,000 or 67,000), and the probability of localized extinction is increased in several steps by progressively decreasing the flow rate of the pilot flame. Dimensions of the piloted burner, originally developed at Sydney University, are the same as for previous studies. The present measurements complement previous results from piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames as targets for combustion model calculations by extending to higher Reynolds number, including more steps in the progression of each flame from a fully burning state to a flame with high probability of local extinction, and adding the degree of partial premixing as an experimental parameter. Local extinction in these flames occurs close to the nozzle near a downstream location of four times the jet exit diameter. Consequently, these data provide the additional modeling challenge of accurately representing the initial development of the reacting jet and the near-field mixing processes. (author)

Barlow, R.S. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Ozarovsky, H.C.; Lindstedt, R.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7-2AZ (United Kingdom); Karpetis, A.N. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 778453-3141 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling of Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond chemical vapor deposition in a bell-jar cavity reactor were characterized by both experimental and modeling investigations. Discharges containing 1% CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} percentages ranging between 2% and 7% were analyzed as a function of the input microwave power under a pressure of 200 mbar. Emission spectroscopy and broadband absorption spectroscopy were carried out in the UV-visible spectral range in order to estimate the gas temperature and the C{sub 2} density within the plasma. Infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was achieved in order to measure the mole fractions of carbon-containing species such as CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. A thermochemical model was developed and used in order to estimate the discharge composition, the gas temperature, and the average electron energy in the frame of a quasihomogeneous plasma assumption. Experiments and calculations yielded consistent results with respect to plasma temperature and composition. A relatively high gas temperature ranging between 3000 and 4000 K is found for the investigated discharge conditions. The C{sub 2} density estimated from both experiments and modeling are quite high compared with what is generally reported in the literature for the same kind of plasma system. It ranges between 10{sup 13} and 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} in the investigated power range. Infrared absorption measurements and model predictions indicate quite low densities of methane and acetylene, while the atomic carbon density calculated by the model ranges between 10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The methane and hydrogen introduced in the feed gas are subject to a strong dissociation, which results in a surprisingly high H-atom population with mole fraction ranging between 0.04 and 0.16. Result analysis shows that the power coupling efficiency would range between 70% and 90%, which may at least explain the relatively high values obtained, as compared with those reported in the literature for similar discharges, for gas temperature and C{sub 2} population. The high H-atom densities obtained in this work would indicate that growing nanocrystalline diamond films would experience a very high etching. Simulation results also confirm that sp species would play a key role in the surface chemistry that governs the diamond growth.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Benedic, F.; Mohasseb, F.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, UPR 1311 CNRS, Universite Paris 13, 99 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, UPR 1311 CNRS, Universite Paris 13, 99 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ab initio wavenumber accurate spectroscopy : {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN vibrational levels on automatically generated IMLS potential energy surfaces.  

SciTech Connect

We report here calculated J = 0 vibrational frequencies for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN with root-mean-square error relative to available measurements of 2.0 cm{sup -1} and 3.2 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These results are obtained with DVR calculations with a dense grid on ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). The ab initio electronic structure calculations employed are Davidson-corrected MRCI calculations with double-, triple-, and quadruple-{zeta} basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. In the {sup 1}CH{sub 2} case, Full CI tests of the Davidson correction at small basis set levels lead to a scaling of the correction with the bend angle that can be profitably applied at the CBS limit. Core-valence corrections are added derived from CCSD(T) calculations with and without frozen cores. Relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer corrections are available for HCN and were applied. CBS limit CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations with the same basis sets were also tried for HCN. The CCSD(T) results are noticeably less accurate than the MRCI results while the CASPT2 results are much poorer. The PESs were generated automatically using the local interpolative moving least-squares method (L-IMLS). A general triatomic code is described where the L-IMLS method is interfaced with several common electronic structure packages. All PESs were computed with this code running in parallel on eight processors. The L-IMLS method provides global and local fitting error measures important in automatically growing the PES from initial ab initio seed points. The reliability of this approach was tested for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} by comparing DVR-calculated vibrational levels on an L-IMLS ab initio surface with levels generated by an explicit ab initio calculation at each DVR grid point. For all levels ({approx}200) below 20000 cm{sup -1}, the mean unsigned difference between the levels of these two calculations was 0.1 cm{sup -1}, consistent with the L-IMLS estimated mean unsigned fitting error of 0.3 cm{sup -1}. All L-IMLS PESs used in this work have comparable mean unsigned fitting errors, implying that fitting errors have a negligible role in the final errors of the computed vibrational levels with experiment. Less than 500 ab initio calculations of the energy and gradients are required to achieve this level of accuracy.

Dawes, R.; Wagner, A. F.; Thompson, D. L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Missouri at Columbia

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

A description of NUEXS, an upgrade of the code FCUP used to compute proton recoil current from CH{sub 2} foils  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, FCUP, developed by A. Craft computes currents of recoil protons from a time- and energy-dependent neutron flux striking a CH{sub 2} foil. Three problem areas need to be addressed to extend the code`s usefulness. First, FCUP computes a response that is not time dependent; that is, only the input time bin is broadened to account for the finite time distribution of protons from a single neutron energy; second, the time coordinate of the signal predicted is translated arbitrarily rather than absolutely relative to the time of maximum neutron production in the source; and third, the code does not account for electron pickup by protons at low proton energies in the target and absorber foils. This report describes the changes in calculational method used to overcome these problems.

Stelts, M.L.; Wood, B.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using Inert Gas Permeation: II. Diffusion of AR, KR, Xe, and CH4 through Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an experimental technique to measure the diffusivity of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their Tg. The approach uses the permeation of inert gases through supercooled liquid overlayers as a measure of the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid itself. The desorption spectra of the probe gas is used to extract the low temperature supercooled liquid diffusivities. In the preceding companion paper, we derived equations using ideal model simulations from which the diffusivity could be extracted using the desorption peak times for isothermal or peak temperatures for TPD experiments. Here, we discuss the experimental conditions for which these equations are valid and demonstrate their utility using amorphous methanol with Ar, Kr, Xe, and CH4 as probe gases. The approach offers a new method by which the diffusivities of supercooled liquids can be measured in the experimentally challenging temperature regime near the glass transition temperature.

Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Projectile fragment emission in fragmentation of $^{56}$Fe on C, Al,and CH$_{2}$ targets at 471 A MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emission angle and the transverse momentum distributions of projectile fragments produced in fragmentation of $^{56}$Fe on CH$_{2}$, C, and Al targets at 471 A MeV are measured. It is found that for the same target the average value and width of angular distribution decrease with increase of the projectile fragment charge, and for the same projectile fragment the average value of the distribution increases and the width of the distribution decreases with increasing the target charge number. The transverse momentum distribution of projectile fragment can be explained by a single Gaussian distribution and the averaged transverse momentum per nucleon decreases with the increase of the charge of projectile fragment. The cumulated squared transverse momentum distribution of projectile fragment can be well explained by a single Rayleigh distribution. The temperature parameter of emission source of projectile fragment, calculated from the cumulated squared transverse momentum distribution, decreases with the increase of the size of projectile fragment.

Y. J. Li; D. H. Zhang; S. W. Yan; L. C. Wang; J. X. Cheng; J. S. Li; S. Kodaira; N. Yasuda

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Real-Time Cardiac Imaging at 3 Tesla K.S. NAYAK, C.H. CUNNINGHAM, J.M. SANTOS, J.M. PAULY, AND D.G. NISHIMURA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-Time Cardiac Imaging at 3 Tesla K.S. NAYAK, C.H. CUNNINGHAM, J.M. SANTOS, J.M. PAULY, AND D are shown in Figure 2. Conclusions We have demonstrated real-time cardiac imaging at 3 Tesla with high SNR

Nayak, Krishna

377

Conversion of CH4/CO2 to syngas over Ni-Co/Al2O3-ZrO2 nanocatalyst synthesized via plasma assisted co-impregnation method: Surface properties and catalytic performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ni/Al2O3 catalyst promoted by Co and ZrO2 was prepared by co-impregnation method and treated with glow discharge plasma. The catalytic activity of the synthesized nanocatalysts has been tested toward conversion of CH4/CO2 to syngas. The physicochemical characterizations like XRD EDX

Nader Rahemi; Mohammad Haghighi; Ali Akbar Babaluo; Mahdi Fallah Jafari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A theoretical analysis of the CH{sub 3} + H reaction : isotope effects, the high pressure limit, and transition state recrossing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of methyl radicals with hydrogen atoms is studied with a combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition state theory, and classical trajectory simulations. The interaction between the two radicals, including the umbrella mode of the methyl radical, is examined at the CAS+1+2 level using an augmented correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta basis set. The implementation of an analytic representation of the ab initio data within variable reaction coordinate transition state theory yields predictions for the zero-pressure limit isotopic exchange rate constants that are about 15% greater than the available experimental data. Trajectory simulations indicate that the transition state recrossing factor for the capture process is 0.90, essentially independent of temperature and isotope. The dynamically corrected theoretical prediction for the CH{sub 3} + H high pressure rate coefficient is well reproduced by the expression 1.32 x 10{sup -10}T{sup 0.153}exp(-15.1/RT) cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}, where R = 1.987 cal mole{sup -1} K{sup -1}, for temperatures between 200 and 2400 K. This prediction is in good agreement with the converted experimental data for all but the one measurement at 200 K. Calculations for the triplet abstraction channel suggest that it is unimportant. Methyl umbrella mode variations have surprisingly little effect on the predicted rate coefficients.

Klippenstein, S. J.; Georgievskii, Y.; Harding, L.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

LCLS_CDR-ch06  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Injector TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The injector for the LCLS is required to produce a single 150-MeV bunch of charge 1.0 nC and 100 A peak current at a repetition rate of 120 Hz with a normalized rms transverse emittance of 1.0 µm. The required emittance is about a factor of 2 lower than has been achieved to date. The design employs a solenoidal field near the cathode of a specially designed rf photocathode gun that allows the initial emittance growth due to space charge to be almost completely compensated by the end of the booster linac. Following the booster linac, the geometric emittance simply damps linearly with energy. PARMELA simulations show that this design will produce the desired normalized emittance. In addition to low emittance, there are two additional electron-beam requirements that pose

380

LCLS_CDR-ch10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 0 Conventional Facilities TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS takes advantage of the existing infrastructure at SLAC. It uses the last third of the existing 3 km linac including the existing enclosure and utilities. A new injector will be installed at sector 20 in the Off-Axis Injector Tunnel. This branch tunnel was constructed as part of the original construction at SLAC in the 1960s for just such an injector. The existing linac equipment including the klystrons and modulators will be used. The injector tunnel will require some modifications to bring it to current safety standards and to accommodate the specific requirements of the LCLS injector. Two short sections of linac will be removed to accommodate the magnets and vacuum chambers for the two pulse compressors. New systems to bring power and water to these

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CB_Ch16.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

382

CB_Ch05.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

383

CB_Ch13.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

384

CB_Ch03.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

385

CB_Ch15.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

386

CB_Ch04.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

387

ARM - Datastreams - nfov2ch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shouxian, Anhui, China PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA...

388

CB_Ch07.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

389

CB_Ch08.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

390

CB_Ch14.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

391

Ch. 33 Modeling: Computational Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter considers methods and techniques for computational modeling for nuclear materials with a focus on fuels. The basic concepts for chemical thermodynamics are described and various current models for complex crystalline and liquid phases are illustrated. Also included are descriptions of available databases for use in chemical thermodynamic studies and commercial codes for performing complex equilibrium calculations.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CB_Ch18.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

393

CB_Ch17.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

394

CB_Ch19.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

395

CB_Ch10.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

396

CB_Ch09.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

397

CB_Ch02.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

398

CB_Ch01.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS prod-

399

CB_Ch12.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

400

CB_Ch20.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CB_Ch11.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

402

ch07wrkg.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 5 Work Breakdown Structure TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is used for defining work packages and developing and tracking the cost and schedule for the project. The work is broken down into tasks, each of which has a manager, a responsible institution, costs and schedule, technical scope, and, to the extent possible, a specific geographic piece of the machine. Each level 3 element has a Task Manager who is responsible for the execution of the project plans for that element. The Task Manager is responsible for translating system performance requirements into design choices for the LCLS technical systems. He/she is also responsible for control of cost and schedule, quality and safety, and documentation. Performance requirements for systems at level 3 and below will be established and advocated

403

Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} interconversion in hydrocarbon/H{sub 2} gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H{sub 2} gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm{sup -1} using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H{sub 2} plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400CH{sub 4} is favored in the more distant regions where T{sub gas}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion, whereas the reverse C{sub 2}H{sub 2}->CH{sub 4} process only requires H atoms to drive the reactions; H atoms are not consumed by the overall conversion.

Ma Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mankelevich, Yuri A. [Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Towards Parallel Access of Multi-dimensional, Multi-resolution Scientific Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/P (BG/P) system at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National LaboratoryCH11357. This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne, Robert Latham, Tom Peterka, Michael Papka, Robert Ross Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois

Utah, University of

405

Petascale Algorithms for Reactor Hydrodynamics Paul Fischer, James Lottes, David Pointer, and Andew Siegel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to P = 65, 000 processors on the IBM BG/P at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. 1. Introduction-AC02-06CH11357. Computer time on the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility was provided through a 2008 cores. The aim is to leverage petascale platforms at DOE's Leadership Computing Figure 1. Turbulence

Fischer, Paul F.

406

The classification of maps between the classifying spaces of Lie groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(i ) + Z(i ) - 1 - 2) J All this follows from the AtiyahHirzebruch results in [2J relating the complex representation ring, R(G) ) of a compact connected Lie group G t o KU (BG) 0 KUO(BSp (1) ~ Z[[.v(1) JJ from above. Put y = y (1) 0 17 Let Ch...

Mahmud, Zafer

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy of M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray Supernova Remnant in M33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and interpret new X-ray data for M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in M33. The SNR is in seen projection against (and appears to be interacting with) the bright Hii region NGC592. Data for this source were obtained as part of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) 1

Terrance J. Gaetz; William P. Blair; John P. Hughes; P. Frank Winkler; Knox S. Long; Thomas G; Benjamin Williams; Richard J. Edgar; Parviz Ghavamian; Paul P. Plucinsky; Manami Sasaki; Robert P. Kirshner; Miguel Avillez; Dieter Breitschwerdt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Microsoft Word - IG-0762 CN Property 032807 _3_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal Controls Over Computer Internal Controls Over Computer Property at the Department's Counterintelligence Directorate DOE/IG-0762 March 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries INTERNAL CONTROLS OVER COMPUTER PROPERTY AT THE DEPARTMENT'S COUNTERINTELLIGENCE DIRECTORATE TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 2 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Property Not Located 3 Property Not in Inventory 4 Expired Loan Documentation 5 Computers Not Properly Labeled 5 RECOMMENDATIONS 5 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 6 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 6 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 7 B. Prior Sensitive Property Reports 8 C. Management Comments 9

410

Synthesis and Spectroscopic Characterization of Si(B)CN ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol Jet Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed Electronic Applications ... Carbon Nanotube Coatings Laser Power and Energy Measurements ... Rational Tailoring of 1-D (Nanowires), 2-D (Graphene) and 3-D (Ceramic/Carbon...

411

An Empirical Analysis of Bulk Cn2 Models over Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines some of the difficulties associated with the determination of C2n over water in a coastal region using a bulk model. The analysis shows the need to supplement bulk models with elements that do not belong to traditional Monin...

Guy Potvin; Denis Dion; Jacques Claverie; Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; J. Luc Forand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

IAEA-CN-38/E-1 STARFIRE -A CONCEPTUAL DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pressure," U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG/CR-0330, April 1979. 12. M. C. Billone, "Progress

Abdou, Mohamed

413

New ambient pressure organic superconductors:. alpha. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 (NH sub 4 )Hg(SCN) sub 4 ,. beta. m-(BEDO-TTF) sub 3 Cu sub 2 (NCS) sub 3 , and. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one hundred and twenty conducting salts based on the organic donor-molecule BEDT-TTF are known, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene (abbreviated herein as ET). Several of the early salts possessed tetrahedral and octahedral anions, such as (ET){sub 2}ClO{sub 4}(TCE), (ET){sub 2}PF{sub 6}, (ET){sub 2}ReO{sub 4}, and (ET){sub 2}BrO{sub 4}. The perchlorate salt is metallic to 1.4 K,{sup 1} and the perrenate derivative was the first ET based organic superconductor ({Tc} 2 K, 4.5 kbar). Since the discovery of ambient pressure superconductivity in {beta}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} ({Tc} 1.4 K),{sup 5} other isostructural {beta}-(ET){sub 2}X salts have been prepared with higher {Tc}'s. A structure-property correlation for the {beta}-type salts has been reviewed in this volume; it predicts that {Tc}'s higher than 8K are possible if {beta}-salts with linear anions longer than I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} can be synthesized. During the search for new linear anions, a variety of compounds with discovered with polymeric anions. The report of superconductivity in {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}X{sub 8} (X = Cl, {Tc} 5.4 K 29 kbar and X = Br, {Tc} 4.3 K ambient pressure and 6.7 K 3.5 kbar) and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} 10.4 K) further stimulated the search for novel polymeric anions. A general synthetic strategy for preparing new salts containing polymeric anions is to couple a coordinatively unsaturated neutral transition metal halide/pseudohalide with a simple halide or pseudohalide during an electrocrystallization synthesis. In this article, the authors discuss three new ambient pressure organic superconductors with novel polymeric anions, {alpha}-(ET){sub 2}(NH{sub 4})Hg(SCN){sub 4}, {beta}m-(BO){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}(NCS){sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br. 48 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Wang, H.H.; Beno, M.A.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E.; Williams, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe2 byMonomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH: Experimental and Computational Support for a Carbenoid Mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction between [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, referred to as Cp'2CeH, andCH3X where X is Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe2, are described. The reactions fall intothree distinct classes. Class a, where X = Cl, Br and I rapidly form Cp'2CeX and CH4without formation of identifiable intermediates in the 1H NMR spectra. Class b, whereX = OMe proceeds rapidly to Cp'2Ce(eta2-CH2OMe) and H2 and then to Cp'2CeOMeand CH4. The methoxymethyl derivative is sufficiently stable to be isolated andcharacterized and it is rapidly converted to Cp'2CeOMe in presence of BPh3. Class c,where X = NMe2 does not result in formation of Cp'2CeNMe2, but deuterium labelingexperiments show that H for D exchange occurs in NMe3. Density functionalcalculations DFT(B3PW91) on the reaction of (C5H5)2CeH, referred to as Cp2CeH,and CH3X show that the barrier for alpha-CH activation, resulting in formation ofCp2Ce(eta2-CH2X), proceeds with a relatively low activation barrier (DeltaG++) but thesubsequent ejection of CH2 and trapping by H2 has a higher barrier; the height of thesecond barrier lies in the order F, Cl, Br, I< OMe<< NMe2, consistent with theexperimental studies. The DFT calculations also show that the two-step reaction,which proceeds through a carbenoid intermediate, has a lower barrier than a directone-step sigma bond metathesis mechanism. The reaction of Cp2CeCH2OMe and BPh3 is calculated to be a low barrier process and the ylide, CH2(+)BPh3(-), is a transition state and not an intermediate.

Werkema, Evan; Andersen, Richard; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

H{sub 2}(v = 0,1) + C{sup +}({sup 2} P) {yields} H+CH{sup +} STATE-TO-STATE RATE CONSTANTS FOR CHEMICAL PUMPING MODELS IN ASTROPHYSICAL MEDIA  

SciTech Connect

State-to-state rate constants for the title reaction are calculated using the electronic ground state potential energy surface and an accurate quantum wave-packet method. The calculations are performed for H{sub 2} in different rovibrational states, v = 0, 1 and J = 0 and 1. The simulated reaction cross section for v = 0 shows a rather good agreement with the experimental results of Gerlich et al., both with a threshold of 0.36 eV and within the experimental error of 20%. The total reaction rate coefficients simulated for v = 1 are two times smaller than those estimated by Hierl et al. from cross sections measured at different temperatures and neglecting the contribution from v > 1 with an uncertainty factor of two. Thus, part of the disagreement is attributed to the contributions of v > 1. The computed state-to-state rate coefficients are used in our radiative transfer model code applied to the conditions of the Orion Bar photodissociation region, and leads to an increase of the line fluxes of high-J lines of CH{sup +}. This result partially explains the discrepancies previously found with measurements and demonstrates that CH{sup +} excitation is mostly driven by chemical pumping.

Zanchet, Alexandre; Bulut, Niyazi; Roncero, Octavio [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Godard, B.; Cernicharo, Jose [Centro de Astrobilogia, CSIC-INTA, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Astrobilogia, CSIC-INTA, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Halvick, Philippe, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS UMR 5255, 351 cours de la Liberation, F-33405 Talence Cedex (France)] [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS UMR 5255, 351 cours de la Liberation, F-33405 Talence Cedex (France)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled-plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the ZnO/GaN heterojunction light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

This article reports fabrication of n-ZnO photonic crystal/p-GaN light emitting diode (LED) by nanosphere lithography to further booster the light efficiency. In this article, the fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals is carried out by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gas gives high etching rate of n-ZnO film, which yields a better surface morphology and results less plasma-induced damages of the n-ZnO film. Optimal ZnO lattice parameters of 200 nm and air fill factor from 0.35 to 0.65 were obtained from fitting the spectrum of n-ZnO/p-GaN LED using a MATLAB code. In this article, we will show our recent result that a ZnO photonic crystal cylinder has been fabricated using polystyrene nanosphere mask with lattice parameter of 200 nm and radius of hole around 70 nm. Surface morphology of ZnO photonic crystal was examined by scanning electron microscope.

Chen, Shr-Jia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Kao, Jiann-Shiun; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng [Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 300 Taiwan (China); Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Spectroscopic determination of C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas for nanocrystalline diamond synthesis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have measured the steady state concentration of gas phase C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. High sensitivity white light absorption spectroscopy is used to monitor the C{sub 2} density using the d{sup 3}II {l_arrow} A{sup 3}II (0,0) vibrational band of C{sub 2} as chamber pressure, microwave power, substrate temperature and feed gas mixtures are varied in both chemistries. Understanding how these parameters influence the C{sub 2} density in the plasma volume provides insight into discharge mechanisms relevant to the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond.

Goyette, A. N.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T. G.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Optical Properties of {beta}''-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} : a novel superconductor with large discrete counterions.''  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optical spectra of the organic superconductor {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} are measured over a wide spectral range (30-35000 cm{sup {minus}1}) as a function of temperature and polarization. The optical anisotropy is quite large compared with other ET-based organic superconductors, and the spectra are far from Drude-like over the full temperature range. A broad electronic band centered near 1000 cm{sup {minus}1} is observed at low temperature along the a axis, prior to the superconducting transition. The changes of vibrational features near 120 K are attributed to a weak reorientation of the counterion, which may affect hydrogen bonding in the material.

Dong, J.

1998-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

In-plane ESR microwave conductivity measurements and electronic band structure studies of the organic superconductor, {beta}'-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of the organic superconductor {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene) was characterized with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electronic band structure calculations. The room-temperature ESR line width is 24-27 G in the plane of a donor molecule layer (i.e., in the ab-plane) and {approx}32 G along the normal to this plane (i.e., along the c*-direction). The ab-plane anisotropy of the microwave conductivity was extracted for the first time from the ESR Dysonian line shape analysis. The in-plane conductivity varies sinusoidally, is maximal along the interstack direction (b-axis), and is minimal along the donor stack direction (a-axis). The Fermi surfaces of the title compound consist of a 2D hole pocket and a pair of 1D wavy lines. The directions for the in-plane conductivity maximum and minimum are in excellent agreement with the electronic band structure calculated for {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, and the origin of the in-plane conductivity anisotropy lies in the one-dimensional part of the Fermi surface. This is the first time that an organic conductor shows Dysonian ESR line shape due to its 2D and strongly metallic nature, yet the 1D character is revealed simultaneously through the in-plane conductivity anisotropy.

Wang, H. H.; VanZile, M. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A. M.; Sche, P. P.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Nixon, P. G.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.; Chemistry; North Carolina State Univ.; Portland State Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optical studies of the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}RSO{sub 3} R = CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}, CHFCF{sub 2} and CHF system: Chemical tuning of the counterion  

SciTech Connect

The authors compare the polarized optical spectra of the organic metal {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFSO{sub 3} and the {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material with those of the first fully organic superconductor {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. The small chemical modification of the counterion has a dramatic effect on the spectral and charge transport properties of these materials, and they discuss their electronic structure in terms of band structure, many-body effects, and disorder. Based on structural differences in the anion pocket of the three salts, they conclude that the unusual electronic excitations observed in the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material are caused by disorder-related localization.

Olejniczak, I.; Jones, B. R.; Dong, J.; Pigos, J. M.; Zhu, Z.; Garlach, A. D.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Schlueter, J. A.; Ward, B. H.; Morales, E.; Kini, A. M.; Winter, R. W.; Mohtasham, J.; Gard, G. L.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energetics of Adsorbed CH3 and CH on Pt(111) by Calorimetry: Dissociative Adsorption of CH3I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidation of methane, steam reforming, combustion and selective oxidations of methane and various other of formation, the enthalpy for the dissociation of adsorbed methane to adsorbed methyl coadsorbed + 2 Had was found to be uphill by between +4 and +23 kJ/mol. Measured methane yields (which require

Campbell, Charles T.

422

CH Last Name CH First Name CH Center Office name Alexander Tina (HQ) International and Interagency Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director Bob Barto Sr. Inspector Doug McGinnis Sr. Inspector George Levinthal Project Manager Jeff Enge Sr. Inspector Mark Peppers Project Manager Peter Ryan Sr. Inspector Rick Whitehead Sr. Inspector Tom Haas Sr. Inspector Ray Aronson Associate Director Daniel Belding Project Manager Anne-Marie Nething Analyst 1 Dan

Christian, Eric

423

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUGUST 2007 6-1 AUGUST 2007 6-1 6.0 REFERENCES CHAPTER 1 BACKGROUND Brown, P. 2004. Climate Fear as CO 2 Soars. The Guardian Unlimited, Guardian Newspapers Limited. Manchester, England. http://www.guardian.co.uk/guardianweekly/story/0,,1327452,00.html. October 15, 2004. Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI). 2007. CMI in Brief: Building the Stabilization Triangle. http://www.princeton.edu/pr/news/04/q3/0812-carbon/backgrounder.pdf. Email from Roberta Hotinski on August 1, 2007. Energy Information Administration (EIA). 2005. Annual Energy Outlook 2005 with Projections to 2025 (Early Release). U.S. Department of Energy. Report # DOE/EIS-0383(2005). January 2005. Energy Information Administration (EIA). 2004. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States

424

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 3.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUGUST 2007 3-1 AUGUST 2007 3-1 3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE INFORMATION 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides environmental baseline information for different regions and individual states within the U.S. that could potentially host carbon sequestration projects. The following aspects will be discussed in this chapter: atmospheric resources, geologic resources, surface water resources, biological resources, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, land use, materials and waste management, health and safety, socioeconomics and infrastructure. 3.2 ATMOSPHERIC RESOURCES The following section describes baseline air quality with respect to the states within the Regional Partnerships and U.S. climate. 3.2.1 National Context Atmosphere is defined as the mixture of gases surrounding any celestial object that has a gravitational

425

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-1 5-1 5.0 SUBJECT INDEX A Acid Mine Drainage, 4-35 Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 4-60, 4-61, 4-64 Allison Unit, 2-53, 2-54, 2-58, 3-55, 3-56 American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA), 3-87, 4-60, 4-63 Archeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, 3-87, 4-60, 4-62, 4-63, 4-65 B Basalt Formations, 2-1, 2-9, 2-26, 2-77, 2-78, 2-80, 3-31, 4-9, 4-21, 4-34, 4-35, 4-48, 4-68, 4-69, 4-76, 4- 79, 4-86, 4-90, 4-98, 4-110, 4-120, 4-127 Best Available Control Technology, 4-7, 4-8, 4-9, 4-13, 4-14 Best Management Practices, 3-32, 4-1, 4-2, 4-13, 4-16, 4-17, 4-18, 4-19, 4-20, 4-21, 4-22, 4-23, 4-25, 4- 26, 4-27, 4-32, 4-33, 4-34, 4-35, 4-36, 4-41, 4-42, 4-48, 4-49, 4-51, 4-52, 4-57, 4-76, 4-88, 4-89, 4-122, 4- 123 Big Horn, 3-57 Black Warrior Basin, 3-57

426

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 7.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 7.0 GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS ACRONYM OR TERM DEFINITION µg/m 3 microgram per cubic meter µg/mL microgram per milliliter 132 Xe Xenon 132 1-hour average ozone concentrations the EPA air quality standard for ozone is 0.12 part per million for a 1-hour average 20 Ne Neon 20 36 Ar Argon 36 84 Kr Krypton 84 8-hour average ozone concentrations the EPA air quality standard for ozone, designed to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety, is 0.085 parts per million (ppm), averaged over 8 hours ac acres ACHP Advisory Council on Historic Preservation AEP American Electric Power afforestation the conversion of bare or cultivated land into forest AGR acid gas removal AHPA Archeological and Historic Preservation Act AIH American Institute of Hydrology

427

Microsoft Word - Ch1_PN_040611km  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bandon-Rogue Transmission Line Bandon-Rogue Transmission Line Rebuild Project Finding of No Significant Impact May 2011 This page left intentionally blank. Bonneville Power Administration 1 Bandon-Rogue Transmission Line Rebuild Project DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings DOE EA-1739 Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Bandon-Rogue Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Rebuild Project or Proposed Action). The Rebuild Project involves rebuilding the existing Bandon-Rogue 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The 46-mile-long transmission line is located in Coos and Curry counties in Oregon, extending from the city of Bandon to near Nesika Beach.

428

CH-ANL Report.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awareness Annual Refresher Briefi ng and the computerized Annual Security and Counterintelligence Refresher Briefi ng, respectively. The briefing material concerning...

429

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mitigation may be the replacement of wetlands in another suitable location. Most of the waste materials generated by this facility would be disposed of offsite in licensed...

430

Activating unreactive C-H bonds  

SciTech Connect

The procedures tested to attempt to reactivate carbon-hydrogen bonds in completely saturated organic compounds are discussed. Saturated hydrocarbons appear in petroleum, coal, in synthetic fuels produced by liquefaction of coal and other fossil fuels, and in synthetic fuels produced by Fisher-Tropsch chemistry from syngas. Their potential use as feedstocks for the chemical industry requires that the hydrocarbons be functionalized. The use of transition-metal complexes for the 'activation' process is discussed.

Maugh, T.H. II

1983-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

Moses, E

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy of M33SNR21, the Brightest X-ray Supernova Remnant in M33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and interpret new X-ray data for M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in M33. The SNR is in seen projection against (and appears to be interacting with) the bright HII region NGC592. Data for this source were obtained as part of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) Very Large Project. The nearly on-axis Chandra data resolve the SNR into a ~5" diameter (20 pc at our assumed M33 distance of 817+/-58 kpc) slightly elliptical shell. The shell is brighter in the east, which suggests that it is encountering higher density material in that direction. The optical emission is coextensive with the X-ray shell in the north, but extends well beyond the X-ray rim in the southwest. Modeling the X-ray spectrum with an absorbed sedov model yields a shock temperature of 0.46(+0.01,-0.02) keV, an ionization timescale of n_e t = $2.1 (+0.2,-0.3) \\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ s, and half-solar abundances (0.45 (+0.12, -0.09)). Assuming Sedov dynamics gives an average preshock H density of 1.7 +/- 0.3 cm$^{-3}$. The dynamical age estimate is 6500 +/- 600 yr, while the best fit $n_e t$ value and derived $n_e$ gives 8200 +/- 1700 yr; the weighted mean of the age estimates is 7600 +/- 600 yr. We estimate an X-ray luminosity (0.25-4.5 keV) of (1.2 +/- 0.2) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (absorbed), and (1.7 +/- 0.3) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (unabsorbed), in good agreement with the recent XMM-Newton determination. No significant excess hard emission was detected; the luminosity $\\le 1.2\\times 10^{35}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (2-8 keV) for any hard point source.

Terrance J. Gaetz; William P. Blair; John P. Hughes; P. Frank Winkler; Knox S. Long; Thomas G. Pannuti; Benjamin Williams; Richard J. Edgar; Parviz Ghavamian; Paul P. Plucinsky; Manami Sasaki; Robert P. Kirshner; Miguel Avillez; Dieter Breitschwerdt

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Load Pocket Forecasting Software E. A. Feinberg, D. Genethliou, J.T. Hajagos, B.G. Irrgang, and R. J. Rossin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity RequirementsElectricity Requirements Council Load Forecast and Portfolio Model Range 10000 15000 and Conservation Council for the Load Forecasting Advisory Committee Friday June 27, 2008 2 Overview Electricity RequirementsElectricity Requirements 5th Plan Non-DSI Price Effects Sales Forecasts 12000 14000

Feinberg, Eugene A.

435

Photomagnetic Switching of the Complex [Nd(dmf)[subscript 4](H[subscript 2]O)[subscript 3]([mu]-CN)Fe(CN)[subscript 5  

SciTech Connect

Single-crystal XRD experiments (see picture) reveal the excited-state structure of the photomagnetic heterobimetallic title complex. The system shows a decrease in all the iron-ligand bond lengths, suggesting that photoexcitation involves a ligand-to-metal charge transfer or a change in the superexchange coupling between the metal centers.

Svendsen, Helle; Overgaard, Jacob; Chevallier, Marie; Collet, Eric; Iversen, Bo B.; (Aarhus); (Universite de Rennes)

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Anion exchange polymer electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

Self-induced unstable behaviors of CH4 and H2/CH4 flames in a...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portillo, David Littlejohn, Scott M. Martin, and Robert K. Cheng Journal Combustion and Flame Volume 160 Issue 2 Pagination 307 - 321 Date Published 022013 ISSN 00102180 DOI...

438

BARTLT SUBROUTINE BARTLT (VAR,DF,N,CH2,CH2CDF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EPS,IFLAG,CDFY) CDFX = 0.5*(1.0+SIGN(CDFY,X)) RETURN C END *CENSCL SUBROUTINE CENSCL (X,W,N1,N2,IOPT,ITER,P1TAIL,CENTER ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

Plasma-enhanced and thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide, [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2}, as an alternative aluminum precursor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have been investigating the use of [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2} (DMAI) as an alternative Al precursor to [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] (TMA) for remote plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD over wide temperature ranges of 25-400 and 100-400 deg. C, respectively. The growth per cycle (GPC) obtained using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for plasma-enhanced ALD was 0.7-0.9 A/cycle, generally lower than the >0.9 A/cycle afforded by TMA. In contrast, the thermal process gave a higher GPC than TMA above 250 deg. C, but below this temperature, the GPC decreased rapidly with decreasing temperature. Quadrupole mass spectrometry data confirmed that both CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were formed during the DMAI dose for both the plasma-enhanced and thermal processes. CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were also formed during the H{sub 2}O dose but combustion-like products (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) were observed during the O{sub 2} plasma dose. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry showed that, for temperatures >100 deg. C and >200 deg. C for plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD, respectively, films from DMAI had an O/Al ratio of 1.5-1.6, a H content of {approx}5 at. % and mass densities of 2.7-3.0 g cm{sup -3}. The film compositions afforded from DMAI were comparable to those from TMA at deposition temperatures {>=}150 deg. C At lower temperatures, there were differences in O, H, and C incorporation. 30 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films from the plasma-enhanced ALD of DMAI were found to passivate n- and p-type Si floatzone wafers ({approx}3.5 and {approx}2 {Omega} cm, respectively) with effective carrier lifetimes comparable to those obtained using TMA. Surface recombination velocities of < 3 and < 6 cm s{sup -1} were obtained for the n- and p-type Si, respectively. Using these results, the film properties obtained using DMAI and TMA are compared and the mechanisms for the plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD using DMAI are discussed.

Potts, Stephen E.; Dingemans, Gijs; Lachaud, Christophe; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Air Liquide Research and Development, 1 Chemin de la Porte des Loges, BP 126, 78345 Jouy-en-Josas (France); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

The IRAM-30m line survey of the Horsehead PDR: III. High abundance of complex (iso-)nitrile molecules in UV-illuminated gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex (iso-)nitrile molecules, such as CH3CN and HC3N, are relatively easily detected in our Galaxy and in other galaxies. We constrain their chemistry through observations of two positions in the Horsehead edge: the photo-dissociation region (PDR) and the dense, cold, and UV-shielded core just behind it. We systematically searched for lines of CH3CN, HC3N, C3N, and some of their isomers in our sensitive unbiased line survey at 3, 2, and 1mm. We derived column densities and abundances through Bayesian analysis using a large velocity gradient radiative transfer model. We report the first clear detection of CH3NC at millimeter wavelength. We detected 17 lines of CH3CN at the PDR and 6 at the dense core position, and we resolved its hyperfine structure for 3 lines. We detected 4 lines of HC3N, and C3N is clearly detected at the PDR position. We computed new electron collisional rate coefficients for CH3CN, and we found that including electron excitation reduces the derived column density by 40% at the PDR posi...

Gratier, P; Guzmn, V; Gerin, M; Goicoechea, J R; Roueff, E; Faure, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DOE-STD-1043-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Operator Aid Postings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-93 3-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATOR AID POSTINGS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1043-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operator Aid Postings Page / Section Change Concluding Material

442

DOE-HDBK-1130-98-CN2; DOE Handbook Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-98 30-98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-98 June 2001 Radiological Worker Training An attachment to the Handbook was omitted. The same attachment is included in DOE-HDBK-

443

IAEA-F1-CN-69/ICP/04 (R) SUSTAINED SPHEROMAK PHYSICS EXPERIMENT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New been designed for high vacuum cleanliness to minimize current and energy losses to impurities. The flux o o o o o o o o o 0 .2 .4 .6 .8 .6 .4 .2 0 -.2 Open flux- lines Diagnostic slot -.4 Bias field coils

444

DOE-HDBK-1113-98, CN 1, Reaffirm; Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REAFFIRMATION WITH REAFFIRMATION WITH ERRATA April 2005 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 iii April 2005 Reaffirmation with Errata Changes to DOE-HDBK-1113-98, Radiological

445

DOE-STD-1042-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Control Area Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-93 2-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL AREA ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1042-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations Turnover Page/Section Change Concluding Material Preparing Activity was changed from

446

Photodissociation spectroscopy of ClCN in the vacuum ultraviolet region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ku, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan. 3 Present address: Department of Material Science, Faculty of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan. 4 Present address: Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan. 5 Present

Kono, Mitsu

447

Rotational ligand dynamics in Mn[N(CN)2]2.pyrazine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this type of instrument (figure 3) bursts of monochromatic neutrons ... source is cleaned of high energy neutron and gamma ray contamination using ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility, Mail Stop 9055, Sandia National Laboratories,is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia authors and some of theDepartment of Energy. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory

Trevitt, Adam J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

IAEA-CN-33/G 3-3 ENGINEERING DESIGN OF A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductors is being considered, the long-term activation of modules will necessitate remote handling. FERF of these coils within an aluminum-lined, concrete shielded tunnel permits remote handling of the active core. Remote handling methods are available for replacing both standard and test core modules. A hot cell

Abdou, Mohamed

450

Calculation of hyperfine coupling constants of the CN and CP ground state radicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&ndez,a)Poul Jdrgenseqb) and Jack Simons Chemistry Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (Received 18 Gaussian atomic orbital basis sets even though these functions are known to be incapable of repro- ducing atomic orbital basis set have also made it difficult to decide what level of electron correlation

Simons, Jack

451

Wettability Testing for Ni/Ti(CN) System in High Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How to Control Strength and Grain Structure of 304L Stainless Steel during Forging Improved ... Process Modeling and Reduction of Copper Loss in Smelting Slag ... Use of Polymeric Residues from the Footwear Industry in Layers of Asphalt...

452

| | English | | | RSS | www.sciencenet.cn 2007-9-11 23:28:9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:28:9 ""911 20072005 · "" 2005 19761978 . "" PriusPrius """ "" 1987 " #12; " """ 2007 E-mail go and his wife Susan drive their hybrid car Prius when really needed. The so-called hybrid car means the car is equipped with gas tank and chargeable batteries as well. Prius is a relatively successful and famous

Zare, Richard N.

453

Attenuating absorption contribution on Cn estimates with a large-aperture scintillometer2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to5 turbulent exchange of matter or energy. Additionally, scinillation also represents a6 was installed on a 6 m-high mast along a 565 m transect, between July 15th and9 August 24th In addition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

454

DOE-STD-1044-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Equipment and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Function Code Air Handler AHU Annunciator ANN Circuit Breaker CB Compressor CMP Condenser COND Damper DMP Heat Exchanger HX Indicator, Current (Electric) II Indicator, Flow...

455

Studies in tandem mirror theory. Paper IAEA-CN-38/F-4  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the formation, maintenance, and microstability of thermal barriers, which have been introduced as a means for improving tandem mirror reactor performance at reduced technological demands. It also describes calculations of tandem mirror central-cell ..beta.. limits due to MHD ballooning modes.

Baldwin, D.E.; Cohen, R.H.; Cutler, T.A.

1980-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Development and Applications of Pd Catalysts for C-N Cross-Coupling Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 A procedure for forming a highly active Pd(0) catalyst from Pd(OAc) 2, water, and biarylphosphine ligands has been developed. This protocol generates a catalyst system, which exhibits excellent reactivity and ...

Fors, Brett P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE-STD-1104-96 CN-1; Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

institutional programs in Integrated Safety Management System documents and site-wide manuals was added. p. 13 Sect. 3 Approval Bases for Technical Safety Requirements New...

458

IAEA-CN-60ID-P6 COMPARISONS OF NONLINEAR TOROIDAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be supported against the same power flow. This bifurcation may explain the H-VH transition. PEP Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America Abstract COMPARISONS the proper non-adiabatic electron response typi- cally doubles the growth rate[3] without significantly

Hammett, Greg

459

Tailored Macroporous SiCN and SiC Structures for High-Temperature Fuel Reforming**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in a microreformer is an attractive approach to supply hydrogen to fuel

Kenis, Paul J. A.

460

Probing The Electronic Structure of the Di-iron Subsite of[Fe] -hydrogenase: A Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Fe(I)- Fe(I) Model Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structures of a series of Fe(I)-Fe(I) model complexes of the di-iron subsite of[Fe]-hydrogenase,[(mu- PDT)Fe-2(CO)(4)(CN)(2)](2-) (1),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(MeSCH2C(Me)(CH2S)(2))(CN)(2)](2-) (II),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(PhCH2SCH2C(Me)-(CH2S)(2))(CN)(2)](2-) (III),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(PhCH2SCH2C(Me) (CH2S)(2))(CN)](-) (IV), and[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(MeSCH2C(Me)(CH2S)(2))(CN)](-) (V), were investigated in the gas phase using photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic electron detachment energy (ADE) of each species and the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion for the doubly charged species were obtained. The ADEs correspond to the intrinsic redox potentials (in vacuo) of reactions involving the Fe(I)-Fe(I)/Fe(I)-Fe(II) couples in these compounds. The photoelectron spectra were understood and qualitatively assigned by comparing with that of Fe-2(CO)(6)S- 2, which has been well studied previously and exhibits similar valence spectral features as I-V. A''normal level scheme'' is suggested for the electronic structure of these low spin di- iron compounds, in which all occupied 3d levels lie above all occupied ligand levels. We also observed subtle differences in the electronic structures of the five di-iron complexes due to the slightly different ligand environments.

Yang, Xin; Razavet, Mathieu; Wang, Xue B.; Pickett, Chris J.; Wang, Lai S.

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bg cn ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ESR studies of two new organic superconductors: {beta}``-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}{sub L}`-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(DBCE)  

SciTech Connect

The normal-state ESR of two new organic superconductors, {beta}{double_prime}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}{sub L}{prime}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(DBCE) are reported. Both compounds showed metallic properties below 140 K. The former gave ESR line widths and g-values of 23-34 G and 2.004-2.012. The latter gave line widths and g-values of 45-58 G and 2.006-2.012. Orientation-dependent line widths and g-values of the {kappa}{sub L}{prime}-phase were found to be similar to that of the {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}Br{sub 8} but not to the {kappa}{sub L}-phases in general.

Wang, H.H.; VanZile, M.L.; Geiser, U. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Transfer between the cesium 6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels induced by collisions with H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

The cross sections of spin-orbit energy exchange between the cesium 6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{r_reversible}6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states induced by collisions with N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} were obtained for pressures less than 100 Torr at room temperature by means of steady-state laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The spin-orbit energy exchange rate with N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, have been measured as {sigma}{sub 21}(6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{yields}6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2})= 16.3, 34.1, 30.0, 22.7, 21.4, 65.6, 64.8, and 137 A{sup 2} and {sigma}{sub 12}(6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{yields}6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2})= 1.8, 4.4, 4.1, 3.0, 2.9, 13.3, 9.7, and 16.3 A{sup 2}, respectively. Correlations of the spin-orbit transfer probabilities with rotational-energy defect and vibrational-energy defect have been shown.

Pitz, Greg A.; Fox, Charles D.; Perram, Glen P. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Labs, 3550 Aberdeen Ave. SE, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, WPAFB, Ohio 45433-7765 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comparative thermal-expansion study of {beta}"-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} : uniaxial pressure coeffcients of T{sub c} and upper critical fields.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report high-resolution measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion, {alpha}=l{sup -1}x({partial_derivative}l/{partial_derivative}T), on single crystals of the organic superconductors {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}. For both salts we find large and highly anisotropic phase-transition anomalies at T{sub c}. Combining these data with literature results on the specific heat via the Ehrenfest relation, the uniaxial pressure coefficients of T{sub c} can be determined. Most remarkably, a strikingly similar in-plane vs out-of-plane anisotropy is found for both compounds: the strong suppression of T{sub c} observed in hydrostatic-pressure experiments is dominated by a huge negative uniaxial stress effect perpendicular to the conducting planes. Therefore we expect that an increase of T{sub c} in this class of superconductors can be obtained by enlarging the distance between the conducting layers. Application of magnetic fields perpendicular to the planes for the {beta}''-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} salt were found to result in pronounced superconducting fluctuation effects and scaling behavior in {alpha}(T,B). Owing to the pronounced phase-transition anomalies in {alpha}(T,B) at T{sub c}, our measurements allow for an accurate determination of the upper critical fields. We find B{sub c{sub 2}}{sup {perpendicular}}(0)=(1.4{+-}0.2)T and B{sub c{sub 2}}{sup {parallel}}(0)=(10.4{+-}0.5)T for fields perpendicular and parallel to the conducting planes, respectively.

Muller, J.; Lang, M.; Steglich, F.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Geiser, U.; Nixon, P. G.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.; Sasaki, T.; Toyota, N.; Max-Planck Inst. for Chemical Physics of Solids; Portland State Univ.; Tohoku Univ.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTIONS BETWEEN H ATOMS AND CARBANIONS OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent detection of molecular anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has highlighted the need for laboratory studies of negative ion chemistry. Hydrogen atoms are the most abundant atomic species in the ISM, and the chemistry of H atoms with anions may contribute to molecular synthesis in interstellar clouds. This work is a combined experimental and computational study of a series of anions reacting with H atoms by associative detachment (A{sup -} + H {yields} AH + e {sup -}). The anions include deprotonated nitriles (CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}, CH{sub 3}CHCN{sup -}, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CCN{sup -}), acetaldehyde (HC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), acetone (CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), ethyl acetate (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), methanol (CH{sub 3}O{sup -}), and acetic acid (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2} {sup -}). Experimental measurements of the reaction rate constants were made with the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube technique. Ab initio theoretical calculations were carried out to explore the reaction mechanism and investigate the factors influencing reaction efficiencies, which are largely proportional to reaction exothermicities. Other factors influencing reaction efficiencies include the charge density on the reactive site of the anion, the characteristics of the potential energy surfaces along the approach of the reactants, and angular momentum conservation of the anion-H atom collision.

Yang Zhibo; Eichelberger, Brian; Carpenter, Marshall Y.; Martinez, Oscar; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@colorado.ed, E-mail: BEichelberger@jbu.ed, E-mail: Marshall.Carpenter@colorado.ed, E-mail: Oscar.Martinez@colorado.ed, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@colorado.ed, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@colorado.ed [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Nature of Interstellar Gas toward the Pleiades Revealed in Absorption Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution, high signal to noise absorption-line observations of CN, Ca II, Ca I, CH^+, and CH along twenty lines of sight toward members of the Pleiades. The acquired data enable the most detailed study to date of the interaction between cluster stars and the surrounding interstellar gas. Total equivalent widths are consistent with previous investigations except where weaker features are detected owing to our greater sensitivity. Mean b-values for the molecular species indicate that toward most of the Pleiades CH is associated with the production of CH^+ rather than CN. An analysis of radial velocities reveals a kinematic distinction between ionized atomic gas and molecular and neutral gas. Molecular components are found with velocities in the local standard of rest of either ~ +7 km s^-1 or ~ +9.5 km s^-1, with the higher-velocity components associated with the strongest absorption. Atomic gas traced by Ca II shows a strong central component at v_LSR ~ +7 km s^-1 exhibiting velocity gradients indicative of cloud-cluster interactions. Gas density estimates derived from measured CH/CH^+ column density ratios show good agreement with those inferred from H_2 rotational populations, yielding typical values of n ~ 50 cm^-3. Our models do not include the important time-dependent effects on CH^+ formation which may ultimately be needed to extract physical conditions in these clouds.

A. M. Ritchey; M. Martinez; K. Pan; S. R. Federman; D. L. Lambert

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Optical spectra and electronic band structure calculations of {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}RSO{sub 3} (R=CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}, CHFCF{sub 2} and CHF) : changing electronic properties by chemical tuning of the counterion.  

SciTech Connect

We report the polarized infrared reflectance spectra, optical conductivity, and electronic band structure of metallic {beta}{prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFSO{sub 3} and compare our results with those of the {beta}{prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} superconductor and the {beta}{prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material. We discuss the electronic structure of these organic molecular solids in terms of band structure, many-body effects, and disorder. On the basis of spectral similarities between the superconductor and metallic salts and structural differences in the anion pocket of all three, we conclude that the unusual electronic excitations observed in the {beta}{prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material are not caused by electron correlation but are due to disorder-related localization.

Jones, B. R.; Olejniczak, I.; Dong, J.; Pigos, J. M.; Zhu, Z.; Garlach, A. D.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Schlueter, J. A.; Ward, B. H.; Morales, E.; Kini, A. M.; Winter, R. W.; Mohtasham, J.; Gard, G. L.; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton; North Carolina State Univ.; Portland State Univ.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Historic, Recent, and Future Subsidence, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Service. Volk BG. 1973. Everglades histosolMap MF1401. Browder JA, Volk BG. 1978. Systems model ofmoisture (Knipling and others 1970; Volk 1973) and microbial

Deverel, Steven J; Leighton, David A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Time and Frequency from A to Z: Ch to Cy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... d rb ). Common-view measurements were made for many years using land based transmitters as the reference. Today, nearly ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Statistical Aspects of ChIP-Seq Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of PIF3 data set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2 Data Set Description . . . . .3.2.2 PIF3 data set . . . . . . . . . 3.2.3 NRSF Monoclonal

Mayba, Oleg Sergeyevich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

People's Physics Book Ch 8-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kinetic energy of all the pieces is zero. c. The chemical potential energy of the bomb has been converted is measured in joules · K = ½ mv2 Kinetic energy (measured in Joules, J) · Ug = mgh Gravitational potential, then you have lost energy and I have gained energy.) Key Applications · When working a problem that asks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

471

GVOP_ch13_239-278.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2012 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. To order more AOCS products, please visit our web

472

People's Physics book Ch 24-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the central maximum to the first order? 17. A light source of 429 nm is used to power a photovoltaic cell

California at Santa Cruz, University of

473