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1

sin 2 beta + gamma Measurements  

SciTech Connect

I report on the most recent measurements done to constrain sin(2{beta}+{gamma}) with neutral B mesons. Direct measurements of 2{beta} + {gamma} will provide a precise test of the standard model predictions with higher statistics. Present constraints come from studies of B {yields} D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}/{rho}{sup {-+}} decays done by BABAR and Belle collaborations with full and inclusive techniques to reconstruct B mesons. B {yields} D{sup 0(*)}K{sup 0} decays are also very promising but statistics are too low to give any constraint at the moment.

Therin, G; /Paris U., VI-VII

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimating Dose Rates from Activated Groundwater at Accelerator Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dose/Dose Rate / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Protection

N. Prolingheuer; M. Herbst; B. Heuel-Fabianek; R. Moormann; R. Nabbi; B. Schlögl; J. Vanderborght

4

Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Enclosure 2 DOE's Position on Dose Rate "Measurement Uncertainty"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncertainty concerns, as cited in their Technical Support Document (TSD), "Review of DOE Planned Change radiation survey instruments used to measure radiation dose rates in the field from waste containers are needed to provide this protection to workers. The purpose of these surface dose rate measurements

6

External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dose dependence and dose-rate dependence of the optically stimulated luminescence signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been seen for a certain dose-rate range. The similarities and dissimilarities of OSL as compared of a solid sample, usually by ionizing radiation during which time, energy is absorbed in the sample. In TLDose dependence and dose-rate dependence of the optically stimulated luminescence signal R. Chena

Chen, Reuven

8

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

9

Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......444-448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental...TERRESTRIAL DOSE RATE IN NIGERIAN MINES N d Aerial ropeway Figure 2. Surface background...444 448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental......

C. E. Mokobia; F. A. Balogun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and scattering environment of the actual radiation exposure.

L. A. Braby; W. D. Reece; W. H. Hsu

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code  

SciTech Connect

To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere.

Lagache, J.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radiation dose-rate meter using an energy-sensitive counter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation dose-rate meter is provided which uses an energy-sensitive detector and combines charge quantization and pulse-rate measurement to monitor radiation dose rates. The charge from each detected photon is quantized by level-sensitive comparators so that the resulting total output pulse rate is proportional to the dose-rate.

Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is probably better than having no value at all. A summary of the complete ECF and DCF values are given in Table 2.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

World Sheet Commuting beta-gamma CFT and Non-Relativistic StringTheories  

SciTech Connect

We construct a sigma model in two dimensions with Galilean symmetry in flat target space similar to the sigma model of the critical string theory with Lorentz symmetry in 10 flat spacetime dimensions. This is motivated by the works of Gomis and Ooguri[1] and Danielsson et. al.[2, 3]. Our theory is much simpler than their theory and does not assume a compact coordinate. This non-relativistic string theory has a bosonic matter {beta}{gamma} CFT with the conformal weight of {beta} as 1. It is natural to identify time as a linear combination of {gamma} and {bar {gamma}} through an explicit realization of the Galilean boost symmetry. The angle between {gamma} and {bar {gamma}} parametrizes one parameter family of selection sectors. These selection sectors are responsible for having a non-relativistic dispersion relation without a nontrivial topology in the non-relativistic setup, which is one of the major differences from the previous works[1, 2, 3]. This simple theory is the non-relativistic analogue of the critical string theory, and there are many different avenues ahead to be investigated. We mention a possible consistent generalization of this theory with different conformal weights for the {beta}{gamma} CFT. We also mention supersymmetric generalizations of these theories.

Kim, Bom Soo

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Effects of High Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiations on Solutions of Iron and Cerium Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Effects of High Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiations on Solutions of Iron and Cerium...of 1.3 duration and over a range of dose rates from 0.5 to 20 000 rads/pulse. Radiation yields at constant dose rate...

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism Edouard I. Azzam 1 , Sonia M. de Toledo 1 , Badri N. Pandey 1 , Perumal Venkatachalam 1 , Manuela Buoannano 1 , Zhi Yang 1 , Ling Li 3 , Donna M. Gordon 2 , Roger W. Howell 1 , Debkumar Pain 2 and Douglas R. Spitz 3 1 Department of Radiology, 2 Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 3 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA To investigate low dose/low dose-rate effects of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, we used γ-irradiated cells adapted to grow in three-dimensional architecture that mimics cell growth in vivo. We determined cellular, molecular and biochemical changes in these

17

Modeling Low-Dose-Rate Effects in Irradiated Bipolar-Base Oxides  

SciTech Connect

A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Multiple-trapping simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for low-dose-rate enhancement. At low dose rates, more holes are trapped near the silicon-oxide interface than at high dose rates, resulting in larger midgap voltage shifts at lower dose rates. The additional trapped charge near the interface may cause an exponential increase in excess base current, and a resultant decrease in current gain for some NPN bipolar technologies.

Cirba, C.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Graves, R.J.; Michez, A.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Witczak, S.C.

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

Bedford, Joel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

The emerging role of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for prostate cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Follow-up PSA control rate/ Late toxicity Grade...HDR = high-dose-rate, PSA = prostate-specific...EQUIPMENT AND RADIATION PHYSICS Because the dose-rate of the radioactive source...holes for the needles to pass through, and their positions......

Yasuo Yoshioka; Ken Yoshida; Hideya Yamazaki; Norio Nonomura; Kazuhiko Ogawa

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons  

SciTech Connect

Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons have been calculated for approximately 500 radionuclides of potential importance in environmental radiological assessments. The dose-rate factors were obtained using the DOSFACTER computer code. The results given in this report incorporate calculation of electron dose-rate factors for radiosensitive tissues of the skin, improved estimates of organ dose-rate factors for photons, based on organ doses for monoenergetic sources at the body surface of an exposed individual, and the spectra of scattered photons in air from monoenergetic sources in an infinite, uniformly contaminated atmospheric cloud, calculation of dose-rate factors for other radionuclides in addition to those of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, and incorporation of updated radioactive decay data for all radionuclides. Dose-rate factors are calculated for three exposure modes - immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure at a height of 1 m above a contaminated ground surface. The report presents the equations used to calculate the external dose-rate factors for photons and electrons, documentation of the revised DOSFACTER computer code, and a complete tabulation of the calculated dose-rate factors. 30 refs., 12 figs.

Kocher, D.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 [1] was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 [2]. The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring [3,4,5] including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of {+-}25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The health physicists should consider this increase for any areas that have dose rates near a posting limit, such as near the 100 mrem/hr for a high radiation area, as this increase in measured dose rate may result in some changes to postings and consequent radiological controls.

Radev, R

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radionuclides in the adriatic sea and related dose-rate assessment for marine biota  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiation and dose rate investigations...Smodis B. Estimation of sedimentation...ionizing radiation on plants...the Great Bay. J. Environ...Norwegian Radiation Protection...water of the Bay of Bengal. Radiat...P. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rate in the......

Branko Petrinec; Marko Strok; Zdenko Franic; Borut Smodis; Dijana Pavicic-Hamer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Equivalent dose rate by muons to the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......strongly on thickness(6). Muons lose energy in the atmosphere. The average rate of muon energy loss is where a(E) is the ionisation...coefficients as a function of muon energy for isotropic geometrical conditions......

I. Bacioiu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

76Radiation Dose and Dose Rate Radiation is measured in two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seiverts per year. Hasty reports about the devastating Japan 2011 nuclear power plant radiation leakages have by Concorde, what are the total radiation doses for a passenger in each case? Problem 3 - The Japan 2011 earthquake damaged several nuclear reactors, causing radiation leakage across northern Japan. On March 22

25

Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan)] [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Comparison of measured and calculated dose rates for the castor® HAW 20/28 CG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Scheib 2 A. Rimpler 2 Corresponding author: kuehl@wti.wse.de 1 WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH...10) dose rate from the Bonner sphere system. | WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH......

O. Ringleb; H. Kühl; H. Scheib; A. Rimpler

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Data base of system-average dose rates at nuclear power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect

In this work, a data base is derived of area dose rates for systems and components listed in the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB). The data base is derived from area surveys obtained during outages at four boiling water reactors (BWRs) at three stations and eight pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at four stations. Separate tables are given for BWRs and PWRs. These tables may be combined with estimates of labor hours to provide order-of-magnitude estimates of exposure for purposes of regulatory analysis. They are only valid for work involving entire systems or components. The estimates of labor hours used in conjunction with the dose rates to estimate exposure must be adjusted to account for in-field time. Finally, the dose rates given in the data base do not reflect ALARA considerations. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Britz, W.L.; Cohen, S.C.; Goldin, A.S.; Goldin, D.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

2\\beta + \\gamma from B^0 to D^\\mp K^0 \\pi^\\pm Decays at BaBar: aSimulation Study  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the results of a simulation study to perform the extraction of 2{beta} + {gamma} from B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup {-+}}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} decays through a time-dependent Dalitz analysis of BaBar data.

Polci, Francesco; Schune, Marie-Helene; Stocchi, Achille; /Orsay, LAL

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Validation of a new control system for Elekta accelerators facilitating continuously variable dose rate  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Elekta accelerators controlled by the current clinically used accelerator control system, Desktop 7.01 (D7), uses binned variable dose rate (BVDR) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The next version of the treatment control system (Integrity) supports continuously variable dose rate (CVDR) as well as BVDR. Using CVDR opposed to BVDR for VMAT has the potential of reducing the treatment time but may lead to lower dosimetric accuracy due to faster moving accelerator parts. Using D7 and a test version of Integrity, differences in ability to control the accelerator, treatment efficiency, and dosimetric accuracy between the two systems were investigated. Methods: Single parameter tests were designed to expose differences in the way the two systems control the movements of the accelerator. In these tests, either the jaws, multi leaf collimators (MLCs), or gantry moved at constant speed while the dose rate was changed in discrete steps. The positional errors of the moving component and dose rate were recorded using the control systems with a sampling frequency of 4 Hz. The clinical applicability of Integrity was tested using 15 clinically used VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5 H and N, and 5 lung) generated by the SmartArc algorithm in PINNACLE. The treatment time was measured from beam-on to beam-off and the accuracy of the dose delivery was assessed by comparing DELTA4 measurements and PINNACLE calculated doses using gamma evaluation. Results: The single parameter tests showed that Integrity had an improved feedback between gantry motion and dose rate at the slight expense of MLC control compared to D7. The single parameter test did not reveal any significant differences in the control of either jaws or backup jaws between the two systems. These differences in gantry and MLC control together with the use of CVDR gives a smoother Integrity VMAT delivery compared to D7 with less abrupt changes in accelerator motion. Gamma evaluation (2% of 2 Gy and 2 mm) of the calculated doses and DELTA4 measured doses corrected for systematic errors showed an average pass rate of more than 97.8% for both D7, Integrity BVDR, and Integrity CVDR deliveries. Direct comparisons between the measured doses using strict gamma criteria of 0.5% and 0.5 mm showed excellent agreement between D7 and Integrity delivered doses with average pass rates above 95.7%. Finally, the Integrity control system resulted in a significant 35% (55 {+-} 13 s) reduction in treatment time, on average. Conclusions: Single parameter tests showed that the two control systems differed in their feedback loops between MLC, gantry, and dose rate. These differences made the VMAT deliveries more smooth using the new Integrity treatment control system, compared to the current Desktop 7.01. Together with the use of CVDR, which results in less abrupt changes in dose rate, this further increases the smoothness of the delivery. The use of CVDR for VMAT with the Integrity desktop results in a significant reduction in treatment time compared to BVDR with an average reduction of 35%. This decrease in delivery time was achieved without compromising the dosimetric accuracy.

Bertelsen, Anders; Lorenzen, Ebbe L.; Brink, Carsten [Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense DK-5000, Denmark and Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense DK-5000 (Denmark)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

SU?FF?T?174: Dose Rate Dependence of Film Dosimetry in Radiation Treatment: Study of Reciprocity Law  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: Film has become an important tool for dose verification in individualized IMRTtreatment fields. The optical density (OD) is related to dose rate also known as reciprocity law; (D= Dr*t). However for modern films (EDR and XV) reciprocity law has not been investigated which is presented in this study. Method and Materials: Using a Varian linear accelerator dose rate dependence was studied for Kodak films (XV and EDR). The dose rate on this unit could be varied in the range of 80–400 MU/min for both (6 MV and 15 MV) photons beams. A large dose rate range; 5 cGy/min ?1100 cGy/min was achieved in conjunction with distance (1–4 meters) and machine dose rate. This was verified using ion chamber. At each dose rate films were exposed in a solid phantom at a depth of dmax for 300 cGy and 50 cGy for EDR and XV films respectively. Calibration curves (dose vs. OD) were also established during this experiment in a standard condition. The measured dose through film and ion chamber were compared and analyzed. Results: Reciprocity law holds good in the dose rate range of 20–400 cGy/min for both energies but deviates at low and high dose rates. The effect is more pronounced at dose rate beyond 400 cGy/min where deviation up to 7.5% was noted for both the films. At low dose rate the deviation is ?3.5% for both films and energies. Conclusion: Low and high dose regions are created in the same time of exposure in IMRT and hence reciprocity law becomes critical for film dosimetry. The reciprocity law failure is due to the interaction of ion pairs to form latent image which could be suppressed at extreme dose rates. The dosimetric impact is noted to be up to 7.5% for both films.

S Srivastava; I Das

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

Yang, Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Junjie, E-mail: junjiewang47@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, Feng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Hua [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications  

SciTech Connect

Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

Shwetha, Bondel [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Ravikumar, Manickam, E-mail: drravikumarm@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Lokesh, Vishwanath [Department of Radiotherapy, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Keshava, Subbarao L. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

Horn, Kevin M.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays  

SciTech Connect

Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Dose Rates from Plutonium Metal and Beryllium Metal in a 9975 Shipping Container  

SciTech Connect

A parametric study was performed of the radiation dose rates that might be produced if plutonium metal and beryllium metal were shipped in the 9975 shipping package. These materials consist of heterogeneous combinations plutonium metal and beryllium. The plutonium metal content varies up to 4.4 kilograms while the beryllium metal varies up to 4 kilograms. This paper presents the results of that study.

Nathan, S.J.

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radiation source rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose rate measurements for operational nuclear emergency response systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an innovative data assimilation method that has been recently developed in NCSR Demokritos for estimating an unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere, with real-scale experimental data. The efficient algorithm is based on the assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model DIPCOT and uses variational principles. The DIPCOT model is used in the framework of the nuclear emergency response system (ERS) RODOS. The evaluation is performed by computational simulations of dispersion of Ar-41 that was emitted routinely by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) previous research reactor, HIFAR, located in Sydney, Australia. In this paper the algorithm is evaluated against a more complicated case than the others used in previous studies: there was only one monitoring station available each day and the site topography is characterised as moderately complex. Overall the estimated release rate approaches the real one to a very satisfactory degree as revealed by the statistical indicators of errors.

Vasiliki Tsiouri; Spyros Andronopoulos; Ivan Kovalets; Leisa L. Dyer; John G. Bartzis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dosimetric Impact of Interfraction Catheter Movement in High-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of interfraction catheter movement on dosimetry in prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients were treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy. Implants were performed on day 1 under transrectal ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed. Inverse planning simulated annealing was used for treatment planning. The first fraction was delivered on day 1. A cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed on day 2 before the second fraction was given. A fusion of the CBCT and CT was performed using intraprostatic gold markers as landmarks. Initial prostate and urethra contours were transferred to the CBCT images. Bladder and rectum contours were drawn, and catheters were digitized on the CBCT. The planned treatment was applied to the CBCT dataset, and dosimetry was analyzed and compared to the initial dose distribution. This process was repeated after a reoptimization was performed, using the same constraints used on day 1. Results: Mean interfraction catheter displacement was 5.1 mm. When we used the initial plan on day 2, the mean prostate V100 (volume receiving 100 Gy or more) decreased from 93.8% to 76.2% (p < 0.01). Rectal V75 went from 0.75 cm{sup 3} to 1.49 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.01). A reoptimization resulted in a mean prostate V100 of 88.1%, closer to the initial plan (p = 0.05). Mean rectal V75 was also improved with a value of 0.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no significant change in bladder and urethra dose on day 2. Conclusions: A mean interfraction catheter displacement of 5.1 mm results in a significant decrease in prostate V100 and an increase in rectum dose. A reoptimization before the second treatment improves dose distribution.

Foster, William, E-mail: fosterw@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Hsu, I.-Chow; Weinberg, Vivan; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Comprehensive Analysis of Cardiac Dose in Balloon-Based High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate radiation dose to the heart in 60 patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using MammoSite or Contura applicators. Methods and Materials: We studied 60 consecutive women with breast cancer who were treated with 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions using MammoSite (n = 37) or Contura (n = 23) applicators. The whole heart and the left and right ventricles were retrospectively delineated, and dose-volume histograms were analyzed. Multiple dosimetrics were reported, such as mean dose (D{sub mean}); relative volume receiving 1.7, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (V1.7, V5, V10, and V20, respectively); dose to 1 cc (D{sub 1cc}); and maximum point dose (D{sub max}). Biologic metrics, biologically effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose were computed. The impact of lumpectomy cavity location on cardiac dose was investigated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation of D{sub mean} was 2.45 {+-} 0.94 Gy (range, 0.56-4.68) and 3.29 {+-} 1.28 Gy (range, 0.77-6.35) for the heart and the ventricles, respectively. The average whole heart V5 and V10 values were 10.2% and 1.3%, respectively, and the heart D{sub max} was >20 Gy in 7 of 60 (11.7%) patients and >25 Gy in 3 of 60 (5%) patients. No cardiac tissue received {>=}30 Gy. The V1.7, V5, V10, V20, and D{sub mean} values were all higher for the ventricles than for the whole heart. For balloons located in the upper inner quadrant of the breast, the average whole heart D{sub mean} was highest. The D{sub mean}, biologically effective dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose values for heart and ventricles decreased with increasing minimal distance from the surface of the balloon. Conclusions: On the basis of these comprehensive cardiac dosimetric data, we recommend that cardiac dose be routinely reported and kept as low as possible in balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning for patients with left-sided breast cancer so the correlation with future cardiac toxicity data can be investigated.

Valakh, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir@valakh.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E. Day; Trombetta, Mark G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbed dose rate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. Absorbed dose is the physical quantity describing energy deposited per unit mass. For radiation protection... all the data in the dose range from 0 ... Source:...

45

Dose and Dose-rate Effects of X rays and Fission Neutrons on Lymphocyte Apoptosis in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......p53 accumulation was not observed in similarly treated ATM-defective (AT) fibroblasts; moreover, when AT fibroblasts were treated...low-level radiation, i.e., mutagenesis, teratogenesis and car- cinogenesis, are dose-rate dependent events. All of the......

Kazuo Fujikawa; Yukinori Hasegawa; Shinya Matsuzawa; Akihiro Fukunaga; Tetsuo Itoh; Sohei Kondo

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Global dose rate assessment in ITER diagnostics ports based on the 3-D FEM ATTILA code  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The USITER, through the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL), is responsible for the delivery of several fully integrated upper, equatorial and lower port plugs dedicated for the diagnostics in ITER. Each port plug package consists of a generic port plug structure and a set of diagnostics and diagnostic housings. The shielding design of the integrated port plugs calls for maintaining a dose level not to exceed 100 ?Sv/h inside the interspace of each port; the room behind the port plug where maintenance personnel access the rear of the port. This is set as an upper target design in order to perform routine maintenance 1E6 sec (?two weeks) following shutdown. Expensive remote handling robots and tooling are required otherwise. In this paper we present results from a parametric study aimed at providing initial assessment of the attainable dose rates in the diagnostics ports and their extension areas in order to properly address the duration time and frequency for the workers to perform the scheduled maintenance. The nuclear analysis is performed using both the serial version and the distributed memory parallel (DMP) version of the ATTILA-7.1.0, 3-D FEM Discrete Ordinates code, along with the FENDL2.1/FORNAX and ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977 data bases.

Mahmoud Z. Youssef; Russell E. Feder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Central Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon and thoron was carried out at selected former uranium mining and processing sites in the Central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments and radon/thoron measurements were carried out using discriminative radon (222Rn)/thoron (220Rn) solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time, including at least three seasonal periods in a year, in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected uranium legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, Rn and Tn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low/relatively low radiological risk. The major radiation hazard is represented by abandoned radioactive filtration material that was being used as insulation by some Minkush residents (Kyrgyzstan) for a longer period of time. Annual radiation doses of several hundred mSv could be received as a consequence of using this material domestically. In addition, the gamma and Rn/Tn dose rates at Digmai, Tajikistan, could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. The doses of ionizing radiation deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor radon and thoron with their short-lived progenies in several cases exceeded the recommended annual effective dose threshold level of 10 mSv. At none of the sites investigated did the individual annual effective doses exceed 30 mSv, the internationally recommended value for considering intervention. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a serious hazard to the health of the resident public, but this issue should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation.

P. Stegnar; I. Shishkov; M. Burkitbayev; B. Tolongutov; M. Yunusov; R. Radyuk; B. Salbu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Clinical implementation of a digital tomosynthesis-based seed reconstruction algorithm for intraoperative postimplant dose evaluation in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The low dose rate brachytherapy procedure would benefit from an intraoperative postimplant dosimetry verification technique to identify possible suboptimal dose coverage and suggest a potential reimplantation. The main objective of this project is to develop an efficient, operator-free, intraoperative seed detection technique using the imaging modalities available in a low dose rate brachytherapy treatment room. Methods: This intraoperative detection allows a complete dosimetry calculation that can be performed right after an I-125 prostate seed implantation, while the patient is still under anesthesia. To accomplish this, a digital tomosynthesis-based algorithm was developed. This automatic filtered reconstruction of the 3D volume requires seven projections acquired over a total angle of 60 deg. with an isocentric imaging system. Results: A phantom study was performed to validate the technique that was used in a retrospective clinical study involving 23 patients. In the patient study, the automatic tomosynthesis-based reconstruction yielded seed detection rates of 96.7% and 2.6% false positives. The seed localization error obtained with a phantom study is 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The average time needed for reconstruction is below 1 min. The reconstruction algorithm also provides the seed orientation with an uncertainty of 10 deg. {+-}8 deg. The seed detection algorithm presented here is reliable and was efficiently used in the clinic. Conclusions: When combined with an appropriate coregistration technique to identify the organs in the seed coordinate system, this algorithm will offer new possibilities for a next generation of clinical brachytherapy systems.

Brunet-Benkhoucha, Malik; Verhaegen, Frank; Lassalle, Stephanie; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Reniers, Brigitte; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Medical Centre Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Medical Centre Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada) and CRCHUM, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Quebec, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the computation time decrease with the number of points and that no effects were observed on the dosimetric indices when varying the number of sampling points and the number of iterations, they were respectively fixed to 2500 and to 100. The computation time to obtain ten complete treatments plans ranging from 9 to 18 catheters, with the corresponding dosimetric indices, was 90 s. However, 93% of the computation time is used by a research version of IPSA. For the breast, on average, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations would be satisfied down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of V100, dose homogeneity index, and D90.Conclusions: The authors have devised a simple, fast and efficient method to optimize the number and position of catheters in interstitial HDR brachytherapy. The method was shown to be robust for both prostate and breast HDR brachytherapy. More importantly, the computation time of the algorithm is acceptable for clinical use. Ultimately, this catheter optimization algorithm could be coupled with a 3D ultrasound system to allow real-time guidance and planning in HDR brachytherapy.

Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)] [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)] [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Shut-down dose rate analyses for the ITER electron cyclotron-heating upper launcher  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electron cyclotron resonance heating upper launcher (ECHUL) is going to be installed in the upper port of the ITER tokamak thermonuclear fusion reactor for plasma mode stabilization (neoclassical tearing modes and the sawtooth instability). The paper reports the latest neutronic modeling and analyses which have been performed for the ITER reference front steering launcher design. It focuses on the port accessibility after reactor shut-down for which dose rate (SDDR) distributions on a fine regular mesh grid were calculated. The results are compared to those obtained for the ITER Dummy Upper Port. The calculations showed that the heterogeneous ECHUL design gives rise to enhanced radiation streaming as compared to the homogenous dummy upper port. Therefore the used launcher geometry was upgraded to a more recent development stage. The inter-comparison shows a significant improvement of the launchers shielding properties but also the necessity to further upgrade the shielding performance. Furthermore, the analysis for the homogenous dummy upper port, which represents optimal shielding inside the launcher, demonstrates that the shielding upgrade also needs to include the launcher's environment.

Bastian Weinhorst; Arkady Serikov; Ulrich Fischer; Lei Lu; Peter Spaeh; Dirk Strauss

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The air dose rate around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant: its spatial characteristics and temporal changes until December 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distribution maps of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were constructed using the results of measurement obtained from approximately 6500 locations (at most) per measurement period. The measurements were conducted 1 m above the ground using survey meters in flat and spatially open locations. Spatial distribution and temporal change of the air dose rate in the area were revealed by examining the resultant distribution maps. The observed reduction rate of the air dose rate over the 18 months between June 2011 and December 2012 was greater than that calculated from radioactive decay of radiocesium by 10% in relative percentage except decontaminated sites. This 10% difference in the reduction of the air dose rate can be explained by the mobility of radiocesium in the depth direction. In the region where the air dose rate was lower than 0.25 ?Sv h?1 on June 2011, the reduction of the air dose rate was observed to be smaller than that of the other dose rate regions, and it was in fact smaller than the reduction rate caused by radioactive decay alone. In contrast, the reduction rate was larger in regions with higher air dose rates. In flat and spatially open locations, no significant difference in the reduction tendency of air dose rates was observed among different land use classifications (rice fields, farmland, forests, and building sites).

Satoshi Mikami; Takeshi Maeyama; Yoshifumi Hoshide; Ryuichi Sakamoto; Shoji Sato; Naotoshi Okuda; Tetsuro Sato; Hiroshi Takemiya; Kimiaki Saito

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Estimation of Molecular and Cytogenetic Effects in Mice Exposed to Chronic Low Dose-Rate Gamma-Radiation  

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Molecular and cytogenetic parameters were estimated in male CBA/lac mice exposed to chronic low dose-rate ?-radiation (62 cGy/year) for 40, 80, 120, 210, and 365 days. After 40 days of exposure (6.7 cGy), sple...

A. N. Osipov; A. L. Elakov; P. V. Puchkov…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A study involving the design and fabrication process on the SRAM behavior during a dose-rate event  

SciTech Connect

The experimental results analysis of TS4T1601 SRAMs in standby mode and electrical simulations show that the SRAM design and some slight mask misalignments during the fabrication process are dominant factors concerning the dose-rate upset patterns and thresholds.

Marec, R.; Gaillard, R. [Nucletudes S.A., Les Ulis (France)] [Nucletudes S.A., Les Ulis (France); Mary, P. [LRBA, Vernon (France)] [LRBA, Vernon (France); Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Centre Electronique de Montpellier] [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Centre Electronique de Montpellier

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and Quality Assurance With the exception of the exposure- and dose-rate conversion factors for portable survey gamma and beta-gamma meters, all survey and laboratory...

55

Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year.

Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ryoshimu@ncc.go.jp; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dosimetric Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy as a Boost to the Prostate  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We compared the dose conformity of two radiation modalities: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to deliver a boost to the prostate after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Ten successive patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with a single 10-Gy HDR BT boost after EBRT were investigated. Four theoretical IMRT plans were computed: (a) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (b) 26 Gy IMRT with CTV-PTV expansions, doses corresponding to the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) of one 10-Gy fraction calculated with a prostate alpha/beta ratio of respectively 1.5 and 3 Gy; and (c) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (d) 26 Gy IMRT without CTV-PTV expansions. The dose-volume histogram values converted in EQD2 with an alpha/beta ratio of 3 Gy for the organs at risk were compared. Results: The HDR BT plan delivered higher mean doses to the PTV compared with IMRT plans. In all, 33% of the rectal volume received a mean dose of 5.32 +- 0.65 Gy and 20% of bladder volume received 4.61 +- 1.24 Gy with HDR BT. In comparison, doses delivered with IMRT were respectively 13.4 +- 1.49 Gy and 10.81 +- 4 Gy, even if only 26 Gy was prescribed to the PTV with no CTV-PTV expansion (p < 0.0001). The hot spots inside the urethra were greater with HDR BT but acceptable. Conclusions: Use of HDR BT produced a more conformal plan for the boost to the prostate than IMRT even without CTV-PTV expansions.

Hermesse, Johanne, E-mail: jhermesse@chu.ulg.ac.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters has been developed for patient dosimetry in high-dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: The necessary calibration and correction factors for MOSFET measurements in {sup 192}Iridium source were determined in a water phantom. With the detector placed inside a custom-made nasopharyngeal applicator, the actual dose delivered to the tumor was measured in vivo and compared to the calculated values using a commercial brachytherapy planning system. Results: Five MOSFETs were independently calibrated with the HDR source, yielding calibration factors of 0.48 {+-} 0.007 cGy/mV. The maximum sensitivity variation was no more than 7% in the clinically relevant distance range of 1-5 cm from the source. A total of 70 in vivo measurements in 11 NPC patients demonstrated good agreement with the treatment planning. The mean differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose within a single treatment fraction were -0.1%{+-} 3.8% and -0.1%{+-} 3.7%, respectively, for right and left side assessments. The maximum dose deviation was less than 8.5%. Conclusions: In vivo measurement using the real-time MOSFET dosimetry system is possible to evaluate the actual dose to the tumor received by the patient during a treatment fraction and thus can offer another line of security to detect and prevent large errors.

Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Cao Xinping; Huang Shaomin; Lerch, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Point kernel technique for calculating dose rates due to cobalt-60 hot particles  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a computer code called BETA that has been developed by health physicists at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station which accounts for the mass and size of hot particles of Cobalt-60, and therefore corrects the Loevinger-based dose calculation for self-absorption.

Thornhill, M.J.; McCarthy, J.T.; Morrissette, R.R.; Leach, B.N. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (US))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

int. j. radiat. biol 2002, vol. 78, no. 7, 593 604 Do low dose-rate bystander eVects in uence domestic radon risks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

int. j. radiat. biol 2002, vol. 78, no. 7, 593± 604 Do low dose-rate bystander eVects in uence that bystander radon risk estimation. eVects can be induced by high-LET radiation even Conclusions : Bystander e of inverse dose-rate eVects by high- exposed to low doses of low-LET radiation (SawantLET radiation

Brenner, David Jonathan

60

R1S-M-2322 TABLE OF EXPOSURE RATE CONSTANTS AND DOSE EQUIVALENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a point source . 4 5. DOSE BUILD-UP FACTORS 7 6. MASS ENERGY ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND LINEAR in units of MeV/photon , (pen/p)air in cm2 /g gives r in R»m2 /Ci«h if the following conversion factors, the contributions from photon energies below 30 keV and X-rays are omitted. (Continue on next page) December 1982

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61

Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter.

Gang Li; Jiayun Xu; Jie Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Characterization of irradiation cell dose rates at the Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watt level is the maximum currently allowed by operational procedures at the Nuclear Science Center for cell operations. Also, 300 watts is the lowest stable power level achievable. TLD measurements are presented for the 100 kW power level.... Gamma exposure rates in R/hr measured by high-range ionization detector, void can not utilized, measurement location A Power Level ( jKW) Core Location ?1 Ex osure Rate (R/hr) 0. 3 1. 0 3. 0 10. 0 30. 0 100. 0 21000 23500 30000 51750 120000...

Jeffords, Eugene Lamarr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Calculation of dose rates during replacement of the 3CL seal tube in the FFTF IEM cell  

SciTech Connect

In September 1996, the seal tube at the 3CL window of the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) failed. Replacement of the seal tube required removing the 3CL master slave manipulator (MSM) and shielding creating a streaming path for radiation from irradiated fuel and activated hardware in the IEM Cell. As a part of the preparation for the seal tube replacement, expected dose rates in the IEM Cell gallery outside the open 3CL penetration during the repair work were evaluated.

Nelson, J.V.

1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

Determination of Radioisotope Content by Measurement of Waste Package Dose Rates - 13394  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this communication is to report the observed correlation between the calculated air kerma rates produced by radioactive waste drums containing untreated ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal slurries with the measured radiation field of each package. Air kerma rates at different distances from the drum surface were calculated with the activity concentrations previously determined by gamma spectrometry of waste samples and the estimated mass, volume and geometry of solid and liquid phases of each waste package. The water content of each waste drum varies widely between different packages. Results will allow determining the total activity of wastes and are intended to complete the previous steps taken to characterize the radioisotope content of wastes packages. (authors)

Souza, Daiane Cristini B.; Gimenes Tessaro, Ana Paula; Vicente, Roberto [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute Brazil, Radioactive Waste Management Department IPEN/GRR, Sao Paulo. SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute Brazil, Radioactive Waste Management Department IPEN/GRR, Sao Paulo. SP. (Brazil)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Estimation of the contribution of photon radiation for measurement of the exposure dose rate of neutron sources based on 252Cf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the estimation of the contribution of photon radiation to the detector readings for measurement of the exposure dose rate and the equivalent activity of neutron ... screens and filters is considered....

N. F. Demchenko; R. N. Minvaliev; V. I. Shipilov…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

An investigation of radon exhalation rate and estimation of radiation doses in coal and fly ash samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal is a technologically important material used for power generation. Its cinder (fly ash) is used in the manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. Coal and its by-products often contain significant amounts of radionuclides, including uranium which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas radon. Burning of coal and the subsequent atmospheric emission cause the redistribution of toxic radioactive trace elements in the environment. In the present study, radon exhalation rates in coal and fly ash samples from the thermal power plants at Kolaghat (W.B.) and Kasimpur (U.P.) have been measured using sealed Can technique having LR-115 type II detectors. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the samples of Kolaghat power station are also measured. It is observed that the radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples from Kolaghat is higher than from coal samples and activity concentration of radionuclides in fly ash is enhanced after the combustion of coal. Fly ash samples from Kasimpur show no appreciable change in radon exhalation. Radiation doses from the fly ash samples have been estimated from radon exhalation rate and radionuclide concentrations.

A.K. Mahur; Rajesh Kumar; Meena Mishra; D. Sengupta; Rajendra Prasad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Computed Tomography-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Safety, Efficacy, and Effect on Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the saftety and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients were recruited, presenting with 140 HCC- lesions. Treatment was performed by CT-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints included local tumor control and overall survival (OS). A matched-pair analysis with patients not receiving brachytherapy was performed. Match criteria included the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score, alpha-fetoprotein, presence, and extent of multifocal disease. For statistical analysis, Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were performed. Results: Mean and median cumulative TTP for all patients (n = 75) were 17.7 and 10.4 months. Five local recurrences were observed. The OS after inclusion reached median times of 19.4 months (all patients), 46.3 months (CLIP score, 0), 20.6 months (CLIP score, 1) 12.7 months, (CLIP score, 2), and 8.3 months (CLIP score, {>=}3). The 1- and 3-year OS were 94% and 65% (CLIP score, 0), 69% and 12% (CLIP score, 1), and 48% and 19% (CLIP score, 2), respectively. Nine complications requiring intervention were encountered in 124 interventions. Matched-pair analysis revealed a significantly longer OS for patients undergoing CT-guided brachytherapy. Conclusion: Based on our results the study treatment could be safely performed. The study treatment had a beneficial effect on OS in patients with advanced HCC, with respect to (and depending on) the CLIP score and compared with OS in a historical control group. A high rate of local control was also observed, regardless of applied dose in a range of 15 to 25 Gy.

Mohnike, Konrad; Wieners, Gero; Schwartz, Franziska; Seidensticker, Max; Pech, Maciej; Ruehl, Ricarda [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Wust, Peter [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Martin-Luther-Krankenhaus, Berlin (Germany); Gademann, Guenther; Peters, Nils [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Berg, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Hepato-Gastroenterologie, Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Malfertheiner, Peter [Klinik fuer Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Ricke, Jens, E-mail: ricke@med.ovgu.d [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Estimation of dose contribution from 226Ra, 232Th and 40K radon exhalation rates in soil samples from Shivalik foot hills in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......than the limit (370 Bq kg1) set in the 1979 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development report. The calculated values...of radon exhalation rate and estimation of radiation doses in coal and fly ash samples. Appl. Radiat. Isot. (2008) 66:401-406......

R. P. Chauhan; Pooja Chauhan; Anil Pundir; Sunil Kamboj; Vakul Bansal; R. S. Saini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments  

SciTech Connect

This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy.

Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

RATES  

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Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

74

RATES  

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Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

75

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

76

Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations. Microscopically involved margins remain a predictor of local and locoregional failure, despite radiation doses >70 Gy. Patients with tumors {>=}6 cm and microscopically involved margins are at high risk of treatment failure and death from the development of distant metastases.

San Miguel, Inigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martin-Algarra, Salvador [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Benchmarking of the 3-D CAD-based Discrete Ordinates code “ATTILA” for dose rate calculations against experiments and Monte Carlo calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) inside and around the diagnostics ports of ITER is performed at PPPL/UCLA using the 3-D, FEM, Discrete Ordinates code, ATTILA, along with its updated FORNAX transmutation/decay gamma library. Other ITER partners assess SDDR using codes based on the Monte Carlo (MC) approach (e.g. MCNP code) for transport calculation and the radioactivity inventory code FISPACT or other equivalent decay data libraries for dose rate assessment. To reveal the range of discrepancies in the results obtained by various analysts, an extensive experimental and calculation benchmarking effort has been undertaken to validate the capability of ATTILA for dose rate assessment. On the experimental validation front, the comparison was performed using the measured data from two SDDR experiments performed at the FNG facility, Italy. Comparison was made to the experimental data and to MC results obtained by other analysts. On the calculation validation front, the ATTILA's predictions were compared to other results at key locations inside a calculation benchmark whose configuration duplicates an upper diagnostics port plug (UPP) in ITER. Both serial and parallel version of ATTILA-7.1.0 are used in the PPPL/UCLA analysis performed with FENDL-2.1/FORNAX databases. In the FNG 1st experimental, it was shown that ATTILA's dose rates are largely over estimated (by ?30–60%) with the ANSI/ANS-6.1.1 flux-to-dose factors whereas the ICRP-74 factors give better agreement (10–20%) with the experimental data and with the MC results at all cooling times. In the 2nd experiment, there is an under estimation in SDDR calculated by both MCNP and ATTILA based on ANSI/ANS-6.1.1 for cooling times up to ?4 days after irradiation. Thereafter, an over estimation is observed (?5–10% with MCNP and ?10–15% with ATTILA). As for the calculation benchmark, the agreement is much better based on ICRP-74 1996 data. The divergence among all dose rate results at ?11 days cooling time is no more than 15% among all participants.

Mahmoud Youssef; Russell Feder; Paola Batistoni; Ulrich Fischer; Shrichand Jakhar; Chikara Konno; Michael Loughlin; Rosaria Villari; Yican Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...background radiation doses in Japan. Finally, health risk...recruited from 63 of 151 households (42%). In Minamisoma’s Haramachi...radon concentration in Japan . J Environ Radioact 65...indoor Rn concentration in Japan . J Environ Radioact 45...International Atomic Energy Agency (2011) Radiation...

Kouji H. Harada; Tamon Niisoe; Mie Imanaka; Tomoyuki Takahashi; Katsumi Amako; Yukiko Fujii; Masatoshi Kanameishi; Kenji Ohse; Yasumichi Nakai; Tamami Nishikawa; Yuuichi Saito; Hiroko Sakamoto; Keiko Ueyama; Kumiko Hisaki; Eiji Ohara; Tokiko Inoue; Kanako Yamamoto; Yukiyo Matsuoka; Hitomi Ohata; Kazue Toshima; Ayumi Okada; Hitomi Sato; Toyomi Kuwamori; Hiroko Tani; Reiko Suzuki; Mai Kashikura; Michiko Nezu; Yoko Miyachi; Fusako Arai; Masanori Kuwamori; Sumiko Harada; Akira Ohmori; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Akio Koizumi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

On the use of a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The goal of this study was to prove the feasibility of using a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector (mPSD) as an in vivo verification tool during {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments.Methods: A three-point detector was built and inserted inside a catheter-positioning template placed in a water phantom. A hyperspectral approach was implemented to discriminate the different optical signals composing the light output at the exit of the single collection optical fiber. The mPSD was tested with different source-to-detector positions, ranging from 1 to 5 cm radially and over 10.5 cm along the longitudinal axis of the detector, and with various integration times. Several strategies for improving the accuracy of the detector were investigated. The device's accuracy in detecting source position was also tested.Results: Good agreement with the expected doses was obtained for all of the scintillating elements, with average relative differences from the expected values of 3.4 {+-} 2.1%, 3.0 {+-} 0.7%, and 4.5 {+-} 1.0% for scintillating elements from the distal to the proximal. A dose threshold of 3 cGy improved the general accuracy of the detector. An integration time of 3 s offered a good trade-off between precision and temporal resolution. Finally, the mPSD measured the radioactive source positioning uncertainty to be no more than 0.32 {+-} 0.06 mm. The accuracy and precision of the detector were improved by a dose-weighted function combining the three measurement points and known details about the geometry of the detector construction.Conclusions: The use of a mPSD for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dosimetry is feasible. This detector shows great promise for development of in vivo applications for real-time verification of treatment delivery.

Therriault-Proulx, Francois [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie and Centre de Recherche du CHU de Quebec, CHU de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Prospective Cohort Study to Compare Treatment Results Between 2 Fractionation Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in Patients With Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.

Huang, Eng-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Sun, Li-Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lan, Jen-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chanchien, Chan-Chao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chong-Jong, E-mail: cjw1010@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naieve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naieve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bangma, Chris H. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measurement of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in fly ash samples from a thermal power plant and estimation of radiation doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ash produced by coal-burning in thermal power station has become a subject of world wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses in construction activities and considerable economic and environmental importance. Fly ash is used in the production of bricks, sheets, cement and also in land filling etc. Indian coals used in thermal power plants are found to have high ash contents, resulting in the production of large amount of fly ash. Coal contains radionuclides including uranium (the source of inert gas radon), Th and K. Thus coal combustion results in enhanced concentration of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. Since these radionuclides concentration in fly ash plays an important role in health physics it is important to measure radionuclides concentration in fly ash. In the present work enhanced radioactivity and radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples collected from a thermal power plant of NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation), Dadri (U.P.) India, have been measured. A high resolution gamma ray spectroscopic system has been used for the measurement of natural radioactivity (226Ra, 232Th and 40K). Gamma spectrometric measurements were carried out at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi using a coaxial n-type \\{HPGe\\} detector (EG&G, ORTEC, Oak Ridge, USA). Activity concentration of 226Ra varies from 81.8 ± 2.2 to 177.3 ± 10.0 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 118.6 ± 7.4 Bq kg?1 and of 232Th from 111.6 ± 3.2 to 178.5 ± 3.9 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 147.0 ± 3.4 Bq kg?1. 40K activity was found to be below detection limit in some samples while other samples have shown potassium activity to vary from 365.9 ± 4.8 to 495.9 ± 6.2 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 352.0 ± 4.5 Bq kg?1. Surface radon exhalation rates (EA) and Mass exhalation rates (EM) in these samples were measured by “Sealed can technique” using LR-115 type II track detectors. EA is found to vary from 80.1 ± 9.3 to 242.7 ± 16.3 mBq m?2 h?1 with an average value 155.5 ± 12.8 mBq m?2 h?1, while EM varies from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 9.3 ± 0.6 mBq kg?1 h?1 with an average value of 6.0 ± 0.5 mBq kg?1 h?1. Radium equivalent activity (Raeq), related to the external gamma dose and internal dose due to radon and its daughters range from 283.2 to 422.4 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 353.9 Bq kg?1. The calculated values of external hazard index (Hex) vary from 0.77 to 1.87 with an average value of 1.03. Most of the samples show the value of Raeq close to the allowed upper limit of 370 Bq kg?1 and Hex close to unity respectively except in two samples. Annual effective dose varies from 0.15 to 0.23 mSv y?1 with an average value 0.19 mSv y?1.

Mamta Gupta; Ajay Kumar Mahur; Rati Varshney; R.G. Sonkawade; K.D. Verma; Rajendra Prasad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The feasibility study and characterization of a two-dimensional diode array in “magic phantom” for high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation treatment technique capable of delivering large dose rates to the tumor. Radiation is delivered using remote afterloaders to drive highly active sources (commonly {sup 192}Ir with an air KERMA strength range between 20 000 and 40 000 U, where 1 U = 1 ?Gy m{sup 2}/h in air) through applicators directly into the patient's prescribed region of treatment. Due to the obvious ramifications of incorrect treatment while using such an active source, it is essential that there are methods for quality assurance (QA) that can directly and accurately verify the treatment plan and the functionality of the remote afterloader. This paper describes the feasibility study of a QA system for HDR brachytherapy using a phantom based two-dimensional 11 × 11 epitaxial diode array, named “magic phantom.”Methods: The HDR brachytherapy treatment plan is translated to the phantom with two rows of 10 (20 in total) HDR source flexible catheters, arranged above and below the diode array “magic plate” (MP). Four-dimensional source tracking in each catheter is based upon a developed fast iterative algorithm, utilizing the response of the diodes in close proximity to the {sup 192}Ir source, sampled at 100 ms intervals by a fast data acquisition (DAQ) system. Using a {sup 192}Ir source in a solid water phantom, the angular response of the developed epitaxial diodes utilized in the MP and also the variation of the MP response as a function of the source-to-detector distance (SDD) were investigated. These response data are then used by an iterative algorithm for source dwelling position determination. A measurement of the average transit speed between dwell positions was performed using the diodes and a fast DAQ.Results: The angular response of the epitaxial diode showed a variation of 15% within 360°, with two flat regions above and below the detector face with less than 5% variation. For SDD distances of between 5 and 30 mm the relative response of the epitaxial diodes used in the MP is in good agreement (within 8%) with radial dose function measurements found within the TG-43 protocol, with SDD of up to 70 mm showing a 40% over response. A method for four-dimensional localization of the HDR source was developed, allowing the source dwell position to be derived within 0.50 mm of the expected position. An estimation of the average transit speed for varying step sizes was determined and was found to increase from (12.8 ± 0.3) up to (38.6 ± 0.4) cm/s for a step size of 2.5 and 50 mm, respectively.Conclusions: Our characterization of the designed QA “magic phantom” with MP in realistic HDR photon fields demonstrates the promising performance for real-time source position tracking in four dimensions and measurements of transit times. Further development of this system will allow a full suite for QA in HDR brachytherapy and analysis, and for future in vivo tracking.

Espinoza, A.; Beeksma, B.; Petasecca, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Cutajar, D.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)] [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Corde, S.; Jackson, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, New South Wales 2031 (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, New South Wales 2031 (Australia)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s data acquisition time) of different brachytherapy seed configurations (with an activity of 0.05 U) throughout a 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 3} Perspex prostate phantom. Conclusions: The newly developed miniature gamma camera component of BrachyView, with its high spatial resolution and real time capability, allows accurate 3D localization of seeds in a prostate phantom. Combination of the gamma camera with TRUS in a single probe will complete the BrachyView system.

Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Meikle, S. [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Bucci, J. A. [St George Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Zaider, M. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

The usefulness of an independent patient-specific treatment planning verification method using a benchmark plan in high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......individual treatment plans, and 18-mm differences...dhfront and dhext. Review of these two cases...cases, a thorough review revealed no human-related...benchmark and individual plans. We found that these...loading patterns of standard loading, manual...using a benchmark plan in high-dose-rate......

Yutaka Takahashi; Masahiko Koizumi; Iori Sumida; Fumiaki Isohashi; Toshiyuki Ogata; Yuichi Akino; Yasuo Yoshioka; Shintaro Maruoka; Shinichi Inoue; Koji Konishi; Kazuhiko Ogawa

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z We welcome updates to the glossary. Please send them to Low Dose. A α=β Ratio: A measure of the curvature of the cell survival curve and a measure of the sensitivity of a tissue or tumor to dose fractionation. The dose at which the linear and quadratic components of cell killing are equal. Abscopal Effect: The radiation response in tissue at a distance from the irradiated site invoked by local irradiation. Absorbed Dose Rate: Absorbed dose divided by the time it takes to deliver that dose. High dose rates are usually more damaging to humans and animals than low-dose rates. This is because repair of damage is more efficient when the dose rate is low. Absorbed Dose: The amount of energy deposited in any substance by ionizing

88

Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were observed for genitourinary/gastrointestinal late complications. Conclusions: These results suggest that definitive radiotherapy using HDR-ICBT with a low cumulative dose schedule (BED, 62 Gy{sub 10} at point A) can provide excellent local control without severe toxicity in nonbulky (<4-cm) early-stage cervical cancer.

Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dose Limits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dose Limits ERAD (Question Posted to ERAD in May 2012) Who do you define as a member of the public for the onsite MEI? This question implies that there may be more than one maximally exposed individual (MEI), one on-site and one off-site, when demonstrating compliance with the Public Dose Limit of DOE Order 458.1. Although all potential MEIs should be considered and documented, as well as the calculated doses and pathways considered, the intent of DOE Order 458.1 is in fact to ultimately identify only one MEI, a theoretical individual who could be either on-site or off-site.

90

Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and UNSCEAR 1988 in Radiation Risk Assessment - Lifetime Total Cancer Mortality Risk Estimates at Low Doses and Low Dose Rates for Low-LET Radiation, Committee on Interagency...

91

Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment  

SciTech Connect

On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other radionuclides. However, we continually see {sup 137}Cs in the groundwater at all contaminated atolls; the turnover time of the groundwater is about 5 y. The {sup 137}Cs can only get to the groundwater by leaching through the soil column when a portion of the soluble fraction of {sup 137}Cs inventory in the soil is transported to the groundwater when rainfall is heavy enough to cause recharge of the aquifer. This process is causing a loss of {sup 137}Cs out of the root zone of the plants that provides an environmental loss constant ({lambda}{sub env}) in addition to radiological decay {lambda}{sub rad}. Consequently, there is an effective rate of loss, {lambda}{sub eff} = {lambda}{sub rad} + {lambda}{sub env} that is the sum of the radiological and environmental-loss decay constants. We have had, and continue to have, a vigorous program to determine the rate of the environmental loss process. What we do know at this time is that the loss of {sup 137}Cs over time is greater than the estimate based on radiological decay only, and that the actual dose received by the Utirik people over 30-, 50-, or 70-y will be less than those presented in this report.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix F Internal Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout F-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page F- Part I. Estimates of Dose...........................................................................................40 Comparison to dose estimates from global fallout

93

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low-Dose Dose-Response of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Dose Rate g-Radiation. Authors: Louise Enns,1 Michael Weinfeld,1 Albert Murtha,1 and Kenneth Bogen2 Institutions: 1Cross Cancer Institute and 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Clinical and environmental exposure to ionizing radiation rarely exceeds 200 cGy. To examine cell proliferation at early times (up to 5 days) post-irradiation, we are utilizing an assay in which single cells encapsulated within ~30- to 70-µm-diameter agarose gel microdrops (GMDs) are exposed and cultured for 4 days at 37°C, then analyzed by flow cytometry (FC). Clonogenic proliferation is measured as the fraction of occupied GMDs containing multicellular microcolonies after 4 days in culture. This assay was applied to human A549 lung cells exposed to gamma

94

Beta-Gamma-Angular Correlation in Na-20  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I r' 2.2 fhm l diameter. The collimators were separated by 5 mm and the second one was located 1.6 mm from the catcher foil. Five catcher foils were attached to a foil holder assembly (see Fig. 1) with a spac- ing of 72' between each foil...-jet technique through a Teflon capillary 1.78 mm in diameter and ~3 m long. The experimental geometry is shown in Fig. 1. The source was produced by depositing the "Na activity on 0.0064 mm aluminized Mylar catcher foils. The source size was defined by a...

Tribble, Robert E.; May, D. P.; Tanner, D. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro  

SciTech Connect

This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

John Leslie Redpath

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

97

Bounding the total-dose response of modern bipolar transistors  

SciTech Connect

The base current in modern bipolar transistors saturates at large total doses once a critical oxide charge is reached. The saturated value of base current is dose-rate independent. Testing implications are discussed.

Kosier, S.L.; Wei, A.; Schrimpf, R.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Combs, W.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane, Crane, IN (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeLaus, M. [Analog Devices, Inc., Wilmington, MA (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Toward Dose Optimization for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Acoustic Neuromas: Comparison of Two Dose Cohorts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe our initial experience of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose reduction comparing two dose cohorts with examination of tumor control rates and serviceable hearing preservation rates. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval, we initiated a retrospective chart review to study the hearing outcomes and tumor control rates. All data were entered into a JMP, version 7.01, statistical spreadsheet for analysis. Results: A total of 89 patients with serviceable hearing had complete serial audiometric data available for analysis. The higher dose cohort included 43 patients treated to 50.4 Gy with a median follow-up (latest audiogram) of 53 weeks and the lower dose cohort included 46 patients treated to 46.8 Gy with a median follow-up of 65 weeks. The tumor control rate was 100% in both cohorts, and the pure tone average was significantly improved in the low-dose cohort (33 dB vs. 40 dB, p = 0.023, chi-square). When the patient data were analyzed at comparable follow-up points, the actuarial hearing preservation rate was significantly longer for the low-dose cohort than for the high-dose cohort (165 weeks vs. 79 weeks, p = .0318, log-rank). Multivariate analysis revealed the dose cohort (p = 0.0282) and pretreatment Gardner-Robertson class (p = 0.0215) to be highly significant variables affecting the hearing outcome. Conclusion: A lower total dose at 46.8 Gy was associated with a 100% local control tumor rate and a greater hearing preservation rate. An additional dose reduction is justified to achieve the optimal dose that will yield the greatest hearing preservation rate without compromising tumor control for these patients.

Andrews, David W. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University (United States)], E-mail: david.andrews@jefferson.edu; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Den, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Paek, Sun Ha [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Downes-Phillips, Beverly [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Willcox, Thomas O. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Bednarz, Greg; Maltenfort, Mitchel; Evans, James J. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix H Internal Dose Estimates from Global Fallout H-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population. 263-MQ-008090 September 30, 2000 H-2 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population of the Continental United Site Part I. Estimates of Dose Lynn R. Anspaugh Lynn R. Anspaugh, Consulting Salt Lake City, UT Report

100

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

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101

detonation rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation rate, detonation velocity, velocity of detonation, V.O.D., detonating velocity, rate of detonation, detonating rate ? Detonationsgeschwindigkeit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimation of radiation doses from 137Cs to frogs in a wetland ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, there is no established methodology to estimate radiation doses to non-human biota. Therefore, in this study, various dose models were used to estimate radiation doses to moor frogs (Rana arvalis) in a wetland ecosystem contaminated with 137Cs. External dose estimations were based on activity concentrations of 137Cs in soil and water, considering changes in habitat over a life-cycle. Internal doses were calculated from the activity concentrations of 137Cs measured in moor frogs. Depending on the dose model used, the results varied substantially. External dose rates ranged from 21 to 160 mGy/y, and internal dose rates varied between 1 and 14 mGy/y. Maximum total dose rates to frogs were below the expected safe level for terrestrial populations, but close to the suggested critical dose rate for amphibians. The results show that realistic assumptions in dose models are particularly important at high levels of contamination.

K. Stark; R. Avila; P. Wallberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

104

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

105

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

106

Neutron dose equivalent meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains. J.R.Brogan 1 , H. Nagasawa 1 , T.A Kato 1 , C.Fallgren 1 , T.Wade 1 . P.Genik 1 , J.B.Little 2 , J.S.Bedford 1 , and M.M.Weil 1 1 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523; 2 Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA 02115 We have recently developed a 'low dose rate' gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding

108

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix G External Dose Estimates from Global Fallout G-1 #12;External Radiation Exposure-MQ-003539 March 15, 2000 G-2 #12;Abstract This report provides estimates of the external radiation-62. Estimates are given on a county by county basis for each month from 1953-1972. The average population dose

109

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix E External Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout E-1 #12;External Radiation Exposure. 1, 1999) E-2 #12;Abstract This report provides estimates of the external radiation exposure of this report to: "Prepare crude estimates of the doses from external irradiation received by the American

110

Rate Schedules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

111

Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined.

Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Original Research Program Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Original Research Program Plan Original Research Program Plan Biological Effects of Low Dose and Dose Rate Radiation Prepared for the Office of Biological and Environmental Research by The Low Dose Radiation Research Program Plan Subcommittee of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. II. Table of Contents Face Page Table of Contents Executive Summary Introduction Program Outline Low Dose Radiation vs. Endogenous Oxidative Damage - The Same or Different? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Understanding Biological Responses to Radiation And Endogenous Damage Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Thresholds for Low Dose Radiation - Fact or Fiction? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs

113

Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

114

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce E. Lehnert  

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E. Lehnert E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory Past Project Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Lehnert, B.E., Cary, R., Gadbois, D. and Gupta G. 2001 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. 1999 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. Publications Lehnert, B.E., Radiation bystander effects. U.S.Department of Energy Research News (March 6 issue) Goldberg, Z. and Lehnert, B.E. (2002). Radiation-induced effects in

115

ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have participated include: Derivation of DCGLs for the Curtis Bay and Hammond depots Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station dose assessment study Radium timepiece dose modeling...

116

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

117

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

118

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Rate schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

120

Estimates of dose rates during the dismantling of JET  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......details of the neutron production scenarios to provide an input for the FISPACT calculations. This inventory code calculates...Great Britain Models, Statistical Monte Carlo Method Neutrons Nuclear Fusion Occupational Exposure analysis Particle Accelerators instrumentation......

M. J. Loughlin; R. P. Nathan

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ACDOS2: AN IMPROVED NEUTRON-INDUCED DOSE RATE CODE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o! *cr t i n i «,5iiE-*t . ;aoc*02 icnn;i .ni'. -n fJ-EIHIPSM'M . -^'.vT^nj 2Vlf6l . *aoc»oi il % I f 7 I P .J^BT'Q?

Lagache, J-C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ACDOS2: AN IMPROVED NEUTRON-INDUCED DOSE RATE CODE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of copper. From the "chart of nuclides', 9th edition, 1966:molyb­ denum from the "chart of nuclides" 9th edition, 1966,

Lagache, J-C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Beta Particle Dose Rates to Micro-Organisms in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Copyright 1977 Japan Radiation Research Society May 1977 research-article Articles Beta Particle...soil are constantly exposed to betaradiations arising from the naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields......

M. Kabir; F.W. Spiers; T.A Iinuma

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at different dose-rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of breakage. These breakages may be due to the physiochemical changes affecting the nucleic acid structure within one or more of the chromatin strands; this is in accordance with the "target theory. " Evans (21) states that after the initial breakage.... The somatic mutation theory purposes that ageing is caused by a gradual accumulation of mutations. Curtis has shown that chroaosomal aberrations of the liver cells increase steadily with age (19). Ionizing radiaticns shorten the lifespan and also increase...

McDaniel, Jackson Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR C01WONENTS LawrenceNeutron Activation of Fusion Reactor Components Lawrence

Ruby, Lawrence

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - ascending dose tolerance Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARTICLE Radiation Biology in Brachytherapy Summary: , is reviewed with emphasis on low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy). Some of the newer alternatives that have... recently been...

128

Dose and Time Relationships for Tumor Induction in the Liver and Esophagus of 4080 Inbred Rats by Chronic Ingestion of N-Nitrosodiethylamine or N-Nitrosodimethylamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ingestion in the drinking water of 16 different doses...proportional to the fourth power of dose rate + 0.04...proportional to the sixth power of dose rate + 0.1 mg...dose-response experiment on the car cinogenic effects of NDEA3...chronically in the drink ing water of 4080 inbred Colworth...

Richard Peto; Richard Gray; Paul Brantom; and Paul Grasso

1991-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

131

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

132

Radioadaptation in Neural Stem Cells Exposed to Low Dose Irradiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioadaptation in Neural Stem Cells Exposed to Low Dose Irradiation Radioadaptation in Neural Stem Cells Exposed to Low Dose Irradiation Charles Limoli University of California, Irvine Abstract In the CNS, irradiation of multipotent neural stem and precursor cells has been shown to cause a persistent oxidative stress that impacts radiosensitivity, mitochondrial function, and cell fate. The nature, magnitude and duration of reactive species dictates whether these radiation-induced changes are harmful or beneficial to a variety of in vitro and in vivo endpoints of viability and function. We have shown that acute low dose irradiation (2-10 cGy) can elicit significant increases in reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species over several days post-exposure. These changes can be attenuated when the dose is protracted over several weeks using a 57Co flood source having a surface dose rate of

133

Fractional Doses of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine in Oman  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...paracetamol, and instructions were given to parents to administer 50 mg every 8 hours for 3 days. Infants were evaluated for adverse events through home visits conducted at 24 hours after each vaccination by qualified medical staff members who were aware of the study-vaccination assignments. In addition... Determining an economically sustainable way to deliver the poliovirus vaccine remains a challenge and a priority. In this article, investigators in Oman show that with a one-fifth dose of the inactivated poliovirus vaccine given intradermally, the seroconversion rates at 7 months of age to all three poliovirus serotypes were equivalent to the rates with the standard full-dose vaccine given intramuscularly. However the median antibody titers were lower with the fractional dose than with the full dose.

Mohammed A.J.; AlAwaidy S.; Bawikar S.

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the workforce, and Pollution and the Persian Gulf SIR - The waters of the Persian Gulf are not well confined. The average annual evaporation rate of the Persian Gulf is about 1.5 m yr-`(ref. 1). Esti- mates of relevant, despite the narrowness of the Strait of Hormuz, which links the Gulf to the Arabian Sea. Renewal of Gulf

Shlyakhter, Ilya

135

Low Dose Radiation Program: 2010 Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop »» Event Slide Show More than 150 people attended this year's workshop, held April 12-14 at the Renaissance M Street Hotel in Washington, D.C. In addition to 34 plenary talks and more than 70 poster presentations made by the program investigators, participants heard guest speakers from the National Cancer Institute and from sister low-dose programs in Europe and Japan. Remarks from DOE Dr. Anna Palmisano, Associate Director, Office of Science, Director for Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcomed the meeting participants, thanked Low Dose Radiation Research Program Manager Dr. Noelle Metting for her leadership, and acknowledged the importance of the Low Dose Program to DOE because of its unique focus and important role. She

136

Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Radiation Doses  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were resectable T3 and T4 tumors with a circumferential margin of {<=}5 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the tumor and pelvic lymph nodes (arm A) or the same treatment supplemented with an endorectal boost given as high-dose-rate brachytherapy (10 Gy in 2 fractions; arm B). Concomitant chemotherapy, uftoral 300 mg/m{sup 2} and L-leucovorin 22.5 mg/d, was added to both arms on treatment days. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic remission. The secondary endpoints included tumor response and rate of complete resection (R0). Results: The study included 248 patients. No significant difference was found in toxicity or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Based on intention to treat, no significant difference was found in the complete pathologic remission rate between the 2 arms (18% and 18%). The rate of R0 resection was different in T3 tumors (90% and 99%; P=.03). The same applied to the rate of major response (tumor regression grade, 1+2), 29% and 44%, respectively (P=.04). Conclusions: This first randomized trial comparing 2 radiation doses indicated that the higher dose increased the rate of major response by 50% in T3 tumors. The endorectal boost is feasible, with no significant increase in toxicity or surgical complications.

Jakobsen, Anders, E-mail: anders.jakobsen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark) [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Ploen, John [University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)] [University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Vuong, Te [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Appelt, Ane [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark) [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Soren R. [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)] [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments  

SciTech Connect

Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from {sup 137}Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y{sup -1}. The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} to 4.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiation protection in inhomogeneous beta–gamma fields and modelling of hand phantoms with MCNPX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......performed using the MCNPX software. In order to investigate...recommendations regarding radiation protection measures...Karlsruhe GmbH, Central Safety Department, KES...Simulation Gamma Rays Hand radiation effects Humans Models...radiation effects Software...

Ch. Blunck; F. Becker; L. Hegenbart; B. Heide; J. Schimmelpfeng; M. Urban

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rates & Repayment  

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Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current and Historical Rate Information Collbran Power Rates CRSP Power Rates CRSP Transmission System Rates CRSP Management Center interest rates Falcon-Amistad Power Rates Provo River Power Rates Rio Grande Power Rates Seedskadee Power Rates SLCA/IP Power Rates Rate Schedules & Supplemental Rate Information Current Rates for Firm Power, Firm & Non-firm Transmission Service, & Ancillary Services Current Transmission & Ancillary Services Rates Tariffs Components of the SLCA/IP Existing Firm Power Rate Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Page MOA Concerning the Upper Colorado River Basin

140

Evaluation of the Linear-Nonthreshold Dose-Response Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements MD: NCRP (2001) 287 pp, $50.00 Lively debate continues on the nature of the dose-response relationship for the excess risk of cancer following exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and/or low dose rates. Clearly, these are the exposure conditions of principal importance to radiological protection. Presently, for the purposes of radiological protection, the assumption is made that the underlying dose-response relationship is linear-quadratic with no threshold, and that in the low dose and/or low dose rate region this curve can be approximated by a straight line with a gradient half that of the linear relationship which (for cancers other than leukaemia) is appropriate for moderate to high doses received at high dose rates. This, in essence, is the `linear-nonthreshold (LNT) dose-response model' referred to in the title of NCRP Report No 136. The debate centres on whether this model is appropriate or not; but it is complicated by the marked polarisation of those that disagree with this model and with the vehemence that characterises the debate. At one extreme are those who argue for a supra-linear dose-response and claim that the assumption of linearity seriously underestimates the risks to health of low dose exposures. At the other extreme are those who argue for a threshold in the dose-response at some non-zero dose, or even for beneficial effects of irradiation at low doses (`radiation hormesis'). Understandably, the former viewpoint tends to be held by anti-nuclear activists whereas the latter tends to be adopted by pro-nuclear pressure groups, and this political backdrop does not assist a balanced discussion of this important issue. In the USA, considerable lobbying exists from the threshold/hormesis camp, and this can also be seen in France and Japan. Unfortunately, although there are reasonable scientific points to be made in favour of mechanisms that ameliorate the effects of radiation at low doses, the attitude struck by some in this camp is that support of the `LNT hypothesis' is quite unreasonable and flies in the face of the evidence. Obviously, this point of view brings into question the motivation of those who support the position presently adopted by, for example, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and leads to acrimonious and unconstructive discussions. The same is true of the other extreme wing, where radiological protection is viewed as being disturbingly lax as a result of pressure being brought to bear by the `military-industrial complex', with scientists being complicit in this conspiracy. It is into this storm that NCRP has bravely marched in publishing its Report No 136. The re-evaluation of the scientific evidence reported in NCRP Report No 136 was carried out by Scientific Committee 1-6 of the NCRP which was charged to `reassess the weight of scientific evidence for and against the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model, without reference to associated policy implications'. In essence, the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model is based upon the assumption that biological damage which, if unrepaired, could lead to cancer is directly proportional to dose throughout the range of dose and dose rates of importance in routine radiological protection. Not only did NCRP Scientific Committee 1-6 deliberate amongst themselves, but the committee sought and obtained written and oral opinion from several scientists in the USA who held different views on the subject. The report begins by examining the way in which radiation energy is deposited in cells. It concludes that at low doses and low dose rates the relevant biological damage would be produced by a `single hit' because of the spatial and temporal sparseness of the events causing the damage. Since cancer is considered to be monoclonal (single cell) in origin, this suggests that the dose-response is linear at low doses with no threshold. However, it is possible that the whole organism may be more capable of repairing damage at low doses and low dose rates, which would m

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141

PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE  

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PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTON EFFECTS ON CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE EXPRESSION AFTER WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION Asma Rizvi 2 , George Coutrakon 1 , James M. Slater 1 , Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 and Daila S. Gridley 1,2 Departments. of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University & Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 Astronauts are exposed to low dose/low dose rate radiation (LDR) and may also be acutely irradiated during a solar particle event (SPE). The biological effects of LDR alone and when combined with a solar particle event, are not yet clearly understood. Previous studies have shown that irradiation can have adverse effects on T cells. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced as a result of radiation can alter or damage the

142

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A" 917 A" 917 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. - FORMER LOOW SITE Summary Report Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1981 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION. CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES .. .. . .. . . . . . . . ......... iii LIST OF TABLES ......... .. iv INTRODUCTION .. ......... 1 OBJECTIVE .................... 1 SURVEY TECHNIQUES . . ............. ...... 1 RESULTS ..... 2 Gamma-Ray Exposure Rates . . . . . . 2 Beta-Gamma Dose Rate ............. 2 226Ra in Soil ............ 3 CONCLUSIONS .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. 3 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . .

143

7 - Estimation of Radiation Doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Radiation doses to the Japanese population from inhalation of contaminated air, external irradiation, terrestrial and marine food contamination are estimated and compared with other sources of anthropogenic (global fallout, Chernobyl accident), natural (radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation) and medical applications (X-ray tests, CT-tests, etc.) of ionizing radiation. The estimated doses from inhalation, ingestion of terrestrial and marine food, and radiation exposure from radioactive clouds and deposited radionuclides were generally below the levels which could cause health damage of the Japanese population, as well as of the world population. The estimated total radiation doses to fish and shellfish in coastal waters during the largest radionuclide releases were by a factor of 10 lower than the baseline safe level postulated for the marine organisms, therefore no harmful effects are expected for the marine ecosystem as well.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiation dose and image quality in K-edge subtraction computed tomography of lung in vivo  

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Radiation dose dependency of image quality was showed in in vivo rabbit lung images with and without a contrast agent using the synchrotron-radiation-based K-edge subtraction method. Consistency of the theoretical and measured radiation dose rate values was found.

Strengell, S.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Custom Device for Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Biological Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the structural material is efficient to absorb most of the cosmic-ray energy and reduce the interior dose rate to below 1.2 mGy per day. However, the biological effects of prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation are not well understood. The purpose...

Bi, Ruoming

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of damage rate on irradiation hardening and post-irradiation annealing characteristics of carbon steel  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement in a low dose region was studied for an aluminum-killed carbon steel from the point of dose rate effects. The dose rate as low as {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/s (E > 1 MeV) caused a Charpy transition temperature shift of more than 30 C after irradiation to {approximately}10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) at 240 C, while a similar amount of Charpy shift was observed after {approximately}10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) at higher dose rate ({approximately}7 {times} 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2}/s). The effect of dose rate was obvious in the annealing response on hardness. The recovery characteristic indicated that more stable defects were produced in the material irradiated at a lower dose rate.

Suzuki, Masahide; Idei, Yoshio; Kizaki, Minoru; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bioassay and dose measurement in UV disinfection.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactors. Bioassay and dose measurement in UV disinfection...determined as a function of UV dose to prepare a standard...Sewage Spores, Bacterial radiation effects Sterilization...Microbiology Bioassay and Dose Measurement in UV Disinfection...meth- ods of UV dose estimation used in previous studies...

R G Qualls; J D Johnson

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect

Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C.F. [Martin Marietta Utility Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

RADIATION DOSE FROM CIGARETTE TOBACCO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides such as 226 Ra and 210 Pb of the uranium series and 228 Ra of the thorium series and/or man?made produced radionuclides such as 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma?ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226 Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6?? Sv ? y ?1 (average 79.7?? Sv ? y ?1 ) while for 228 Ra from 19.3 to 116.0?? Sv ? y ?1 (average 67.1?? Sv ? y ?1 ) and for 210 Pb from 47.0 to 134.9?? Sv ? y ?1 (average 104.7?? Sv ? y ?1 ) that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3?? Sv ? y ?1 (average 251.5?? Sv ? y ?1 ). The annual effective dose from 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4? nSv ? y ?1 (average 199.3? nSv ? y ?1 ).

C. Papastefanou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

152

An evaluation of stray neutron interference with routine thermoluminescent dosimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and measured characteristics of the neutron calibration ran e Source- Detector Distance Scattered Fraction of Direct Flux Calculated Flux Density (n/Sec-cm2) Measured Normalized cps cps 80 cm 90 cm 100 cm 120 cm 200 cm 609 cm 0. 076 0. 093... be appropriate. The gamma dose rate was measured with a standard beta/gamma survey meter (Victoreen 440) and found to be approximately 10 MRad/hr in both positions 1 and 2. 26 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Rem-meter calibration The calculated neutron flux density...

Bliss, John Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Brenner* Abstract--There is strong evidence that ionizing radiation increases cancer risks at high doses. There exists a range of high radiation doses which demonstra- bly increase cancer risks, and a lower dose rangePaper EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES David J

Brenner, David Jonathan

154

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choices (2003-06) Power Function Review (PFR) Firstgov Power Rate Cases BPA's wholesale power rates are set to recover its costs and repay the U.S. Treasury for the Federal...

155

Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1?, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-?. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naïve T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose ?-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

Suk Chul Shin; Kyung-Mi Lee; Yu Mi Kang; Kwanghee Kim; Cha Soon Kim; Kwang Hee Yang; Young-Woo Jin; Chong Soon Kim; Hee Sun Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

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Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

158

Radiation dose from cigarette tobacco  

SciTech Connect

The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb of the uranium series and {sup 228}Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made produced radionuclides, such as {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for {sup 226}Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 79.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), while for {sup 228}Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 67.1 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}) and for {sup 210}Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 104.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 251.5 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). The annual effective dose from {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv y{sup -1} (average 199.3 nSv y{sup -1})

Papastefanou, C. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reassessment of the potential radiological doses for residents resettling Enewetak Atoll  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to refine the dose predictions, subsequent to the cleanup effort, for alternate living patterns proposed for resettlement of Enewetak Atoll. The most recent data developed from projects at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls for concentration and uptake of Cs, Sr, Pu, and Am were used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to predict annual dose rates and 30- and 50-y integral doses (dose commitments). The terrestrial food chain in the most significant exposure pathway - it contributes more than 50% of the total dose - and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation.

Robison, W.L.; Phillips, W.A.; Mount, M.E.; Clegg, B.R.; Conrado, C.L.

1980-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose  

SciTech Connect

The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

Weber, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Computer aided warfarin dosing in the Swedish national quality registry AuriculA – Algorithmic suggestions are performing better than manually changed doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction Warfarin treatment with a high time in therapeutic range (TTR) is correlated to fewer complications. The TTR in Sweden is generally high but varies partly depending on local expertise and traditions. A dosing algorithm could minimize variations and increase treatment quality. Here we evaluate the performance of a computerized dosing algorithm. Materials and methods 53.779 warfarin treated patients from 125 centers using the Swedish national quality registry AuriculA. If certain criteria are met, the algorithm gives one of seven possible dose suggestions, which can be unchanged, decreased or increased weekly dose by 5, 10 or 15%. The outcome evaluated by the resulting INR value was compared between dose suggestions arising from the algorithm that were accepted and those that were manually changed. There were no randomization, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Results Both the algorithm-based and the manually changed doses had worse outcome if only two instead of three previous INR values were available. The algorithm suggestions were superior to manual dosing regarding percent samples within the target range 2-3 (hit-rate) or deviation from INR 2.5 (mean error). Of the seven possible outcomes from the algorithm, six were significantly superior and one equal to the manually changed doses when three previous INR:s were present. Conclusions The algorithm-based dosing suggestions show better outcome in most cases. This can make dosing of warfarin easier and more efficient. There are however cases where manual dosing fares better. Here the algorithm will be improved to further enhance its dosing performance in the future.

Bartosz Grzymala-Lubanski; Sara Själander; Henrik Renlund; Peter J. Svensson; Anders Själander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Population doses from environmental gamma radiation in Iraq  

SciTech Connect

The exposure rates due to external gamma radiation were measured in 11 Iraqi governerates. Measurements were performed with an Environmental Monitoring System (RSS-111) in open air 1 m above the ground. The average absorbed dose rate in each governerate was as follows (number x 10(-2) microGy h-1): Babylon (6.0), Kerbala (5.3), Al-Najaf (5.4), Al-Kadysia (6.5), Wasit (6.5), Diala (6.5), Al-Anbar (6.5), Al-Muthana (6.6), Maisan (6.8), Thee-Kar (6.6), and Al-Basrah (6.5). The collective doses to the population living in these governerates were 499, 187, 239, 269, 262, 458, 384, 153, 250, 450, and 419 person-Sv, respectively.

Marouf, B.A.; Mohamad, A.S.; Taha, J.S.; al-Haddad, I.K. (Iraq Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Research Center, Tuwaitha, Baghdad, (Iraq))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

164

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in Six National Parks Stephen A. Diamond,1 ABSTRACT Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280­320-nm wave- lengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates

Knapp, Roland

165

Updated radiological dose assessment of Bikini and Eneu Islands at Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a continuing effort to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Radionuclide concentration data developed at Bikini Atoll since 1977 have been used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to develop the annual dose rate and 30- and 50-y integral doses presented here for Bikini and Eneu Island living patterns. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant exposure pathway--it contributes more than 50% of the total dose--and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation. Cesium-137 produces more than 85% of the predicted dose; /sup 90/Sr is the second most significant radionuclide; /sup 60/Co contributes to the external gamma exposure in varying degrees, but is a small part of the total predicted dose; the transuranic radionuclides contribute a small portion of the total predicted lung and bone doses but do present a long-term source of exposure. Maximum annual dose rates for Bikini Island are about 1 rem/y for the whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and about 1.9 rem/y when imports are unavailable. Maximum annual dose rates for Eneu Island when imports are available are 130 mrem/y for the whole body and 136 mrem/y for bone marrow. Similar doses when imported foods are unavailable are 245 and 263 mrem/y, respectively. The 30-y integral doses for Bikini Island are about 23 rem for whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and more than 40 rem when imports are unavailable. The Eneu Island 30-y integral doses for whole body and bone marrow are about 3 rem when imports are available and 5.5 and 6.1 rem, respectively, when imports are unavailable. Doses from living patterns involving some combination of Bikini and Eneu Islands fall between the doses listed above for each island separately.

Robison, W.L.; Mount, M.E.; Phillips, W.A.; Stuart, M.L.; Thompson, S.E.; Conrado, C.L.; Stoker, A.C.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton's duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT replanning in 8 patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results: Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%){sup Gy} as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses {<=}39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%){sup Gy} as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT replanning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving {<=}39 Gy in 5 of 8 patients, without target underdosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2-3 Gy. Conclusions: SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target underdosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs.

Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne [Department of Oral Medicine/Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, Hyugnjin M. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ship, Jonathan [Department of Oral Medicine/Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks D of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radi. Keywords: Low dose risk estimation; Effective dose; Flawed definition; Effective risk 1. INTRODUCTION

Brenner, David Jonathan

168

Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF . To estimate the possible risks, the doses receivedBiological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high

Boyer, Edmond

169

Comparison of 50-year and 70-year internal-dose-conversion factors  

SciTech Connect

The 50-year inhalation and ingestion dose commitments associated with an acute intake (of a radionuclide) of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq (1 ..mu..Ci) in one day were compared with the corresponding dose commitments calculated for a 70-year integration period resulting from a chronic intake of the same amount at a rate of 101 Bq/d (0.00274 ..mu..Ci/d) for one year. These values, known as dose conversion factors, estimate the dose accumulated during a given period of time following a unit of intake of a radionuclide. It was demonstrated that the acute intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq in one day and the chronic intake of 101 Bq/d for one year (a total intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq) result in essentially the same dose commitment for a relatively long integration period. Therefore, the comparison of 50-year acute dose conversion factors and 70-year chronic dose conversion factors is essentially only a measure of the additional dose accumulated in the 50 to 70 year period. It was found that for radionuclides with atomic mass less than 200 the percent difference in the 70-year and 50-year dose conversion factors was essentially zero in most cases. Differences of approximately 5 to 50% were obtained for dose conversion factors for most alpha emitters with atomic masses of greater than 200. Comparisons were made on the basis of both organ dose equivalent and effective dose equivalent. The implications and significance of these results are discussed.

Ryan, M.T.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

Schlaefer, Alexander [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany)] [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Viulet, Tiberiu [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562 (Germany)] [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562 (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)] [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

rates | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rates rates Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

172

Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations have been demonstrated.

Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 and Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

No-threshold dose-response curves for nongenotoxic chemicals: Findings and applications for risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

We tested the hypothesis that no threshold exists when estradiol acts through the same mechanism as an active endogenous estrogen. A Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation accounting for response saturation, background effects, and endogenous estrogen level fit a turtle sex-reversal data set with no threshold and estimated the endogenous dose. Additionally, 31 diverse literature dose-response data sets were analyzed by adding a term for nonhormonal background; good fits were obtained but endogenous dose estimations were not significant due to low resolving power. No thresholds were observed. Data sets were plotted using a normalized MM equation; all 178 data points were accommodated on a single graph. Response rates from {approx}1% to >95% were well fit. The findings contradict the threshold assumption and low-dose safety. Calculating risk and assuming additivity of effects from multiple chemicals acting through the same mechanism rather than assuming a safe dose for nonthresholded curves is appropriate.

Sheehan, Daniel M. [Daniel M. Sheehan and Associates, 1422 Scott St., Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States)]. E-mail: dansheeh@swbell.net

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice K Taylor, N Phan, ME Cybulski, L Laframboise, DR Boreham Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high dose rates using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been postulated that human exposure to medical imaging involving low doses of x-rays and gamma rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their lifetime. Conversely, there is evidence that low doses of gamma radiation increase the latency period of cancer depending upon genotype, cancer type, and the magnitude of

175

VMAT QA: Measurement-guided 4D dose reconstruction on a patient  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop and validate a volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) tool that takes as input a time-resolved, low-density ({approx}10 mm) cylindrical surface dose map from a commercial helical diode array, and outputs a high density, volumetric, time-resolved dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. This first validation study is limited to a homogeneous 'patient.'Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array phantom (ARCCHECK, Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high-density volumetric dose using measurement-guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning dose on the patient dataset, producing a semiempirical volumetric dose grid. Four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing individual sub-beam doses instead of the composite. For conventional (3D) dose comparison two methods were developed, using the four plans (Multi-Target, C-shape, Mock Prostate, and Head and Neck), including their structures and objectives, from the AAPM TG-119 report. First, 3DVH and treatment planning system (TPS) cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water-equivalent phantom ('patient'). The shape of the phantom is different from the ARCCHECK and furthermore the targets were placed asymmetrically. Second, coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. For time-resolved (4D) comparisons, three tests were performed. First, volumetric dose differences were calculated between the 3D MGDR and cumulative time-resolved patient (4D MGDR) dose at the end of delivery, where they ideally should be identical. Second, time-resolved (10 Hz sampling rate) ion chamber doses were compared to cumulative point dose vs time curves from 4D MGDR. Finally, accelerator output was varied to assess the linearity of the 4D MGDR with global fluence change. Results: Across four TG-119 plans, the average PTV point dose difference in the cube between 3DVH and ion chamber is 0.1 {+-} 1.0%. Average film vs TPS {gamma}-analysis passing rates are 83.0%, 91.1%, and 98.4% for 1%/2 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 3%/3 mm threshold combinations, respectively, while average film vs 3DVH {gamma}-analysis passing rates are 88.6%, 96.1%, and 99.5% for the same respective criteria. 4D MGDR was also sufficiently accurate. First, for 99.5% voxels in each case, the doses from 3D and 4D MGDR at the end of delivery agree within 0.5%local dose-error/1 mm distance. Moreover, all failing voxels are confined to the edge of the cylindrical reconstruction volume. Second, dose vs time curves track between the ion chamber and 4D MGDR within 1%. Finally, 4D MGDR dose changes linearly with the accelerator output: the difference between cumulative ion chamber and MGDR dose changed by no more than 1% (randomly) with the output variation range of 10%. Conclusions: Even for a well-commissioned TPS, comparison metrics show better agreement on average to MGDR than to TPS on the arbitrary-shaped measurable 'patient.' The method requires no more accelerator time than standard QA, while producing more clinically relevant information. Validation in a heterogeneous thoracic phantom is under way, as is the ultimate application of 4D MGDR to virtual motion studies.

Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Robinson, Joshua; Wolf, Theresa K.; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Historical Interest Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current and Historical Interest Rates Current and Historical Interest Rates The table lists interest rates, from the project's inception through the present, for all projects with repayment supervised by the CRSP MC. The latest available interest rate is used for all future interest rate calculations. The Amistad-Falcon, Collbran, Provo River, and Rio Grande Projects are all assigned the average daily "Yield Rate" calculated by the U.S. Treasury, on an annual basis, for Treasury bonds having terms of 15 years or more remaining to maturity. The calculated yield rate is rounded to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. The yield rate is based upon the bond's interest rate, as well as its market value. The Colorado River Storage Project and its participating projects, Dolores and Seedskadee, are assigned the average daily "Coupon Rate," annualized for the same U.S. Treasury bonds used in "Yield Rate" calculations. The coupon rate is the interest rate that the bond carries upon its face.

177

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

178

Low dose ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in  

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ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Recent evidence suggest that the causes of cancer development are not limited to mutations within cancer cells, but also involve in alterations of cancer microenvironment. Senescent cells are irreversibly growth arrested, but remain metabolically active. Senescent cells, especially senescent fibroblasts in the stroma may provide a beneficial environment for tumor growth through secretion of certain factors. Accumulation of senescent cells in the stroma of patients repeatedly exposed to low doses of IR or low dose rates of IR, could be an important factor, causing alteration of the microenvironment that ultimately benefits tumor

179

Improvements in dose accuracy delivered with static-MLC IMRT on an integrated linear accelerator control system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dose accuracy has been shown to vary with dose per segment and dose rate when delivered with static multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Varian C-series MLC controllers. The authors investigated the impact of monitor units (MUs) per segment and dose rate on the dose delivery accuracy of SMLC-IMRT fields on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC), which delivers dose and manages motion of all components using a single integrated controller. Methods: An SMLC sequence was created consisting of ten identical 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} segments with identical MUs. Beam holding between segments was achieved by moving one out-of-field MLC leaf pair. Measurements were repeated for various combinations of MU/segment ranging from 1 to 40 and dose rates of 100-600 MU/min for a 6 MV photon beam (6X) and dose rates of 800-2400 MU/min for a 10 MV flattening-filter free photon (10XFFF) beam. All measurements were made with a Farmer (0.6 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber placed at the isocenter in a solid-water phantom at 10 cm depth. The measurements were performed on two Varian LINACs: C-series Trilogy and TrueBeam. Each sequence was delivered three times and the dose readings for the corresponding segments were averaged. The effects of MU/segment, dose rate, and LINAC type on the relative dose variation ({Delta}{sub i}) were compared using F-tests ({alpha} = 0.05). Results: On the Trilogy, large {Delta}{sub i} was observed in small MU segments: at 1 MU/segment, the maximum {Delta}{sub i} was 10.1% and 57.9% at 100 MU/min and 600 MU/min, respectively. Also, the first segment of each sequence consistently overshot ({Delta}{sub i} > 0), while the last segment consistently undershot ({Delta}{sub i} < 0). On the TrueBeam, at 1 MU/segment, {Delta}{sub i} ranged from 3.0% to 4.5% at 100 and 600 MU/min; no obvious overshoot/undershoot trend was observed. F-tests showed statistically significant difference [(1 - {beta}) =1.0000] between the Trilogy and the TrueBeam up to 10 MU/segment, at all dose rates greater than 100 MU/min. The linear trend of decreasing dose accuracy as a function of increasing dose rate on the Trilogy is no longer apparent on TrueBeam, even for dose rates as high as 2400 MU/min. Dose inaccuracy averaged over all ten segments in each beam delivery sequence was larger for Trilogy than TrueBeam, with the largest discrepancy (0.2% vs 3%) occurring for 1 MU/segment beams at both 300 and 600 MU/min. Conclusions: Earlier generations of Varian LINACs exhibited large dose variations for small MU segments in SMLC-IMRT delivery. Our results confirmed these findings. The dose delivery accuracy for SMLC-IMRT is significantly improved on TrueBeam compared to Trilogy for every combination of low MU/segment (1-10) and high dose rate (200-600 MU/min), in part due to the faster sampling rate (100 vs 20 Hz) and enhanced electronic integration of the MLC controller with the LINAC. SMLC-IMRT can be implemented on TrueBeam with higher dose accuracy per beam ({+-}0.2% vs {+-}3%) than previous generations of Varian C-series LINACs for 1 MU/segment delivered at 600 MU/min).

Li Ji; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Stepaniak, Christopher J.; Farrey, Karl J.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of the embolization material in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations  

SciTech Connect

It is reported in the literature that the material used in an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can attenuate the radiation beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) up to 10% to 15%. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric impact of this attenuating material in the SRS treatment of embolized AVMs, using Monte Carlo simulations assuming clinical conditions. A commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation engine was used to recalculate the dose distribution of 20 AVMs previously planned with a pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Dose distributions were compared using the following metrics: average, minimal and maximum dose of AVM, and 2D gamma index. The effect in the obliteration rate was investigated using radiobiological models. It was found that the dosimetric impact of the embolization material is less than 1.0 Gy in the prescription dose to the AVM for the 20 cases studied. The impact in the obliteration rate is less than 4.0%. There is reported evidence in the literature that embolized AVMs treated with SRS have low obliteration rates. This work shows that there are dosimetric implications that should be considered in the final treatment decisions for embolized AVMs.

Galván de la Cruz, Olga Olinca [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel, E-mail: jlarraga@innn.edu.mx [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Celis, Miguel Angel [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

ORISE: Radiation Dose Estimates and Other Compendia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downloaded free from the Adobe website. Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation (PDF) This article addresses methods that can be used to rapidly estimate internal...

182

Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Medical Radiation Research Center, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, B1002 WIMR, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, R.A.

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

185

Coherence principles in dose-finding studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Trust December 2005 Article Articles Coherence principles in dose-finding studies...Revised April 2005. This paper studies the coherence conditions of dose-finding methods...toxic outcome has just been seen. The coherence conditions, motivated by ethical concerns......

Ying Kuen Cheung

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient. Phys...C. A. and Persliden, J. Energy imparted to the patient in diagnostic...factors for determining the energy imparted from measurements of...dental radiology. | Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality......

Ebba Helmrot; Gudrun Alm Carlsson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island  

SciTech Connect

We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An algorithm to calculate a collapsed arc dose matrix in volumetric modulated arc therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is more complex than other conformal radiotherapy techniques. In this work, the authors present the feasibility of performing routine verification of VMAT delivery using a dose matrix measured by a gantry mounted 2D ion chamber array and corresponding dose matrix calculated by an inhouse developed algorithm.Methods: Pinnacle, v9.0, treatment planning system (TPS) was used in this study to generate VMAT plans for a 6 MV photon beam from an Elekta-Synergy linear accelerator. An algorithm was developed and implemented with inhouse computer code to calculate the dose matrix resulting from a VMAT arc in a plane perpendicular to the beam at isocenter. The algorithm was validated using measurement of standard patterns and clinical VMAT plans with a 2D ion chamber array. The clinical VMAT plans were also validated using ArcCHECK measurements. The measured and calculated dose matrices were compared using gamma ({gamma}) analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria and {gamma} tolerance of 1.Results: The dose matrix comparison of standard patterns has shown excellent agreement with the mean {gamma} pass rate 97.7 ({sigma}= 0.4)%. The validation of clinical VMAT plans using the dose matrix predicted by the algorithm and the corresponding measured dose matrices also showed good agreement with the mean {gamma} pass rate of 97.6 ({sigma}= 1.6)%. The validation of clinical VMAT plans using ArcCHECK measurements showed a mean pass rate of 95.6 ({sigma}= 1.8)%.Conclusions: The developed algorithm was shown to accurately predict the dose matrix, in a plane perpendicular to the beam, by considering all possible leaf trajectories in a VMAT delivery. This enables the verification of VMAT delivery using a 2D array detector mounted on a treatment head.

Arumugam, Sankar; Xing Aitang [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Jameson, Michael [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); South West Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

190

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Finch, S.M. (comp.)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

About the Ratings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 Ratings Changes 2008 Ratings Changes EPA's "New" Fuel Economy Ratings Video about EPA's New Fuel Economy Ratings Windows Media Video (6.8 MB) Quicktime Video (7.8 MB) Text Version EPA changed the way it estimates fuel economy starting with the 2008 model year. This "new" way of estimating fuel economy supplements the previous method by incorporating the effects of Faster speeds and acceleration Air conditioner use Colder outside temperatures What else do I need to know about the "new" ratings? The tests lower MPG estimates for most vehicles. View old/new MPG ratings for a specific vehicle The actual mileage you get will still vary based on your driving habits, traffic conditions, and other factors. All MPG estimates in Find-a-Car have been converted to the new

192

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

193

LCC Guidance Rates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

194

Draft Tiered Rate Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year's weather and other specific factors are removed from the loads of irrigated agriculture. ( ) "Irrigation Rate Mitigation" means the form of a discount by BPA to...

195

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

197

Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (dose). In clinical cases, the FM reduced the dose to some voxels by up to 50% and generated shadows with extents of the order of 4 mm. Within the prostate contour, cold spots (<95% prescription dose) of the order of 20 mm{sup 3} were observed. D{sub 90} proved insensitive to the presence of FM for the cases selected. Conclusions: There is a major local impact of FM present in LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although our results are too limited to draw conclusions regarding clinical significance.

Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dose mapping of the rectal wall during brachytherapy with an array of scintillation dosimeters  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In pelvic brachytherapy treatments, the rectum is an organ at risk. The authors have developed an array of scintillation dosimeters suitable for in vivo use that enables quality assurance of the treatment delivery and provides an alert to potential radiation accidents. Ultimately, this will provide evidence to direct treatment planning and dose escalation and correlate dose with the rectal response. Methods: An array of 16 scintillation dosimeters in an insertable applicator has been developed. The dosimeters were calibrated simultaneously in a custom designed circular jig before use. Each dosimeter is optically interfaced to a set of pixels on a CCD camera located outside the treatment bunker. A customized software converts pixel values into dose rate and accumulates dose for presentation during treatment delivery. The performance of the array is tested by simulating brachytherapy treatments in a water phantom. The treatment plans were designed to deliver a known dose distribution on the surface of the rectal applicator, assumed to represent the dose to the rectal wall. Results: The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment plan and found to be in agreement to within the uncertainty in measurement, usually within 3%. The array was also used to track the progression of the source as it moved along the catheter. The measured position was found to agree with the position reported by the afterloader to within the measurement uncertainty, usually within 2 mm. Conclusions: This array is capable of measuring the actual dose received by each region of the rectal wall during brachytherapy treatments. It will provide real time monitoring of treatment delivery and raise an alert to a potential radiation accident. Real time dose mapping in the clinical environment will give the clinician additional confidence to carry out dose escalation to the tumor volume while avoiding rectal side effects.

Cartwright, L. E.; Suchowerska, N.; Yin, Y.; Lambert, J.; Haque, M.; McKenzie, D. R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Radiation Dose Metrics in CT: Assessing Dose Using the National Quality Forum CT Patient Safety Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a nonprofit consensus organization that recently endorsed a measure focused on CT radiation doses. To comply, facilities must summarize the doses from consecutive scans within age and anatomic area strata and report the data in the medical record. Our purpose was to assess the time needed to assemble the data and to demonstrate how review of such data permits a facility to understand doses. Methods and Materials To assemble the data we used for analysis, we used the dose monitoring software eXposure to automatically export dose metrics from consecutive scans in 2010 and 2012. For a subset of 50 exams, we also collected dose metrics manually, copying data directly from the PACS into an excel spreadsheet. Results Manual data collection for 50 scans required 2 hours and 15 minutes. eXposure compiled the data in under an hour. All dose metrics demonstrated a 30% to 50% reduction between 2010 and 2012. There was also a significant decline and a reduction in the variability of the doses over time. Conclusion The NQF measure facilitates an institution's capacity to assess the doses they are using for CT as part of routine practice. The necessary data can be collected within a reasonable amount of time either with automatic software or manually. The collection and review of these data will allow facilities to compare their radiation dose distributions with national distributions and allow assessment of temporal trends in the doses they are using.

Jillian Keegan; Diana L. Miglioretti; Robert Gould; Lane F. Donnelly; Nicole D. Wilson; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references.

Dunning, D.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical held designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of two induction cycles with a first cycle of standard-dose cytarabine and a second cycle of intermediate-dose cytarabine and a third and final consolidation cycle without cytarabine. The HOVON–SAKK treatment approach served as control treatment in the current phase 3 study and generated 5-year survival... Cytarabine has been one of the cornerstone drugs in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for more than three decades.1 It was initially used in remission-induction therapy at a dose of 100 to 200 mg per square meter of body-surface area. From ...

Löwenberg B.; Pabst T.; Vellenga E.

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Biokinetics, Concentrations, and Doses  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal goals of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was to quantify and characterize DU aerosols generated inside armored vehicles by perforation with a DU penetrator. This study consequently produced a database in which the DU aerosol source terms were specified both physically and chemically for a variety of penetrator-impact geometries and conditions. These source terms were used to calculate radiation doses and uranium concentrations for various scenarios as part of the Capstone DU Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA). This paper describes the scenario-related biokinetics of uranium, and summarizes intakes, chemical concentrations to the organs, and E(50) and HT(50) for organs and tissues based on exposure scenarios for personnel in vehicles at the time of perforation as well as for first responders. For a given exposure scenario (duration time and breathing rates), the range of DU intakes among the target vehicles and shots was not large, about a factor of 10, with the lowest being from a ventilated operational Abrams tank and the highest being for an unventilated Abrams with DU penetrator perforating DU armor. The ranges of committed effective doses were more scenario-dependent than were intakes. For example, the largest range, a factor of 20, was shown for scenario A, a 1-min exposure, whereas, the range was only a factor of two for the first-responder scenario (E). In general, the committed effective doses were found to be in the tens of mSv. The risks ascribed to these doses are discussed separately.

Guilmette, Raymond A.; Miller, Guthrie; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Low Dose Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Joe Gray Priscilla Cooper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The radiation Adaptive Response (adaptation, or AR) is a well documented, although evidently highly variable, protective phenomenon in which exposures to low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation result in reduced deleterious effects of subsequent higher exposures. Protection has been reported against a variety of biologically important endpoints, but its variability as a function of cell and tissue type and its genetic control are not well understood. The adaptive response is predicted to result in a non-linear dose response for cancer risk in the low dose range. However, the molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown, and such information is

206

A method of dose reconstruction for moving targets compatible with dynamic treatments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a method that allows a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to perform accurate dose reconstruction for rigidly moving targets and to validate the method in phantom measurements for a range of treatments including intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), and dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking. Methods: An in-house computer program was developed to manipulate Dicom treatment plans exported from a TPS (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) such that target motion during treatment delivery was incorporated into the plans. For each treatment, a motion including plan was generated by dividing the intratreatment target motion into 1 mm position bins and construct sub-beams that represented the parts of the treatment that were delivered, while the target was located within each position bin. For each sub-beam, the target shift was modeled by a corresponding isocenter shift. The motion incorporating Dicom plans were reimported into the TPS, where dose calculation resulted in motion including target dose distributions. For experimental validation of the dose reconstruction a thorax phantom with a moveable lung equivalent rod with a tumor insert of solid water was first CT scanned. The tumor insert was delineated as a gross tumor volume (GTV), and a planning target volume (PTV) was formed by adding margins. A conformal plan, two IMRT plans (step-and-shoot and sliding windows), and a VMAT plan were generated giving minimum target doses of 95% (GTV) and 67% (PTV) of the prescription dose (3 Gy). Two conformal fields with MLC leaves perpendicular and parallel to the tumor motion, respectively, were generated for DMLC tracking. All treatment plans were delivered to the thorax phantom without tumor motion and with a sinusoidal tumor motion. The two conformal fields were delivered with and without portal image guided DMLC tracking based on an embedded gold marker. The target dose distribution was measured with a radiochromic film in the moving rod and compared with the reconstructed doses using gamma tests. Results: Considerable interplay effects between machine motion and target motion were observed for the treatments without tracking. For nontracking experiments, the mean 2 mm/2% gamma pass rate over all investigated scenarios was 99.6% between calculated and measured doses. For tracking experiments, the mean gamma pass rate was 99.4%. Conclusions: A method for accurate dose reconstruction for moving targets with dynamic treatments was developed and experimentally validated in a variety of delivery scenarios. The method is suitable for integration into TPSs, e.g., for reconstruction of the dose delivered to moving tumors or calculation of target doses delivered with DMLC tracking.

Rugaard Poulsen, Per; Lykkegaard Schmidt, Mai; Keall, Paul; Schjodt Worm, Esben; Fledelius, Walther; Hoffmann, Lone [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

2007-2009 Power Rate Adjustments (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Function Review (PFR) Firstgov FY 2007 2009 Power Rate Adjustments BPA's 2007-2009 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (GRSPs) took effect on...

208

DOSE TO CURIE DETERMINATION FOR CONTAINERS WITH MEASURABLE CS-137  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Retrieval (NGR) project will retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste containers from Trenches 17 and 27 in the 218-E-12B (12B) burial ground. The trenches were in operation from May 1970 through October 1972. A portion of the retrieved containers that will require shipment to and acceptance at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility and the containers will be either remote-handled (RH) and/or contact-handled (CH). The method discussed in this document will be used for the RH and some of the CH containers to determine the radionuclide inventory. Waste disposition (shipment and TSD acceptance) requires that the radioactive content be characterized for each container. Source-term estimates using high resolution, shielded, gamma-ray scan assay techniques cannot be performed on a number of RH and other containers with high dose rates from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba. This document provides the method to quantify the radioactive inventory of fission product gamma emitters within the containers based on the surface dose rate measurements taken in the field with hand-held survey instruments.

RATHBUN LA; ANDERSON JD; SWAN RJ

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.) [comps.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Dental orthopantomography: survey of patient dose  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed dose to specific regions of the head and neck during dental orthopantomography with various commercial units was assessed using a Rando ''standard man'' phantom and TLD-100 LiF dosimeters. Relevance to patient protection is discussed.

Bartolotta, A.; Calenda, E.; Calicchia, A.; Indovina, P.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

Harrison, Cameron, E-mail: cameronh@stanford.edu [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Young, James; Navi, Daniel [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Riaz, Nadeem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Maximizing dose reductions with cardiac CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when heart rates are [60 bpm or when heart rate variabilitya heart rate dependent fashion as follows: 30–39 bpm, 175 mspadding; 40–49 bpm, 150 ms padding; 50– 59 bpm, 125 ms

Budoff, Matthew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

OpenEI - rates  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Electric Utility U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

214

Water Rate Escalations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal agencies need accurate water cost escalation rates to perform life cycle cost analyses for water efficiency projects to meet Executive Order 13514 and Energy Independence and Security Act...

215

Before a Rate Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is made up of two processes. The first part of the IBR is the Integrated Program Review (IPR), which will address proposed program costs prior to their inclusion in a rate case,...

216

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted "advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202. ...

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tiered Rate Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Period limit. This 23 exception is limited for the duration of this TRM to the first ten requesting utilities that 24 BP-12-A-03 Section 4 Page 46 meet the size threshold and...

218

Benchmarking of Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculations for applications to JET  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......issues. INTRODUCTION In nuclear fusion reactors, 14 and 2...to problems related to nuclear fusion machines. They both...neutron flux spectrum is input to the inventory code...May 2003 including MCNP input deck for JET DTE1, note......

L. Petrizzi; P. Batistoni; U. Fischer; M. Loughlin; P. Pereslavtsev; R. Villari

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, part II: remanent dose rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......production of radioactive isotopes as well as their decay...carbon composites, boron nitride, aluminium...step (calculation of isotopes), the FLUKA implementation...benchmark(6,7). Isotope information was written...uncertainty for the determination of the effective centre......

M. Brugger; H. Khater; S. Mayer; A. Prinz; S. Roesler; L. Ulrici; H. Vincke

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

A simple and efficient method for retrieving surface UV radiation dose rate from satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, especially following the discovery of the ozone hole in the Antarctic [Farman et al., 1985; Solomon, 1988

Li, Zhanqing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Inverse planning for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy by simulated annealing under fuzzy expert control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulated annealing (SA) is a multivariate combinatorial optimization process that searches the configuration space of possible solutions by a random walk guided only by the goal of minimization of the objective function. The decision-making capabilities of a fuzzy inference system are applied to guide the SA search to look for solutions which in addition to optimizing a plan in dosimetric terms also present some clinically desirable spatial features. No a priori constraints are placed on the number or position of needles or on the seed loading sequence of individual needles. These additional degrees of freedom are balanced by giving preference to consider plans with seed distributions that are balanced in the right/left and anterior/posterior halves in each axial slice and with local seed density that is about uniform. Piecewise linear membership functions are constructed to represent these requirements. Before a step in the random search is subject to the SA test the expert functions representing the spatial seed-distribution requirements are evaluated. Thus the expert planner’s knowledge enters into the decision as to the “goodness” of a seed configuration regarding the spatial seed-distribution goals. When a step in the random walk yields a seed configuration that is found wanting a specific number of additional steps in the local neighborhood is attempted until either improvement in the spatial requirements is achieved or the allowed number of attempts is exhausted. In the latter case the expert system desists and the unfavorable step is taken moving on to the simulated annealing test. The number of attempts is determined by the fuzzy logic inference engine and depends on just how badly the expert requirement is not met. The program is interfaced with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to import optimized seed plans for isodose display and analysis. Execution in a 1.5 GHz computer is less than a minute adequate for real-time planning. Results for phantom and real patients are dosimetrically comparable to generic methods such as modified peripheral loading but in some cases fewer needles and less radioactivity are required. Sensitivity to simulated random seed placement error is similar to manual plans.

Alberto de la Zerda Lerner

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessment of gamma dose rates from terrestrial exposure in Serbia and Montenegro  

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......obtained in this study, the radiation hazard was found to be...area. INTRODUCTION Gamma radiation emitted from naturally occuring radioisotopes, such as...Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation and from Chernobyl fallout......

S. Dragovic; Lj. Jankovic; A. Onjia

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure  

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In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the ...

Cucinotta Francis A.; Wilson John W.; Shavers Mark R.; Katz Robert

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation dose-rate effects, endogenous DNA damage, and signaling resonance  

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...These data from the Oak Ridge and Harwell laboratories...other nuclear industries) workers (22 –24), and Chernobyl's...clean-up”) workers (21). These data provide...that of nuclear industry workers, including nuclear plant personnel...

Michael M. Vilenchik; Alfred G. Knudson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Benchmarking of MCNP for calculating dose rates at an interim storage facility for nuclear waste  

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......an interim storage facility for nuclear waste Burkhard Heuel-Fabianek Ralf...Research Centre Julich, Germany, nuclear waste is stored in drums and other vessels...Research Centre Julich (FZJ) nuclear waste is generated, which has to be......

Burkhard Heuel-Fabianek; Ralf Hille

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation  

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......the public telephone network, GSM or public authorities intranet to the respective measuring and service centre. Redundant...interface can easily be configured to support different network characteristics, including maps of the country where the network is implemented......

R. Luff; M. Zähringer; W. Harms; M. Bleher; B. Prommer; U. Stöhlker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Gamma radiation and dose rate investigations on the Adriatic islands of magmatic origin  

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......Gamma ray spectrometry in seawater The underwater measuring system...electronics for data acquisition, storage and transmission. The power...direct gamma ray spectrometry in seawater, the obtained spectrum from...spectrometric measurement in the seawater. Isotope Energy (keV) Net......

Branko Petrinec; Zdenko Franic; Nenad Leder; Christos Tsabaris; Tomislav Bituh; Gordana Marovic

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

In Vitro Photodynamic Therapy of Human Lung Cancer: Investigation of Dose-Rate Effects  

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...observed at equal light energies (225 mj/ cm2). The...X-ray view box (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI; daylight...exposed to the highest energies using a thermister probe...therapy of a human lung car cinoma line. Although...of time and treatment energy, however, was not addressed...

Wilbert Matthews; John Cook; James B. Mitchell; Roger R. Perry; Steven Evans; and Harvey I. Pass

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation  

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......protocols for data transfer are...where no fixed line telephone or...radioactive plume. The data logger generates...during power outages and is only used...analogue data transmission. DATA LOGGER SOFTWARE...long-term power outages (low battery......

R. Luff; M. Zähringer; W. Harms; M. Bleher; B. Prommer; U. Stöhlker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Stocking Rate Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to predict potential forage shortfalls, determine the im- pact of the decision on finances and other ranch re- sources, and make any necessary adjustments before the forage resource is harmed or financial problems occur. Through adequate planning and periodic... rates with limited knowledge of future forage and market conditions. But they can use past records, experience and range surveys to make realistic projections of forage and market conditions (Figure 3). Then, the planned stock- ing rate should...

White, Larry D.; McGinty, Allan

1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

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Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

233

Dose characterization of the rad source 2400 x-ray irradiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The RS 2400 irradiator has been looked to as a replacement for discontinued gamma irradiators. The RS 2400 has a cylindrical, rather than point, x-ray source, which yields higher dose rates. The irradiator unit allows the user to set the current...

Wagner, Jennifer Ann Koop

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

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October 2001 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY 2002-2006 rate period were originally established in May 2000 during the WP-02 Rate...

235

Oligonucleotide microarray analysis of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure  

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...health risk due to low-dose ionizing radiation is still debated. Functional...pathways that are induced by ionizing irradiation (IR...transcriptionally regulated by low-dose IR in occupationally...and showed different ranges of accumulated doses...

Paola Silingardi; Elena Morandi; Cinzia Severini; Daniele Quercioli; Monica Vaccari; Wolfango Horn; Maria Concetta Nucci; Vittorio Lodi; Francesco Violante; Sandro Grilli; and Annmaria Colacci

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reduced Kilovoltage in Computed Tomography–Guided Intervention in a Community Hospital: Effect on the Radiation Dose  

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AbstractPurpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether low-kilovoltage (80 or 100 kV) computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions performed in a community-based hospital are feasible and to compare radiation exposure incurred with conventional 120 kV potential. Materials and Methods Effective doses (ED) received by patients who underwent CT-guided intervention were analysed before and after a low-dose kilovoltage protocol was instituted in our department. We performed CT-guided procedures of 93 consecutive patients by using conventional 120-kV tube voltage (50 patients) and a low voltage of 80 or 100 kV for the remainder of this cohort. Automatic tube current modulation was enabled to obtain the best image quality. Procedure details were prospectively recorded and included examination site and type, slice width, tube voltage and current, dose length product, volume CT dose index, and size-specific dose estimate. Dose length product was converted to ED to account for radiosensitivity of specific organs. Statistical comparisons with test differences in the ED, volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, and effective diameter (patient size) were made by using the Student t test. Results All but 6 of the procedures performed at 80 kV were successful, for a success rate of 86%. At lower voltages, the ED was significantly (P dose radiation technique by using 80 or 100 kV results in a high technical success rate for pelvic, chest, and abdomen CT-guided interventional procedures, although dramatically decreasing radiation exposure. There was no significant difference in effective diameter (patient size) between the conventional and the low-dose groups, which would suggest that dose reduction was indeed a result of kVp change and not patient size.

Saman Rezazadeh; Steven J. Co; Simon Bicknell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparison of radiological dose pathways for tank farm accidents  

SciTech Connect

This calculation note documents an evaluation of the doses from submersion and ground shine due to a release of tank farm radioactive materials, and a comparison of these doses to the doses from inhalation of the materials. The submersion and ground shine doses are insignificant compared to the inhalation doses. The doses from resuspension are also shown to be negligible for the tank farm analysis conditions.

Van Keuren, J.C.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Approach for calculating population doses using the CIDER computer code  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an approach for calculating radiation doses for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. The approach utilizes the CIDER computer code.

Shipler, D.B.

1993-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Upper Great Plains Rates information  

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Rates and Repayment Services Rates and Repayment Services Rates 2010 Firm Power Rate (effective January 1, 2010) Rate Adjustments 2010 Firm Power Rate Adjustment 2009 Firm Power Rate Adjustment IS Rate Adjustments Rate Adjustment Process Rate Orders Signed, December 23, 2009 (16kb pdf) Announcements Firm Electric Service Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component, June 27, 2013 (74kb pdf) Customer Letter - Final Notice of Drought Adder Component, October 2, 2013 (68kb pdf) Integrated System (IS) Rates 2014 IS Rates Customer Information Meeting Presentation, October 15, 2013 (611kb pdf) Customer Letter - Notification of 2014 Rates, September 13, 2013 (160kb pdf) 2014 Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation and 2012 Rate True-up Calculation (4.9mb pdf) 2013 IS Rates

240

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BCP Annual Rate Process  

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2013 BCP Annual Rate Process 2013 BCP Annual Rate Process Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 6, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4 Informal Customer Meeting Presentation (Pdf) PRS Executive Summary (Mar 07, 2013) (Pdf) FY2014 Final Ten Year Operating Plan PRS Executive Summary (PDF) FORM for Foreign Visits (doc) Formal Process Initial Federal Register Notice (pdf) Public Information Forum March 27,2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 Customer Meeting Presentation PIF Presentation (PPT) Presentation Details (pdf) Reclamation Fund Status Report PIF PRS Executive Summary (pdf) PIF Transcripts (PDF) Visitor Center Cost Analysis Questions - Responses Public Comment Forum April 10, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 PCF Transcripts Customer Letters

242

Multiple System Rate Process  

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DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savings Under Various MSTR (XLS) Public Information Forum March 29, 2005 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point) Customer Meeting Overview (PDF) Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Public Comment Forum April 6, 2005 Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Response Letter 5-17-05 (PDF) Customer Letters Tonopah ID-5/25/05 (PDF) APS-5/26/05 (PDF) SRP-5/27/05 (PDF) RSLynch-6/1/05 (PDF) KRSaline-6/1/05 (PDF) Formal Process Federal Register Notice (Word) Federal Register Notice (PDF) Brochure (Word) Appendices to Brochure: A B C D E1 E2 F1 F2 GH Public Information Forum July 14, 2004 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point)

243

Alanine/EPR dosimetry applied to the verification of a total body irradiation protocol and treatment planning dose calculation using a humanoid phantom  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To avoid complications in total body irradiation (TBI), it is important to achieve a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the body and to deliver a correct dose to the lung which is an organ at risk. The purpose of this work was to validate the TBI dose protocol and to check the accuracy of the 3D dose calculations of the treatment planning system. Methods: Dosimetry based on alanine/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure dose at numerous locations within an anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson) that was irradiated in a clinical TBI beam setup. The alanine EPR dosimetry system was calibrated against water calorimetry in a Co-60 beam and the absorbed dose was determined by the use of ''dose-normalized amplitudes'' A{sub D}. The dose rate of the TBI beam was checked against a Farmer ionization chamber. The phantom measurements were compared to 3D dose calculations from a treatment planning system (Pinnacle) modeled for standard dose calculations. Results: Alanine dosimetry allowed accurate measurements which were in accordance with ionization chamber measurements. The combined relative standard measurement uncertainty in the Alderson phantom was U{sub r}(A{sub D})=0.6%. The humanoid phantom was irradiated to a reference dose of 10 Gy, limiting the lung dose to 7.5 Gy. The ratio of the average measured dose midplane in the craniocaudal direction to the reference dose was 1.001 with a spread of {+-}4.7% (1 sd). Dose to the lung was measured in 26 locations and found, in average, 1.8% lower than expected. Lung dose was homogeneous in the ventral-dorsal direction but a dose gradient of 0.10 Gy cm{sup -1} was observed in the craniocaudal direction midline within the lung lobe. 3D dose calculations (Pinnacle) were found, in average, 2% lower compared to dose measurements on the body axis and 3% lower for the lungs. Conclusions: The alanine/EPR dosimetry system allowed accurate dose measurements which enabled the authors to validate their TBI dose protocol. Dose calculations based on a collapsed cone convolution dose algorithm modeled for regular treatments are accurate within 3% and can further be improved when the algorithm is modeled for TBI.

Schaeken, B.; Lelie, S.; Meijnders, P.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Janssens, H.; Verellen, D. [NuTeC-EPR Dosimetry Laboratory, Xios Hogeschool Limburg, Technologiecentrum 27, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium) and Department of Radiotherapy, ZNA-Middelheim, Lindendreef 1, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); NuTeC-EPR Dosimetry Laboratory, Xios Hogeschool Limburg, Technologiecentrum 27, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, ZNA-Middelheim, Lindendreef 1, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); NuTeC-EPR Dosimetry Laboratory, Xios Hogeschool Limburg, Technologiecentrum 27, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); UZ-Brussels, Laarbeeklaan 1, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment  

SciTech Connect

Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e., the hybrid-QA. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the model-based QA and to evaluate time efficiency of the hybrid-QA method. Methods: Accuracy of the model-based QA was determined by comparison of COMPASS calculated dose with Monte Carlo calculations for heterogeneous media. In total, 330 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans were evaluated based on the mean gamma index (GI) with criteria of 3%/3mm and classification of PASS (GI {<=} 0.4), EVAL (0.4 < GI > 0.6), and FAIL (GI {>=} 0.6). Agreement between model-based QA and measurement-based QA was determined for 48 treatment plans, and linac stability was verified for 15 months. Finally, time efficiency improvement of the hybrid-QA was quantified for four representative treatment plans. Results: COMPASS calculated dose was in agreement with Monte Carlo dose, with a maximum error of 3.2% in heterogeneous media with high density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3}). Hybrid-QA results for IMRT treatment plans showed an excellent PASS rate of 98% for all cases. Model-based QA was in agreement with measurement-based QA, as shown by a minimal difference in GI of 0.03 {+-} 0.08. Linac stability was high with an average GI of 0.28 {+-} 0.04. The hybrid-QA method resulted in a time efficiency improvement of 15 min per treatment plan QA compared to measurement-based QA. Conclusions: The hybrid-QA method is adequate for efficient and accurate 3D dose verification. It combines time efficiency of model-based QA with reliability of measurement-based QA and is suitable for implementation within any radiotherapy department.

Visser, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands); Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen 9714 CE (Netherlands); Wauben, D. J. L.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; Veld, A. A. van't; Korevaar, E. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands); Groot, M. de [Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen 9714 CE (Netherlands)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutions Institutions Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung-Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM USA Contact: Dr. Bobby R. Scott Program Objective Our research focuses on elucidating the biological bases for radiation adaptive responses in the lung and for suppressing lung cancer, and to use the knowledge gained to produce an improved systems-biology-based, risk model for lung cancer induction by low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation. Research was initiated in October 2009. This research should help foster a new era of low-dose radiation risk/benefit assessment. It will have important implications for possible use of low-dose diagnostic radiation (e.g., X-rays) in cancer therapy. It

247

Obsidian Hydration Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSIDIAN HYDRATION RATE FOR KLAMATH BASIN OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON...as the material is excreted, falls through the air, and dries...Friedman. Table 1 presents two new groups of hydra-tion readings for...the true age is believed to fall (3). The Snaketown age is...

Clement W. Meighan

1970-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19067-1612. ...

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members, if not designated, placement will be determined by the first word of the text submitted. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Koad, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cell cycle responses to low-dose ionizing radiation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...47, 2006] 5178 Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity...radiosensitivity of cells to doses of ionizing radiation less than 0.5 Gy...connection between low-dose HRS survival, Ataxia...the low dose radiation range (0-1 Gy). MR4 cells...

Sarah A. Krueger; George D. Wilson; Michael C. Joiner; and Brian Marples

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Functional proteomic pattern identification under low dose ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective: High dose radiation has been well known for increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. However, the understanding of biological effects of low dose radiation is limited. Low dose radiation is reported to affect several signaling pathways including ... Keywords: Feature selection, Jumping emerging identification, Low dose radiation, Proteomic signaling patterns

Young Bun Kim; Chin-Rang Yang; Jean Gao

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

TECHNICAL NOTE Measurement of radiotherapy superficial X-ray dose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rays; Dosimetry; Radiochromic film; Radiation; Surface dose Abstract Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose mm of depth. Baker et al. [3] produced empirical models to estimate absorbed dose be- hind eye shields. This theory produces a simple yet effective tool for estimation of dose under an eye shield

Yu, K.N.

262

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

263

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

264

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: 2.5% Aug '12 to Aug '13: -1.3% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 1.5% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: -0.8%

265

Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjusted Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 5,500 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -7.4% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -0.1% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -0.1% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -16.8% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -3.2% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -3.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -9.3% Jan '99 to Jan '00: +3.5% YTD '99 to YTD '00: +3.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

266

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents CRSP Transmission 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2014 Accompanying calculation table for FY 2014 CRSP transmission rate letter Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2013 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2012 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2011 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2010 SLCA/IP 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, SLCA/IP firm power rate extension Letter announcing two-year extension to SLCA/IP firm power rate SLCA/IP Tentative Rate Adjustment Schedule

267

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June '99 to July '99: -5.4% June '99 to July '99: -5.4% July '98 to July '99: +3.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: -0.5% July '98 to July '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +0.5% July '98 to July '99: +1.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +1.5% July '98 to July '99: +10.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

268

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +8.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +6.0% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +4.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +2.4% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +3.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +32.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +2.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.5%

269

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +1.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -1.9% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -0.1% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: +22.3% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +21.1%

270

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.4% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.1% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: 0.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: +7.3% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +8.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +8.3%

271

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +5.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: -0.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +1.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +2.5% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +6.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +9.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +2.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2%

272

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -0.2% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -1.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -2.1% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -6.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.6%

273

FINAL REPORT DOSES TO THE PUBLIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oak Ridge, Inc. 102 Donner Drive Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Authors: A. Iulian Apostoaei / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. Brian A. Thomas / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. David C. Kocher / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. F. Owen Hoffman / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. July 2005 #12;Doses to the Public from Atmospheric

274

Visualization of a changing dose field.  

SciTech Connect

To help visualize the results of dose modeling for nuclear materials processing opcrations, we have developed an integrated model that uses a simple dosc calculation tool to obtain estimates of the dose field in a complex geomctry and then post-process the data to produce a video of the now time-dependent data. We generate two-dimensional radiation fields within an existing physical cnvironment and then analyze them using three-dimensional visualization techniques. The radiation fields are generated for both neutrons and photons. Standard monoenergetic diffusion theory is used to estimate the neutron dosc fields. The photon dose is estimated using a point-kernel formalism, with photon shielding effects and buildup taken into account. The radiation field dynamics are analyzed by interleaving individual 3D graphic 'snapshots' into a smoothed, lime dependent, video-based display. In-the-room workers are 'seen' in the radiation fields via a graphical, 3D fly-through rendering of the room. Worker dose levels can reveal surprising dependencies on operational source placement, source types, worker alignment, shielding alignments, and indirect operations from external workers.

Helm, T. M (Terry M.); Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

HEFTY DOSE OF VITAMINS FOR DSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HEFTY DOSE OF VITAMINS FOR DSM ... FOR ROUGHLY $2.24 BILLION, DSM will buy the vitamins and fine chemicals division of Switzerland's Roche. ... With the acquisition, DSM becomes the largest worldwide supplier, by far, to the life sciences sector, overtaking Degussa, BASF, and Lonza. ...

PATRICIA SHORT

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

276

8, 119, 2008 UV doses during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 1­19, 2008 UV doses during psoriasis climate therapy at Gran Canaria L. T. N. Nilsen et al climate therapy at Gran Canaria L. T. N. Nilsen et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions climate therapy at Gran Canaria L. T. N. Nilsen et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Robert L. Ullrich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert L. Ullrich Robert L. Ullrich Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates (NSCOR) Genetic Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Bailey, S.M., Williams, E.S., and Ullrich, R.L. 2005 Workshop: Dsyfunctional Mammalian Telomeres in DNA-PKcs Deficient Backgrounds Bailey, S.M., Williams, E., Hagelstrom, T., and Ullrich, R.L. 2003 Workshop: Dysfunctional Mammalian Telomeres Join to Double-Strand Breaks Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Williams, E., and Ullrich, R.L. 2002 Workshop: Dysfunctional Telomeres, Radiation-Induced Instability and Tumorigenesis Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Cornforth, M.N., and Ullrich, R.L.

278

Transportation Rates For Fishery Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

express (Railway Express Agency), and motor carriers. Air transporta- tion and water transportation 2 Rail-freight rates 2 Rail-express rates 3 Motor-carrier rates 3 Protective-service charges 4 used in sample 7 2. Rail-express rate index: Routes used in sample 7 3. Motor-carrier rate index

279

Software requirements specification for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project air pathway environmental accumulation and dose codes  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the general software requirements for the Hanford Reservation Dose reconstruction Project.

Not Available

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

October 1996 - September 2001 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

affecting a specific power purchase. For more specific information see: 1996 Final Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate Schedules: Power Rates (PDF, 84 pages, 188 kb) Ancillary...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dose volume histograms (DVHs) are common tools in radiation therapy treatment planning to characterize plan quality. As statistical metrics, DVHs provide a compact summary of the underlying plan at the cost of losing spatial information: the same or similar dose-volume histograms can arise from substantially different spatial dose maps. This is exactly the reason why physicians and physicists scrutinize dose maps even after they satisfy all DVH endpoints numerically. However, up to this point, little has been done to control spatial phenomena, such as the spatial distribution of hot spots, which has significant clinical implications. To this end, the authors propose a novel objective function that enables a more direct tradeoff between target coverage, organ-sparing, and planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity, and presents our findings from four prostate cases, a pancreas case, and a head-and-neck case to illustrate the advantages and general applicability of our method.Methods: In designing the energy minimization objective (E{sub tot}{sup sparse}), the authors utilized the following robust cost functions: (1) an asymmetric linear well function to allow differential penalties for underdose, relaxation of prescription dose, and overdose in the PTV; (2) a two-piece linear function to heavily penalize high dose and mildly penalize low and intermediate dose in organs-at risk (OARs); and (3) a total variation energy, i.e., the L{sub 1} norm applied to the first-order approximation of the dose gradient in the PTV. By minimizing a weighted sum of these robust costs, general conformity to dose prescription and dose-gradient prescription is achieved while encouraging prescription violations to follow a Laplace distribution. In contrast, conventional quadratic objectives are associated with a Gaussian distribution of violations, which is less forgiving to large violations of prescription than the Laplace distribution. As a result, the proposed objective E{sub tot}{sup sparse} improves tradeoff between planning goals by 'sacrificing' voxels that have already been violated to improve PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity, and/or OAR-sparing. In doing so, overall plan quality is increased since these large violations only arise if a net reduction in E{sub tot}{sup sparse} occurs as a result. For example, large violations to dose prescription in the PTV in E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans will naturally localize to voxels in and around PTV-OAR overlaps where OAR-sparing may be increased without compromising target coverage. The authors compared the results of our method and the corresponding clinical plans using analyses of DVH plots, dose maps, and two quantitative metrics that quantify PTV homogeneity and overdose. These metrics do not penalize underdose since E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans were planned such that their target coverage was similar or better than that of the clinical plans. Finally, plan deliverability was assessed with the 2D modulation index.Results: The proposed method was implemented using IBM's CPLEX optimization package (ILOG CPLEX, Sunnyvale, CA) and required 1-4 min to solve with a 12-core Intel i7 processor. In the testing procedure, the authors optimized for several points on the Pareto surface of four 7-field 6MV prostate cases that were optimized for different levels of PTV homogeneity and OAR-sparing. The generated results were compared against each other and the clinical plan by analyzing their DVH plots and dose maps. After developing intuition by planning the four prostate cases, which had relatively few tradeoffs, the authors applied our method to a 7-field 6 MV pancreas case and a 9-field 6MV head-and-neck case to test the potential impact of our method on more challenging cases. The authors found that our formulation: (1) provided excellent flexibility for balancing OAR-sparing with PTV homogeneity; and (2) permitted the dose planner more control over the evolution of the PTV's spatial dose distribution than conventional objective functions. In particular, E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-op

Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California - Los Angeles School of Medicine, 200 Medical Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tier 2 Vintage Rate Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Load Growth Rate BPA commits to meet Load Following customers' load growth placed on BPA for the term of the commitment period...

283

Plasma Adiabatic Lapse Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient ??? and difference in average ionization states Z2-Z1. Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

Peter Amendt; Claudio Bellei; Scott Wilks

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? Even low doses (0.1 Gy) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. The first-known oxidative lesion repaired only by nucleotide excision repair found in normal cells is cyclo-dA. This lesion is found in normal cells and thought to be a byproduct of oxidative metabolism. When this lesion occurs, it stimulates repair. If repair is stimulated by low dose radiation, there are some implications for human health. For example, do some individuals exhibit a greater, lower, or no stimulation to certain DNA lesions? If there are population polymorphism that influence DNA repair, then it would be possible to use our assay for screening individuals for repair sensitivity.

285

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Abstract Title: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair (PNNL Project # 42699) Authors: Eric J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Institutions: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA We developed a functional assay to measure the effects of LDR on repair of many different lesions representative of those found in cells as consequences of normal oxidative metabolism, as well as those caused by radiation. Currently only 1/10th attomole =105 damaged molecules/cell and 3000 cells/measurement are required. We have found that even low doses (10 rad) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. Interestingly, the amount of DNA repair increases at 10-50 rads, plateaus, and then increases even further at higher doses well below doses where radiation-induced lethality

286

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue Constructs Authors: John Ford, Amy Maslowski, Alex Redd and Les Braby Institutions: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX We are developing a model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture, and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types, on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal

287

RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC CT IN SUDAN: CT DOSE, ORGAN AND EFFECTIVE DOSES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Paper RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC...Energy Commission, Radiation Safety Institute, PO Box 3001...assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric...CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated......

I. I. Suliman; H. M. Khamis; T. H. Ombada; K. Alzimami; M. Alkhorayef; A. Sulieman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Uptake, depuration, and radiation dose estimation in zebrafish exposed to radionuclides via aqueous or dietary routes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding uptake and depuration of radionuclides in organisms is necessary to relate exposure to radiation dose and ultimately to biological effects. We investigated uptake and depuration of a mixture of radionuclides to link bioaccumulation with radiation dose in zebrafish, Danio rerio. Adult zebrafish were exposed to radionuclides (54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 109Cd, 110mAg, 134Cs and 241Am) at tracer levels (dose rates were modelled from activity concentrations in whole body and exposure medium (water or diet). After 14-day aqueous exposure, radionuclides were detected in decreasing activity concentrations: 75Se > 65Zn > 109Cd > 110mAg > 54Mn > 60Co > 241Am > 134Cs (range: 175–8 Bq g1). After dietary exposure the order of radionuclide activity concentration in tissues (Bq g?1) was: 65Zn > 60Co > 75Se > 109Cd > 110mAg > 241Am > 54Mn > 134Cs (range: 91–1 Bq g?1). Aqueous exposure resulted in higher whole body activity concentrations for all radionuclides except 60Co. Route of exposure did not appear to influence activity concentrations in gonads, except for 54Mn, 65Zn, and 75Se, which had higher activity concentrations in gonads following aqueous exposure. Highest gonad activity concentrations (Bq g?1) were for 75Se (211), 109Cd (142), and 65Zn (117), and highest dose rates (?Gy h?1) were from 241Am (aqueous, 1050; diet 242). This study links radionuclide bioaccumulation data obtained in laboratory experiments with radiation dose determined by application of a dosimetry modelling tool, an approach that will enable better linkages to be made between exposure, dose, and effects of radionuclides in organisms.

Helena C. Reinardy; Jean-Louis Teyssie; Ross A. Jeffree; David Copplestone; Theodore B. Henry; Awadhesh N. Jha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of ?1.7% and ?0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

Hornbeck, Amaury, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine [Radiotherapy Department, Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris (France)] [Radiotherapy Department, Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris (France)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dose reduction for snubber inspection and testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Health physics staff members at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station have implemented several dose reduction methods for snubber inspection, testing and changeout. These methods include construction maps to permit easy location of snubbers in the drywell, painting azimuth numbers on the inside drywell wall and biological shield wall to coincide with the maps, requiring pre-job briefings for quality inspectors and craft support personnel, using job history files for work planning, using experienced inspectors and craft personnel whenever possible, designating certain craft personnel solely for snubber work, and cutting out stuck snubber pins rather than attempting intact removal. The total dose for snubber-related tasks has been significantly reduced using these methods.

Morrison, G.M.; Cotton, S.R. (Entergy Operations, Inc. (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

PARP-1, PARP-2, and the cellular response to low doses of ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is rapidly and directly activated by single-strand breaks and is required for efficient base excision repair. These properties indicate that inhibition of PARP-1 might enhance the cellular response to low doses of radiation. We tested the effect of chemical inhibition of PARP-1 on low-dose clonogenic survival in a number of cell lines and the low-dose radiation response of a PARP-1 knockout murine cell line. Methods and materials Clonogenic cell survival of V79-379A and CHO-K1 hamster fibroblasts, T98G and U373-MG human glioma cells, and 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblast PARP-1 knockout cells was measured using a precise flow cytometry-based plating assay. Chemical inhibitors of PARP enzymes were tested for their effect on clonogenic survival after a range of ionizing radiation doses. Results Chemical inhibition of PARP activity induced marked radiosensitization of V79, CHO, and exponentially growing T98G cells in the 0.05–0.3-Gy range. This effect was not seen in U373 cells or in confluent T98G populations. Low-dose radiosensitization was not apparent in PARP-1 knockout cells. Conclusion Low-dose radiosensitization of actively dividing tumor cells by PARP-1 inhibitors suggests that they may have a role in enhancing the efficacy of ultrafractionated or low-dose-rate radiotherapy regimens. We hypothesize that PARP-2 compensates for the absence of PARP-1 in the knockout cell line.

Anthony Chalmers; Peter Johnston; Mick Woodcock; Michael Joiner; Brian Marples

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

Wasiolek, Maryla A.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Site-specific parameter values for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's food pathway dose model  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Western South Carolina result in radionuclide releases to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiation doses to the off-site maximum individual and the off-site population within 80 km of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are currently generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose-model parameters for facilities without resources to develop site-specific values. A survey of land- and water-use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine site-specific values for water recreation, consumption, and agricultural parameters used in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 (1977) dosimetric models. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; recreational and commercial activities on the Savannah River; and meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates. This paper describes how parameter data were obtained at the Savannah River Site and the impacts of such data on off-site dose. Dose estimates using site-specific parameter values are compared to estimates using the NRC default values.

Hamby, D.M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

297

MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based on recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These factors are fixed internally in the code, and are not part of the input option. Dose commitments which are available from the code are as follows: • Individual dose commitments for use in predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations (Radon and short-lived daughters are excluded) • Total individual dose commitments (impacts from all available radionuclides are considered) • Annual population dose commitments (regional, extraregional, total and cummulative). This model is primarily designed for uranium mill facilities, and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes.

Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy  

SciTech Connect

We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

Kelsey Iv, Charles T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prinja, Anil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO); Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Rate types for stream programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce RATE TYPES, a novel type system to reason about and optimize data-intensive programs. Built around stream languages, RATE TYPES performs static quantitative reasoning about stream rates -- the frequency of data items in a stream being ... Keywords: data processing rates, data throughput, performance reasoning, stream programming, type systems

Thomas W. Bartenstein, Yu David Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Spot Scanning Proton Therapy Using Single-Field Uniform Dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe our experiences with patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for patients with prostate cancer receiving spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using single-field uniform dose (SFUD). Methods and Materials: The first group of 249 patients with prostate cancer treated with SSPT using SFUD was included in this work. The scanning-beam planning target volume and number of monitor units were recorded and checked for consistency. Patient-specific dosimetric measurements were performed, including the point dose for each plan, depth doses, and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution in the planes perpendicular to the incident beam direction for each field at multiple depths. The {gamma}-index with 3% dose or 3-mm distance agreement criteria was used to evaluate the 2D dose distributions. Results: We observed a linear relationship between the number of monitor units and scanning-beam planning target volume. The difference between the measured and calculated point doses (mean {+-} SD) was 0.0% {+-} 0.7% (range, -2.9% to 1.8%). In general, the depth doses exhibited good agreement except at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak. The pass rate of {gamma}-index (mean {+-} SD) for 2D dose comparison was 96.2% {+-} 2.6% (range, 90-100%). Discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions primarily resulted from the limitation of the model used by the treatment planning system. Conclusions: We have established a patient-specific QA program for prostate cancer patients receiving SSPT using SFUD.

Zhu, X. Ronald, E-mail: xrzhu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Poenisch, Falk; Song, Xiaofei; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ciangaru, George; Taylor, M. Brad; Lii, Ming Fwu; Martin, Craig; Arjomandy, Bijan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh nhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Is it sensible to 'deform' dose? 3D experimental validation of dose-warping  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Strategies for dose accumulation in deforming anatomy are of interest in radiotherapy. Algorithms exist for the deformation of dose based on patient image sets, though these are sometimes contentious because not all such image calculations are constrained by physical laws. While tumor and organ motion has been a key area of study for a considerable amount of time, deformation is of increasing interest. In this work, we demonstrate a full 3D experimental validation of results from a range of dose deformation algorithms available in the public domain. Methods: We recently developed the first tissue-equivalent, full 3D deformable dosimetric phantom-'DEFGEL.' To assess the accuracy of dose-warping based on deformable image registration (DIR), we have measured doses in undeformed and deformed states of the DEFGEL dosimeter and compared these to planned doses and warped doses. In this way we have directly evaluated the accuracy of dose-warping calculations for 11 different algorithms. We have done this for a range of stereotactic irradiation schemes and types and magnitudes of deformation. Results: The original Horn and Schunck algorithm is shown to be the best performing of the 11 algorithms trialled. Comparing measured and dose-warped calculations for this method, it is found that for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2} square field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.9%; for a 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 mm{sup 2} cross-shaped field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.1%; and for a multiple dynamic arc (0.413 cm{sup 3} PTV) treatment adapted from a patient treatment plan, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 95%. In each case, the agreement is comparable to-but consistently {approx}1% less than-comparison between measured and calculated (planned) dose distributions in the absence of deformation. The magnitude of the deformation, as measured by the largest displacement experienced by any voxel in the volume, has the greatest influence on the accuracy of the warped dose distribution. Considering the square field case, the smallest deformation ({approx}9 mm) yields agreement of {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.9%, while the most significant deformation ({approx}20 mm) yields agreement of {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 96.7%. Conclusions: We have confirmed that, for a range of mass and density conserving deformations representative of those observable in anatomical targets, DIR-based dose-warping can yield accurate predictions of the dose distribution. Substantial differences can be seen between the results of different algorithms indicating that DIR performance should be scrutinized before application todose-warping. We have demonstrated that the DEFGEL deformable dosimeter can be used to evaluate DIR performance and the accuracy of dose-warping results by direct measurement.

Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Supple, J. R.; Smith, R. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Franich, R. D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia) and Medical Physics, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3181 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia) and Medical Physics, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3181 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia) and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis''. The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the volcanic ash exposure scenario and the dose factors for calculating inhalation doses during volcanic eruption (eruption phase of the volcanic event). For the volcanic ash exposure scenario, the mode of radionuclide release into the biosphere is a volcanic eruption through the repository with the resulting entrainment of contaminated waste in the tephra and the subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion of contaminated material in the biosphere. The biosphere process model for this scenario uses the surface deposition of contaminated ash as the source of radionuclides in the biosphere. The initial atmospheric transport and dispersion of the ash as well as its subsequent redistribution by fluvial and aeolian processes are not addressed within the biosphere model. These processes influence the value of the source term that is calculated elsewhere and then combined with the BDCFs in the TSPA model to calculate expected dose to the receptor. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163958]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gemcitabine Radiosensitization after High-Dose Samarium for Osteoblastic Osteosarcoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...osteosarcoma in dogs, using 153Sm-ethylene-diamino-tetramethylene-phosphonate...High-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate...High-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate...LK, Kasi LP, Fossella FV, Price DR, Fordyce WA. Analysis...

Peter M. Anderson; Gregory A. Wiseman; Linda Erlandson; Vilmarie Rodriguez; Barbara Trotz; Stephen A. Dubansky; and Karen Albritton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within±3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image-guided radiation therapy procedure.

Matsubara, Kana, E-mail: matsubara-kana@hs.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

electric rates | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric rates electric rates Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

308

Rate Schedules | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rate Schedules Rate Schedules Rate Schedules One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate levels and these studies for each of Southeastern's four power marketing systems are updated annually. They demonstrate the adequacy of the rates for each system. Rates are considered to be adequate when revenues are sufficient to repay all costs associated with power production and transmission costs, which include the amortization of the Federal investment allocated to power. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012

309

2007-2009 Power Rates Quarterly Updates (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PFR) Firstgov FY 2007 2009 Power Rates Quarterly Updates In BPAs 2007-2009 Wholesale Power Rate Case (WP-07), BPA agreed that it would post reports about BPAs power...

310

WP-07 Power Rate Case (rates/ratecases)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Cases Financial Choices (2003-06) Power Function Review (PFR) Firstgov 2007 Wholesale Power (WP-07) Rate Case Related Links: Power Function Review (PFR) On July 17, 2006,...

311

Further evaluation of dose estimation using the FBX dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) methodology was developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine in 1968 and subse- quently revised in 1973 (Lo76). This methodology is commonly accepted as a means of estimating dose to the body organs through exposure... Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) methodology was developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine in 1968 and subse- quently revised in 1973 (Lo76). This methodology is commonly accepted as a means of estimating dose to the body organs through exposure...

Helfinstine, Suzanne Yvette

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

RIS-M-2254 ON A RADIOCHROMIC DYE DOSE METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISÃ?-M-2254 ON A RADIOCHROMIC DYE DOSE METER Arne Miller and William L. McLaughlin Abstract. Radiochromic dye dose meters made of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) with hexa(hydroxyethyl)pararosaniline cyanide (HPR results and outlines plans for further research on this dose meter. Currently the response is found

314

Dose-Response Relations from Epidemiological Studies [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Dose-Response Relations...The paper discusses dose-response relations...available over a range wide enough to make...chrysotile asbestos and ionizing radiation. In both cases the...increases with the dose of asbestos (principally...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Molecular signatures of low dose radiation exposure in human subjects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular signatures of low dose radiation exposure in human subjects...Volume 46, 2005] 3096 Low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) in the 1-10 cGy range has largely unknown biological...the effect and risk at low dose by extrapolation from measured...

Zelanna Goldberg; Chad W. Schwietert; Maggie Isbell; Joerg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Christine Hartmann Siantar; and David M. Rocke

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Parameter Estimation for Automatic Dose Control in Radioscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parameter Estimation for Automatic Dose Control in Radioscopy Daniel Keysers, Sami Celik, Henning of the X-ray dose on this parameter alone leads to incorrect exposure, if direct radiation enters-ray dose needs to be adjusted continuously to the body region examined. In cur- rent systems

Keysers, Daniel

317

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site dose measurements include the contribution from natural terrestrial and cosmic background radiation-site areas known to have radiation dose slightly elevated above the natural background radiation. The results was calculated as 7.20E-02 mrem (0.72 Sv) to the MEI. The dose from the ingestion pathway was estimated as 7

318

Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). \\{TLDs\\} were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, \\{CTDIvol\\} 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients \\{ESDs\\} values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

K. Alzimami; A. Sulieman; E. Omer; I.I. Suliman; K. Alsafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y ambient environments on the indoor radon dose (in terms of the dose conversion coefficient or DCC of the human respiratory tract. Epidemiological studies of under- ground miners of uranium and other minerals

Yu, K.N.

320

Field-size dependence of doses of therapeutic carbon beams  

SciTech Connect

To estimate the physical dose at the center of spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) for various conditions of the irradiation system, a semiempirical approach was applied. The dose at the center of the SOBP depends on the field size because of large-angle scattering particles in the water phantom. For a small field of 5x5 cm{sup 2}, the dose was reduced to 99.2%, 97.5%, and 96.5% of the dose used for the open field in the case of 290, 350, and 400 MeV/n carbon beams, respectively. Based on the three-Gaussian form of the lateral dose distributions of the carbon pencil beam, which has previously been shown to be effective for describing scattered carbon beams, we reconstructed the dose distributions of the SOBP beam. The reconstructed lateral dose distribution reproduced the measured lateral dose distributions very well. The field-size dependencies calculated using the reconstructed lateral dose distribution of the therapeutic carbon beam agreed with the measured dose dependency very well. The reconstructed beam was also used for irregularly shaped fields. The resultant dose distribution agreed with the measured dose distribution. The reconstructed beams were found to be applicable to the treatment-planning system.

Kusano, Yohsuke; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yonai, Shunsuke; Komori, Masataka; Ikeda, Noritoshi; Tachikawa, Yuji; Ito, Atsushi; Uchida, Hirohisa [Tokai University Unified Graduate School, Graduate School of Science and Technology, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1207, Japan and Accelerator Engineering Co., 2-13-1 Konakadai, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan); Department of Accelerator Physics and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Accelerator Physics and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Accelerator Engineering Co., 2-13-1 Konakadai, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan); Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rating the NRF's rating system Michael I. Cherry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the NRF's raison d'être--thetrainingofhigh-qualityresearch manpower. The progress of the rating systemRating the NRF's rating system Michael I. Cherry a* and Mark J. Gibbons b T HE LATEST REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL Research Foundation (NRF), chaired by Wieland Gevers, and released surreptitiously

Wagner, Stephan

322

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standard. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states considered in the TSPA-LA as well as conversion factors for evaluating compliance with the groundwater protection standard. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 164403]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

323

The effect of different adaptation strengths on image quality and radiation dose using Siemens Care Dose 4D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......undertaking strategies for CT radiation dose optimisation...supported by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSI P 1579...4D new technique for radiation dose reduction. SOMATOM...Application Guide. Software Version syngo CT 2005A......

Marcus Söderberg; Mikael Gunnarsson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standards. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1-1). The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states (present day, monsoon, and glacial transition) considered in the TSPA-LA, as well as conversion factors for compliance evaluation with the groundwater protection standards. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TELECOMMUNICATIONS RATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TELECOMMUNICATIONS RATE BACKGROUND The University recently the desktop phone service costs back to individual units/departments by creating a telecommunications rate in the Other Expenses category of the budget as a "Telecommunications Charge". NOTE- direct charging

Straight, Aaron

326

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.  

SciTech Connect

This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

328

Improving low-dose blood-brain barrier permeability quantification using sparse high-dose induced prior for Patlak model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation of BBBP map with the prior regularized Patlak model. Evaluation with the simulated low-dose-brain barrier permeability; Patlak model; radiation dose reduction 1. Introduction As the first leading cause), let alone the prolong protocol for BBBP assessment. While ef- fective radiation dose reduction in PCT

Chen, Tsuhan

329

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biotinylated nucleotide analogue/ribonucleotide mix. The biotinylated cRNA targets were then...dose-response to controlled, low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation exposure. | The effect of low doses of low-linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation...

Zelanna Goldberg; David M. Rocke; Chad Schwietert; Susanne R. Berglund; Alison Santana; Angela Jones; Jörg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Ruixiao Lu; and Christine Hartmann Siantar

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

SU?E?T?348: Measurement?Guided 4D VMAT Dose Reconstruction on an Arbitrary Homogeneous Dataset  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop and validate a VMAT QA tool that takes as input a 2D low?density (?10 mm) empirical dose map from a commercial helical diode array and outputs a high density volumetric time?resolved (4D) dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. At first the method validation is limited to a homogeneous ‘patient’. Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array (ArcCHECK Sun Nuclear Corp. Melbourne FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high?density volumetric dose using measurement?guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the 3D TPS dose on the patient dataset producing a semi?empirical volumetric dose grid. Four?dimensional dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing the sub?beam instead of composite dose. For validation TG?119 structures and objectives were used. 3DVH and TPS cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water?equivalent phantom (‘patient’). The shape of the phantom is different from the ArcCHECK and the targets were placed asymmetrically. Ion chamber dose sampled at 10Hz was compared to time?resolved 3DVH point doses. Coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. Results: Across four TG?119 plans the average PTV point dose difference in the cube between 3DVH and ion chamber is 0.0±0.9%. Average film vs. 3DVH gamma analysis passing rates are 88.6 96.1 and 99.5% for 1%/2mm 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. 4D MGDR was also sufficiently accurate. Conclusions: Even for a well?commissioned TPS comparison metrics show on average better agreement between MGDR and measurement compared to MGDR and TPS on the arbitrary?shaped phantom (‘patient’). The method requires no more accelerator time than standard QA while producing more clinically relevant information. Validation in a heterogeneous thoracic phantom is under way as is ultimate application to virtual motion studies. Supported in part by a grant from Sun Nuclear Corp.

D Opp; J Robinson; B Nelms; G Zhang; V Feygelman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Patient-Specific Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Kernel Approach for Inverse Planning in Afterloading Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. Methods and Materials: The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. Results: A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. Conclusion: A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report 43 approach for the Axxent source.

D'Amours, Michel [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dagnault, Anne [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastro Clinic, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation Globus Ruth NASA Ames Research Center Abstract Osteoporosis profoundly affects the aging U.S. population and exposure to high doses of radiation causes bone loss similar to age-related osteoporosis, although the influence of low dose radiation exposures is not known. The central hypothesis of our DOE project (NASA supplement) is that low doses of radiation modulate subsequent skeletal degeneration via oxidative pathways. Our working hypothesis is that a prior exposure to low dose radiation regulates oxidative metabolism within bone and contributes to bone loss caused either by subsequent high, challenge doses of radiation or by aging. HZE source: Because astronauts are exposed to radiation from GCR and solar

333

Reduction of radiation dose to radiosensitive organs and its tradeoff with image quality in Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trimester Fetal Radiation Dose Estimation in 16-MDCT Withoutsimulations for radiation dose estimations discussed in thisspecific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT:

Zhang, Di

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting dose distributions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2) short overall... is briefly discussed. Good Dose Distribution Good radiation dose distribution speaks for itself. In many... , good dose ... Source: Brenner, David...

335

Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and near East Fork Poplar Creek. More detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, are presented in several technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. The asterisk placed after the base number will enable the search to list all of the related reports in this series.

Thomas E. Widner; et. al.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M. [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Guthrie Clinic/Robert Packard Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania 18840 (United States); EBG MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria A2700 (Austria)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative to Flat Rate Billing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 22 IntroductionIntroduction ·· Modern societies rely on electrical collectionMetering and Rate Models facilitate collection #12;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 33 Rate

Hughes, Larry

339

Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Design and development of a silicon-segmented detector for 2D dose measurements in radiotherapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and protontherapy, require detectors with specific features, usually not available in conventional dosimeters. IMRT dose measurements, for instance, must face non-uniform beam fluences as well as a time-varying dose rate. Two-dimensional detectors present a great interest for dosimetry in beams with steep dose gradients, but they must satisfy a number of requirements and, in particular, they must exhibit high spatial resolution. With the aim of developing a dosimetric system adequate for 2D pre-treatment dose verifications, we designed a modular dosimetric device based on a monolithic silicon-segmented module. State and results of this work in progress are described in this article. The first 441 pixels, 6.29×6.29 cm2 silicon module has been produced by ion implantation on a 50 ?m thick p-type epitaxial layer. This sensor has been connected to a discrete readout electronics performing current integration, and has been tested with satisfactory results. In the final configuration, nine silicon modules will be assembled together to cover an area close to 20×20 cm2 with 3969 channels. In this case, the readout electronics will be based on an ASIC capable to read 64 channels by performing current-to-frequency conversion.

David Menichelli; Mara Bruzzi; Marta Bucciolini; Cinzia Talamonti; Marta Casati; Livia Marrazzo; Mauro Tesi; Claudio Piemonte; Alberto Pozza; Nicola Zorzi; Mirko Brianzi; Antonio De Sio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Re-evaluation of the reference dose for methylmercury and assessment of current exposure levels  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury (Me-Hg) is widely distributed through freshwater and saltwater food chains and human consumption of fish and shellfish has lead to widespread exposure. Both the US EPA Reference Dose (0.3 [mu]g/kg/day) and the FAO/WHO Permissible Tolerable Weekly Intake (3.3 [mu]g/kg/week) are currently based on the prevention of paraesthesia in adult and older children. However, Me-Hg exposure in utero is known to result in a range of developmental neurologic effects including clinical CNS symptoms and delayed onset of walking. Based on a critical review of development toxicity data from human and animal studies, it is concluded that current guidelines for the prevention of paraesthesia are not adequate to address developmental effects. A dose of 0.07 [mu]g/kg/day is suggested as the best estimate of a potential reference dose for developmental effects. Data on nationwide fish consumption rates and Me-Hg levels in fish/seafood weighted by proportion of the catch intended for human consumption are analyzed in a Monte Carlo simulation to derive a probability distribution of background Me-Hg exposure. While various uncertainties in the toxicologic and exposure data limit the precision with which health risk can be estimated, this analysis suggests that at current levels of Me-Hg exposure, a significant fraction of women of childbearing age have exposures above this suggested reference dose.

Stern, A.H. (New Jersey Dept. of Environmental Protection and Energy, Trenton (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - March 2004 (CRAC 5 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2003 - March 2004 (CRAC 5 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 15 kb, corrected December 18, 2003,...

343

April - September 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 (CRAC 6 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April 1 - September 30, 2004 (CRAC 6 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 14 kb, originally posted January 12, 2004;...

344

April - September 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April - September 2005 (CRAC 8 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April - September 2005 (CRAC 8 period) (PDF, 3 pages, 108 kb, posted December 17, 2004)...

345

October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2005 - March 2006 (CRAC 9 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2005 - March 2006 (CRAC 9 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 116 kb, originally posted...

346

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Online Literature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Literature Online Literature Journals, Books and other Publications Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety Radioactive Waste and Radioecology "Insight" Magazine Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) News: Aiming at an information center on low dose radiation research Health Physics International Journal of Radiation Biology Iranian Journal of Radiation Research Journal of Radiological Protection National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Radiation Research U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge Reports Animal Cancer Tests and Human Cancer Risk Assessment: A Broad Perspective Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Atomic Bomb Survivors and Their Children (1945-1995) Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation: BEIR

347

Device for the reduction of population dose  

SciTech Connect

Conventional dental radiographic procedures do not permit direct visualization of the radiation field or the central ray. As a result, it is necessary to use a beam diameter larger than the film in order to prevent an unnecessarily high number of cone cuts or other errors during visual alignment of the cone and film. The modification of a conventional dental x-ray cone which permits the central ray to be depicted by a beam of light is described. The use of the device significantly reduced the number of cone cuts, even when small beam diameters were used. Visualization of the central ray improved radiographic accuracy and has the potential to significantly reduce the over-all dose to the population by reducing the size of the field used for dental radiography.

Kihara, T.; Uchinoumi, K.; Akagi, F.; Antoku, S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup ?1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with the BrachyPhantom and those calculated by the treatment plans and using the S{sub k} values did not exceed ±3% and ±1.6%, respectively.Conclusions: The BrachyPhantom may be conveniently used for quality assurance and/or verification of HDR planning system with a priori threshold level to spot problems of 2% and ±3%, respectively, and in the long run save time for the medical physicist.

Austerlitz, C. [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil)] [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil); Campos, C. A. T. [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)] [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research  

SciTech Connect

Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

Strom, Daniel J.

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family #12;The top 25% of new homes based% REGULATIONS lawbreakers DEGREE OF GREEN MARKET SHIFT typical building practices market leaders innovators the negative impact of buildings on their occupants and on the environment. LEED for Homes categories

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

351

The Coal Transportation Rate Database  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Transportation Rate Database (CTRDB) adds new data for 2000 and 2001. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Form 580 "interrogatories" are the primary source for...

352

BPA revises oversupply rate proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oversupply-rate-proposal Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

353

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

354

Microsoft PowerPoint - Dose Ranges 24Jan 05.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 40 60 20 40 60 80 100 rem NRC Dose Limit for Public 100 mrem/yr = 1 mSv/yr (DOE, ICRP, NCRP) ANSI standard N43.17 Personnel scanner, max = 25 mrem/yr Cleanup criteria for site decommissioning/ license termination 25 mrem/yr NCRP "Negligible Dose" Medical Diagnostics (A-J) A C D E G B Temporary "Special Case" annual Public Limit (NRC, DOE) NRC Dose Limit for Workers = 5 rem/yr = 50 mSv/yr Cancer Epidemiology Life Span Study (A-bomb survivors) ( Chart compiled by NF Metting, Office of Science DOE/BER; 24Jan2005,"Orders of Magnitude") Absorbed dose: 100 rad = 1 Gray Dose equivalent: 100 rem = 1 Sievert 100 mrem = 1 mSv (1 rem = 1 rad for x- and gamma- rays) Estimated dose for

355

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

356

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue John Ford Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A & M University Why this Project? Using the well-established rat trachea model to test the hypothesis that normal respiratory epithelial cells transmit signals to neighboring cells in response to very low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals By comparing the responses shown by cells in these normal rodent respiratory tissues to those seen for human respiratory epithelial cells in reconstituted tissue constructs, it will be possible to better understand the responds in human respiratory cells in vivo. These studies will characterize responses after exposure to a variety of radiation types and dose distributions. Experimental Approach

357

Low-dose Photon and Simulated Solar Particle Event Proton Effects on Foxp3+  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon and Simulated Solar Particle Event Proton Effects on Foxp3+ Photon and Simulated Solar Particle Event Proton Effects on Foxp3+ Treg Cells and Other Leukocytes Daila Gridley Loma Linda University and Medical Center Abstract Purpose: Radiation is a major factor in the spaceflight environment that can compromise immune defense mechanisms. Astronauts on missions are continuously exposed to lowdose/ low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation and may receive relatively high doses during a solar particle event (SPE) that consists primarily of protons. However, there are very few reports in which LDR photons were combined with protons. The goal of this study was to determine whether exposure to LDR γ-rays would modulate the effect of proton radiation mimicking an SPE. Materials and Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1.7 Gy simulated SPE

358

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells. Munira Kadhim 1 , Stefania Militi 1 , Debbie Bowler 1 , Denise Macdonald 1 and Kevin Prise 2 1 Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, MRC, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RD, UK 2 Gray Cancer Institute ,PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Because the human population is genetically heterogeneous, it is important to understand the role that heterogeneity may play in radiation response. Exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to a suite of changes, including increased mutation rate, delayed reproductive cell death, and delayed chromosomal aberrations, all of which are manifestations of the complex genomic instability (GI) phenotype. Following exposure to either high LET

359

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung.

Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.van.luijk@rt.umcg.nl; Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Meertens, Harm [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Schippers, Jacobus M. [Accelerator Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switerland (Switzerland); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kampinga, Harm H. [Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

363

Innovative Rates Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were ?-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20 Gy at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37 °C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20 Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8–24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y = (0.088 ± 0.005) × D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

A.I. Lamadrid Boada; I. Romero Aguilera; G.I. Terzoudi; J.E. González Mesa; G. Pantelias; O. García

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Original article Increase of plasma eCG binding rate after  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Increase of plasma eCG binding rate after administration of repeated high dose of eCG to cows Pierre V. DRIONa*, Rudy DE ROOVERb, Jean-Yves HOUTAINc, Edmond M. MCNAMARAd, Benoît chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) is still used to promote follicular growth in cat- tle and, more recently

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 - March 2005 (CRAC 7 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2004 - March 2005 (CRAC 7 period) (PDF, 3 pages, 13 kb, originally posted at 11 a.m. on...

367

April - September 2002 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 (CRAC 2 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April - September 2002 (CRAC 2 period) (PDF, 9 kb, posted April 1, 2002) Note: The PDF document above provides...

368

October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - March 2003 (CRAC 3 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2002 - March 2003 (CRAC 3 period) (PDF, 14 kb, posted October 1, 2002) Note: The PDF...

369

April - September 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 (CRAC 4 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April - September 2003 (CRAC 4 period) (PDF, 3 pages, 74 kb, updated April 8, 2003) Note: The PDF document...

370

October 2001 - March 2002 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - March 2002 (CRAC 1 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2001 - March 2002 (CRAC 1 period) (PDF, 6 kb, updated October 3, 2001, posted October 4,...

371

3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

Sheng Ke, E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo [TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Read, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Positron annihilation rates in materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of positron annihilation rate is one subject of a relatively new method of material structure analysis â?? positron annihilation spectroscopy. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films have been studied by positron annihilation rate measurement. The correlation between annihilation rates and the PET film thickness was established. Similar studies were carried out for aluminium foils and water. The results give information on the probability of positron annihilation per unit of time and per unit of material thickness that is described by an explicit function of the energy transfer model.

Tran Dai Nghiep; Khuong Thanh Tuan; Ngo Danh Du

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY  

SciTech Connect

A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2007 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and 64 ± 10 mrem (640 ± 100 Sv) at off-site locations. Both on-and off-site dose measurements include doses measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at 49 on-site and 15 off-site locations showed penetrating radiation expo- sures both on and off site. The direct measure- ments taken at the off-site

375

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from ambient sources was 69 ± 13 mrem (690 ± 130 Sv) and 63 ± 11 mrem (630 ± 110 Sv) at off-site locations. Both on- and off-site dose measurements include the contribution from natural terrestrial thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at 49 on-site and 15 off-site locations showed that there was no external dose

376

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents: Preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

A method for the determination of radiation doses resulting from a hypothetical crticality accident is presented. The method is an improvement over the slide-rule method cuurently used. The improved method calculates doses for low eneriched uranium as well as highly enriched solutions.

Wilkinson, A.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hopper, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Total dose radiation response of plasma-damaged NMOS devices  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-damaged NMOS devices were subjected to the X-ray total dose irradiation. Unlike the traditional hot-carrier or Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) stress where the hole trap generation is less pronounced, this study shows enhanced hole trap and interface trap generation on plasma-damaged devices after total dose irradiation.

Yue, J.; Lo, E.; Flanery, M. [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)] [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The role of high-dose, single-fraction irradiation in small and large intracranial arteriovenous malformations  

SciTech Connect

Radiosurgery with external beam irradiation is an accepted treatment for small intracranial vascular malformations. It has been proven effective and safe for lesions with volumes of less than 4 cc. However, there is only some limited clinical data for malformations of grade 4 and grade 5, according to Spetzler and Martin. At the Heidelberg radiosurgery facility equipped with a linear accelerator, 212 patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations have been treated since 1984. Thirty-eight percent of the arteriovenous malformations treated were classified inoperable, 14% grade 5, 19% grade 4, and 29% grades l-3. Radiation doses between 10 and 29 Gy were applied to the 80% isodose contour. Above a threshold dose of 18 Gy, the overall obliteration rate was 72%. After 3 years, the obliteration rates were 83% with volumes of less than 4.2 cc, 75% with volumes of up to 33.5 cc, and 50% with volumes of up to 113 cc. Of the patients presenting with seizures and paresis, 83% and 56%, respectively, showed improvement, which correlated with the degree of obliteration. After a follow-up period of up to 9 years, the rate of radiation-induced severe late complication was 4.3%. In grade 5 lesions, the risk of side effects was 10%. No serious complications occurred if a maximum dose of less than 25 Gy was applied to treatment volumes of less than 33.5 cc. The success of sterotactic high-dose irradiation of arteriovenous malformations depends on the dose applied. The incidence of radiation-induced side effects increased with the applied dose and treatment volumes. From our experience, doses of less than 25 Gy and treatment volumes of up to 33.5 cc are safe and effective. In the future, new techniques of radiosurgery with linear accelerators and dynamically reshaped beams will allow us to apply homogenous dose distributions. Additional use of magnetic resonance angiography for 3D treatment planning will help to identify the nidus more easily. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Engenhart, R.; Debus, J.; Wannenmacher, M. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)] [and others

1994-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

DOE Guidance-Category Rating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTORS FROM: SARA"iJ. Boku1, DIRECToR OF HUMAN C~TAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #10 CATEGORY RATING The purpose of this memorandum is to establish the Department of Energy's (DOE's) policy for the use of Category Rating. Authorities: Public Law 107-296; Title 5 USC 3319; 5 CFR, Part 337, Subpart C., Presidential Memorandum of May 11, 2010 This guidance is established in accordance with 5 USC 3319, which authorizes Federal Agencies to use alternative rating proced.ures in assessing applicants for employment using category rating and selection procedures, and to ensure consistency in complying with federal regulations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Department of

380

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OpenEI - electric rates  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Electric Utility U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

382

High repetition rate fiber lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for...

384

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

385

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

386

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

387

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

388

Estimation of the total effective dose from low-dose CT scans and radiopharmaceutical administrations delivered to patients undergoing SPECT/CT explorations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective dose calculation is useful to compare the doses from, and the radiation risks associated with, different diagnostic examinations. ... account the uncertainties associated with the estimated effectiv...

Carlos Montes; Pilar Tamayo; Jorge Hernandez…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On the use of computed radiography plates for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distributions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: As traditional film is phased out in most radiotherapy centers, computed radiography (CR) systems are increasingly being purchased as a replacement. CR plates can be used for patient imaging, but may also be used for a variety of quality assurance (QA) purposes and can be calibrated in terms of dose. This study looks at their suitability for verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions. Methods: A CR plate was calibrated in terms of the relative dose and the stability of response over 1 year was studied. The effect of exposing the CR plate to ambient light and of using different time delays before scanning was quantified. The CR plate was used to verify the relative dose distributions for ten IMRT patients and the results were compared to those obtained using a two dimensional (2D) diode array. Results: Exposing the CR plate to 10 s of ambient light between irradiation (174 cGy) and scanning erased approximately 80% of the signal. Changes in delay time between irradiation and scanning also affected the measurement results. The signal on the plate was found to decay at a rate of approximately 3.6 cGy/min in the first 10 min after irradiation. The use of a CR plate for IMRT patient-specific QA resulted in a significantly lower distance to agreement (DTA) and gamma pass rate than when using a 2D diode array for the measurement. This was primarily due to the over-response of the CR phosphor to low energy scattered radiation. For the IMRT QA using the CR plate, the average gamma pass rate was 97.3%. For the same IMRT QA using a diode array, the average gamma pass rate was 99.7%. The gamma criteria used were 4% dose difference and 4 mm DTA for head and neck treatments and 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA for prostate treatments. The gamma index tolerance was 1. The lowest 10% of the dose distribution was excluded from all gamma and DTA analyses. Conclusions: Although the authors showed that CR plates can be used for patient specific IMRT QA, the practical problems such as the over-response to low energy scatter and signal fading with light exposure and time mean that alternative detectors such as radiochromic film or diode arrays will be a more sensible choice for most radiotherapy departments.

Day, R. A.; Sankar, A. P.; Nailon, W. H.; MacLeod, A. S. [Department of Oncology Physics, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road South, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Measurement of routinely encountered neutron field doses using portable survey instruments and a Bonner multisphere system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

against two 10 Ci PuBe neutron sources. Measurements were m de at a research reactor facility and a cyclotron facility using a Victoreen 4BBA portable survey instrument, a Ludlum Mode1 15 portable survey instrument and a Bonner multisphere system. Data... Detector Response as a Function of Neutron Energy Page Figure 2. Plot of BON25G Spectral Output Figure 3, Flux-to-Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Neutrons . . . . 8 Figure 4. Data Measurement Locations at NSC 13 Figure 5. Data Measurement Locations...

Davis, Donald Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Population doses from terrestrial exposure in the vicinity of abandoned uranium mines in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A uranium mineralized area of Stara Planina Mt., Serbia, where uranium ore was exploited for seven years was characterized radiologically. Results were compared with those for an area of background radiation in the northern part of the mountain. The terrestrial gamma dose rate due to 238U, 232Th and 40K in the area affected by mining activities was twofold higher than that of background area. The radiological situation of the affected area is not of immediate concern, except one location with elevated external hazard index where remediative measures taking into account site-specific ecological characteristics should be planned and implemented.

M. Mom?ilovi?; J. Kova?evi?; S. Dragovi?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of low-dose low-linear energy transfer ionizing radiation (LDIR) in humans...direct evidence that doses in the range of 1 to 10 cGy...the intentional radiation of healthy tissue...the response to ionizing radiation. Attempts...

Zelanna Goldberg; David M. Rocke; Chad Schwietert; Susanne R. Berglund; Alison Santana; Angela Jones; Jörg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Ruixiao Lu; and Christine Hartmann Siantar

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Assessment of diurnal systemic dose of agrochemicals in regulatory toxicity testing – An integrated approach without additional animal use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated toxicokinetics (TK) data provide information on the rate, extent and duration of systemic exposure across doses, species, strains, gender, and life stages within a toxicology program. While routine for pharmaceuticals, TK assessments of non-pharmaceuticals are still relatively rare, and have never before been included in a full range of guideline studies for a new agrochemical. In order to better understand the relationship between diurnal systemic dose (AUC24h) and toxicity of agrochemicals, TK analyses in the study animals is now included in all short- (excluding acute), medium- and long-term guideline mammalian toxicity studies including reproduction/developmental tests. This paper describes a detailed procedure for the implementation of TK in short-, medium- and long-term regulatory toxicity studies, without the use of satellite animals, conducted on three agrochemicals (X11422208, 2,4-D and X574175). In these studies, kinetically-derived maximum doses (KMD) from short-term studies instead of, or along with, maximum tolerated doses (MTD) were used for the selection of the high dose in subsequent longer-term studies. In addition to leveraging TK data to guide dose level selection, the integrated program was also used to select the most appropriate method of oral administration (i.e., gavage versus dietary) of test materials for rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies. The integrated TK data obtained across toxicity studies (without the use of additional/satellite animals) provided data critical to understanding differences in response across doses, species, strains, sexes, and life stages. Such data should also be useful in mode of action studies and to improve human risk assessments.

Shakil A. Saghir; Michael J. Bartels; David L. Rick; Alene T. McCoy; Reza J. Rasoulpour; Robert G. Ellis-Hutchings; M. Sue Marty; Claire Terry; Jason P. Bailey; Richard Billington; James S. Bus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of Sex-Sorted Sperm Dosage on Conception Rates in Holstein Heifers and Lactating Cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ejaculates were collected by artificial vagina from 3 Holstein sires and sorted to 90% purity for X-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa (range 88 to 93%) using flow cytometry. Sorted sperm were diluted to 2.1, 3.5, or 5.0 × 106 sperm per dose in an egg yolk (20%), Tris, glycerol (7%) extender. Collections were repeated until >600 straws per sperm dose per sire were obtained. Each sperm dose was loaded into color-coded 0.25-mL French straws, with alternate colors used to define treatments across sires. Within sires, straws were packaged at 9 per cane (3 of each color) and strategically allocated to 75 Holstein herds with targets for 50% use in heifers and 50% in lactating cows. Straw color was recorded in the on-farm record-keeping system at the time of insemination. Data were analyzed separately for cows and heifers. Among heifers, a total of 2,125 usable records were retrieved from 51 herds (238 ± 5.5 services/ sperm dose per sire, range: 218 to 263). Conception rates in heifers were influenced by the sire × sperm dosage interaction. Within sire A, conception rates of heifers were greater for the 5 × 106 (59.5%) than for the 2.1 × 106 (46.4%) sperm dose and intermediate for the 3.5 × 106 sperm dose (52.2%). However, across sires, sperm dosage had no effect on heifer conception rates (46.7, 51.2, and 52.5% for the 2.1, 3.5, and 5.0 × 106 sperm dosages, respectively). Among cows, a total of 2,369 services were retrieved from 56 herds (263 ± 8.8 services/sperm dose per sire, range: 233 to 303). Conception rates of cows (29.4%) were not affected by sire or sperm dosage (27.0, 29.1, and 30.3% for the 2.1, 3.5, and 5.0 × 106 sperm dosages, respectively). In conclusion, these data indicate that an increased sperm dosage may enhance virgin heifer conception rates for some (but not all) sires, whereas neither sire nor sexed-sperm dosage affected conception rates of lactating cows. Additional studies of sexed-sperm dosage across a larger sampling of bulls are warranted to determine whether and how such a practice can be implemented cost effectively for the benefit of the dairy industry.

J.M. DeJarnette; R.L. Nebel; C.E. Marshall; J.F. Moreno; C.R. McCleary; R.W. Lenz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files  

SciTech Connect

Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

Holloway, Lois Charlotte, E-mail: lois.holloway@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney (Australia); Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); Miller, Julie-Anne [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); Kumar, Shivani [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney (Australia); Whelan, Brendan M. [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); Vinod, Shalini K. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales (Australia)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Authors: E. A. Blakely1, R. I. Schwarz1, A. C. Thompson2, K. A. Bjornstad1, P. Y. Chang1,3 C.J. Rosen1, and D. Sudar1 Institutions: Divisions of 1Life Sciences and 2Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. and 3SRI International, Menlo Park, CA. We are using a novel x-ray Microprobe Beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL to investigate bystander effects of low doses in well characterized human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). The ALS facility is capable of producing a beam of 12.5 keV x-rays with a focussed spot size of __m_ and a wide range of doses and dose-rates. Unlike normal x-ray sources, this beam has a very small background of either low-

397

Standard Practice for Application of Thermoluminescence-Dosimetry (TLD) Systems for Determining Absorbed Dose in Radiation-Hardness Testing of Electronic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers procedures for the use of thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) to determine the absorbed dose in a material irradiated by ionizing radiation. Although some elements of the procedures have broader application, the specific area of concern is radiation-hardness testing of electronic devices. This practice is applicable to the measurement of absorbed dose in materials irradiated by gamma rays, X rays, and electrons of energies from 12 to 60 MeV. Specific energy limits are covered in appropriate sections describing specific applications of the procedures. The range of absorbed dose covered is approximately from 10?2 to 104 Gy (1 to 106 rad), and the range of absorbed dose rates is approximately from 10?2 to 1010 Gy/s (1 to 1012 rad/s). Absorbed dose and absorbed dose-rate measurements in materials subjected to neutron irradiation are not covered in this practice. Further, the portion of these procedures that deal with electron irradiation are primarily intended for use in parts testin...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in the 1D correction case, the 2D algorithm leaves the portal dosimetry process virtually unchanged in the central portion of the detector, and thus these correction algorithms are not needed for centrally located fields of moderate size (at least, in the case of 6 MV beam energy).Conclusion: The 2D correction improves the portal dosimetry results for those fields for which the 1D correction proves insufficient, especially in the inplane, off-axis regions of the detector. This 2D correction neglects the relatively smaller discrepancies that may be caused by backscatter from nonuniform machine components downstream from the detecting layer.

Bailey, Daniel W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Calculation of gamma radiation dose rate and radon concentration due to granites used as building materials in Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Magusa, North Cyprus, via Mersin 10, Turkey Natural radioactivity concentrations...equivalent from all natural sources of radiation...health(4). Radon gas is a radionuclide present...to determining the natural radioactivity concentration......

A. Abbasi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Soil radioactivity and radiation absorbed dose rates at roadsides in high-traffic density areas in Ibadan metropolis, southwestern Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......under the spectrum of the radionuclide in the standard reference sample. The standard reference soil sample prepared from Rocketdyne Laboratories (CA) is traceable to a mixed standard gamma source (Ref. No. 48722-356) by Analytic Inc. (Atlanta......

N. N. Jibiri; O. S. Bankole

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beta-gamma dose rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measurement of neutron spectra for determining dose equivalent rates at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Also, placement of the detector in a low flux neutron environment adjacent to the area to be characterized could be utilized. These recommendations are reasonable for measurements taken at commercial power plants in areas where personnel exposure... reactions in this region, He 3 10 proportional counters have been proposed by Brackenbush (Br84) to measure neutron spectra up to 1 MeV. The He detector is surrounded by a thermal neutron absorber to maximize the sensitivity at the low end...

Sanza, Bruce Jerome

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Relation between clinical and laboratory parameters with radiation dose rates from patients receiving iodine-131 therapy for thyroid carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......educate every patient on radiation safety procedures for the dosage...improvised containers; the safety officer transferred...origin of emission, and radiation detection survey metre...significant. SPSS for Windows software package (Release 11......

Isa Neshandar Asli; Nastaran Baharfard; Babak Shafiei; Faraj Tabei; Hamid Javadi; Mohammad Seyedabadi; Iraj Nabipour; Majid Assadi

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...began food monitoring on March 16, 2011 and set provisional regulation values for contaminated food and water on March 17, 2011 (14). Except for the early stage of the accident, such food sources have been screened, and those containing more...

Kouji H. Harada; Tamon Niisoe; Mie Imanaka; Tomoyuki Takahashi; Katsumi Amako; Yukiko Fujii; Masatoshi Kanameishi; Kenji Ohse; Yasumichi Nakai; Tamami Nishikawa; Yuuichi Saito; Hiroko Sakamoto; Keiko Ueyama; Kumiko Hisaki; Eiji Ohara; Tokiko Inoue; Kanako Yamamoto; Yukiyo Matsuoka; Hitomi Ohata; Kazue Toshima; Ayumi Okada; Hitomi Sato; Toyomi Kuwamori; Hiroko Tani; Reiko Suzuki; Mai Kashikura; Michiko Nezu; Yoko Miyachi; Fusako Arai; Masanori Kuwamori; Sumiko Harada; Akira Ohmori; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Akio Koizumi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation average dose rate in three mountainous locations in the western region of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......produced an almost energy-independent response of the detectors within the energy range of terrestrial...TL signal vs. storage time. As can be...Figure 1. TL response of CaSO4:Dy as...3 -5 show the frequency distributions of......

Fayez H. H. A1-Ghorabie

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Estimation of dose rates to humans exposed to elevated natural radioactivity through different pathways in the island of Ikaria, Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......0001-0.12 mSv y1 with an average value of 0.07 mSv y1...01-2.4 Bq m1, with an average value of 0.8 Bq m1...spectrum. Considering the consumption of potable water, the...Protection Agency, Air and Energy Environmental Research...against Radon-222 at Home and at Work. (1993......

G. Trabidou; H. Florou

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Natural radionuclides content and associated dose rates in fine-grained sediments from Patras-Rion sub-basins, Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Sychaina areas of lower Pleistocene age. Within this facies, coal beds were recognised. In the periphery of the lake, small...limit of 370 Bq kg1, as recommended by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development(21, 22) (Table-2). Table-2......

H.V. Papaefthymiou; G. Chourdakis; J. Vakalas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Heart  

SciTech Connect

The literature is reviewed to identify the main clinical and dose-volume predictors for acute and late radiation-induced heart disease. A clear quantitative dose and/or volume dependence for most cardiac toxicity has not yet been shown, primarily because of the scarcity of the data. Several clinical factors, such as age, comorbidities and doxorubicin use, appear to increase the risk of injury. The existing dose-volume data is presented, as well as suggestions for future investigations to better define radiation-induced cardiac injury.

Gagliardi, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.gagliardi@karolinska.s [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Cancer Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Correa, Candace; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Allen, Aaron M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana- Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Rabin Medical Center Petach Tikvah (Israel); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber ?-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam delivery is suggested.

Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)] [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate" Rate" Showing 13 pages using this property. 4 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 +, 6 +, 3 +, ... 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 6 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 3 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 7 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 8 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 6 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 6 + E E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 1 + E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 1 + E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 1 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate&oldid=53975

410

Advertising Rates from May 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advertising Rates from May 2012 Abitrich INSIDE: NEW LIFTOUT Isausedluxurycar worththerisk? Page8 May 5, 2012 #12;1 MODULE WIDE DRIVE TABLOID ADVERTISING SIZES VALID FROM MAY 2012 2 MODULES WIDE 8 3pm Thursday Display Phoned Bookings and AdOnline Noon Thursday Noon Thursday Display Advertising

Peters, Richard

411

Results of the radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois (GSG002)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, located in the South Plant facility of Granite City Steel Division, 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois. The survey was performed in August 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from 1958 to 1966. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the ground surface outdoors near the building, the floor and walls in all accessible areas inside the building, and the roof; measurement of beta-gamma dose rates, alpha radiation levels, and removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels at selected locations inside the building and on the roof; and radionuclide analysis of outdoor soil samples and indoor samples of shield-wall fill material land debris. Analysis of soil, shield-wall fill material, debris, and smear samples showed no residual {sup 238}U attributable to former AEC-supported operations at this site. None of the indoor or outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements were elevated above DOE guidelines. The slight elevations in gamma levels found outdoors and on the roof over the shield wall are typical of naturally occurring radioactive substances present in coal ash and cinders in the fill material surrounding the building and in concrete and cinders used in constuction of the shield wall. The slightly elevated gamma levels measured at soil sampling locations can be attributed to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides. In all samples, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U appeared to be in equilibrium, indicating that these radionuclides were of natural origin and not derived from former AEC activities at this site.

Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations  

SciTech Connect

The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

Rittmann, P.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

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Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

414

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Biologically Based Analysis of Lung  

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Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Canadian Occupational Cohort with Low-LET Low-dose Radiation Exposure, and Comparison with Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors. Authors: W.D. Hazelton, D. Krewski, S.H. Moolgavkar Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using several types of multistage models. The primary analysis utilizes the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE), with sensitivity analyses using extensions of this model incorporating additional stages. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of risk are found for dose-response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, e.g., initiation with one or more stages,

415

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

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Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

416

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Dose.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation Dose Dose Radiation Dose One of the most confusing things about One of the most confusing things about understanding radiation effects is visualizing "how much" radiation is involved. It is very difficult to keep the units which measure p radiation straight. A number describing the amount of radiation means nothing without amount of radiation means nothing without evaluating the units, but this is not easy. For example... ...try to match the letter with the amount of di ti i l d i h l radiation involved in each example * Amount of potassium 40 in the body A. Billions of becquerels * Dose to Atomic bomb survivors B. About 250 picocuries * You can safety hold this amount of alpha radiation C. 2-10,000 millirem D. 0-5 Gy * One coast to coast flight * A diagnostic X-ray

417

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

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Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

418

Genetic profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose  

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profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose radiation David Rocke University of California Davis Abstract Previous study from our laboratory has identified pathways associated with low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) in vivo that is consistent across individuals. Furthermore, gene expression patterns have revealed genetic variation between individuals, which may play a role in individual sensitivity to LDIR. The aim is to evaluate microRNA and mRNA expression patterns in lymphoblast cell lines that exhibit sensitivity to radiation. Human lymphoblastoid cell lines were screened for low dose radiation sensitivity by apoptosis, cellular proliferation, and colony forming assay. Cells were irradiated with 5cGy and 10cGy and analyzed at multiple time

419

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

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DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

420

Low Dose Radiation Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo.  

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Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo. 1 Blyth, B.J., 1 Sykes, P.J. 1 Department of Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, The general population is daily exposed to chronic, low doses of ionizing radiation from both natural and artificial sources. The shape of the radiation dose-response curve at these low doses is currently linearly extrapolated from data obtained after high dose exposure due to the low sensitivity of traditional biological assays after near-background exposures. At odds with this Linear No-Threshold model, are the phenomena collectively referred to as the radiation-induced bystander effect. The bystander effect describes a collection of in vitro