Sample records for beryllium disease prevention

  1. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  2. Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Departmental expectations for addressing chronic beryllium disease throughout the Department until a Departmental rule on beryllium is promulgated. This Notice was replaced by final rule 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, published December 8, 1999.

  3. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  4. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (10 CFR 850) | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  5. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    , machining, and using beryllium and their supervisors; the Industrial Hygiene Group, Field Services Beryllium is an element with various industrial uses that is classified as a suspected human lung carcinogen of copper, which makes beryllium a useful material for aerospace and defense. It has various industrial uses

  6. Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established regulatory requirements for the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 850 (10 CFR 850) [64 Federal Register (FR) 68854]. Cancels DOE G 440.1-7. Certified 9-23-10.

  7. Memorandum, Clarification of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 850 (10 CPR 850), Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, Paragraph 850.34(g)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to clarification regarding the reporting of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) as required by paragraph 850.34(g) of the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program rule (10 CFR 850).

  8. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  9. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossman, M.D. [Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  10. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and Â?normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify changes in potential protein biomarkers in beryllium-treated mice. We will correlate these findings with the ability of the transgenic mice to develop a beryllium-specific adaptive immune response in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We will also determine whether beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in blood and BAL correlate with the onset of granuloma formation. Thus, we will provide the scientific community with biomarkers of sensitization and disease progression for CBD. These biomarkers will serve as critical tools for development of improved industrial hygiene and therapeutic interventions.

  11. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  12. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program What's New

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For additional information Contact: David Weitzman, Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy at (301) 903-5401 or: David.Weitzman@hq.doe.gov.

  13. Beryllium Technology Research in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Robert A. Anderl; M. Kay Adleer-Flitton; Gretchen E. Matthern; Troy J. Tranter; Kendall J. Hollis

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While most active research involving beryllium in the United States remains tied strongly to biological effects, there are several areas of technology development in the last two years that should be mentioned. (1) Beryllium disposed of in soil vaults at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) has been encapsulated in-situ by high-temperature and pressure injection of a proprietary wax based material to inhibit corrosion. (2) A research program to develop a process for removing heavy metals and cobalt from irradiated beryllium using solvent extraction techniques has been initiated to remove components that prevent the beryllium from being disposed of as ordinary radioactive waste. (3) The JUPITER-II program at the INL Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has addressed the REDOX reaction of beryllium in molten Flibe (a mixture of LiF and BeF2) to control tritium, particularly in the form of HF, bred in the Flibe by reactions involving both beryllium and lithium. (4) Work has been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to produce beryllium high heat flux components by plasma spray deposition on macro-roughened substrates. Finally, (5) corrosion studies on buried beryllium samples at the RWMC have shown that the physical form of some of the corroded beryllium is very filamentary and asbestos-like. This form of beryllium may exacerbate the contraction of chronic beryllium disease.

  14. About Beryllium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information on what is Beryllium, the symptoms and health hazards associated with Beryllium contamination.

  15. SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium -exposed workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium - exposed workers-up of beryllium-exposed workers. Method: a medical follow-up of workers from a factory machining beryllium (Be preventive measures. Key words: beryllium, sensitisation, occupational exposure, prevention, Lymphocyte

  16. Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

  17. Analysis of HLA-DP association with beryllium disease susceptibility in pooled exposed populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesare Saltini, Massimo Amicosante

    2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Berylliosis or Chronic Beryllium Disease is a chronic granulomatous disorder primarily involving the lung associated with the exposition to low doses of Beryllium (Be) in the workplace. Berylliosis risk has been associated with the presence of a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP beta chain (HLA-DPbetaGlu69) that is expressed in about 97% of disease cases and in 27% of the unaffected Be-exposed controls (p<0.0001) (Richeldi et al. Science 1993; 262: 242-244.12). Since this first observation of an immunogenetic association between berylliosis and HLA-DPbetaGlu69 a number of studies have confirmed the role of this marker as the primary gene of susceptibility of berylliosis (Richeldi et al Am J Ind Med. 1997; 32:337-40; Wang et al J. Immunol. 1999; 163: 1647-53; Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94). Moreover, a structure/function interaction between HLA-DP molecules carrying Glu69 and beryllium in driving and developing the immune response against beryllium itself has been observed as: (1) Be-specific T-cells clones obtained from berylliosis patients recognize beryllium as antigen only when presented in the context of the HLA-DP{beta}Glu69 molecules but not in the context of HLA-DP allelic variants carrying Lys69 (Lombardi G et al. J Immunol 2001; 166: 3549-3555), and (2) beryllium presents an affinity for the HLA-DP2, carrying the berylliosis marker of susceptibility HLA-DPGlu69, from 40 to 100 times higher that the HLA-DP molecule carrying Lys69 (Amicosante M. et al Hum. Immunol. 2001; 62: 686-93). However, although the immunogenetic studies performed have been addressed a number of different questions about the genetic association between berylliosis and/or beryllium sensitization, exposure levels to beryllium and HLA markers, a number of questions are still open in the field mainly due to the limitation imposed by the low number of subjects carrying berylliosis or beryllium sensitization enrolled in each immunogenetic study. In this context, the populations of the study already performed in this field by the University of Modena and Rome (by Prof. C. Saltini) and the University of Pennsylvania (by Prof. M. Rossman) have been evaluated by using similar HLA molecular typing methodologies and that both populations have now been followed up for a period of 4 to 7 years. The general objective of this study has to generate a larger data base comprising the two population with which analyze gene disease association with greater statistical power and ascertain the effect of lesser common gener variants which may be missed when analyzing associations on small populations. In particular addressing the role suggested in previous study such as: (1) the role of HLA-DP rare alleles and polymorphisms, and (2) the role of the HLA markers in disease progression from sensitization. The two populations from the already published studies (Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94) present similar aspects about: ethnicity, type and length of exposure to Be dust, a broadly similar association between beryllium related abnormalities and HLA. The two population have been pooled and evaluated using common criteria of diagnosis (Sensitized subject: at least 2 positive BeLPT tests each with 2 positive wells; CBD-affected subject: identification of well formed non-caseating granulomas on biopsy), follow up and HLA typing technique (complete HLA-DRB, DQB, DPB high resolution typing using amplification with sequence specific primers or sequence based typing). The two populations included 137 subjects with Beryllium hypersensitized (BH) and 155 Be-exposed controls. Inclusion criteria were met by one hundred and six subjects with Be-hypersensitivity of whom 55 were affected by CBD (age 52 {+-} 11 years; 50 caucasians, 2 African-Americans 2 Hispanics and 1 Asian; 46 males and 9 females; mean duration of Be-exposure 15 {+-} 9 years) and 51 showed Be-sensitization without lung granulomas detected by trans-bronchial biopsy (ag

  18. ATTACHMENT 1: HANFORD SITE CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for communication to the workforce Provide Program status to the Senior Management Team (SMT) and DOE management when requested 4.0 Roles and Responsibilities 4.1. Chair Roles and...

  19. Title 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. NIOSH Alert-Preventing Sentization and Disease from Beryllium | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

  2. Beryllium Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beryllium is a naturally occurring metal and is not radioactive. Because of its properties, beryllium has been part of the atomic energy and nuclear weapons industries since the 1940s.

  3. Chronic Conditions and Disease Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , diabetes, heart disease and osteoarthritis. One-on-One Nutrition Counseling Help with weight management and supportive program for those who have chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis

  4. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Frank M. (Espanola, NM); O'Leary, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  5. Beryllium weldability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, M.A.; Damkroger, B.K.; Dixon, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Robertson, E. (Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Welding processes and metallurgical considerations for beryllium welding are discussed in this review. The primary difficulties of welding beryllium are hot cracking, cracking at defects, and ductility limitation or thermally induced cracking. Solutions to these welding problems include control of the Fe/Al ratio in the base metal to reduce hot cracking, minimization of the BeO content and starting grain size to limit cracking at defects and ductility limitation cracking, and optimization of the welding process and process variables. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to generate dusts, mists, fumes, or small particulates. A beryllium exposure control program should minimize airborne concentrations, the potential for and spread of contamination, the number of times individuals are exposed to beryllium, and the number of employees who may be potentially exposed.

  7. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  8. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  9. Update on the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Update on the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevision toNetworkMay 9, 2013

  11. Update on the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevision toNetworkMay 9, 2013

  12. Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Mark [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Garcia, Pete [U.S. Department of Energy - Richland Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Goeckner, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy - HQ, EMCBC, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (United States); Millikin, Emily [Washington Closure Hanford, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Stoner, Mike [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of beryllium use because of the element's broad application to many nuclear operations and processes. At the Hanford Site beryllium alloy was used to fabricate parts for reactors, including fuel rods for the N-Reactor during plutonium production. Because of continued confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and data suggesting CBD occurs at exposures to low-level concentrations, the DOE decided to issue a rule to further protect federal and contractor workers from hazards associated with exposure to beryllium. When the beryllium rule was issued in 1999, each of the Hanford Site contractors developed a Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) and initial site wide beryllium inventories. A new site-wide CBDPP, applicable to all Hanford contractors, was issued in May, 2009. In the spring of 2010 the DOE Headquarters Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) conducted an independent inspection to evaluate the status of implementation of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The report identified four Findings and 12 cross-cutting Opportunities for Improvement (OFIs). A corrective action plan (CAP) was developed to address the Findings and crosscutting OFIs. The DOE directed affected site contractors to identify dedicated resources to participate in development of the CAP, along with involving stakeholders. The CAP included general and contractor-specific recommendations. Following initiation of actions to implement the approved CAP, it became apparent that additional definition of product deliverables was necessary to assure that expectations were adequately addressed and CAP actions could be closed. Consequently, a supplement to the original CAP was prepared and transmitted to DOE-HQ for approval. Development of the supplemental CAP was an eight month effort. From the onset a core group of CAP development members were identified to develop a mechanism for assuring that consensus was achieved on products developed as part of the CAP and the closure process. The original CAP was developed based on a large number of actions developed from the HSS report. This was essentially a 'bottoms up' approach. The revised CAP development team concluded that a more holistic, process-based approach was appropriate to assure that the resulting deliverable resulted in a best-in-class product. Consequently, issues and recommendations contained in the HSS report were grouped into 11 program areas, specific product deliverables were identified within each of the program areas, and a work breakdown structure (WBS) was logically applied to number the groupings. While the revised approach to product development utilizes a more holistic, 'top down' approach, the intent was still to incorporate specific recommendations and address specific issues contained in the HSS report. Through implementation of this new approach, a collaborative team has been established that works together using a consensus process for ensuring product completion. Benefits of the new approach include building a level of trust amongst all parties, quality of the products have improved, and acceptance by all parties of what action will truly meet the intent of the deficiency and make the beryllium program stronger. Open dialogue occurs amongst the core Be CAP team members, Hanford contractors, and DOE. It has been a learning process and will continue to be one, but everyone shares the common goal of reducing worker exposure to beryllium. (authors)

  14. ORISE: ORAU-managed beryllium lab marks outstanding year in 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    higher risk of developing Chronic Beryllium Disease, a chronic disease that scars the lungs making it more difficult for oxygen to transfer into the bloodstream. The test...

  15. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  16. Major prime contractors have developed a plan to address Hanford Beryllium exposure and are continuing to improve the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Plan (CBDPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6,Bradbury

  17. Risk-based approach for controlling beryllium exposure in a manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, W. E. (Walter E.); Clawson, C. D. (Chris D.); Ellis, K. K. (Kimberly K.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many diverse uses for beryllium in both military and industrial applications. Unfortunately, there are certain worker health risks associated with the manufacture and production of beryllium products. Respiratory illnesses due to prolonged contact with beryllium particulate are of paramount concern. However, these health risks can be controlled provided that the appropriate protective measures to prevent worker exposure from beryllium are in place. But it is no1 always a straightforward process to identify exactly what the beryllium protective measures should be in order to realize a true risk savings. Without prudent attention to a systematic inquiry and suitable evaluative criteria, a program for controlling beryllium health risks can be lacking in completeness and overall effectiveness. One approach that took into account the necessary ingredients for risk-based determination of beryllium protective measures was developed for a beryllium operation at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The methodological framework that was applied at this facility, as well as a discussion of the final beryllium protective measures that were determined by this approach will be presented. Regulatory aspects for working with beryllium, as well as a risk-assessment strategy for ranking beryllium-handling activities with respect to exposure potential will also be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a synopsis of lessons-learned as gleaned from this case study, as well as providing the participants with a constructive blueprint that can be adapted to other processes involving beryllium.

  18. ORISE: Ann Gehl named new manager of Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    individuals at higher risk of developing Chronic Beryllium Disease that scars the lungs. In 2013, the lab processed nearly 4,100 such tests without a single error. Located in...

  19. Office of Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - June 2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf Environmental ManagementRollout -Summary

  20. Q&A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Lead Poisoning Prevention in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q&A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Recommendations for Lead Poisoning these recommendations, and who else was involved in the process? A: The CDC Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program resettlement than were U. S. born children (Geltman P, Brown MJ, Cochran J. Lead poisoning among refugee

  1. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Frank L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of excited Lithium and Beryllium F. L. Yip, 1 C. W. McCurdy,ion- ization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned,DPI from aligned lithium and beryllium atoms in excited P-

  2. Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

  3. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Chris D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Addessio, Francis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wynn, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Preliminary analysis of the results appears to indicate that, if fractured by the initial shock loading, the S200F Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading of the material. Additional 'arrested' drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  4. Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Yes at risk for heart disease, stroke, and related conditions and risk factors (e.g., routine screenings the health plan offer specialized disease management programs for members who have been diagnosed with heart

  5. Understanding Equine Strangles: Signs of Disease, Management and Prevention1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    in 1251. The infection is highly contagious in horse populations and can recur on farms with previous outbreaks of the disease. It is one of the most commonly diagnosed contagious diseases of the horse signs of infection. Complications of Disease Fortunately, although strangles is highly contagious

  6. Massachusetts Beryllium Screening Program for Former Workers of Wyman-Gordon, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, L.D.

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to provide medical screening to former workers of Wyman-Gordon Company, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals (NMI) in order to prevent and minimize the health impact of diseases caused by site related workplace exposures to beryllium. The program was developed in response to a request by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that had been authorized by Congress in Section 3162 of the 1993 Defense Authorization Act, urging the DOE to â??carry out a program for the identification and ongoing evaluation of current and former DOE employees who are subjected to significant health risks during such employment." This program, funded by the DOE, was an amendment to the medical surveillance program for former DOE workers at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This programâ??s scope included workers who had worked for organizations that provided beryllium products or materials to the DOE as part of their nuclear weapons program. These organizations have been identified as Beryllium Vendors.

  7. MATERIALS ENGINEERING KEYWORDS: beryllium, stainless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    MATERIALS ENGINEERING KEYWORDS: beryllium, stainless steel, heat conductance EXPERIMENTAL SURFACES SUBJECTED TO NONUNIFORM THERMAL DEFORMATIONS ROBERT DEAN ABELSON and MOHAMED A. ABDOU* University of California, Los Angeles Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department 43-133 Engineering IV, Box 951597

  8. Preventing diet induced disease: bioavailable nutrient-rich, low-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzané, France abstract What the World needs is an integrated and sustainable) foods (e.g. land-based cereal, chocolate, alcohol and refined sugar, fat and oil), so tissues synthesize foods for human (and livestock) consumption that may eventually (without excessive consumption) prevent

  9. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force White Paper #2 -- Uses of Uncensored Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: (1) reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors; (2) minimize the levels of, and potential for, exposure to beryllium; and (3) establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease. On January 4, 2001, DOE issued DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing the CBDPP. That guide describes methods and techniques that DOE considers acceptable in complying with the Rule. In 2005 a draft DOE Technical Standard ''Management of Items and Areas Containing Low Levels of Beryllium'' (SAFT 0103; hereafter referred to as the ''TS'') was circulated for comment (http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/tsdrafts/saft-0103.pdf). DOE technical standards are voluntary consensus standards developed when industry standards do not exist (see http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/index.html for more information). DOE does not require its field elements to implement DOE technical standards, but field elements may choose to adopt these standards to meet specific needs. This beryllium TS is intended to provide best practices and lessons learned for manageing items and areas that contain low levels of beryllium, which has been a costly and technically challenging component of CBDPPs. The TS is also intended to provide guidance for determining if the Rule's housekeeping and release criteria are met. On challenge the TS addressed was the statistical interpretation of data sets with non-detected results, a topic for which no strong consensus exists. Among the many comments on the draft TS was a suggestion that certain of the statistical comparisons described in the TS could be better implemented if analytical results, even when below a reporting limit, were to be reported by analytical laboratories. See Appendix 1 for a review of terminology related to reporting limits. The Beryllium Health and Safety Committee (BHSC) formed a Sampling and Analysis Subcommittee (SAS) in 2003. The SAS established a working group on accreditation and reporting limits. By 2006 it had become evident that the issues extended to data reporting as a whole. The SAS proposed to the BHSC the formation of a Data Reporting Task Force (DRTF) to consider issues related to data reporting. The BHSC Board agreed, and requested that the DRTF generate a white paper, to be offered by the BHSC to potential interested parties such as the DOE policy office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy. It was noted that additional products could include detailed guidance and potentially a journal article in the future. The SAS proposed that DRTF membership represent the affected disciplines (chemists, industrial hygiene professionals and statisticians, and the DOE office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy). The BHSC Board decided that DRTF membership should come from DOE sites, since the focus would be on reporting in the context of the TS and the Rule. The DRTF came into existence in late 2006. The DRTF membership includes industrial hygienists, analytical chemists and laboratory managers, members of the regulatory and oversight community, and environmental statisticians. A first White Paper, ''Summary of Issues and Path Forward'', was reviewed by the BHSC in March 2007 and issued by the DRTF in June 2007. It describes the charter of the DRTF, introduces some basic terminology (reproduced here in Appendix 1), lays out the issues the DRTF is expected to address, and describes a path forward for the DRTF's work. This first White Paper is available through the BHSC web site. This White Paper presents recommendations developed by the DRTF following the process laid out in that first White Pap

  10. Beryllium Related Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, R F

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent months, LLNL has identified, commenced, and implemented a series of interim controls, compensatory measures, and initiatives to ensure worker safety, and improve safety processes with regards to potential worker exposure to beryllium. Many of these actions have been undertaken in response to the NNSA Independent Review (COR-TS-5/15/2008-8550) received by LLNL in November of 2008. Others are the result of recent discoveries, events or incidents, and lessons learned, or were scheduled corrective actions from earlier commitments. Many of these actions are very recent in nature, or are still in progress, and vary in the formality of implementation. Actions are being reviewed for effectiveness as they progress. The documentation of implementation, and review of effectiveness, when appropriate, of these actions will be addressed as part of the formal Corrective Action Plan addressing the Independent Review. The mitigating actions taken fall into the following categories: (1) Responses to specific events/concerns; (2) Development of interim controls; (3) Review of ongoing activities; and (4) Performance improvement measures.

  11. Experimental investigation of beryllium: plans and current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Experimental investigation of beryllium: plans and current results within the Ra;3 Beryllium is a promising candidate because of: · good "nuclear" properties; · appropriate mechanical will Beryllium be used? Application Operating conditions Proton beam parametersAvg. T (°C) Peak T (°C) Total DPA

  12. Possibility for irradiated beryllium at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Possibility for irradiated beryllium at CERN RaDIATE meeting, 22nd July 2013 M. Calviani (CERN ­ Engineering Department ­ Sources, Target and Interactions Group) #12;Irradiated beryllium at CERN 2 Two possibilities exists at CERN to obtain irradiated beryllium for testing: beam windows, and in particular

  13. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  14. Healthy Housing Reference Manual Now Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healthy Housing Reference Manual Now Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Healthy Housing Reference Manual is a revised and updated edition of the 1976 CDC Basic Healthy Housing Inspection manual. The Healthy Housing Reference Manual

  15. CS233917-AF National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS233917-AF National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division, Physical Activity, and Obesity Profile Obesity has important consequences on our nation's health by unhealthy options when it comes to diet and physical activity.We need public health approaches that make

  16. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  17. Beryllium - A Unique Material in Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T., A. Tomberlin

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium, due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section characteristics, has been used successfully as a neutron reflector for three generations of nuclear test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the largest test reactor in the world, has utilized five successive beryllium neutron reflectors and is scheduled for continued operation with a sixth beryllium reflector. A high radiation environment in a test reactor produces radiation damage and other changes in beryllium. These changes necessitate safety analysis of the beryllium, methods to predict performance, and appropriate surveillances. Other nuclear applications also utilize beryllium. Beryllium, given its unique atomic, physical, and chemical characteristics, is widely used as a “window” for x-rays and gamma rays. Beryllium, intimately mixed with high-energy alpha radiation emitters has been successfully used to produce neutron sources. This paper addresses operational experience and methodologies associated with the use of beryllium in nuclear test reactors and in “windows” for x-rays and gamma rays. Other nuclear applications utilizing beryllium are also discussed.

  18. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballard, Ambrose H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mowery, Erb H. (Clinton, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  19. The Corrosion / Electrochemistry of Beryllium and Beryllium Weldments in Aqueous Chloride Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Corrosion / Electrochemistry of Beryllium and Beryllium Weldments in Aqueous Chloride Environments submitted by: Mary Ann Hill, Darryl P. Butt, R. Scott Lillard Materials Corrosion year. Our goals for FY '96 were two-fold: 1) develop a sensor for monitoring the corrosion of beryllium

  20. Infectious Disease Updates To minimize the risk of any infectious disease, practice these daily preventive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    these daily preventive measures: · Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw seconds), especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are an alternative://www.sjsu.edu/studenthealth/cold_flu/index.html http://www.cdph.ca.gov/healthinfo/discond/pages/influenza(flu).aspx 2) Pertussis (Whooping Cough) http://www.sjsu.edu/studenthealth/docs/whooping_cough

  1. MANAGING BERYLLIUM IN NUCLEAR FACILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Rohe; T. N. Tranter

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium plays important roles in nuclear facilities. Its neutron multiplication capability and low atomic weight make it very useful as a reflector in fission reactors. Its low atomic number and high chemical affinity for oxygen have led to its consideration as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. In both applications, the beryllium and the impurities in it become activated by neutrons, transmuting them to radionuclides, some of which are long-lived and difficult to dispose of. Also, gas production, notably helium and tritium, results in swelling, embrittlement, and cracking, which means that the beryllium must be replaced periodically, especially in fission reactors where dimensional tolerances must be maintained. It has long been known that neutron activation of inherent iron and cobalt in the beryllium results in significant {sup 60}Co activity. In 2001, it was discovered that activation of naturally occurring contaminants in the beryllium creates sufficient {sup 14}C and {sup 94}Nb to render the irradiated beryllium 'Greater-Than-Class-C' for disposal in U.S. radioactive waste facilities. It was further found that there was sufficient uranium impurity in beryllium that had been used in fission reactors up to that time that the irradiated beryllium had become transuranic in character, making it even more difficult to dispose of. In this paper we review the extent of the disposal issue, processes that have been investigated or considered for improving the disposability of irradiated beryllium, and approaches for recycling.

  2. Beryllium Use in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began operation in 1967. It makes use of a unique serpentine fuel core design and a beryllium reflector. Reactor control is achieved with rotating beryllium cylinders to which have been fastened plates of hafnium. Over time, the beryllium develops rather high helium content because of nuclear transmutations and begins to swell. The beryllium must be replaced at nominally 10-year intervals. Determination of when the replacement is made is by visual observation using a periscope to examine the beryllium surface for cracking and swelling. Disposition of the irradiated beryllium was once accomplished in the INL’s Radioactive Waste Management Complex, but that is no longer possible. Among contributing reasons are high levels of specific radioactive contaminants including transuranics. The INL is presently considering disposition pathways for this irradiated beryllium, but presently is storing it in the canal adjacent to the reactor. Numerous issues are associated with this situation including (1) Is there a need for ultra-low uranium material? (2) Is there a need to recover tritium from irradiated beryllium either because this is a strategic material resource or in preparation for disposal? (3) Is there a need to remove activation and fission products from irradiated beryllium? (4) Will there be enough material available to meet requirements for research reactors (fission and fusion)? In this paper will be discussed the present status of considerations on these issues.

  3. Beryllium Associated Worker Registry Summary 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    submission at all for 5 sites. Exposure sampling data were submitted by 25 industrial hygiene programs for sites and subcontractors that have continuing beryllium operations or...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Beryllium High Heat Flux Testing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system, controls, and blast gun) is now used for electron beam test system vacuum vessel beryllium decontamination and has shortened the beryllium clean-up procedure from...

  5. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Testing Beryllium Vendor Populations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Vendor Populations When former employees at 25 closed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) beryllium vendor companies needed...

  6. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Associated Worker Registry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Associated Worker Registry (BAWR) The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains the Beryllium Associated...

  7. Boron nitride protective coating of beryllium window surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of beryllium windows on white synchrotron radiation beamlines is constrained by the fact that the downstream surfaces of these windows should not be exposed to ambient atmosphere. They should, rather, be protected by a tail-piece under vacuum or containing helium atmosphere. This tailpiece is typically capped by Kapton (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) or aluminum foil. The reason for such an arrangement is due to the health risk associated with contaminants (BeO) which from on the exposed beryllium window surfaces and due to possible loss of integrity of the windows. Such a tail-piece may, however, add unwanted complications to the beamline in the form of vacuum pumps or helium supplies and their related monitoring systems. The Kapton windows may burn through in the case of high intensity beams and lower energy radiation may be absorbed in the case of aluminum foil windows. A more ideal situation would be to provide a coating for the exposed beryllium window surface, sealing it off from the atmosphere, thus preventing contamination and/or degradation of the window, and eliminating the need for helium or vacuum equipment.

  8. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Charles (Baton Rouge, LA); Bullard, John E. (Kendall Park, NJ); Morgan, Evan (Lynchburg, VA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  9. Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium- based Ion Plasma Chamber Physics 492R the voltage on the far end of the chamber must be turned on. Then a beam of ions is sent into the chamber was to develop and assemble two sets of identical magnetic coils for the Beryllium based plasma chamber

  10. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  11. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  12. Beryllium Information | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrence Berkeley Industrial Hygiene Beryllium

  13. National Diabetes Prevention Program The University of Florida/IFAS Extension Bay County office is offering the Center for Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) The University of Florida/IFAS Extension Bay County office is offering the Center for Disease Control-led National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP). The purpose of the NDPP Program is to reach individuals before they acquire diabetes. This is an evidence

  14. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  15. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  16. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Laboratory Beryllium is a metal that is primarily used as a hardening agent in alloys. Its low density, heat stability and high melting point have made it of benefit to...

  17. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron : Origin and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabeth Vangioni-Flam; Michel Casse; Jean Audouze

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin and evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron is a crossing point between different astrophysical fields : optical and gamma spectroscopy, non thermal nucleosynthesis, Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis and finally galactic evolution. We describe the production and the evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron from Big Bang up to now through the interaction of the Standard Galactic Cosmic Rays with the interstellar medium, supernova neutrino spallation and a low energy component related to supernova explosions in galactic superbubbles.

  18. Analysis of tritium transport in irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the beryllium tritium release results with simple analytical models indicated that tritium behavior in Be is not dominated by one simple mechanism, but by a combination of several mechanisms including surface processes and helium bubbles. A model was developed and the initial version of the model included tritium diffusion in the beryllium and the beryllium oxide, second order desorption at the solid/gas interface and diffusion through interconnected porosity. Fundamental data, tritium diffusion and desorption coefficients for Be and BeO, were derived from experimental data using the model. Beryllium is a metal to which one can generally apply the concepts of diffusion, solubility, surface processes and traps. Tritium transport in the irradiated beryllium is affected by processes occurring in the bulk, He bubbles, the bulk/surface and surface/gas interfaces. There are two types of solid/gas surfaces in the irradiated Be. One is the surface at the pure Be/He bubble interface where no oxide layer exists and the other is the surface at the BeO layer/purge gas interface. Although the material characteristics of the Be and BeO layer are different and have different activation barriers, the surface processes can be applied to both interfaces.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM7 PLASMA SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM­7 PLASMA SOURCE by David K. Olson A thesis submitted Dean College of Mathematics and Physical Sciences #12;ABSTRACT DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM­7 source designs. Our pri- mary intent with this MeVVA­type source is to create a confinable beryllium-7 (7

  20. April 7, 1998 Studies of Coolant Compatibility with Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    CBX 98­8 April 7, 1998 D.Cinabro S.McGee Studies of Coolant Compatibility with Beryllium Abstract A study of the petroleum­based coolant, PF200, has found it to be chemically compat­ ible with beryllium. These features make PF200 a suitable substitute for water in the coolant system of CLEO's beryllium beam pipe. 1

  1. Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute are calculated for the ground state of the beryllium atom and its positive ion. A basis set of correlated of high precision theoretical predictions for energy levels of the beryllium atom and light ions. Our

  2. Summary of beryllium specifications, current and historical

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, S.P.; Kyed, P.

    1990-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes beryllium properties included in producer, Department of Energy, and government specifications. The specifications are divided into two major categories: current and historical. Within each category the data are arranged primarily according to increasing purity and secondarily by increasing tensile properties. Qualitative comments on formability and weldability are included. Also, short summaries of powder production and consolidation techniques are provided.

  3. Hybrid Orbital and Numerical Grid Representationfor Electronic Continuum Processes: Double Photoionization of Atomic Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Frank L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photoionization from beryllium This work was performed underPhotoionization of Atomic Beryllium F. L. Yip, 1 C. W.photoionization of beryllium is treated in a calculation in

  4. Density functional study of hydrogen adsorption on beryllium (0001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allouche, A. [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite de Provence, Campus Scientifique de Saint Jerome, service 242, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium, tungsten, and carbon are planned as wall materials for the future international tokamak. Although beryllium is not situated in a region submitted to the most dramatic plasma-wall interaction, its reactivity toward hydrogen atom impinging is of fundamental importance. This paper is devoted to theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption on the beryllium (0001) surface based on the first-principles discrete Fourier transform method. Comparison is proposed to former theoretical works and to thermal-desorption spectroscopy.

  5. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  6. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Ehler, Deborah S. (Los Alamos, NM); John, Kevin D. (Santa Fe, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Collis, Gavin E. (Los Alamos, NM); Minogue, Edel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  7. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Scholz, M.; Igielski, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS (IFJPAN), Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Karpinski, L. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Rzeszow University of Technology, Pola 2, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Pytel, K. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock - Swierk (Poland)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, ?){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting ?{sup ?} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of ?–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known ?–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of ?{sup ?} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  8. Neutron irradiation of beryllium: Recent Russian results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results on postirradiation tensile and compression testing, swelling and bubble growth during annealing for various grades of beryllium are presented. It is shown that swelling at temperatures above 550{degrees}C is sensitive to material condition and response is correlated with oxygen content. Swelling on the order of 15% can be expected at 700{degrees}C for doses on the order of 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. Bubble growth response depends on irradiation fluence.

  9. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, Powell (New Bern, NC); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Prach, Thomas F. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  10. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

    1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  11. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

    1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC ORIENTATION AND THE PASSIVITY AND BREAKDOWN OF BERYLLIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC ORIENTATION AND THE PASSIVITY AND BREAKDOWN OF BERYLLIUM corrosion for S200D beryllium (Be) was found to decrease logarithmically with increasing chloride

  13. Integrated Pest Management: Conducting Urban Rodent Surveys i Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Integrated pest management: conducting urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Integrated Pest Management: Conducting Urban Rodent Surveys i Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Integrated pest management: conducting urban rodent surveys. Atlanta: US...........................................................................................................................2 Characteristics of Urban Rodent Surveys

  14. Method for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA)

    2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium-based multilayer structures and a process for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer mirrors, useful in the wavelength region greater than the beryllium K-edge (111 .ANG. or 11.1 nm). The process includes alternating sputter deposition of beryllium and a metal, typically from the fifth row of the periodic table, such as niobium (Nb), molybdenum (Mo), ruthenium (Ru), and rhodium (Rh). The process includes not only the method of sputtering the materials, but the industrial hygiene controls for safe handling of beryllium. The mirrors made in accordance with the process may be utilized in soft x-ray and extreme-ultraviolet projection lithography, which requires mirrors of high reflectivity (>60%) for x-rays in the range of 60-140 .ANG. (60-14.0 nm).

  15. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  16. Beryllium Vender Screening Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowaweBeryllium Vender

  17. Guidance for Informed Choice on Beryllium Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment ofof Energy Download presentationBeryllium

  18. Author's personal copy Beryllium-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of Quaternary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Robert X.

    for cosmogenic Beryllium-10 geochronology. When combined with the offsets, these samples yield late Pleistocene

  19. Beryllium and Other Trace Elements in Paragneisses and Anatectic Veins of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Beryllium and Other Trace Elements in Paragneisses and Anatectic Veins of the Ultrahigh-bearing paragneisses. KEY WORDS: Antarctica; beryllium; granulite facies; microprobe; sapphirine INTRODUCTION Beryllium in granitic pegmatites where beryllium minerals, most com- monly beryl, are found (e.g. London & Evensen, 2002

  20. Questions and Answers About LeukemiaCENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the disease develops (acute vs. chronic leukemia) and by the type of blood cell involved (lymphocytic and myeloid leukemia being the most common). In acute leukemia, bone marrow cells are immature and are unable slowly. The most common types of leukemia are acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic

  1. Veterans' Health Activities Since its inception, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with that of 8,989 Vietnam-era veterans who served in Korea, Germany, or the United States. Over the entire follow-up period, the total death rate for Vietnam veterans was 17% higher than for other veterans of the study group (mean = 53 years) and longer follow-up period (average 30 years), death rates from disease

  2. Cosmic Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabeth Vangioni-Flam; Michel Casse

    1999-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Li7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meter KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope.These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity. Aside GCRs, which are accelerated in the general interstellar medium (ISM) and create LiBeB through the break up of CNO by fast protons and alphas, Wolf-Rayet stars (WR) and core collapse supernovae (SNII) grouped in superbubbles could produce copious amounts of light elements via the fragmentation in flight of rapid carbon and oxygen nuclei colliding with H and He in the ISM.

  3. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  4. Radiation effects in beryllium used for plasma protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dalle Donne, M. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Sernyaev, G.A. [SF NIKIET, Zarechnyi (Russian Federation); Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Blanket Irradiation and Analysis Lab.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium is presently a leading candidate material for fusion reactor first wall coating and divertor applications. This paper reviews the literature on beryllium, emphasizing the effects of irradiation on essential properties. Swelling and embrittlement experiments as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and as a function of neutron spectrum are described, and the results are quantified, where possible. Effects of impurity content are also reported, from which optimum composition specifications can be defined. Microstructural information has also been obtained to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The available information indicates that beryllium divertors can be expected to embrittle quickly and may need frequent replacement.

  5. Primordial Beryllium as a Big Bang Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pospelov, Maxim [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Pradler, Josef [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of new physics including variants of supersymmetry predict metastable long-lived particles that can decay during or after primordial nucleosynthesis, releasing significant amounts of nonthermal energy. The hadronic energy injection in these decays leads to the formation of {sup 9}Be via the chain of nonequilibrium transformations: Energy{sub h}{yields}T, {sup 3}He{yields}{sup 6}He, {sup 6}Li{yields}{sup 9}Be. We calculate the efficiency of this transformation and show that if the injection happens at cosmic times of a few hours the release of O(10 MeV) per baryon can be sufficient for obtaining a sizable {sup 9}Be abundance. The absence of a plateau structure in the {sup 9}Be/H abundance down to a O(10{sup -14}) level allows one to use beryllium as a robust constraint on new physics models with decaying or annihilating particles.

  6. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  7. Primordial beryllium as a big bang calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Pospelov; Josef Pradler

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of new physics including variants of supersymmetry predict metastable long-lived particles that can decay during or after primordial nucleosynthesis, releasing significant amounts of non-thermal energy. The hadronic energy injection in these decays leads to the formation of ^9Be via the chain of non-equilibrium transformations: Energy_h -> T, ^3He -> ^6He, ^6Li -> ^9Be. We calculate the efficiency of this transformation and show that if the injection happens at cosmic times of a few hours, the release of 10 MeV per baryon can be sufficient for obtaining a sizable ^9Be abundance. The absence of a plateau-structure in the ^9Be/H abundance down to a 10^{-14} level allows one to use beryllium as a robust constraint on new physics models with decaying or annihilating particles.

  8. Beryllium abundances in metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. Tan; J. R. Shi; G. Zhao

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined beryllium abundances for 25 metal-poor stars based on the high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra from the VLT/UVES database. Our results confirm that Be abundances increase with Fe, supporting the global enrichment of Be in the Galaxy. Oxygen abundances based on [O I] forbidden line implies a linear relation with a slope close to one for the Be vs. O trend, which indicates that Be is probably produced in a primary process. Some strong evidences are found for the intrinsic dispersion of Be abundances at a given metallicity. The deviation of HD132475 and HD126681 from the general Be vs. Fe and Be vs. O trend favours the predictions of the superbubble model, though the possibility that such dispersion originates from the inhomogeneous enrichment in Fe and O of the protogalactic gas cannot be excluded.

  9. Application of RIMS to the Study of Beryllium ChronologyApplication of RIMS to the Study of Beryllium Chronology in Early Solar System Condensatesin Early Solar System Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    Application of RIMS to the Study of Beryllium ChronologyApplication of RIMS to the Study of Beryllium Chronology in Early Solar System Condensatesin Early Solar System Condensates K. B. Knight1, Beryllium and Boron in the Early Solar System Many unanswered questions remain concerning the timing

  10. Removing tritium and other impurities during industrial recycling of beryllium from a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylst, K.; Seghers, J.; Druyts, F.; Braet, J. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling beryllium used in a fusion reactor might be a good way to overcome problems related to the disposal of neutron irradiated beryllium. The critical issues for the recycling of used first wall beryllium are the presence of tritium and (transuranic) impurities. High temperature annealing seems to be the most promising technique for detritiation. Purification of the de-tritiated beryllium can be achieved by chlorination of the irradiated beryllium and the subsequent reduction of beryllium chloride to highly pure metallic beryllium. After that, the beryllium can be re-fabricated into first wall tiles via powder metallurgy which is already a mature industrial practice. This paper outlines the path to define the experimental needs for beryllium recycling and tackles problems related to the detritiation and the purification via the chlorine route. (authors)

  11. Actinide/beryllium neutron sources with reduced dispersion characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulte, Louis D.

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron source comprising a composite, said composite comprising crystals comprising BeO and AmBe.sub.13, and an excess of beryllium, wherein the crystals have an average size of less than 2 microns; the size distribution of the crystals is less than 2 microns; and the beryllium is present in a 7-fold to a 75-fold excess by weight of the amount of AmBe.sub.13; and methods of making thereof.

  12. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Isotopic Compositions in Meteoritic Hibonite: Implications for Origin of 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Isotopic Compositions in Meteoritic Hibonite: Implications for Origin of 10. 2003; Marhas & Goswami 2003). Beryllium-10 and 7 Be are primarily produced through the same

  13. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; R. J. Garcia Lopez; G. Israelian; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; A. Garcia-Gil; M. R. Perez de Taoro; S. Randich

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be depletion mechanisms.

  14. acute beryllium disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common...

  15. Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState andGreenhouse Gases |

  16. Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal Ongoing atGreenhouse Gases | Department

  17. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  18. Beryllium Adsorption at Transition Aluminas: Implications for Environmental Science and Oxidation of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that?gamma- and?eta- aluminas (transition Al2O3 polytypes with defect spinel structure) can effectively capture beryllium atoms. Although the bulk crystal structures of these two oxides are characterized only by slight differences in cation vacancy distributions, the interaction of Be with the two polytypes are different. For gamma- Al2O3, the Be adsorption energy is high (~ 5 eV per atom), and all Be atoms are captured and trapped at the surface - all attempts to move Be in the subsurface region result in its expulsion back to the surface. On the other hand, for ?eta- alumina Be atoms can be captured both at the surface and in octahedrally-coordinated subsurface cation vacancies. This result implies that both alumina oxides could be successfully used for Be capture out of wastewater streams related to industrial processes of aluminum and alumina production. Also, the surface adsorption mechanism of Be at?gamma- Al2O3 explains why very small additions of Be (of the order of several ppm) to Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si casting and wrought alloys prevent run-away oxidation of these materials in molten state, as well as ingot cracking. We also discuss possibilities to use other additives (e.g., Ca and Sr) yielding the same protective effect for aluminum alloys but which are less toxic than beryllium.

  19. HiRadMat Beryllium ThermalShock Test Kavin Ammigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    HiRadMat Beryllium ThermalShock Test Kavin Ammigan PASI 2nd Annual Meeting RAL, UK April 5, 2013 Collaboration with RAL HPTG Fracture Beryllium with one or multiple beam pulses Experimentally deduce measurements fairly comparable with numerical simulations Goal: make similar comparisons for Beryllium

  20. Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10 Christy Veeder Submitted Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10 Christy Veeder I use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE general circulation model to ex- amine the how beryllium-10, a cosmogenic

  1. Testing quantum electrodynamics in the lowest singlet states of beryllium atom Mariusz Puchalski and Jacek Komasa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Testing quantum electrodynamics in the lowest singlet states of beryllium atom Mariusz Puchalski of the beryllium atom. Calcu- lations are performed using fully correlated Gaussian basis sets and taking predictions for the ionization potential of the beryllium ground state 75 192.696(8) cm-1 and the 21 P 21

  2. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED Angeles, CA 90095-1597 ali@fusion.ucla.edu ABSTRACT Beryllium, in its pebble form, has been proposed Beryllium (as a neutron multiplier) is considered one of the prime candidates to enhance tritium breeding

  3. Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and beryllium hydride polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkenheuer, Uwe

    Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and berylliumH and beryllium hydride Be2H4 . First, employing a Wannier-function-based approach, the systems are studiedH and the beryllium hydride polymer Be2H4 . As a simple, but due to its ionic character, non- trivial model polymer

  4. Beryllium Material Tests HiRadMat windows and NOA fins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Beryllium Material Tests HiRadMat windows and NOA fins C. Densham, A. Atherton, T. Davenne, P (FNAL) S. Roberts, V. Kuksenko (Oxford University) Motivation Beryllium is currently widely used, it is essential to understand the response and potential limits of beryllium in such extreme environments

  5. LA CONDUCTIVIT LECTRIQUE DES COUCHES MICROCRISTALLINES DES MTAUX A CONDUCTION MIXTE (BERYLLIUM ET PLOMB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (BERYLLIUM ET PLOMB) Par R. GRIGOROVICI, A. DÉVÉNYI, T. BOTILÅ, C. RUSU et A. VANCU, Institut de Physique de continuous beryllium and lead films deposited by vacuum evaporation have a negative temperature coefficient connue. Le beryllium nous a semblé le métal le plus indiqué pour ce dessein, car il satisfait aux

  6. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  7. Preliminary Investigation into the Corrosion of Beryllium Exposed to Celotex and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preliminary Investigation into the Corrosion of Beryllium Exposed to Celotex and Water R. Scott , it was uncertain in the LLNL work if accelerate corrosion would result when beryllium was exposed to Celotex the corrosion rate of beryllium. While preliminary, these results indicate that storage conditions which may

  8. Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    1 Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2 3 Hongyu Liu1 , David B, MA13 14 Short Title: Beryllium-7 and cross-tropopause transport15 Index Terms: 0368 Troposphere Initiative (GMI) modeling framework the29 utility of cosmogenic beryllium-7 (7 Be), a natural aerosol tracer

  9. RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

  10. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  11. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  12. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  13. Battelle Consent Order (WCO-2014-01)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, requirements, including baseline inventory, hazard assessment, permissible exposure limits, housekeeping, release criteria,...

  14. CRAD, Assessment of the Site- February 17, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessment of the Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Plan (CBDPP) Implementation (HSS CRAD 64-37, Rev 0)

  15. A preliminary assessment of beryllium dust oxidation during a wet bypass accident in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad J. Merrill; Richard L. Moore; J. Phillip Sharp

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beryllium dust oxidation model has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the Fusion Safety Program (FSP) for the MELCOR safety computer code. The purpose of this model is to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside a fusion reactor vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). This beryllium dust oxidation model accounts for the diffusion of steam into a beryllium dust layer, the oxidation of the dust particles inside this layer based on the beryllium-steam oxidation equations developed at the INL, and the effective thermal conductivity of this beryllium dust layer. This paper details this oxidation model and presents the results of the application of this model to a wet bypass accident scenario in the ITER device.

  16. Elastic scattering of Beryllium isotopes near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Amorini, F.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Randisi, G.; Rizzo, F.; Santonocito, D.; Scalia, G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Papa, M. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Perez-Bernal, F. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada Universidad de Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, results of experiments performed with the three Beryllium isotopes {sup 9,10,11}Be on a medium mass {sup 64}Zn target, at a center of mass energy of {approx_equal}1.4 the Coulomb barrier, will be discussed. Elastic scattering angular distributions have been measured for the {sup 9,10}Be reactions. In the {sup 11}Be case the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. In the halo nucleus case, the angular distribution exhibit a non-Fresnel-type pattern with a strong damping of the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. Moreover, it is found that the total reaction cross-section for the halo nucleus induced collision is more than double the ones extracted in the collisions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the {sup 11}Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  17. Failure prediction of cross-rolled beryllium sheets subjected to transverse point loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascorro, Edward

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Ultimate Strengths for Cross-Rolled SR-200 Beryllium Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Failure Coefficients for SR-200 Beryllium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Dimensions and Edge Conditions of Plate Bending Specimens...-Axis Note: 1 ksi = 6. 9 MPa 78. 0 81. 8 95. 5 100. 2 oz = 116, az = 127 77. 4 25 Fig. 19 is a graphical representation of contours of the three-dimensional stress failure surface. All four quadrants are constructed from Eq. 4 and the beryllium...

  18. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  19. Beryllium, Lithium and Oxygen Abundances in F-type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Garcia Lopez; M. C. Dominguez Herrera; M. R. Perez de Taoro; C. Casares; J. L. Rasilla; R. Rebolo; C. Allende Prieto

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium and oxygen abundances have been derived in a sample of F-type field stars for which lithium abundances had been measured previously, with the aim of obtaining observational constraints to discriminate between the different mixing mechanisms proposed. Mixing associated with the transport of angular momentum in the stellar interior and internal gravity waves within the framework of rotating evolutionary models, appear to be promising ways to explain the observations.

  20. The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, Michael

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

  1. Shockless compression and release behavior of beryllium to 110?GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J. L.; Knudson, M. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Asay, J. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetohydrodynamic loading technique was used to shocklessly compress beryllium to peak longitudinal stresses of 19–110?GPa and, subsequently, unload in order to determine both the compressive response and also the shear stress supported upon release. Loading strain rates were on the order of 10{sup 6?}s{sup ?1}, while the unloading rates were nearly constant at 3?×?10{sup 5?}s{sup ?1}. Velocimetry was used to monitor the ramp and release behavior of a beryllium/lithium fluoride window interface. After applying window corrections to infer in situ beryllium velocities, a Lagrangian analysis was employed to determine the material response. The Lagrangian wavespeed-particle velocity response is integrated to generate the stress-strain path, average change in shear stress over the elastic unloading, and estimates of the shear modulus at peak compression. These data are used to infer the pressure dependence of the flow strength at the unloading rate. Comparisons to several strength models reveal good agreement to 45?GPa, but the data indicate 20%–30% higher strength near 100?GPa.

  2. Nanoimaging to Prevent and Treat Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases. Scientific/Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuri L. Lyubchenko, PhD, DSc

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will develop innovative approaches to characterization of the very early stages of protein aggregation that eventually can be translated to the development of early diagnostic tools and efficient treatments for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Funding will be used to acquire nanoimaging technology for nanoscale imaging, manipulation and analysis of biomedical materials to develop treatments that will repair disabled proteins and cure diseases that result from protein malfunction, specifically Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Expected outcomes include tests for early diagnosis and therapeutic treatments for these devastating neurological diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms of protein misfolding, we will establish an extensive program of experimental studies using a broad arsenal of advanced nanoscale and traditional techniques that will be integrated with molecular-scale modeling of protein misfolding and the nucleation of aggregate structures. To identify intracellular machinery or/and multicomponent complexes critically involved in protein misfolding, we will characterize interactions between targeted proteins and specific intracellular components or metabolites that impact on protein conformational pathways leading to protein misfolding accompanied by formation of toxic aggregated morphologies. To design innovative nanotechnology tools for the control of intracellular protein misfolding and aggregation processes, we will develop a predictive molecular scale model for intracellular protein misfolding and the formation of toxic aggregates. Verified through experimental studies, the objective is to establish an enabling foundation for the engineering of novel molecular diagnostics and therapeutics for various cellular pathologies.

  3. Structure of the H-induced vacancy reconstruction of the ,,0001... surface of beryllium Karsten Pohl* and E. Ward Plummer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Structure of the H-induced vacancy reconstruction of the ,,0001... surface of beryllium Karsten binding sites on a strongly reconstructed beryllium surface via LEED because the weak electron

  4. Procedure for calibration of a portable, real-time beryllium aerosol monitor based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killough, David Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The toxic metal beryllium is finding applications in a growing number of workplaces, potentially affecting an expanding segment of the work force. The current, accepted method for determining employee exposure to airborne beryllium is NIOSH Method...

  5. Procedure for calibration of a portable, real-time beryllium aerosol monitor based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killough, David Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The toxic metal beryllium is finding applications in a growing number of workplaces, potentially affecting an expanding segment of the work force. The current, accepted method for determining employee exposure to airborne beryllium is NIOSH Method...

  6. Distribution of Hydrogen Isotopes, Carbon and Beryllium on In-Vessel Surfaces in the Various JET Divertors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Hydrogen Isotopes, Carbon and Beryllium on In-Vessel Surfaces in the Various JET Divertors

  7. Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

  8. High Heat Flux Exposure Tests on 10mm Beryllium Tiles Brazed on Actively Cooled Vapotron made from CUCRZR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Heat Flux Exposure Tests on 10mm Beryllium Tiles Brazed on Actively Cooled Vapotron made from CUCRZR

  9. Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

  10. Simulating the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Simulating the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code Michael Takeshi Nakata Department of Physics and Astronomy Doctor of Philosophy Beryllium-7 (Be-7) only decays

  11. BIOAVAILABILITY OF BERYLLIUM OXIDE PARTICLES: AN IN VITRO STUDY IN THE MURINE J774A.1 MACROPHAGE CELL LINE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    BIOAVAILABILITY OF BERYLLIUM OXIDE PARTICLES: AN IN VITRO STUDY IN THE MURINE J774A.1 MACROPHAGE/04/10 Forpersonaluseonly. #12;Ronald C. Scripsick & Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA & Beryllium is assessed through measurement of beryllium aerosol mass con- centration. Compliance with the current mass

  12. AN INTERSTELLAR ORIGIN FOR THE BERYLLIUM 10 IN CALCIUM-RICH, ALUMINUM-RICH INCLUSIONS S. J. Desch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly Jr, Harold C.

    AN INTERSTELLAR ORIGIN FOR THE BERYLLIUM 10 IN CALCIUM-RICH, ALUMINUM-RICH INCLUSIONS S. J. Desch1 October 15 ABSTRACT Beryllium 10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t1=2 ¼ 1:5 Myr) that was incorporated live into calcium-rich, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) at the birth of our solar system. Beryllium 10 is unique

  13. First-principles studies of beryllium doping of GaN Chris G. Van de Walle* and Sukit Limpijumnong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First-principles studies of beryllium doping of GaN Chris G. Van de Walle* and Sukit Limpijumnong Received 12 October 2000; published 8 June 2001 The structural and electronic properties of beryllium acceptors, and between hydrogen and substitutional beryllium. The results for wurtzite GaN are compared

  14. Beryllium and Graphite Neutron Total Cross-Section Measurements from 0.4 to 20 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Beryllium and Graphite Neutron Total Cross-Section Measurements from 0.4 to 20 MeV M. J. Rapp,* Y of the neutron total cross section of natural beryllium and carbon (graphite) in the energy range of 0.4 to 20 Me a verification of the accuracy in the measurement and analytical methods used. The measurements of beryllium

  15. Pollution Prevention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Promoting green purchasing, reuse and recycling, and the conservation of fuel, energy, and water. April 17, 2012 Pollution prevention and...

  16. Pollution Prevention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution Prevention Goal 5: Pollution Prevention LANL is dedicated to finding ways to reduce waste, prevent pollution, and recycle waste that cannot be reduced. Energy...

  17. Double K-shell photoionization of atomic beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yip, F. L. [Departamento de Quimica, Modulo 13, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martin, F. [Departamento de Quimica, Modulo 13, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrilen (tilde sign)o de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); McCurdy, C. W. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences, and Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rescigno, T. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences, and Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Double photoionization of the core 1s electrons in atomic beryllium is theoretically studied using a hybrid approach that combines orbital and grid-based representations of the Hamiltonian. The {sup 1} S ground state and {sup 1} P final state contain a double occupancy of the 2s valence shell in all configurations used to represent the correlated wave function. Triply differential cross sections are evaluated, with particular attention focused on a comparison of the effects of scattering the ejected electrons through the spherically symmetric valence shell with similar cross sections for helium, representing a purely two-electron target with an analogous initial-state configuration.

  18. Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Data Collection and Management Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowaweBeryllium

  19. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium contamination. Historical records indicate that there are locations at the NTS which contain hazardous quantities of beryllium; however, because beryllium was not always considered a contaminant of concern, complete characterization was not performed prior to remediation efforts. Today, it is not practical to characterize Area 25 for beryllium due to the successful remediation. Analysis of sample data collected in B-1 for the BIAT was performed for the purpose of confirming past results and identifying a source of beryllium through the use of markers. The results confirmed the presence of man-made beryllium contamination in the B-1 High Bay at levels consistent with the NNSA Report. No source markers were found that would be associated with NTS historical nuclear rocket or weapons-related operations. Beryllium contamination was identified in the southwest area of the B-1 High Bay in characteristic association with materials handled during historic metal-working operations. Use of source marker analysis suggests a contributor of beryllium found in carpeted areas of the B-Complex may be naturally occurring. Naturally occurring beryllium is not regulated by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 850 (10 CFR 850) (see Appendix A). No current uncontrolled beryllium source or transport pathways have been identified as available for spread of contamination to uncontrolled areas from the NTS.

  20. National Osteoporosis Prevention Month

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAY National Osteoporosis Prevention Month JUNE National Dairy Month Texas AgriLife Extension - Bone Health Power Point # P4-1 Eat Smart for Bone Health # P4-2 Osteoporosis Disease Statistics # P4-3 Osteoporosis = Porous Bones # P4-4 Risk Factors # P4-5 Risk Factors (continued) # P4-6 Steps to Prevention # P4

  1. Beryllium anomalies in solar-type field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; S. Randich; R. J. Garcia Lopez; R. Rebolo

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of field solar-type dwarfs and sub-giants spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The analysis shows that Be is severely depleted for F stars, as expected by the light-element depletion models. However, we also show that Beryllium abundances decrease with decreasing temperature for stars cooler than $\\sim$6000 K, a result that cannot be explained by current theoretical models including rotational mixing, but that is, at least in part, expected from the models that take into account internal wave physics. In particular, the light element abundances of the coolest and youngest stars in our sample suggest that Be, as well as lithium (Li), has already been burned early during their evolution. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for the existence of a Be-gap for solar-temperature stars. The analysis of Li and Be abundances in the sub-giants of our sample also shows the presence of one case that has still detectable amounts of Li, while Be is severely depleted. Finally, we compare the derived Be abundances with Li abundances derived using the same set of stellar parameters. This gives us the possibility to explore the temperatures for which the onset of Li and Be depletion occurs.

  2. Beryllium in turnoff stars of NGC6397: early Galaxy spallation, cosmochronology and cluster formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Pasquini; P. Bonifacio; S. Randich; D. Galli; R. G. Gratton

    2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detection of beryllium in two turnoff stars of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6397. The beryllium lines are clearly detected and we determine a mean beryllium abundance of log(Be/H)=-12.35 +/- 0.2. The beryllium abundance is very similar to that of field stars of similar Fe content. We interpret the beryllium abundance observed as the result of primary spallation of cosmic rays acting on a Galactic scale, showing that beryllium can be used as a powerful cosmochronometer for the first stellar generations. With this method, we estimate that the cluster formed 0.2-0.3 Gyr after the onset of star formation in the Galaxy, in excellent agreement with the age derived from main sequence fitting. From the same spectra we also find low O (noticeably different for the two stars) and high N abundances, suggesting that the original gas was enriched in CNO processed material. Our beryllium results, together with the N, O, and Li abundances, provide insights on the formation of this globular cluster, showing that any CNO processing of the gas must have occurred in the protocluster cloud before the formation of the stars we observe now. We encounter, however, difficulties in giving a fully consistent picture of the cluster formation, able to explain the complex overall abundance pattern.

  3. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

  4. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  5. Validation of NCSSHP for highly enriched uranium systems containing beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krass, A.W.; Elliott, E.P.; Tollefson, D.A.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the validation of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross section library for highly enriched uranium and beryllium neutronic systems, and is in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988) requirements for calculational methods. The validation has been performed on a Hewlett Packard 9000/Series 700 Workstation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Department using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software code package. Critical experiments from LA-2203, UCRL-4975, ORNL-2201, and ORNL/ENG-2 have been identified as having the constituents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. The results of these calculations establish the safety criteria to be employed in future calculational studies of these types of systems.

  6. Synthesis of the Beryllium 3131A Spectral Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johanna F. Ashwell; R. D. Jeffries; B. Smalley

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beryllium spectral region of the Sun, Procyon and 4 stars in the open cluster NGC6633 up to Teff = 7500K have been synthesised using ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the MOOG spectral synthesis program. The line list used for these syntheses has been modified from the ATLAS9 line list to improve the quality of the fits in light of the improved opacities in the new version of the MOOG code. Significant changes have been made to the Mn I line at ATLAS9 wavelength 3131.037A and an OH line has been added at 3131.358A. In addition there are a number of minor changes to gf-values throughout the synthesised region thus improving the fit for the spectra across the temperature range considerably.

  7. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron and Oxygen in the early Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabeth Vangioni-Flam; Michel Casse

    2000-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen is a much better evolutionary index than iron to follow the history of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron (LiBeB) since it is the main producer of these light elements at least in the early Galaxy. The O-Fe relation is crucial to the determination of the exact physical process responsible for the LiBeB production. Calculated nucleosynthetic yields of massive stars, estimates of the energy cost of Be production, and above all recent observations reported in this meeting seem to favor a mechanism in which fast nuclei enriched into He, C and O arising from supernovae are accelerated in superbubbles and fragment on H and He in the interstellar medium.

  8. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhidkov, I. S., E-mail: i.s.zhidkov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, Yekaterinburg, 620002, Russia and Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Str. 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A. [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, Yekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO){sub x}(PbO?SiO{sub 2}){sub 1?x} glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  9. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Ratka, J.O. (Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  10. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ratka, J.O. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  11. Study of interdomain boundary in diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Lykov

    2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    At low temperatures, in strong magnetic fields, the formation of a non-uniform magnetisation is possible in a single-crystal metal sample whose demagnetising factor along the field is close to unity. Namely, so-called Condon diamagnetic domain structure arises and disappears periodically with magnetic field. In this paper, the diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium single crystalis analysed. Directly, existence of diamagnetic domains in that sample was observed earlier by the muon spin precession (mSR) resonance peak splitting. A method is described that allows to calculate quantitative characteristics of the interdomain boundary using the muon histograms. The technique is based on the Marquardt minimisation procedure that has been modified in order to reduce the influence of noise on iterations convergence. Boundary volume fraction was calculated.

  12. Dynamic failure prediction of cross-rolled beryllium sheets subjected to vibration loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serna, Oscar R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this investigation is to develop and verify a numerical method for prediction of failure for cross-rolled beryllium sheet structures that are subjected to vibration loads. To this end, complementary laboratory experiments...

  13. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of $K\\alpha$ transition energies in beryllium-like iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform relativistic configuration-interaction calculations of the energy levels of the low-lying and core-excited states of beryllium-like iron, Fe$^{22+}$. The results include the QED contributions calculated by two different methods, the model QED operator approach and the screening-potential approach. The uncertainties of theoretical energies are estimated systematically. The predicted wavelengths of the K\\alpha transitions in beryllium-like iron improve previous theoretical results and compare favorably with the experimental data.

  14. Are beryllium abundances anomalous in stars with giant planets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; R. J Garcia Lopez; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; S. Randich; A. Ecuvillon; C. Dominguez Cerdena

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of 41 extra-solar planet host stars, and for 29 stars without any known planetary-mass companion, spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The Be abundances were derived through spectral synthesis done in standard Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium, using spectra obtained with various instruments. The results seem to confirm that overall, planet-host stars have ``normal'' Be abundances, although a small, but not significant, difference might be present. This result is discussed, and we show that this difference is probably not due to any stellar ``pollution'' events. In other words, our results support the idea that the high-metal content of planet-host stars has, overall, a ``primordial'' origin. However, we also find a small subset of planet-host late-F and early-G dwarfs that might have higher than average Be abundances. The reason for the offset is not clear, and might be related either to the engulfment of planetary material, to galactic chemical evolution effects, or to stellar-mass differences for stars of similar temperature.

  15. Electric properties of the Beryllium-11 system in Halo EFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -W. Hammer; D. R. Phillips

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute E1 transitions and electric radii in the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the leading-order parameters of the EFT from measured data on the 1/2+ and 1/2- levels in Be-11 and the B(E1) strength for the transition between them. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1) strength for Coulomb dissociation of the Be-11 nucleus to the continuum. We also compute the charge radii of the 1/2+ and 1/2- states. Agreement with experiment within the expected accuracy of a leading-order computation in this EFT is obtained. We also discuss how next-to-leading-order (NLO) corrections involving both s-wave and p-wave neutron-Be-10 interactions affect our results, and display the NLO predictions for quantities which are free of additional short-distance operators at this order. Information on neutron-Be-10 scattering in the relevant channels is inferred.

  16. Spectroscopic Study on the Beryllium Abundances of Red Giant Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive spectroscopic study was carried out for the beryllium abundances of 200 red giants (mostly of late G and early K type), which were determined from the near-UV Be II 3131.066 line based on high-dispersion spectra obtained by Subaru/HDS, with an aim of investigating the nature of surface Be contents in these evolved giants; e.g., dependence upon stellar parameters, degree of peculiarity along with its origin and build-up timing. We found that Be is considerably deficient (to widely different degree from star to star) in the photosphere of these evolved giants by ~1-3 dex (or more) compared to the initial abundance. While the resulting Be abundances (A(Be)) appear to weakly depend upon T_eff, log g, [Fe/H], M, age, and v_sin i, this may be attributed to the metallicity dependence of A(Be) coupled with the mutual correlation between these stellar parameters, since such tendencies almost disappear in the metallicity-scaled Be abundance ([Be/Fe]). By comparing the Be abundances (as well as their correl...

  17. Summary of Surface Swipe Sampling for Beryllium on Lead Bricks and Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paik, S Y; Barron, D A

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 25,000 lbs of lead bricks at Site 300 were assessed by the Site 300 Industrial Hygienis tand Health Physicist for potential contamination of beryllium and radiation for reuse. These lead bricks and shielding had been used as shielding material during explosives tests that included beryllium and depleted uranium. Based on surface swipe sampling that was performed between July 26 and October 11, 2010, specifically for beryllium, the use of a spray encapsulant was found to be an effective means to limit removable surface contamination to levels below the DOE release limit for beryllium, which is 0.2 mcg/100 cm{sup 2}. All the surface swipe sampling data for beryllium and a timeline of when the samples were collected (and a brief description) are presented in this report. On December 15, 2010, the lead bricks and shielding were surveyed with an ion chamber and indicated dose rates less than 0.05 mrem per hour on contact. This represents a dose rate consistent with natural background. An additional suevey was performed on February 8, 2011, using a GM survey instrument to estimate total activity on the lead bricks and shielding, confirming safe levels of radioactivity. The vendor is licensed to possess and work with radioactive material.

  18. Separation of Transmutation - and Fission-Produced Radioisotopes from Irradiated Beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy J. Tranter; RIchard D. Tillotson; Nick R. Mann; Glen R. Longhurst

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a two-step solvent extraction-precipitation process for separating transmutation and fission products from irradiated beryllium. Beryllium metal was dissolved in nitric and fluoroboric acids. Isotopes of 241Am, 239Pu, 85Sr, 60Co, and 137Cs were then added to make a surrogate beryllium waste solution. A series of batch contacts was performed with the spiked simulant using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol diluted with sulfone to extract the isotopes of Cs and Sr. Another series of batch contacts was performed using a combination of octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate diluted with dodecane for extracting the isotopes of Pu and Am. The 60Co was separated by first forming a cobalt complex and then selectively precipitating the beryllium as a hydroxide. The results indicate that greater than 99.9% removal can be achieved for each radionuclide. Transuranic isotope contamination levels are reduced to less than 100 nCi/g, and sources of high beta-gamma radiation (60Co, 137Cs, and 90Sr) are reduced to levels that will allow the beryllium to be contact handled. The separation process may be applicable to a recycle or waste disposition scenario.

  19. The Passivity and Breakdown of Beryllium in Aqueous Solutions M.A. Hill, D.P. Butt, and R.S. Lillard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Passivity and Breakdown of Beryllium in Aqueous Solutions M.A. Hill, D.P. Butt, and R beryllium (Be) has been studied as a function of pH. Below pH 2, Be exhibited active dissolution at all, the presence of the fluoride increased the passive current density of beryllium, but had no effect

  20. 1529-6466/02/0050-0014$10.00 DOI:10.2138/rmg.2002.50.14 14 Non-pegmatitic Deposits of Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    1529-6466/02/0050-0014$10.00 DOI:10.2138/rmg.2002.50.14 14 Non-pegmatitic Deposits of Beryllium natural of occurrences (cf. Table 1, Fig. 4; see text for discussion). Beryllium minerals are best known. Compositions range from strongly peraluminous to #12;592 Chapter 14: Barton & Young Table 1. Beryllium minerals

  1. Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 to 900 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 new measurements of the carbon and beryllium neutron total cross section in the energy range of 24. Measurements of three samples of different thicknesses of beryllium resulted in accurate total cross

  2. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Sean A. C. [Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus (Barbados)

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  3. Beryllium abundance in turn-off stars of NGC 6752

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Pasquini; Piercarlo Bonifacio; Sofia Randich; Daniele Galli; Raffaele G. Gratton; B. Wolff

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: To measure the beryllium abundance in two TO stars of the Globular Cluster NGC 6752, one oxygen rich and sodium poor, the other presumably oxygen poor and sodium rich. Be abundances in these stars are used to put on firmer grounds the hypothesis of Be as cosmochronometer and to investigate the formation of Globular Clusters. Method:We present near UV spectra with resolution R$\\sim 45000$ obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2m VLT Kueyen telescope, analysed with spectrum synthesis based on plane parallel LTE model atmospheres. Results:Be is detected in the O rich star with log(Be/H)=-12.04 $\\pm$0.15, while Be is not detected in the other star for which we obtain the upper limit log(Be/H)$<$-12.2. A large difference in nitrogen abundance (1.6 dex) is found between the two stars. Conclusions:The Be measurement is compatible with what found in field stars with the same [Fe/H] and [O/H]. The 'Be age' of the cluster is found to be 13.3 Gyrs, in excellent agreement with the results from main sequence fitting and stellar evolution. The presence of Be confirms the results previously obtained for the cluster NGC 6397 and supports the hypothesis that Be can be used as a clock for the early formation of the Galaxy. Since only an upper limit is found for the star with low oxygen abundance, we cannot decide between competing scenarios of Globular Cluster formation, but we can exclude that 'polluted' stars are substantially younger than 'unpolluted' ones. We stress that the Be test might be the only measurement capable of distinguishing between these scenarios.

  4. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C17510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a literature search and discussion with manufacturers revealed that there was virtually no existing data related to the fracture properties and behavior of copper beryllium alloy C17510, a series of test programs was undertaken to ascertain this information for several variations in material processing and chemistry. These variations in C17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing and fatigue crack growth rate tests, as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature. In order to confirm the test results, duplicate and independent test programs were awarded to separate facilities with appropriate test experience, whenever possible. The primary goal of the test program, to determine and bound the fracture toughness and Paris constants for C17510,was accomplished. In addition, a wealth of information was accumulated pertaining to crack growth characteristics, effects of directionality and potential testing pitfalls. The paper discusses the test program and its findings in detail.

  5. Fundamental hydrogen interactions with beryllium : a magnetic fusion perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wampler, William R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Felter, Thomas E.; Whaley, Josh A.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly, basic models such as density functional theory and molecular dynamics are being used to simulate different aspects of hydrogen recycling from plasma facing materials. These models provide valuable insight into hydrogen diffusion, trapping, and recombination from surfaces, but their validation relies on knowledge of the detailed behavior of hydrogen at an atomic scale. Despite being the first wall material for ITER, basic single crystal beryllium surfaces have been studied only sparsely from an experimental standpoint. In prior cases researchers used electron spectroscopy to examine surface reconstruction or adsorption kinetics during exposure to a hydrogen atmosphere. While valuable, these approaches lack the ability to directly detect the positioning of hydrogen on the surface. Ion beam techniques, such as low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), are two of the only experimental approaches capable of providing this information. In this study, we applied both LEIS and DRS to examine how hydrogen binds to the Be(0001) surface. Our measurements were performed using an angle-resolved ion energy spectrometer (ARIES) to probe the surface with low energy ions (500 eV - 3 keV He{sup +} and Ne{sup +}). We were able to obtain a 'scattering maps' of the crystal surface, providing insight on how low energy ions are focused along open surface channels. Once we completed a characterization of the clean surface, we dosed the sample with atomic hydrogen using a heated tungsten capillary. A distinct signal associated with adsorbed hydrogen emerged that was consistent with hydrogen residing between atom rows. To aid in the interpretation of the experimental results, we developed a computational model to simulate ion scattering at grazing incidence. For this purpose, we incorporated a simplified surface model into the Kalypso molecular dynamics code. This approach allowed us to understand how the incident ions interacted with the surface hydrogen, providing confirmation of the preferred binding site.

  6. Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

  7. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alba; M. Barbagallo; P. Boccaccio; A. Celentano; N. Colonna; G. Cosentino; A. Del Zoppo; A. Di Pietro; J. Esposito; P. Figuera; P. Finocchiaro; A. Kostyukov; C. Maiolino; M. Osipenko; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; C. M. Viberti; D. Santonocito; M. Schillaci

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of research on IVth generation reactors and high intensity neutron sources a low-power prototype neutron amplifier was recently proposed by INFN. It is based on a low-energy, high current proton cyclotron, whose beam, impinging on a thick Beryllium converter, produces a fast neutron spectrum. The world database on the neutron yield from thick Beryllium target in the 70 MeV proton energy domain is rather scarce. The new measurement was performed at LNS, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and an almost complete neutron energy interval. In this contribution the preliminary data are discussed together with the proposed ADS facility.

  8. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 13 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 30 MARCH 1998 Anomalously Large Thermal Expansion at the (0001) Surface of Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Thermal Expansion at the (0001) Surface of Beryllium without Observable Interlayer Anharmonicity K. Pohl,1

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Deactivation Services Section...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disease Prevention Program. d) Ensure adequate access to health programsambulatory care, and beryllium and radiation worker health surveillance programs. These services are...

  10. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory - March 2011 March 2011 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review HIAR-LLNL-2011-03-25 This...

  11. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical...

  12. Review Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Health Evaluations. March 22, 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 Report on Implementation of 10 CFR Part...

  13. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for deficiencies associated with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program On October 29, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  14. Criteria Review and Approach Documents | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 17, 2010 CRAD, Assessment of the Site - February 17, 2010 Assessment of the Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Plan (CBDPP) Implementation (HSS CRAD 64-37, Rev...

  15. Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic...

  16. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Tank Farms 222-S Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - April 2015 Enterprise Assessments Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - June 2015 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank...

  17. Audits and Inspections Work Plan Audits Central Audits Division

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Follow-up on the Beryllium Disease Prevention Programs at Oak Ridge Sites Depleted Uranium Operations at Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security...

  18. US Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Follow-up on the Beryllium Disease Prevention Programs at Oak Ridge Sites Depleted Uranium Operations at Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex...

  19. Hylleraas-configuration-interaction study of the {sup 1}S ground state of neutral beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, James S.; Hagstrom, Stanley A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878-9957 (United States); Departments of Chemistry and Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hylleraas-configuration-interaction (Hy-CI) method variational calculations are reported for the {sup 1}S ground state of neutral beryllium. The best nonrelativistic energy obtained was -14.667 356 4 hartree, which is estimated to be accurate to a tenth of a microhartree.

  20. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Keith C. Bledsoe; Bradley T. Rearden

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  1. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  2. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowring, D.L.; DeMello, A.J.; Lambert, A.R.; Li, D.; Virostek,, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  3. Aerosol resuspension from fabric: implications for personal monitoring in the beryllium industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohne, J.E. Jr.; Cohen, B.S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabric used for work clothing at an industrial site can significantly influence personal monitor (PM) exposure estimates because dust resuspension from clothing can increase the concentration at the sampler inlet. The magnitude of the effect depends on removal forces and on the interaction of the contaminant particles with work garments. Aerosol deposition and resuspension on cotton and Nomex aramid fabrics was evaluated at a beryllium refinery. Electrostatically charged cotton backdrops collected more beryllium than neutral controls, but electronegative Nomex backdrops did not. Moving fabrics collected more beryllium than did stationary controls. When contaminated fabrics were agitated, PMs mounted 2.5 cm in front of the fabric collected more beryllium than monitors above the fabric, positioned to simulate the nose or mouth. The difference between the air concentrations measured by these PMs increased with Be loading and tended to level off for highly contaminated fabric. Cotton resuspended a larger fraction of its contaminant load than Nomex. These results are consistent with current knowledge of the behavior of particles on fabric fibers. Aerosol resuspension from garments is an important consideration in assessing inhalation exposure to toxic dusts. A garment may attract and retain toxic particles. This contamination is then available for later resuspension.

  4. ITER-like wall sliced beryllium tiles The JET Enhanced Performance 2 (EP2) shutdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comprises beryllium, tungsten and coated CFC tiles mounted on inconel carriers. A simulation of the wall of the component with the production of a sequence description. This document outlines the scope of the task to guide the production of optimised assembly procedures. It also addresses the scope of the task as listed

  5. Beryllium-10 in the Taylor Dome ice core: Applications to Antarctic glaciology and paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steig, E.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ice core was drilled at Taylor dome, East Antarctica, reaching to bedrock at 554 meters. Oxygen-isotope measurements reveal climatic fluctuations through the last interglacial period. To facilitate comparison of the Taylor Dome paleoclimate record with geologic data and results from other deep ice cores, several glaciological issues need to be addressed. In particular, accumulation data are necessary as input for numerical ice-flow-models, for determining the flux of chemical constituents from measured concentrations, and for calculation of the offset in age between ice and trapped air in the core. The analysis of cosmogenic beryllium-10 provides a geochemical method for constraining the accumulation-rate history at Taylor Dome. High-resolution measurements were made in shallow firn cores and snow pits to determine the relationship among beryllium-10 concentrations, wet and dry deposition mechanisms, and snow-accumulation rates. Comparison between theoretical and measured variations in deposition over the last 75 years constrains the relationship between beryllium-10 deposition and global average production rates. The results indicate that variations in geomagnetically-modulated production-rate do not strongly influence beryllium-10 deposition at Taylor Dome. Although solar modulation of production rate is important for time scales of years to centuries, snow-accumulation rate is the dominant control on ice-core beryllium-10 concentrations for longer periods. Results show that the Taylor Dome core can be used to provide new constraints on regional climate over the last 130,000 years, complementing the terrestrial and marine geological record from the Dry Valley, Transantarctic Mountains and western Ross Sea.

  6. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  7. Irradiated Beryllium Disposal Workshop, Idaho Falls, ID, May 29-30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Anderson, Gail; Mullen, Carlan K; West, William Howard

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, while performing routine radioactive decay heat rate calculations for beryllium reflector blocks for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), it became evident that there may be sufficient concentrations of transuranic isotopes to require classification of this irradiated beryllium as transuranic waste. Measurements on samples from ATR reflector blocks and further calculations confirmed that for reflector blocks and outer shim control cylinders now in the ATR canal, transuranic activities are about five times the threshold for classification. That situation implies that there is no apparent disposal pathway for this material. The problem is not unique to the ATR. The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Missouri University Research Reactor at Columbia, Missouri and other reactors abroad must also deal with this issue. A workshop was held in Idaho Falls Idaho on May 29-30, 2002 to acquaint stakeholders with these findings and consider a path forward in resolving the issues attendant to disposition of irradiated material. Among the findings from this workshop were (1) there is a real potential for the US to be dependent on foreign sources for metallic beryllium within about a decade; (2) there is a need for a national policy on beryllium utilization and disposition and for a beryllium coordinating committee to be assembled to provide guidance on that policy; (3) it appears it will be difficult to dispose of this material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico due to issues of Defense classification, facility radioactivity inventory limits, and transportation to WIPP; (4) there is a need for a funded DOE program to seek resolution of these issues including research on processing techniques that may make this waste acceptable in an existing disposal pathway or allow for its recycle.

  8. Preventive Maintenance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preventive maintenance aims to sustain and/or extend system lifespan through a set of actions that detect, preclude, or mitigate system degradation. These actions are based on either calendar time or machine run time.

  9. All-solid-state continuous-wave laser systems for ionization, cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, H -Y; Kienzler, D; Keitch, B C; de Clercq, L E; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe laser systems for photoionization, Doppler cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions. For photoionization of neutral beryllium, we have developed a continuous-wave 235 nm source obtained by two stages of frequency doubling from a diode laser at 940 nm. The system delivers up to 400 mW at 470 nm and 28 mW at 235 nm. For control of the beryllium ion, three laser wavelengths at 313 nm are produced by sum-frequency generation and second-harmonic generation from four infrared fiber lasers. Up to 7.2 W at 626 nm and 1.9 W at 313 nm are obtained using two pump beams at 1051 and 1551 nm. Intensity fluctuations below 0.5 % per hour (during 8 hours of operation) have been measured at a 313 nm power of 1 W. These systems are used to load beryllium ions into a segmented ion trap.

  10. All-solid-state continuous-wave laser systems for ionization, cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -Y. Lo; J. Alonso; D. Kienzler; B. C. Keitch; L. E. de Clercq; V. Negnevitsky; J. P. Home

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe laser systems for photoionization, Doppler cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions. For photoionization of neutral beryllium, we have developed a continuous-wave 235 nm source obtained by two stages of frequency doubling from a diode laser at 940 nm. The system delivers up to 400 mW at 470 nm and 28 mW at 235 nm. For control of the beryllium ion, three laser wavelengths at 313 nm are produced by sum-frequency generation and second-harmonic generation from four infrared fiber lasers. Up to 7.2 W at 626 nm and 1.9 W at 313 nm are obtained using two pump beams at 1051 and 1551 nm. Intensity fluctuations below 0.5 % per hour (during 8 hours of operation) have been measured at a 313 nm power of 1 W. These systems are used to load beryllium ions into a segmented ion trap.

  11. CYTOCHROMES P450 AS THERAPEUTIC TARGETS AND COUNTER-TARGETS FOR THE PREVENTION OF LUNG CANCER AND TREATMENT OF STEROIDOGENIC DISEASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Linda

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    crucial role in cortisol production also presents this enzyme as an independent therapeutic target for the treatment of Cushing's disease resulting from cortisol overproduction. However, biochemical studies for both human CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 have been...

  12. Possible signature of hypernova nucleosynthesis in a beryllium rich halo dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Smiljanic; L. Pasquini; F. Primas; P. Mazzali; D. Galli; G. Valle

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a large survey of halo and thick disc stars, we found one halo star, HD 106038, exceptionally overabundant in beryllium. In spite of its low metallicity, [Fe/H] = -1.26, the star has log(Be/H) = -10.60, which is similar to the solar meteoritic abundance, log(Be/H) = -10.58. This abundance is more than ten times higher the abundance of stars with similar metallicity and cannot be explained by models of chemical evolution of the Galaxy that include the standard theory of cosmic-ray spallation. No other halo star exhibiting such a beryllium overabundance is known. In addition, overabundances of Li, Si, Ni, Y, and Ba are also observed. We suggest that all these chemical peculiarities, but the Ba abundance, can be simultaneously explained if the star was formed in the vicinity of a hypernova.

  13. Face-Cooling of Beryllium Window at z = 3 m in Magnet IDS120h Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Face-Cooling of Beryllium Window at z = 3 m in Magnet IDS120h Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC December 24, 2011 This report analyzes the face-cooling--by water or helium gas--of a beryllium window at z at ­1, +0.7) is 103 W/g--i.e., 190 W/cm3 for beryllium, which has a density of 1.85 g/cm3 . The power

  14. Peak T in Edge-Cooled Beryllium Window at z = 3 m in Magnet IDS120h Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Peak T in Edge-Cooled Beryllium Window at z = 3 m in Magnet IDS120h Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC:16 PM) to incorporate Nick's latest predictions of the power density in a beryllium window at z = 3 m, +0.7) of 103 W/g--190 W/cm3 for beryllium (1.85 g/cm3 ). [Note: File "IDS120hm_BeWind_TDP_NO_SH1_NP

  15. Production of J=/ at Large x F in 800 GeV/c p--Copper and p--Beryllium Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of J=/ at Large x F in 800 GeV/c p--Copper and p--Beryllium Collisions M. S. Kowitt section of J=/ with 800 GeV/c protons on copper and beryllium, with good acceptance for p? ! 5 GeV/c over observed via the decay J=/ ! ¯ + ¯ \\Gamma . For a portion of the data , a thick beryllium target (91.4 cm

  16. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of $K\\alpha$ transition energies in beryllium-like argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations have been performed for the energy levels of the low-lying and core-excited states of beryllium-like argon, Ar$^{14+}$. These calculations include the one-loop QED effects as obtained by two different methods, the screening-potential approach as well as the model QED operator approach. The calculations are supplemented by a systematic estimation of uncertainties of theoretical predictions.

  17. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Proctor, Larry Duane [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  18. Beryllium abundances in parent stars of extrasolar planets: 16 Cyg A & B and rho 1 Cnc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Garcia Lopez; M. R. Perez de Taoro

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Be II 3131 A doublet has been observed in the solar-type stars 16 Cyg A & B and in the late G-type star rho 1 Cnc, to derive their beryllium abundances. 16 Cyg A & B show similar (solar) beryllium abundances while 16 Cyg B, which has been proposed to have a planetary companion of ~2 M_Jup, is known to be depleted in lithium by a factor larger than 6 with respect to 16 Cyg A. Differences in their rotational histories which could induce different rates of internal mixing of material, and the ingestion of a similar planet by 16 Cyg A are discussed as potential explanations. The existence of two other solar-type stars which are candidates to harbour planetary-mass companions and which show lithium and beryllium abundances close to those of 16 Cyg A, requires a more detailed inspection of the peculiarities of the 16 Cyg system. For rho 1 Cnc, which is the coolest known object candidate to harbour a planetary-mass companion (M > 0.85 M_Jup), we establish a precise upper limit for its beryllium abundance, showing a strong Be depletion which constrains the available mixing mechanisms. Observations of similar stars without companions are required to asses the potential effects of the planetary companion on the observed depletion. It has been recently claimed that rho 1 Cnc appears to be a subgiant. If this were the case, the observed strong Li and Be depletions could be explained by a dilution process taking place during its post-main sequence evolution.

  19. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  20. Glass-Coated Beryllium Mirrors for the LHCb RICH1 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, G J; Cameron, W; D'Ambrosio, C; Frei, C; Harnew, N; Head, R; Khimitch, Y P; Khmelnikov, V A; Loveridge, P W; Metlica, F; Obraztsov, V F; Piedigrossi, D; Sizenev, V; Kompozit Joint Stock Company, Moscow, Russia; Szczypka, P M; Ullaland, O; Vygosky, E; Websdale, D M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, manufacture and testing of lightweight glass-coated beryllium spherical converging mirrors for the RICH1 detector of LHCb are described. The mirrors need to be lightweight to minimize the material budget and fluorocarbon-compatible to avoid degradation in the RICH1 C4F10 gas radiator. Results of the optical measurements for the small-sized prototypes and for the first full-sized prototype mirror are reported.

  1. JET Papers presented to the 2nd IEA International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion (6th September 1995, Jackson Hole, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JET Papers presented to the 2nd IEA International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion (6th September 1995, Jackson Hole, USA)

  2. Influence of Atomic Physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE Simulations of JET Divertor Detachment with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Atomic Physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE Simulations of JET Divertor Detachment with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components

  3. Target Particle and Heat Loads in Low-Triangularity L-mode Plasmas in JET with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Target Particle and Heat Loads in Low-Triangularity L-mode Plasmas in JET with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Walls

  4. Rapid Separation of Beryllium and Lanthanide Derivatives by Capillary Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Lucke, Richard B.; Douglas, Matthew

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies describe derivatization of metal ions followed by analysis using gas chromatography, usually on packed columns. In many of these studies, stable and volatile derivatives were formed using fluorinated ?-diketonate reagents. This paper extends previous work by investigating separations of the derivatives on small-diameter capillary gas chromatography columns and exploring on-fiber, solid-phase microextraction derivatization techniques for beryllium. The ?-diketonate used for these studies was 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Derivatization of lanthanides also required addition of a neutral donor, dibutyl sulfoxide, in addition to 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Un-optimized separations on a 100-µm i.d. capillary column proved capable of rapid separations (within 15 min) of lanthanide derivatives that are adjacent to one another in the periodic table. Full-scan mass spectra were obtained from derivatives containing 5 ng of each lanthanide. Studies also developed a simple on-fiber solid-phase microextraction derivatization of beryllium. Beryllium could be analyzed in the presence of other alkali earth elements [Ba(II) and Sr(II)] without interference. Extension of the general approach was demonstrated for several additional elements [i.e., Cu(II), Cr(III), and Ga(III)].

  5. Comprehensive Measurement of Neutron Yield Produced by 62 MeV Protons on Beryllium Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; R. Alba; G. Ricco; M. Schillaci; M. Barbagallo; P. Boccaccio; A. Celentano; N. Colonna; L. Cosentino; A. Del Zoppo; A. Di Pietro; J. Esposito; P. Figuera; P. Finocchiaro; A. Kostyukov; C. Maiolino; D. Santonocito; V. Scuderi; C. M. Viberti

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power prototype of neutron amplifier, based on a 70 MeV, high current proton cyclotron being installed at LNL for the SPES RIB facility, was recently proposed within INFN-E project. This prototype uses a thick Beryllium converter to produce a fast neutron spectrum feeding a sub-critical reactor core. To complete the design of such facility the new measurement of neutron yield from a thick Beryllium target was performed at LNS. This measurement used liquid scintillator detectors to identify produced neutrons by Pulse Shape Discrimination and Time of Flight technique to measure neutron energy in the range 0.5-62 MeV. To extend the covered neutron energy range He3 detector was used to measure neutrons below 0.5 MeV. The obtained yields were normalized to the charge deposited by the proton beam on the metallic Beryllium target. These techniques allowed to achieve a wide angular coverage from 0 to 150 degrees and to explore almost complete neutron energy interval.

  6. Benchmark Evaluation of Uranium Metal Annuli and Cylinders with Beryllium Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive series of delayed critical experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility using enriched uranium metal during the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments were designed to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits of the Y-12 Plant and to provide data for the verification of cross sections and calculation methods utilized in nuclear criticality safety applications. Many of these experiments have already been evaluated and included in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook: unreflected (HEU-MET-FAST-051), graphite-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-071), and polyethylene-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-076). Three of the experiments consisted of highly-enriched uranium (HEU, ~93.2% 235U) metal parts reflected by beryllium metal discs. The first evaluated experiment was constructed from a stack of 7-in.-diameter, 4-1/8-in.-high stack of HEU discs top-reflected by a 7-in.-diameter, 5-9/16-in.-high stack of beryllium discs. The other two experiments were formed from stacks of concentric HEU metal annular rings surrounding a 7-in.diameter beryllium core. The nominal outer diameters were 13 and 15 in. with a nominal stack height of 5 and 4 in., respectively. These experiments have been evaluated for inclusion in the ICSBEP Handbook.

  7. Comprehensive Measurement of Neutron Yield Produced by 62 MeV Protons on Beryllium Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osipenko, M; Alba, R; Ricco, G; Schillaci, M; Barbagallo, M; Boccaccio, P; Celentano, A; Colonna, N; Cosentino, L; Del Zoppo, A; Di Pietro, A; Esposito, J; Figuera, P; Finocchiaro, P; Kostyukov, A; Maiolino, C; Santonocito, D; Scuderi, V; Viberti, C M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power prototype of neutron amplifier, based on a 70 MeV, high current proton cyclotron being installed at LNL for the SPES RIB facility, was recently proposed within INFN-E project. This prototype uses a thick Beryllium converter to produce a fast neutron spectrum feeding a sub-critical reactor core. To complete the design of such facility the new measurement of neutron yield from a thick Beryllium target was performed at LNS. This measurement used liquid scintillator detectors to identify produced neutrons by Pulse Shape Discrimination and Time of Flight technique to measure neutron energy in the range 0.5-62 MeV. To extend the covered neutron energy range He3 detector was used to measure neutrons below 0.5 MeV. The obtained yields were normalized to the charge deposited by the proton beam on the metallic Beryllium target. These techniques allowed to achieve a wide angular coverage from 0 to 150 degrees and to explore almost complete neutron energy interval.

  8. Pollution Prevention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38Polaron Behavior in1Pollution Prevention Goal

  9. Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York (SY002V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Sacandaga Site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York following limited remediation of the site by Allwash of Syracuse, Inc. At the time of this survey, only building P was still standing. A small concrete structure at the east of the property had been demolished and the debris hauled away, leaving only a pit. The purpose of the survey, conducted between April and August 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside building P, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected. the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York.

  10. Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Peek Street Site, Schenectady, New York (SY001V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.; Carrier, R.F.; Allred, J.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Peek Street site, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York. The purpose of the survey, conducted during 1993 and continuing through January 1994, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the structure, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected, the industrial property at 425 Peek Street and the adjacent state-owned bike path in Schenectady, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York.

  11. Pollution Prevention Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention awards are presented each year for minimized waste, conserved resources, and other sustainable...

  12. Scattering of low-energy electrons and positrons by atomic beryllium: Ramsauer-Townsend effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, David D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total cross sections for the scattering of low-energy electrons and positrons by atomic beryllium in the energy range below the first inelastic thresholds are calculated. A Ramsauer-Townsend minimum is seen in the electron scattering cross sections, while no such effect is found in the case of positron scattering. A minimum total cross section of 0.016 a.u. at 0.0029 eV is observed for the electron case. In the limit of zero energy, the cross sections yield a scattering length of -0.61 a.u. for electron and +13.8 a.u. for positron scattering.

  13. Sub Shot-Noise interferometric phase sensitivity with Beryllium ions Schroedinger Cat States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Pezzé; Augusto Smerzi

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometry with NOON quantum states can provide unbiased phase estimation with a sensitivity scaling as $\\Delta \\theta \\sim 1/N_T$ given a prior knowledge that the true phase shift $\\theta$ lies in the interval $-\\pi \\leq \\theta \\leq \\pi$. The protocol requires a total of $N_T = 2^{p}-1$ particles (unequally) distributed among $p$ independent measurements and overcomes basic difficulties present in previously proposed approaches. We demonstrate the possibility to obtain a phase sensitivity beating the classical shot-noise limit using published probabilities retrieved experimentally for the creation of Schr\\"odinger cat quantum states containing up to N=6 beryllium ions.

  14. Isotope Shifts in Beryllium-, Boron-, Carbon-, and Nitrogen-like Ions from Relativistic Configuration Interaction Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazé, C; Rynkun, P; Gaigalas, G; Godefroid, M; Jönsson, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wave functions that account for valence, core-valence and core-core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  15. Spectroscopic accuracy directly from quantum chemistry: application to ground and excited states of beryllium dimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sandeep; Booth, George H; Umrigar, C J; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine explicit correlation via the canonical transcorrelation approach with the density matrix renormalization group and initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo methods to compute a near-exact beryllium dimer curve, {\\it without} the use of composite methods. In particular, our direct density matrix renormalization group calculations produce a well-depth of $D_e$=931.2 cm$^{-1}$ which agrees very well with recent experimentally derived estimates $D_e$=929.7$\\pm 2$~cm$^{-1}$ [Science, 324, 1548 (2009)] and $D_e$=934.6~cm$^{-1}$ [Science, 326, 1382 (2009)

  16. Carrier dynamics in Beryllium doped low-temperature-grown InGaAs/InAlAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Globisch, B., E-mail: Bjoern.Globisch@hhi.fraunhofer.de; Dietz, R. J. B.; Stanze, D.; Göbel, T.; Schell, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, Einsteinufer 37, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron and hole dynamics in low-temperature-grown InGaAs/InAlAs multiple quantum well structures are studied by optical pump-probe transmission measurements for Beryllium (Be) doping levels between 3?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} and 4?×?10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. We investigate electron dynamics in the limit cases of unsaturated and completely saturated electron trapping. By expanding a rate equation model in these limits, the details of carrier dynamics are revealed. Electrons are trapped by ionized arsenic antisites, whereas recombination occurs between trapped electrons and holes trapped by negatively charged Be dopants.

  17. Helium-cluster decay widths of molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Pei; F. R. Xu

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\alpha$ particle and $^6$He emissions from possible molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes have been studied using a mean-field-type cluster potential. Calculations can reproduce well the $\\alpha$-decay widths of excited states in $^{8}$Be, $^{12}$C and $^{20}$Ne. For the nucleus $^{10}$Be, we discussed the $\\alpha$-decay widths with different shapes or decay modes, in order to understand the very different decay widths of two excited states. The widths of $^{6}$He decay from $^{12}$Be and $\\alpha$ decays from $^{13,14}$C are predicted, which could be useful for future experiments.

  18. Single and double photoionization of beryllium below 40 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehlitz, R.; Bluett, J.B. [Synchrotron Radiation Center, UW-Madison, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States); Lukic, D. [Institute of Physics, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the double-to-single photoionization ratio of beryllium (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}) between 28 and 40 eV and determined the relative single- and double-photoionization cross sections. In this energy region only simultaneous but not sequential emission of both 2s electrons can take place. We also compare our data with recent theoretical calculations and find good agreement with our data. The previously found scaling law for the double-to-single photoionization ratio is confirmed with high accuracy.

  19. A Lithium-Beryllium Method for the Detection of Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kopylov; I. V. Orekhov; V. V. Petukhov; A. E. Solomatin

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the detection of solar neutrino has been developed using the laboratory bench installations. The efficiency of the extraction of beryllium from lithium as high as 96.4{%} has been achieved, and it was shown that lithium losses during the extraction were less than 1{%}. The prospects of a full-scale experiment with a 10-t lithium detector consisting of twenty 500-kg lithium modules are discussed. The technical solutions formulated on the basis of this study enable to make design of a pilot lithium installation containing 500 kg of metallic lithium

  20. ORISE: Beryllium Testing and Surveillance for the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981 U.S. ORAppliedBeryllium Testing and

  1. Fast neutron spectra produced by a 49 MeV deuteron-beryllium reaction and its modification by selected absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hertel, Nolan Elmer

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 566 m from the beryllium target. Figures 14 and 15 display the neutron spectra measured two different times in air. Figures 16-20 display the neutron spectra produced after passage through various depths of TE liquid. Figures 21-25 display... for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1975 Najor Subject: Nuclear Engineering FAST NEUTRON SPECTRA PRODUCED BY A 49 MEV DEUTERON-BERYLLIUM REACTION AND ITS MODIFICATION BY SELECTED ABSORBERS A Thesis by NOLAN ELMER HERTEL Approved as to style and con...

  2. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  3. Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

  4. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  5. A Comparison of Magnesium and Beryllium Acceptors in GaN Grown by rf-Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Tom

    as a function of substrate temperature and dopant flux for Ga-polarity and N-polarity GaN. Incorporation GaN templates on (0001) sapphire substrates. The doped layers were grown at a rate of 0.25 µmA Comparison of Magnesium and Beryllium Acceptors in GaN Grown by rf-Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam

  6. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Josefa

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    llantas, la carrocer?a de veh?culos y para ba?os de botas. Haga una soluci?n m?s d?bil con ? de cucharadita de ? blanqueador con 1 cuarto de gal?n de agua para uso sobre superficies duras. Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  7. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Josefa

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ? weakness? sneezing? coughing? nasal discharge? blisters? unusual behavior? What to do if animals are sick Separate sick animals from healthy animals.? Take immediate action if you observe a large number of death losses.? Contact a local veterinarian...

  8. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Josefa

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    llantas, la carrocer?a de veh?culos y para ba?os de botas. Haga una soluci?n m?s d?bil con ? de cucharadita de ? blanqueador con 1 cuarto de gal?n de agua para uso sobre superficies duras. Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  9. Disease Prevention in the Home Garden.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jerral D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -borne Wet, cool soils off 2. Downy Fungus Airborne spores, Rainy, foggy, cool mildew, old crop weather anthracnose residue 3. Powdery Fungus Airborne spores Cool , wet weather mildew 4. Rust Fungus Airborne spores Cool, wet weather BROCCOLI, CABBAGE..., CANTALOUPE, SQUASH AND WATERMELON 1. Powdery mildew Fungus Soil , airborne spores Temperatures of 80?-90?F. Rain or heavy dews; temperatures of 80?- 86?F. are optimum Night temperatures of 4P-61?F. with day temperatures not exceeding 75? F...

  10. Thermal equation of state and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of beryllium metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jianzhong, E-mail: jzhang@lanl.gov; Zhu, Jinlong [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Velisavljevic, Nenad [Dynamic and Energetic Materials Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted in-situ high-pressure synchrotron x-ray experiments on beryllium metal at pressures up to 7.9?GPa and temperatures up to 1373?K. A complete pressure (P)–volume (V)–temperature (T) equation of state (EOS) is determined based on the experiment, which includes temperature derivatives of elastic bulk modulus (at both constant pressure and constant volume) and pressure dependence of thermal expansivity. From this EOS, we calculate thermal pressure, heat capacity at constant volume, and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter as a function of temperature. Above ?600?K, our results show notable deviation from theoretical predictions using the quasiharmonic and local-density approximations, indicating that the free energy calculations need to be further improved within the current scheme of approximations.

  11. MICRON-SCALE DEEP HOLE DRILLING FOR BERYLLIUM CAPSULE FILL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, J P; Rubenchik, A M; Gunther, J; Stuart, B C

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser processing system has been developed to drill high aspect ratio holes through the impermeable beryllium capsules envisioned for ignition shots on NIF. The drilling system was designed to produce holes with an entrance and exit diameter of approximately 5 {micro}m through the full 175 {micro}m thickness of the capsule. To meet these requirements, a frequency doubled femtosecond-class Ti:Sapphire laser is directed through a high numerical aperture lens to provide the spot geometry needed to drill the hole. The laser pulse is confined by the metallic walls of the hole, thereby maintaining the diameter of the channel well beyond the Rayleigh range of the optical system. Presented is the current state of this work-in-progress, including descriptions of the device and the technique used to produce the holes. The various means of characterizing the laser-drilled channels are also discussed.

  12. A Manual of Poultry Diseases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, R. R.; Flowers, A. I.; Grumbles, L. C.; Meinecke, C. F.; Patterson, C. M.; Wormell, B. C.; Hall, C. F.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " of ocular leucosis is specific. Hatchery and Breeder Flock Health Management Sanitation is a much used, but poorly defined word. The usual implication is that sanitation is a universally understood practice that may be applied to prevent all diseases... must be based on the nature of specific diseases. The ;kmbiguity surrounding the term "sanitation" can be avoided by using a term "management and sanitation for disease prevention." This phrase then would be defined as all practices, specific...

  13. Supplementary radiological and beryllium characterization of the facility at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Allred, J.F.; Carrier, R.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a radiological survey of the Peek Street industrial facility, the adjacent state-owned bike path, and two nearby residential properties was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in November 1989. The results indicated small isolated areas that exceeded DOE guidelines. These areas totaled approximately 0.2 m{sup 2} of floor area and approximately 3 m{sup 2} of wall area inside the building, and two small areas totaling approximately 5 m{sup 2} outside the building. A small section of one of these areas extended beyond the fence on the east side of the industrial property onto the state-owned property. No residual radioactive material or elevated radiation levels were detected on any portion of the paved section of the bike path or the residential properties adjacent to the site. Because the elevated radiation levels were localized and limited in extent, any credible use scenario, including current use conditions, indicated that no significant radiation exposures would accrue to individuals frequenting the area. Samples were also analyzed for elemental beryllium since that material had formerly been used at the site. In conjunction with the planned remediation at the facility, a supplementary characterization survey was performed to further define the areas containing beryllium in excess of the identified guidelines. Additional radiological characterization of Ra-226, Th-232, and U-238 was also performed in areas that were largely inaccessible prior to the remediation efforts.

  14. A Comparison of "Total Dust" and Inhalable Personal Sampling for Beryllium Exposure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, C M

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) reduced the Beryllium (Be) 8-hr Time Weighted Average Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA) from 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} to 0.05 {micro}g/m{sup 3} with an inhalable 'I' designation in accordance with ACGIH's particle size-selective criterion for inhalable mass. Currently, per the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is following the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} as an 8-hr TWA, which is also the 2005 ACGIH TLV-TWA, and an Action Level (AL) of 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and sampling is performed using the 37mm (total dust) sampling method. Since DOE is considering adopting the newer 2009 TLV guidelines, the goal of this study was to determine if the current method of sampling using the 37mm (total dust) sampler would produce results that are comparable to what would be measured using the IOM (inhalable) sampler specific to the application of high energy explosive work at LLNL's remote experimental test facility at Site 300. Side-by-side personal sampling using the two samplers was performed over an approximately two-week period during chamber re-entry and cleanup procedures following detonation of an explosive assembly containing Beryllium (Be). The average ratio of personal sampling results for the IOM (inhalable) vs. 37-mm (total dust) sampler was 1.1:1 with a P-value of 0.62, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two samplers. Therefore, for the type of activity monitored during this study, the 37-mm sampling cassette would be considered a suitable alternative to the IOM sampler for collecting inhalable particulate matter, which is important given the many practical and economic advantages that it presents. However, similar comparison studies would be necessary for this conclusion to be applied to other types of activities, where earlier studies have shown that the IOM sampler tends to collect higher concentrations of Be compared to the 37-mm cassette, which could complicate compliance with what is already an extremely low exposure limit.

  15. Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models. Michael Bartholomew-Biggs. School of Physics Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire.

  16. awareness and pollution prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Hazard awareness and pollution prevention for contractors and visitors at UCSD #12;Hazard Awareness and Pollution Prevention For Contractors and Visitors at UC San Diego This booklet was developed by UC San Diego ..............................................5 Storm Water Pollution Prevention.....................5 Sanitary Sewer System Management

  17. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of the Effective Thermal Properties of Beryllium Packed Beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou-Sena, A.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M. [University of California at Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium, in its pebble form, has been proposed in various blanket concepts to serve different purposes. Thermal property data for such a heterogeneous packed bed is needed, particularly data on the impact of compression forces on its magnitude and consequent temperature profile. The objectives of this work are to obtain and quantify experimental data on the effective thermal conductivity of a Be-He packed bed, on the interface heat conductance between Be and SiC, and on the effects of externally applied pressure on these effective thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of a Be-He pebble bed increases as the bed mean temperature increases. The values of effective thermal conductivity vary from 2.15 to 3.00 W/m.K for bed mean temperature ranges from 90 to 420 deg C. Similar temperature effects are seen in the Be/SiC interface heat conductance, as the values of interface heat conductance range from 1140 to 2200 W/m{sup 2}.K. In addition, effective thermal conductivity increases remarkably with the increase of applied pressure (by a factor of 2.53 at 2 MPa), while it remains higher than the initial value by {approx}0.3 W/m.K when external pressure is released (hysteresis effect)

  18. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  19. The Irradiation Origin of Beryllium Radioisotopes and Other Short-lived Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthieu Gounelle; Frank H. Shu; Hsien Shang; A. E. Glassgold; K. E. Rehm; Typhoon Lee

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two explanations exist for the short-lived radionuclides present in the solar system when the CAIs first formed. They originated either from the ejecta of a supernova or by the in situ irradiation of nebular dust by energetic particles. With a half-life of only 53 days, Beryllium-7 is then the key discriminant, since it can be made only by irradiation. We calculate the yield of Be-7. Within model uncertainties associated mainly with nuclear cross sections, we obtain agreement with the experimental value. Moreover, if Be-7 and Be-10 have the same origin, the irradiation time must be short. The x-wind model provides a natural astrophysical setting that gives the requisite conditions. The decoupling of the Al-26 and Be-10 observed in some rare CAIs receives a quantitative explanation when rare gradual events are considered. Finally, we show that the presence of supernova-produced Fe-60 in the solar accretion disk does not necessarily mean that other short-lived radionuclides have a stellar origin.

  20. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; R. Alba; G. Ricco; M. Barbagallo; P. Boccaccio; A. Celentano; N. Colonna; L. Cosentino; A. Del Zoppo; A. Di Pietro; J. Esposito; P. Figuera; P. Finocchiaro; A. Kostyukov; C. Maiolino; D. Santonocito; M. Schillaci; V. Scuderi; C. M. Viberti

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a low-power prototype of neutron amplifier recently proposed within the INFN-E project indicated the need for more accurate called for detailed data on the neutron yield produced by a proton beam with energy of about 70 MeV impinging on a thick Beryllium target. Such measurement was performed at the LNS superconducting cyclotron, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and a complete neutron energy interval from thermal to beam energy. Neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV were measured by liquid scintillators exploiting their Time of Flight to determine the kinetic energy. For lower energy neutrons, down to thermal energy, a $^3$He detector was used. The obtained data are in good agreement with previous measurements at 0 degree with 66 MeV proton beam, covering neutron energies >10 MeV, as well as with measurements at few selected angles with protons of 46, 55 and 113 MeV energy. The present results extend the neutron yield data in the 60-70 MeV beam energy range. A comparison of measured yields to MCNP and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations was performed.

  1. Electron transport properties of bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-pyridine]beryllium investigated by impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanping; Chen, Jiangshan; Huang, Jinying; Ma, Dongge, E-mail: mdg1014@ciac.jl.cn, E-mail: dongls@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Dong, Lisong, E-mail: mdg1014@ciac.jl.cn, E-mail: dongls@ciac.jl.cn [Key Laboratory of Polymer Ecomaterials, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Chen, Hui [Department of Science, Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang 110142 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron transport properties of bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-pyridine] beryllium (Bepp{sub 2}) are investigated by impedance spectroscopy over a frequency range of 10?Hz to 13?MHz. The Cole-Cole plots demonstrate that the Bepp{sub 2}-based device can be represented by a single parallel resistance R{sub p} and capacitance C{sub p} network with a series resistance R{sub s}. The current-voltage characteristics and the variation of R{sub p} with applied bias voltage indicate the electron conduction of space-charge-limited current with exponential trap distributions in Bepp{sub 2}. It can be seen that the electron mobility exhibits strong field-dependence in low electric field region and almost saturate in high electric field region. It is experimentally found that Bepp{sub 2} shows dispersion transport and becomes weak as the electric field increases. The activation energy is determined to be 0.043?eV by temperature-dependent conductivity, which is consistent with the result obtained from the temperature-dependent current density characteristics. The electron mobility reaches the orders of 10{sup ?6}–10{sup ?5} cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}, depending on the electric field.

  2. Design, manufacture and initial operation of the beryllium components of the JET ITER-like wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo, V; Matthews, G F; Nunes, I; Thompson, V; Villedieu, E; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the JET ITER-like Wall Project was to provide JET with the plasma facing material combination now selected for the DT phase of ITER (bulk beryllium main chamber limiters and a full tungsten divertor) and, in conjunction with the upgraded neutral beam heating system, to achieve ITER relevant conditions. The design of the bulk Be plasma facing components had to be compatible with increased heating power and pulse length, as well as to reuse the existing tile supports originally designed to cope with disruption loads from carbon based tiles and be installed by remote handling. Risk reduction measures (prototypes, jigs, etc) were implemented to maximize efficiency during the shutdown. However, a large number of clashes with existing components not fully captured by the configuration model occurred. Restarting the plasma on the ITER-like Wall proved much easier than for the carbon wall and no deconditioning by disruptions was observed. Disruptions have been more threatening than expected due to the redu...

  3. Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith Rule; Paul Kalb; Pete Kwaschyn

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two, 111-GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (depleted uranium and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

  4. PACKAGING AND DISPOSAL OF A RADIUM BERYLLIUM SOURCE USING DEPLETED URANIUM POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITE SHIELDING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RULE,K.; KALB,P.; KWASCHYN,P.

    2003-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two, 111 GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (DU and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

  5. Measurement of the Melting Point Temperature of Several Lithium-Sodium-Beryllium Fluoride Salt (Flinabe) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.M; Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.J.; Tanaka, T.J; Ulrickson, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Troncosa, K.P. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium fluorides studied for molten salt fission reactors, has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for fusion applications. The melting points of 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2} are 460 deg. C and 363 deg. C, but LiF-BeF{sub 2} is rather viscous and has less lithium for breeding. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing liquid for the first wall and blanket were investigated. Flinabe (a mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2} and NaF) was selected for a molten salt design because a melting temperature below 350 deg. C appeared possible and this provided an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a stainless steel crucible under vacuum. One had an apparent melting temperature of 305 deg. C. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, melting procedures and temperature curves for the melting and cooling are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible is reported in an accompanying paper.

  6. Helium-cooled, FLiBe-breeder, beryllium-multiplier blanket for MINIMARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We adapted the helium-cooled, FLiBe-breeder blanket to the commercial tandem-mirror fusion-reactor design, MINIMARS. Vanadium was used to achieve high performance from the high-energy-release neutron-capture reactions and from the high-temperature operation permitted by the refractory property of the material, which increases the conversion efficiency and decreases the helium-pumping power. Although this blanket had the highest performance among the MINIMARS blankets designs, measured by Mn/sub th/ (blanket energy multiplication times thermal conversion efficiency), it had a cost of electricity (COE) 18% higher than the University of Wisconsin (UW) blanket design (42.5 vs 35.9 mills/kW.h). This increased cost was due to using higher-cost blanket materials (beryllium and vanadium) and a thicker blanket, which resulted in higher-cost central-cell magnets and the need for more blanket materials. Apparently, the high efficiency does not substantially affect the COE. Therefore, in the future, we recommend lowering the helium temperature so that ferritic steel can be used. This will result in a lower-cost blanket, which may compensate for the lower performance resulting from lower efficiency.

  7. Heart Disease and Early Heart Attack Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Heart Disease and Early Heart Attack Care Pamela Kostic, RN, CCCC, Chest Pain Coordinator, Stony Risk Factors · EHAC & Prevention #12;Heart disease includes a number of problems affecting the heart and the blood vessels in the heart. #12;Types of heart disease include: · Coronary artery disease (CAD) · Angina

  8. VALIDATION OF ANALYTICAL METHODS AND INSTRUMENTATION FOR BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT: REVIEW AND SUMMARY OF AVAILABLE GUIDES, PROCEDURES, AND PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Method validation is the process of evaluating whether an analytical method is acceptable for its intended purpose. For pharmaceutical methods, guidelines from the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH), and the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) provide a framework for performing such valications. In general, methods for regulatory compliance must include studies on specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, range, detection limit, quantitation limit, and robustness. Elements of these guidelines are readily adapted to the issue of validation for beryllium sampling and analysis. This document provides a listing of available sources which can be used to validate analytical methods and/or instrumentation for beryllium determination. A literature review was conducted of available standard methods and publications used for method validation and/or quality control. A comprehensive listing of the articles, papers and books reviewed is given in the Appendix. Available validation documents and guides are listed therein; each has a brief description of application and use. In the referenced sources, there are varying approches to validation and varying descriptions of the valication process at different stages in method development. This discussion focuses on valication and verification of fully developed methods and instrumentation that have been offered up for use or approval by other laboratories or official consensus bodies such as ASTM International, the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). This review was conducted as part of a collaborative effort to investigate and improve the state of validation for measuring beryllium in the workplace and the environment. Documents and publications from the United States and Europe are included. Unless otherwise specified, all referenced documents were published in English.

  9. Estimating Entropy of Liquids from Atom-Atom Radial Distribution Functions: Silica, Beryllium Fluoride and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruchi Sharma; Manish Agarwal; Charusita Chakravarty

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of water, liquid beryllium fluoride and silica melt are used to study the accuracy with which the entropy of ionic and molecular liquids can be estimated from atom-atom radial distribution function data. All three systems are known to display similar liquid-state thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies due to a region of anomalous excess entropy behaviour where entropy rises on isothermal compression. The pair correlation entropy is demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate that the density-temperature regime of anomalous behaviour as well as the strength of the entropy anomaly can be predicted reliably for both ionic melts as well as different rigid-body pair potentials for water. Errors in the total thermodynamic entropy for ionic melts due to the pair correlation approximation are of the order of 10% or less for most state points but can be significantly larger in the anomalous regime at very low temperatures. In the case of water, as expected given the rigid-body constraints for a molecular liquids, the pair correlation approximation causes significantly larger errors, between 20 and 30%, for most state points. Comparison of the excess entropy, Se, of ionic melts with the pair correlation entropy, S2, shows that the temperature dependence of Se is well described by T ??2=5 scaling across both the normal and anomalous regimes, unlike in the case of S2. As a function of density, the Se(rho) curves shows only a single maximum while the S2(rho) curves show both a maximum and a minimum. These differences in the behaviour of S2 and Se are due to the fact that the residual multiparticle entropy, delta(S) = Se - S2, shows a strong negative correlation with tetrahedral order in the anomalous regime.

  10. Beryllium in the Hyades F and G Dwarfs from Keck/HIRES Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann Merchant Boesgaard; Jeremy R. King

    2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium is not destroyed as easily as Li, so the abundances of Li and Be together can tell us more about the internal physical processes in stars than either element can alone. We have obtained high-resolution (45,000) and high signal-to-noise (typically 90 per pixel) spectra of the Be II resonance lines in 34 Hyades F and G dwarfs with the Keck I telescope and HIRES. The Be abundances have been derived with the spectrum synthesis method. We find that Be is depleted in the Li gap in the F stars reaching down to values of A(Be) = 0.60, or a factor of nearly seven below the meteoritic Be abundance. There is little or no depletion of Be in stars cooler than 6000 K, in spite of the large depletions (0.5 - 2.5 dex) in Li. The mean value of A(Be) for the ten coolest stars is 1.33 +/- 0.06, not far from the meteoritic value of 1.42. The pattern in the Be abundances - a Be dip in the F stars and undepleted Be in the cool stars - is well matched by the predictions of slow mixing due to stellar rotation (e.g. Deliyannis and Pinsonneault). The depletions of Li and Be probably occur simultaneously. The Li and Be abundances are correlated for stars in the temperature range of 5850 - 6680 K, similar to results from earlier work on Li and Be in F and G field stars. The Hyades G dwarfs have more Be than the sun; their initial Be may have been larger or they may not be old enough to have depleted Be. For those Hyades stars which appear to have little or no depletion of Li or Be, the Li/Be ratio is found to be 75 +/- 30. (abridged)

  11. Spectroscopic accuracy directly from quantum chemistry: Application to ground and excited states of beryllium dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Booth, George H.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic, E-mail: gkc1000@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Frick Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Yanai, Takeshi [Department of Theoretical and Computational Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Theoretical and Computational Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Umrigar, C. J. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States)] [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine explicit correlation via the canonical transcorrelation approach with the density matrix renormalization group and initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo methods to compute a near-exact beryllium dimer curve, without the use of composite methods. In particular, our direct density matrix renormalization group calculations produce a well-depth of D{sub e} = 931.2 cm{sup ?1} which agrees very well with recent experimentally derived estimates D{sub e} = 929.7±2 cm{sup ?1} [J. M. Merritt, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, Science 324, 1548 (2009)] and D{sub e}= 934.6 cm{sup ?1} [K. Patkowski, V. Špirko, and K. Szalewicz, Science 326, 1382 (2009)], as well the best composite theoretical estimates, D{sub e} = 938±15 cm{sup ?1} [K. Patkowski, R. Podeszwa, and K. Szalewicz, J. Phys. Chem. A 111, 12822 (2007)] and D{sub e}=935.1±10 cm{sup ?1} [J. Koput, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 20311 (2011)]. Our results suggest possible inaccuracies in the functional form of the potential used at shorter bond lengths to fit the experimental data [J. M. Merritt, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, Science 324, 1548 (2009)]. With the density matrix renormalization group we also compute near-exact vertical excitation energies at the equilibrium geometry. These provide non-trivial benchmarks for quantum chemical methods for excited states, and illustrate the surprisingly large error that remains for 1 {sup 1}?{sub g}{sup ?} state with approximate multi-reference configuration interaction and equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods. Overall, we demonstrate that explicitly correlated density matrix renormalization group and initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo methods allow us to fully converge to the basis set and correlation limit of the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation in small molecules.

  12. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  13. Predicting the sensitivity of the beryllium/scintillator layer neutron detector using Monte Carlo and experimental response functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Styron, J. D., E-mail: jdstyro@sandia.gov; Cooper, G. W.; Carpenter, Ken; Bonura, M. A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Nelson, A. J.; Torres, J. A.; McWatters, B. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for obtaining empirical curves relating absolute measured scintillation light output to beta energy deposited is presented. Output signals were measured from thin plastic scintillator using NIST traceable beta and gamma sources and MCNP5 was used to model the energy deposition from each source. Combining the experimental and calculated results gives the desired empirical relationships. To validate, the sensitivity of a beryllium/scintillator-layer neutron activation detector was predicted and then exposed to a known neutron fluence from a Deuterium-Deuterium fusion plasma (DD). The predicted and the measured sensitivity were in statistical agreement.

  14. Changes in the characteristics of new drug applications for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiao-Lan Sharon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts in managing diabetes, including the medical advances in novel therapies and public health policies of disease control and prevention, have not reduced the disease prevalence since 1990s. I analyze this phenomenon ...

  15. LEAD POISONING PREVENTION INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Families AreForever LEAD POISONING PREVENTION INFORMATION FOR PARENTS & PROSPECTIVE-lead levels There is no safe level of lead in the body. Often, symptoms are not obvious, so lead poisoning's medical examination in the U.S. or contact your state or local Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

  16. Primary Prevention of Hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Primary Prevention of Hypertension: Clinical and Public Health Advisory from the National High NIH PUBLICATION NO. 02-5076 NOVEMBER 2002 Primary Prevention of Hypertension: Clinical and Public OF HYPERTENSION CLINICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY FROM THE NATIONAL HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE EDUCATION PROGRAM

  17. VALIDATION OF ANALYTICAL METHODS AND INSTRUMENTATION FOR BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT: REVIEW AND SUMMARY OF AVAILABLE GUIDES, PROCEDURES, AND PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document proposes to provide a listing of available sources which can be used to validate analytical methods and/or instrumentation for beryllium determination. A literature review was conducted of available standard methods and publications used for method validation and/or quality control. A comprehensive listing of the articles, papers, and books reviewed is given in Appendix 1. Available validation documents and guides are listed in the appendix; each has a brief description of application and use. In the referenced sources, there are varying approaches to validation and varying descriptions of validation at different stages in method development. This discussion focuses on validation and verification of fully developed methods and instrumentation that have been offered up for use or approval by other laboratories or official consensus bodies such as ASTM International, the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). This review was conducted as part of a collaborative effort to investigate and improve the state of validation for measuring beryllium in the workplace and the environment. Documents and publications from the United States and Europe are included. Unless otherwise specified, all documents were published in English.

  18. Measurement of the melting point temperature of several lithium-sodium-beryllium fluoride salt (FLINABE) mixtures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium flourides, was studied for molten salt fission reactors and has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for the fusion applications. 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at 460 C. LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at a lower temperature, 363 C, but is rather viscous and has less lithium breeder. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing ternary molten salt for the first wall surface and blanket were investigated. The molten salt (FLiNaBe, a ternary mixture of LiF, BeF2 and NaF) salt was selected because a melting temperature below 350 C that would provide an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor application appeared possible. This information came from a Russian binary phase diagram and a US ternary phase diagram in the 1960's that were not wholly consistent. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and, BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a small stainless steel crucible under vacuum. The proportions of the three salts were selected to yield conglomerate salts with as low a melting temperature as possible. The temperature of the salts and the crucible were recorded during the melting and subsequent re-solidification using a thermocouple directly in the salt pool and two thermocouples embedded in the crucible. One mixture had an apparent melting temperature of 305 C. Particular attention was paid to the cooling curve of the salt temperature to observe evidence of any mixed intermediate phases between the fully liquid and fully solid states. The clarity, texture, and thickness were observed and noted as well. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, and the melting procedure are described. The temperature curves for the melting and cooling of each of the mixtures are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible was also done and is reported in a separate paper.

  19. Cover illustration courtesy of the Los Angeles County Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cover illustration courtesy of the Los Angeles County Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Edited by Birt Harvey, MD Centers for Disease Control, Director Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch Gary P. Noonan, MPA, Acting Chief U.S. Department of Health

  20. Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

  1. Analyses of engineering-oriented neutronics integral experiments utilizing beryllium in various configurations with 14 MeV point source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.; Abdou, M.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of integral experiments on tritium breeding rate (TPR), in-system spectrum, and several reaction rates inside a Li{sub 2}O test assembly were performed in a closed geometry with a 14 MeV point source in which beryllium has been extensively utilized as a neutron multiplier. This activity was part of the USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics with the objective of verifying the present neutron transport codes and databases in predicting key design parameters such as TPR. The test assembly itself (with dimension of {approximately}87 cm x {approximately}87 cm x 60 cm) is located at one end of a Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} enclosure and the neutron point source is located at a distance of {approximately}78 cm from the assembly. The enclosure is surrounded from the outside by polyethylene layer (5 cm-thick) to minimize the neutron wall-room effect.

  2. Beyond chemical accuracy: The pseudopotential approximation in diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the HCP to BCC phase transition in beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, M P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the disagreement between recent diffusion Monte Carlo calculations and experiments on the phase transition pressure between the ambient and beta-Sn phases of silicon, we present a study of the HCP to BCC phase transition in beryllium. This lighter element provides an oppor- tunity for directly testing many of the approximations required for calculations on silicon and may suggest a path towards increasing the practical accuracy of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of solids in general. We demonstrate that the single largest approximation in these calculations is the pseudopotential approximation. After removing this we find excellent agreement with experiment for the ambient HCP phase and results similar to careful calculations using density functional theory for the phase transition pressure.

  3. Prediction of {sup 1}P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s{sup 2}2s?np?({sup 1}P), n = 2…8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of {sup 9}Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12 500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s{sup 2}2s?np?({sup 1}P) ?1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}?({sup 1}S) transition is about 12 cm{sup ?1}. The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm{sup ?1}.

  4. STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  5. Reproductive Diseases in Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, L. R.; Field, Bob

    1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    susceptible. Droplets of urine from infected cows can infect normal cows after contact with the eye or mucous membranes of the nose or mouth. The disease infects more cattle each day, preventing cows from settling and lengthening their calving intervals... abortus) fetal membranes from aborting heifers at 4-12 not vaccinate bulls. cow; fetus; months. placenta Leptospirosis Bacterial (At least Urine of infected Any stage, Sample 10 Every 6 months Laboratory should deter- 5 serotypes) animals...

  6. A Manual of Poultry Diseases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, C. F.; Bell, R. R.; Clifford, R. L., Jr.; Glass, S. E.; Grimes, J. E.; Grumbles, L. C.; Keahey, E. E.; Wormell, B. C.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surrounding the term "sanitation" can be avoided by using the expression "management and sanitation for disease preven- , tion." This phrase then would be defined as all practices, specific and nonspecific, that the poultry- man applies to ptevent.... Change litter and thoroughly clean and disinfect the house and equipment between each group of birds. While litter selection and management is a large subject, applying this recommendation as a general practice will prevent many disease and parasite...

  7. Estimations and integral measurements for the spectral yield of neutrons from thick beryllium target bombarded with 16 MeV protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenyvesi, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral yield of p+Be neutrons emitted by thick (stopping) beryllium target bombarded by 16 MeV protons was estimated via extrapolation of literature data. The spectrum was validated via multi-foil activation method and irradiation of 2N2222 transistors. The hardness parameter (NIEL scaling factor) for displacement damage in bulk silicon was calculated and measured and kappa = 1.26 +- 0.1 was obtained.

  8. Estimations and integral measurements for the spectral yield of neutrons from thick beryllium target bombarded with 16 MeV protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fenyvesi

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral yield of p+Be neutrons emitted by thick (stopping) beryllium target bombarded by 16 MeV protons was estimated via extrapolation of literature data. The spectrum was validated via multi-foil activation method and irradiation of 2N2222 transistors. The hardness parameter (NIEL scaling factor) for displacement damage in bulk silicon was calculated and measured and kappa = 1.26 +- 0.1 was obtained.

  9. Calculation of two-centre two-electron integrals over Slater-type orbitals revisited. III. Case study of the beryllium dimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Lesiuk; Micha? Przybytek; Monika Musia?; Bogumi? Jeziorski; Robert Moszynski

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer with basis set of Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Nonrelativistic interaction energy of the system is determined using the frozen-core full configuration interaction calculations combined with high-level coupled cluster correction for inner-shell effects. Newly developed STOs basis sets, ranging in quality from double to sextuple zeta, are used in these computations. Principles of their construction are discussed and several atomic benchmarks are presented. Relativistic effects of order ${\\alpha}^2$ are calculated perturbatively by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and are found to be significant. We also estimate the leading-order QED effects. Influence of the adiabatic correction is found to be negligible. Finally, the interaction energy of the beryllium dimer is determined to be 929.0$\\,\\pm\\,$1.9 $cm^{-1}$, in a very good agreement with the recent experimental value. The results presented here appear to be the most accurate ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer available in the literature up to date and probably also one of the most accurate calculations for molecular systems containing more than four electrons.

  10. Evaluation of beryllium exposure assessment and control programs at AWE, Cardiff Facility, Rocky Flats Plant, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Foote, K.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slawski, J.W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Cogbill, G. [Cardiff Facility (United Kingdom). Atomic Weapons Establishment

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Site visits were made to DOE beryllium handling facilities at the Rocky Flats Plant; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, LLNL; as well as to the AWE Cardiff Facility. Available historical data from each facility describing its beryllium control program were obtained and summarized in this report. The AWE Cardiff Facility computerized Be personal and area air-sampling database was obtained and a preliminary evaluation was conducted. Further validation and documentation of this database will be very useful in estimating worker Be. exposure as well as in identifying the source potential for a variety of Be fabrication activities. Although all of the Be control programs recognized the toxicity of Be and its compounds, their established control procedures differed significantly. The Cardiff Facility, which was designed for only Be work, implemented a very strict Be control program that has essentially remained unchanged, even to today. LLNL and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant also implemented a strict Be control program, but personal sampling was not used until the mid 1980s to evaluate worker exposure. The Rocky Flats plant implemented significantly less controls on beryllium processing than the three previous facilities. In addition, records were less available, management and industrial hygiene staff turned over regularly, and less control was evident from a management perspective.

  11. Pollution Prevention Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38Polaron Behavior in1Pollution Prevention

  12. Early detection of contagious diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Jr., Billy W. (San Ramon, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Estacio, Pedro (Mission San Jose, CA); Chang, John (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides an electronic proximity apparatus and a surveillance method using such an apparatus for alerting individuals that are exposed to a contagious disease. When a person becomes symptomatic and is diagnosed as positive for a given contagious agent, individuals that have recently maintained a threshold proximity with respect to an infected individual are notified and advised to seek immediate medial care. Treatment of individuals in the very early phases of infection (pre-symptomatic) significantly reduces contagiousness of the infected population first exposed to the contagious disease, thus preventing spread of the disease throughout the general population.

  13. {sup 1}D states of the beryllium atom: Quantum mechanical nonrelativistic calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Keeper L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Very accurate finite-nuclear-mass variational nonrelativistic calculations are performed for the lowest five {sup 1}D states (1s{sup 2} 2p{sup 2}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 3d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 4d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 5d{sup 1}, and 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 6d{sup 1}) of the beryllium atom ({sup 9}Be). The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to those parameters. The calculations exemplify the level of accuracy that is now possible with Gaussians in describing bound states of a four-electron system where some of the electrons are excited into higher angular states.

  14. The beryllium abundance in the very metal-poor halo star G 64-12 from VLT/UVES observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Primas; M. Asplund; P. E. Nissen; V. Hill

    2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a new spectroscopic analysis of the very metal deficient star G 64-12 ([Fe/H]=-3.3), aimed at determining, for the first time, its Be content. The spectra were observed during the Science Verification of UVES, the ESO VLT Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph. The high resolution (~48,000) and high S/N (~130 per pixel) achieved at the wavelengths of the BeII resonance doublet allowed an accurate determination of its abundance: log N(Be/H) = -13.10 +/- 0.15 dex. The Be abundance is significantly higher than expected from previous measurements of Be in stars of similar metallicity (3D and NLTE corrections acting to make a slightly higher value than an LTE analysis). When compared to iron, the high [Be/Fe] ratio thus found may suggest a flattening in the beryllium evolutionary trend at the lowest metallicity end or the presence of dispersion at early epochs of galactic evolution.

  15. The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

  16. Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System Welcome to the Department of Energy's Pollution Prevention Tracking and...

  17. Los Alamos wins 2008 Pollution Prevention awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2008 Pollution Prevention awards Los Alamos wins 2008 Pollution Prevention awards Winner of two Best-in-Class Pollution Prevention awards and six Environmental Stewardship awards...

  18. The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: a critical appraisal of the relationship between diet and coronary artery disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurewitz, Daniel L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. JAMA. 2002;288:M. Fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality: aacid and risk of ischemic heart disease among women. Am J

  19. Information Regarding MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Meningococcal disease is a serious disease, caused by bacteria. Meningococcal disease is a contagious

  20. New Media Interventions in Youth Sexual Health Promotion and HIV/STI Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown III, William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sexual Health Promotion and Disease Prevention: ISIS As anan evaluation proposal for ISIS inc. , and to have beenLevine, Executive Director of ISIS Inc. , and her team for

  1. BACKGROUND June 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Fernald Risk Assessment Project ­ Draft Phase II Report Phase II: Screening Level Estimates of the Maximum Estimated Exposure to Radioactive Materials Released from the Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) The Fernald Nuclear Site The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near Ross

  2. Optimization Methods for Disease Prevention and Epidemic Control ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University ... is to formulate mathematical optimization models, for identifying which ...

  3. Experimental Measurement of the Interface Heat Conductance Between Nonconforming Beryllium and Type 316 Stainless Steel Surfaces Subjected to Nonuniform Thermal Deformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert Dean; Abdou, Mohamed A. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion blanket designs that employ beryllium as a neutron multiplier, the interface conductance h plays a key role in evaluating the blanket's thermal profile. Therefore, an extensive experimental program was conducted to measure the magnitude of h between nonconforming beryllium and Type 316 stainless steel surfaces subjected to nonuniform thermal deformations. The magnitude of h was measured as a function of relevant environmental, surface, and geometric parameters, including surface roughness, contact pressure, gas pressure, gas type, and magnitude and direction of heat flow. The results indicate the following: (a) Decreasing the interfacial surface roughness from 6.28 to 0.28 {mu}m, in 760 Torr of helium, increased the magnitude of h by up to 100%; however, increasing the surface roughness reduced the dependence of h on the magnitude of the contact pressure. (b) The interface conductance was significantly higher for measurements made in helium gas as opposed to air. Additionally, the sensitivity of h to the gas pressure was significantly greater for runs conducted in helium and/or with smoother surfaces. This sensitivity was reduced in air and/or with roughened surfaces, and it was essentially nonexistent for the 6.25-{mu}m specimen for air pressures exceeding 76 Torr. (c) For runs conducted in vacuum, the interface conductance was more sensitive to heat flux than when runs were conducted in 760 Torr of helium. (d) The interface conductance was found to be dependent on the direction of heat flux. When the specimens were arranged so that heat flowed from the steel to the beryllium disk, the magnitude of h was generally greater than in the opposite direction.

  4. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimzadeh, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  5. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April 2011...

  6. Tracing mixing in stars: new beryllium observations of the open clusters NGC 2516, Hyades, and M67

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Randich; F. Primas; L. Pasquini; P. Sestito; R. Pallavicini

    2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Determinations of beryllium abundance in stars, together with lithium, provide a key tool to investigate the so far poorly understood extra-mixing processes at work in stellar interiors. We measured Be in three open clusters,complementing existing Be surveys, and aiming at gathering a more complete empirical scenario of the evolution of Be as a function of stellar age and temperature. Specifically, we analyzed VLT/UVES spectra of members of NGC 2516, the Hyades, and M 67 to determine their Be and Li abundances. In the first two clusters we focused on stars cooler than 5400 K, while the M 67 sample includes stars warmer than 6150 K, as well as two subgiants and two blue stragglers. We also computed the evolution of Be for a 0.9 Mo star based on standard evolutionary models. We find different emprical behaviours for stars in different temperature bins and ages. Stars warmer than 6150 K show Be depletion and follow a Be vs. Li correlation while Be is undepleted in stars in the ~6150-5600 K range. NGC 2516 members cooler than 5400 K have not depleted any Be, but older Hyades of similar temperature do show some depletion. Be is severely depleted in the subgiants and blue stragglers. The results for warm stars are in agreement with previous studies, supporting the hypothesis that mixing in this temperature regime is driven by rotation. The same holds for the two subgiants that have evolved from the "Li gap". This mechanism is instead not the dominant one for solar-type stars. We show that Be depletion of cool Hyades cannot simply be explained by the effect of increasing depth of the convective zone. Finally, the different Be content of the two blue stragglers suggests that they have formed by two different processes (i.e., collisions vs. binary merging).

  7. Pion Production by Protons on a Thin Beryllium Target at 6.4, 12.3, and 17.5 GeV/c Incident Proton Momenta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E910 Collaboration; I. Chemakin; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; R. C. Fernow; A. D. Frawley; M. Gilkes; S. Gushue; E. P. Hartouni; H. Hiejima; M. Justice; J. H. Kang; H. G. Kirk; J. M. Link; N. Maeda; R. L. McGrath; S. Mioduszewski; J. Monroe; D. Morrison; M. Moulson; M. N. Namboodiri; G. Rai; K. Read; L. Remsberg; M. Rosati; Y. Shin; R. A. Soltz; M. Sorel; S. Sorensen; J. H. Thomas; Y. Torun; D. L. Winter; X. Yang; W. A. Zajc; Y. Zhang

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of inclusive pion production in proton-beryllium collisions at 6.4, 12.3, and 17.5 GeV/c proton beam momentum has been performed. The data were taken by Experiment 910 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The differential $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$ production cross sections ($d^2\\sigma/dpd\\Omega$) are measured up to 400 mRad in $\\theta_{\\pi}$ and up to 6 GeV/c in $p_{\\pi}$. The measured cross section is fit with a Sanford-Wang parameterization.

  8. Pion production by protons on a thin berylLium target at 6.4, 12.3, and 17.5 GeV/c incident proton momenta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemakin, I.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; Fernow, R. C.; Frawley, A. D.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hiejima, H.; Justice, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kirk, H. G.; Link, J. M.; Maeda, N.; McGrath, R. L.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Monroe, J.; Morrison, D.; Moulson, M.; Namboodiri, M. N.; Rai, G.; Read, K.; Remsberg, L.; Rosati, M.; Shin, Y.; Soltz, R. A.; Sorel, M.; Sorensen, S.; Thomas, J. H.; Torun, Y.; Winter, D. L.; Yang, X.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 015209 (2008) Pion production by protons on a thin beryllium target at 6.4, 12.3, and 17.5 GeV/c incident proton momenta I. Chemakin,2 V. Cianciolo,9,10 B. A. Cole,2 R. C. Fernow,1 A. D. Frawley,3 M. Gilkes,11 S. Gushue,1 E... 15Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA 16Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea (Received 16 July 2007; published 24 January 2008) An analysis of inclusive pion production in proton-beryllium...

  9. Preventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires AgendaAgenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    June 2006fire June 2006 #12;Hamilton HallHamilton Hall September 1992September 1992 Explosion Rm. 619Behlen Explosion 2002Explosion 2002 Explosion in ventilationExplosion in ventilation hood, no fire orhood, no firePreventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires #12;AgendaAgenda Flash over VideoFlash over

  10. Micro-Simulations of Infectious Disease using Official Register Data The Case of Smallpox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boman, Magnus

    , for example. #12;Introduction Should an infection of a contagious disease occur, the potential threat must be seen as an example of a predominantly airborne, fairly contagious vaccine-preventable disease where

  11. A new approach and computational algorithm for sensitivity/uncertainty analysis for SED and SAD with applications to beryllium integral experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, P.M.; Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach for treating the sensitivity and uncertainty in the secondary energy distribution (SED) and the secondary angular distribution (SAD) has been developed, and the existing two-dimensional sensitivity/uncertainty analysis code, FORSS, was expanded to incorporate the new approach. The calculational algorithm was applied to the [sup 9]Be(n,2n) cross section to study the effect of the current uncertainties in the SED and SAD of neutrons emitted from this reaction on the prediction accuracy of the tritium production rate from [sup 6]Li(T[sub 6]) and [sup 7]Li(T[sub 7]) in an engineering-oriented fusion integral experiment of the US Department of Energy/Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics in which beryllium was used as a neutron multiplier. In addition, the analysis was extended to include the uncertainties in the integrated smooth cross sections of beryllium and other materials that constituted the test assembly used in the experiment. This comprehensive two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity/uncertainty analysis aimed at identifying the sources of discrepancies between calculated and measured values for T[sub 6] and T[sub 7].

  12. Calculation of two-centre two-electron integrals over Slater-type orbitals revisited. III. Case study of the beryllium dimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesiuk, Micha?; Musia?, Monika; Jeziorski, Bogumi?; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer with basis set of Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Nonrelativistic interaction energy of the system is determined using the frozen-core full configuration interaction calculations combined with high-level coupled cluster correction for inner-shell effects. Newly developed STOs basis sets, ranging in quality from double to sextuple zeta, are used in these computations. Principles of their construction are discussed and several atomic benchmarks are presented. Relativistic effects of order ${\\alpha}^2$ are calculated perturbatively by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and are found to be significant. We also estimate the leading-order QED effects. Influence of the adiabatic correction is found to be negligible. Finally, the interaction energy of the beryllium dimer is determined to be 929.0$\\,\\pm\\,$1.9 $cm^{-1}$, in a very good agreement with the recent experimental value. The results presented here appear to be the most accurate ab-...

  13. Cross-sections of large-angle hadron production in proton- and pion-nucleus interactions II: beryllium nuclei and beam momenta from +/- 3 GeV/c to +/-15 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HARP-CDP group; :; A. Bolshakova

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on double-differential inclusive cross-sections of the production of secondary protons and charged pions, in the interactions with a 5% interaction length thick stationary beryllium target, of proton and pion beams with momentum from +/-3 GeV/c to +/-15 GeV/c. Results are given for secondary particles with production angles between 20 and 125 degrees.

  14. Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

  15. Adolescent drug abuse - Awareness & prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shah, Shyam; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev Psychiatry.therapy for adolescent drug abuse. J Clin Child Psychol.outcomes in an indicated drug prevention program for high-

  16. CDC Response to Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Recommendations in "Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDC Response to Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Recommendations in "Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call of Primary Prevention" BACKGROUND In late 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee for Childhood Lead Poisoning

  17. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  18. Guidance on Incorporating EPA's Pollution Prevention Strategy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The guidance discusses the Environmental Protection Agency's definition of pollution prevention; how to incorporate pollution prevention into the EPA environmental review process...

  19. Beryllium Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Most Singular

  20. Beryllium FAQs - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOTDiagnosticFAQs About

  1. HANFORD SITE BERYLLIUM QUESTIONNAIRE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed-MTBEJobs in computing 1

  2. ZPPR-20 phase D : a cylindrical assembly of polyethylene moderated U metal reflected by beryllium oxide and polyethylene.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lell, R.; Grimm, K.; McKnight, R.; Shaefer, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fast critical facility was built at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site in Idaho in 1969 to obtain neutron physics information necessary for the design of fast breeder reactors. The ZPPR-20D Benchmark Assembly was part of a series of cores built in Assembly 20 (References 1 through 3) of the ZPPR facility to provide data for developing a nuclear power source for space applications (SP-100). The assemblies were beryllium oxide reflected and had core fuel compositions containing enriched uranium fuel, niobium and rhenium. ZPPR-20 Phase C (HEU-MET-FAST-075) was built as the reference flight configuration. Two other configurations, Phases D and E, simulated accident scenarios. Phase D modeled the water immersion scenario during a launch accident, and Phase E (SUB-HEU-MET-FAST-001) modeled the earth burial scenario during a launch accident. Two configurations were recorded for the simulated water immersion accident scenario (Phase D); the critical configuration, documented here, and the subcritical configuration (SUB-HEU-MET-MIXED-001). Experiments in Assembly 20 Phases 20A through 20F were performed in 1988. The reference water immersion configuration for the ZPPR-20D assembly was obtained as reactor loading 129 on October 7, 1988 with a fissile mass of 167.477 kg and a reactivity of -4.626 {+-} 0.044{cents} (k {approx} 0.9997). The SP-100 core was to be constructed of highly enriched uranium nitride, niobium, rhenium and depleted lithium. The core design called for two enrichment zones with niobium-1% zirconium alloy fuel cladding and core structure. Rhenium was to be used as a fuel pin liner to provide shut down in the event of water immersion and flooding. The core coolant was to be depleted lithium metal ({sup 7}Li). The core was to be surrounded radially with a niobium reactor vessel and bypass which would carry the lithium coolant to the forward inlet plenum. Immediately inside the reactor vessel was a rhenium baffle which would act as a neutron curtain in the event of water immersion. A fission gas plenum and coolant inlet plenum were located axially forward of the core. Some material substitutions had to be made in mocking up the SP-100 design. The ZPPR-20 critical assemblies were fueled by 93% enriched uranium metal because uranium nitride, which was the SP-100 fuel type, was not available. ZPPR Assembly 20D was designed to simulate a water immersion accident. The water was simulated by polyethylene (CH{sub 2}), which contains a similar amount of hydrogen and has a similar density. A very accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any of the ZPPR assemblies a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact model of a ZPPR assembly, particularly as complicated an assembly as ZPPR-20D. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must do this without increasing the total uncertainty far beyond that of the original experiment. Such a transformation will be described in a later section. First, Assembly 20D was modeled in full detail--every plate, drawer, matrix tube, and air gap was modeled explicitly. Then the regionwise compositions and volumes from this model were converted to an RZ model. ZPPR Assembly 20D has been determined to be an acceptable criticality-safety benchmark experiment.

  3. Measurement of the production cross-section of positive pions in the collision of 8.9 GeV/c protons on beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARP Collaboration

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-differential production cross-section of positive pions, $d^2\\sigma^{\\pi^{+}}/dpd\\Omega$, measured in the HARP experiment is presented. The incident particles are 8.9 GeV/c protons directed onto a beryllium target with a nominal thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The measured cross-section has a direct impact on the prediction of neutrino fluxes for the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments at Fermilab. After cuts, 13 million protons on target produced about 96,000 reconstructed secondary tracks which were used in this analysis. Cross-section results are presented in the kinematic range 0.75 GeV/c < $p_{\\pi}$ < 6.5 GeV/c and 30 mrad < $\\theta_{\\pi}$ < 210 mrad in the laboratory frame.

  4. Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

  5. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heat. In 2005/2006, German waste incineration plants provided some 6 terawatt hours (TWh-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste for en- ergy recovery is an indispensable element of sus- tainable waste management. Waste incineration

  6. Pollution prevention through reactor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of waste in the chemical processing industries has its beginning in the heart of the process--the reaction system. Pollution prevention will have the greatest impact in minimizing the generation of waste through the design and operation of chemical reactors by reducing generation at the source--source reduction. Pollution prevention by modification of reaction parameters is defined as changing the selectivity of the reaction so that undesirable reactions which produce waste products are minimized while at the same time producing the desirable products.

  7. Bullous Lung Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Corey; Carey, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thorascopic surgery. Bullous Lung Disease REFERENCES 1.S, Kaiser LR. Giant bullous lung disease: evaluation,for bullous disease of the lung. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg.

  8. Cross-Sections of Large-Angle Hadron Production in Proton- and Pion-Nucleus Interactions I: Beryllium Nuclei and Beam Momenta of +8.9 Gev/c and -8.0 Gev/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HARP-CDP group; :; A. Bolshakova; I. Boyko; G. Chelkov; D. Dedovitch; A. Elagin; M. Gostkin; S. Grishin; A. Guskov; Z. Kroumchtein; Yu. Nefedov; K. Nikolaev; A. Zhemchugov; F. Dydak; J. Wotschack A. De Min; V. Ammosov; V. Gapienko; V. Koreshev; A. Semak; Yu. Sviridov; E. Usenko; V. Zaets

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on double-differential inclusive cross-sections of the production of secondary protons, deuterons, and charged pions and kaons, in the interactions with a 5% nuclear interaction length thick stationary beryllium target, of a +8.9 GeV/c proton and pion beam, and a -8.0 GeV/c pion beam. Results are given for secondary particles with production angles between 20 and 125 degrees.

  9. Comparison of Geant4 hadron generation with data from the interactions with beryllium nuclei of +8.9 GeV/c protons and pions, and of -8 GeV/c pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bolshakova

    2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadron generation in the Geant4 simulation tool kit is compared with inclusive spectra of secondary protons and pions from the interactions with beryllium nuclei of +8.9 GeV/c protons and pions, and of -8.0 GeV/c pions. The data were taken in 2002 at the CERN Proton Synchrotron with the HARP spectrometer. We report on significant disagreements between data and simulated data especially in the polar-angle distributions of secondary protons and pions.

  10. Prevent the Spread of Zoonotic Diseases A zoonotic disease is a disease that can be shared between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of illness to watch for are diarrhea· vomiting· not eating or drinking· weakness· sneezing· coughing· nasal

  11. Pollution prevention program plan 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan serves as the principal crosscutting guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Operations Office, laboratory, and contractor management to fully implement pollution prevention programs within the DOE complex between now and 2000. To firmly demonstrate DOE`s commitment to pollution prevention, the Secretary of Energy has established goals, to be achieved by December 31, 1999, that will aggressively reduce DOE`s routine generation of radioactive, mixed, and hazardous wastes, and total releases and offsite transfers of toxic chemicals. The Secretary also has established sanitary waste reduction, recycling, and affirmative procurement goals. Site progress in meeting these goals will be reported annually to the Secretary in the Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, using 1993 as the baseline year. Implementation of this plan will represent a major step toward reducing the environmental risks and costs associated with DOE operations.

  12. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice and arranged in 7-tube clusters. The experiments have been determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  13. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by: Environment, Health, Safety, and Security .....................................................16 3.0 Potential Sources of Pollution

  14. Maintenance and Prevention: Formalization and Fixpoint Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maintenance and Prevention: Formalization and Fixpoint Characterization Munindar P. Singh Maintenance and prevention are important concepts in the science of intel­ ligent systems, yet serious research attention. Maintenance and prevention are duals of each other, but cannot be reduced

  15. Optimal Preventive Maintenance Scheduling in Semiconductor Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Steven I.

    1 Optimal Preventive Maintenance Scheduling in Semiconductor Manufacturing Xiaodong Yao, Emmanuel on Control Applications in 2001. #12;2 Abstract Preventive Maintenance (PM) scheduling is a very challenging schedule with that of a baseline reference schedule are also presented. Index Terms preventive maintenance

  16. Pollution Prevention and Lean Manufacturing Paper # 360

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution Prevention and Lean Manufacturing Paper # 360 Harry W. Edwards and Jason M. Jonkman, the CSU IAC promotes energy conservation, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement. During that generated a total of 467 assessment recommendations (ARs) with pollution prevention benefits. Such benefits

  17. Pollution Prevention Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a national Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program for pollution prevention and waste minimization at its production plants During FY89/90 the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), established comprehensive, pollution prevention technical support programs to demonstrate new, environmentally-conscious technology for production processes. The RDDT&E program now entails collaborative efforts across DOE. The Pollution Prevention Program is currently supporting three major activities: The DOE/US Air Force Memorandum of Understanding Program is a collaborative effort to utilize the combined resources of DOE and the Department of Defense, eliminate duplication of effort in developing technologies, and to facilitate technology solutions aimed at reducing waste through process modification, material substitution or recycling. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment and Disposal Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) will develop recycle, treatment, and disposal processes and associated technologies for use in the dismantlement of non-nuclear weapons components, to support US arms treaties and policies. This program will focus on meeting all security and regulatory requirements (with additional benefit to the commercial electronics industry). The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID) will effectively implement ECM technologies that address both the needs of the DOE Complex and US electronics industry, and encourage strong interaction between DOE and US industry. The ECMID will also develop life cycle analysis tools that will aid decisionmakers in selecting the optimum process based on the tradeoffs between cost an environmental impact.

  18. Large-angle production of charged pions by 3 GeV/c - 12.9 GeV/c protons on beryllium, aluminium and lead targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARP Collaboration

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the double-differential $\\pi^{\\pm}$ production cross-section in the range of momentum $100 \\MeVc \\leq p beryllium, proton--aluminium and proton--lead collisions are presented. The data were taken with the HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN PS. The pions were produced by proton beams in a momentum range from 3 \\GeVc to 12.9 \\GeVc hitting a target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) placed inside a solenoidal magnet. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross-sections at six incident proton beam momenta (3 \\GeVc, 5 \\GeVc, 8 \\GeVc, 8.9 \\GeVc (Be only), 12 \\GeVc and 12.9 \\GeVc (Al only)) and compared to previously available data.

  19. Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raney, E.A.; Whitehead, J.K.; Encke, D.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Dorsey, J.A. [Kaiser Engineers Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This material was developed to assist engineers in incorporating pollution prevention into the design of new or modified facilities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The material demonstrates how the design of a facility can affect the generation of waste throughout a facility`s entire life and it offers guidance on how to prevent the generation of waste during design. Contents include: Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design training course booklet; Pollution prevention design guideline; Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design lesson plan; Training participant survey and pretest; and Training facilitator`s guide and schedule.

  20. Environmental evaluation of municipal waste prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentil, Emmanuel C.; Gallo, Daniele [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Influence of prevention on waste management systems, excluding avoided production, is relatively minor. > Influence of prevention on overall supply chain, including avoided production is very significant. > Higher relative benefits of prevention are observed in waste management systems relying mainly on landfills. - Abstract: Waste prevention has been addressed in the literature in terms of the social and behavioural aspects, but very little quantitative assessment exists of the environmental benefits. Our study evaluates the environmental consequences of waste prevention on waste management systems and on the wider society, using life-cycle thinking. The partial prevention of unsolicited mail, beverage packaging and food waste is tested for a 'High-tech' waste management system relying on high energy and material recovery and for a 'Low-tech' waste management system with less recycling and relying on landfilling. Prevention of 13% of the waste mass entering the waste management system generates a reduction of loads and savings in the waste management system for the different impacts categories; 45% net reduction for nutrient enrichment and 12% reduction for global warming potential. When expanding our system and including avoided production incurred by the prevention measures, large savings are observed (15-fold improvement for nutrient enrichment and 2-fold for global warming potential). Prevention of food waste has the highest environmental impact saving. Prevention generates relatively higher overall relative benefit for 'Low-tech' systems depending on landfilling. The paper provides clear evidence of the environmental benefits of waste prevention and has specific relevance in climate change mitigation.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution Prevention Awardees Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention Awards Nearly 400 employees on 47 teams received Pollution Prevention awards for...

  2. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  3. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossmiller, R.L. (HDR Engineering, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.

  4. Inside Alzheimer's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reveal conditions that lead to the disease's signature tangles and plaques in the brain March 12, 2015 Inside Alzheimer's Disease Neuron membrane disruption may underlie...

  5. Pollutant Discharge Prevention and Control Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection is responsible for enacting regulations to prevent and mitigate the release of pollutants into the land and waters of the state. This legislation...

  6. Optimization Online - Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Bartholomew-Biggs

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 29, 2004 ... Abstract: We deal with the problem of scheduling preventive maintenance (PM) by minimizing a performance function which reflects repair and ...

  7. Site Discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (SDPPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SDPPP Individual Permit: Site Discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (SDPPP) The 2012 SDPPP update fully incorporates all changes made during the year and reflects changes projected...

  8. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This...

  9. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M. [Institute for Shock Physics and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7?GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101{sup ¯}2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More broadly, the present work demonstrates the potential of shock wave propagation along low-symmetry directions to examine, and discriminate between, different inelastic deformation mechanisms in crystalline solids.

  10. On-Line Measurement of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and TIme-Integrated Filter Sampling and Reference Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.-D.; Vannice, R.W.

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. They had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  11. On-Line Measurements of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and Time-Integrated Filter Sampling Reference Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. We had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were subsequently analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  12. Rulemaking, Public Hearing in Oak Ridge, TN (2/3/1999)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chronic Beryllium Diease Prevention Program Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) Docket Number EH-RM-98-BRYLM

  13. Pollution Prevention Wipe Application Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, E.P.; Modderman, W.E.; Montoya, M.G.

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a pollution prevention program, a study was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Amarillo, ''Pantex Plant'' to identify a suitable replacement solvent(s) for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. Current cleaning is performed using solvents (e.g. acetone, toluene, MEK, alcohols) that are classified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCW) materials. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has assigned four characteristics as the criteria for determining whether a material is identified as hazardous under RCRA: Ignitability, Corrosivity, Reactivity and Toxicity. Within the DOE and DoD sector, these solvents are used with hand wipes to clean surfaces prior to O-ring replacement, to remove decals for new labeling, to clean painted surfaces prior to reconditioning, and for other general maintenance purposes. In some cases, low level radioactive contamination during cleaning necessitates that the RCIL4 solvent-containing wipes be classified as mixed waste. To avoid using RCRA materials, cleaning candidates were sought that had a flashpoint greater than 140 F, a pH between 2.5 and 12.5, and did not fail the reactivity and toxicity criteria. Three brominated cleaners, two hydrofluoroether azeotropes and two aliphatic hydrocarbon cleaner formulations were studied as potential replacements. Cleaning efficacy, materials compatibility, corrosion and accelerated aging studies were conducted and used to screen potential candidates. Hypersolve NPB (an n-propyl bromide based formulation) consistently ranked high in removing typical contaminants for weapons applications.

  14. September 17, 2010 SLIPS, TRIPS, FALLS PREVENTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    September 17, 2010 SLIPS, TRIPS, FALLS PREVENTION Slips, trips and falls at UCDHS account for 18 and in an effort to reduce slips, trips and falls we offer the following "best practices" to consider: Be aware on floors Use slip resistant shoes in icy conditions (Home Health visits) SLIP and FALL PREVENTION TEAM

  15. Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    1 Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates Chris Pittner Associate Director WSP 21 May 2012 POLLUTION PREVENTION AND NEW INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Pollution within Industrial Estates Legal Framework and Guidance Surface Water Management Project Examples #12;2 POLLUTION WITHIN INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Sources Poor

  16. Revised: May 2011 Fraud Prevention Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Revised: May 2011 Fraud Prevention Policy #12;Fraud Prevention Policy March 2011 1 Contents Page 1. Introduction 2 2. Basis of the Policy 3 3. Purpose and Definitions 3 4. Management and Staff Responsibilities 4 5. Adherence to University Regulations, Policies and Procedures 4 6. Code of Conduct on Commercial

  17. Molecular Bioinformatics for Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radivojac, Predrag

    . Curr Opin Pediatr, 13: 22 (2001). Leads to sickle cell anemia Manifestation of disease vastly different

  18. Kidney Disease of Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Kidney Disease of Diabetes National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases.1 Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to CKD

  19. Application of environmental accounting to pollution prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Mar, R.A.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental accounting represents a major paradigm shift in the way most companies account for costs and benefits. However, it is a change that must be made if pollution prevention is to become institutionalized into the corporate and government mainstream. Pollution prevention investments must be justified on an economic basis; without environmental accounting tools, pollution prevention investments cannot show their true profitability. This is because traditional accounting methods only track billable costs, thus ignoring some of the major benefits of pollution prevention investments, which are indirect savings resulting from a lessening of a company`s regulatory compliance burden and present and future liabilities. This paper discusses how to apply environmental accounting principles to pollution prevention assessments to improve the outcome of profitability analyses.

  20. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel wasmore »in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.« less

  1. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  2. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  3. What college students should know about Meningococcal Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    is relatively rare, occurring at a rate of less than 1 in 100,000 people in the United States. Q. Who is at risk in their throat or nose in a harmless state without developing an illness. Meningococcal bacteria are spread and death within a few hours. Q. How can meningococcal disease be prevented? A. A vaccine is available

  4. Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease Leaflet 2 Osteoporosis, a painful of State Health Services, 2008). Osteoporosis is preventable and/or treatable. Accordingly, osteoporosis of height, and chronic back pain. Hip fracture, the most serious consequence of osteoporosis, threatens one

  5. The role of phenoloxidase suppression in QX disease outbreaks among Sydney rock oysters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftos, David

    disease. Oysters from the same brood stock were harvested from QX prone and QX free growing areas over negative correlation between phenoloxidase activity and the intensity of parasitic infection ( p = 0 prevented effective management of QX disease in endemic areas. Current management regimes rely only

  6. Communitywide strategies key to preventing childhood obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    livers=1. Berenson GS. 2005. Obesity – A critical issue inAccelerat- ing Progress in Obesity Prevention Solving thein US childhood obesity, 2001-2007. Ann Epidemiol 20(1):40–

  7. Managing preventative maintenance activities at Intel Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Rebecca Cassler

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work for this thesis was completed at Intel Corporation in Colorado Springs, Colorado at Fab 23, a semiconductor fabrication facility making flash memory. The project focused on evaluating and managing preventative ...

  8. Model development for household waste prevention behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

  9. Thermography for Preventive Maintenance and Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, T.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THERMOGRAPHY FOR PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE AND CONSERVATION Tony Lopez Southern California Gas Company Los Angles, California The Supply Situation With fuel prices soaring, more and more companies are looking at energy management as a means... years. In the last twenty years, however, other applica tions have been developed for thermography. Some of these include: medicine, nondestructive testi:ng, aerial land mapping, preventive maintenance and conservation. The balance of this paper...

  10. Optimal Joint Preventive Maintenance and Production Policies* Xiaodong Yao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Steven I.

    Optimal Joint Preventive Maintenance and Production Policies* Xiaodong Yao SAS Institute Inc. Cary preventive maintenance (PM) and production policies for an unreliable production-inventory system in which to establish some additional structural properties. Keywords: optimal preventive maintenance, joint maintenance

  11. activation prevents behavioral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Preventing Exclusion at the Bottleneck: Structural and Behavioral Approaches* Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: to prevent such abuses.2 Similarly,...

  12. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    174 Preventing Food Contamination A Need for Innovation infurther prevent microbial contamination. Due largely becausequick migration of the contamination in the example given

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employees Receive Pollution Prevention Awards Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention Awards Nearly 400 employees on 47 teams received Pollution...

  14. Phosphate-Containing Polyethylene Glycol Polymers Prevent Lethal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phosphate-Containing Polyethylene Glycol Polymers Prevent Lethal Sepsis by Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens. Phosphate-Containing Polyethylene Glycol Polymers Prevent Lethal Sepsis by...

  15. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements...

  16. Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Coronary heart disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    have a greater prevalence in women · Osteoporosis · Autoimmune disease A. Osteoporosis · Osteoporosis ­ disorder of low bone mass, microarchitectural denegra7on% of all women >65 years old have osteoporosis (15% of all Caucasian women

  17. Beryllium - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOTDiagnostic

  18. Beryllium Health Advocates - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOTDiagnosticFAQsHealth

  19. Beryllium Program Feedback - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits

  20. Beryllium Program Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefitsProgram Information About Us

  1. Beryllium Related Links - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefitsProgram InformationRelated

  2. Preventative Maintenance (PM) Policy Outline the policy regarding preventative vehicle maintenance on University of Michigan (U-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Preventative Maintenance (PM) Policy Objective Outline the policy regarding preventative vehicle maintenance on University of Michigan (U- M) vehicles. Policy 1. All maintenance performed on U-M vehicles their own campus maintenance facility to repair their fleet vehicles. 2. To ensure proper stewardship of U

  3. Preventive overhaul time for power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmadi, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Rouhi, J. [Univ. of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fayyaz, A. [Mazandaran Power Co. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power transformers are the major piece of equipment in high-voltage substations. A considerable number of these transformers exist in Iran`s integrated network. Due to the climate diversity and improper usage, many of these transformers age rapidly, suffer failure and are taken out of service before half their useful life. At the present time the utility companies have no specific time-frame and plan for preventive overhaul. Detection of preventive overhaul time will increase the remaining life of transformers and improve the reliability of substations. An exact check of the remaining lifetime of transformers is not yet possible by available diagnostic techniques. In this paper, the authors present a method of identifying the right time for preventive overhaul in 63 kV power transformers. This method is developed based on 25 year transformer performance records in Northern Iran (subtropical climate) and with the utilization of studies done by electrical engineering communities world-wide.

  4. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to document the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be employed to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. The intent of this plan is to respond to and comply with (DOE's) policy and guidelines concerning the need for pollution prevention. The Plan is composed of a LLNL Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan and, as attachments, Program- and Department-specific waste minimization plans. This format reflects the fact that waste minimization is considered a line management responsibility and is to be addressed by each of the Programs and Departments. 14 refs.

  5. Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

  6. Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance: The repair alert model, or a preventive maintenance (PM) action, where the latter will prevent the failure. It is reasonable to expect that the failure can be avoided by a possible preventive maintenance (PM) at some random time Z. If Z

  7. Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance: The repair alert model, or a preventive maintenance (PM) action, where the latter will prevent the failure. It is reasonable to expect be avoided by a possible preventive maintenance (PM) at some random time Z. If Z

  8. Approaches for preventing and mitigating accidental gaseous chemical releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of approaches to prevent and mitigate accidental releases of toxic and flammable gases. The prevention options are related to: choosing safer processes and materials, preventing initiating events, preventing or minimizing releases, and preventing human exposures. the mitigation options include: secondary confinement, de-inventory, vapor barriers, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and operation of effective post-release mitigation systems are also presented.

  9. WHEN DOES COMPROMISE PREVENT MORE POLLUTION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Mike

    WHEN DOES COMPROMISE PREVENT MORE POLLUTION? C. CLEMONS1, J. COSSEY2, M. FERRARA3, S. FORCEY4, T an industrial firm has the option of voluntar- ily controlling the pollutants it originates. A regu- lating agency sets the tax rate on corporate profits as well as a Pigouvian pollution tax: preset per- centages

  10. Guide to Preventing Computer Software Piracy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide to Preventing Computer Software Piracy It is the intent of the Department of Energy (DOE) to issue guidance in accordance with Federal CIO Council recommendations and in compliance with Executive Order 13103. The guidance in this document is based on the CIO Council's recommendations in reference to computer software piracy, and applies to all DOE elements. Canceled by DOE N 205.18

  11. Detection, Prevention and Mitigation of Cascading Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of automatic control and protection systems in preventing, slowing, or mitigating the impact of a large controllers that respond to unforeseen operating conditions to keep power system problems from cascading and control the effects of instability events in large electric power systems. This research produced a real

  12. Workplace Violence Prevention Employee Awareness Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Health, Safety, and Security has been working to organize a Workplace Violence Prevention Program that includes dealing with the Active Shooter scenario. After the Navy Yard event, HSS has been trying to accelerate the roll out. Next week we start two-a-days for the Employee Awareness class, which is the first step in the program development and roll out.

  13. Compositions and Methods for the Treatment of Pierce's Disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Goutam (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Chimeric anti-microbial proteins, compositions, and methods for the therapeutic and prophylactic treatment of plant diseases caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are provided. The anti-microbial proteins of the invention generally comprise a surface recognition domain polypeptide, capable of binding to a bacterial membrane component, fused to a bacterial lysis domain polypeptide, capable of affecting lysis or rupture of the bacterial membrane, typically via a fused polypeptide linker. In particular, methods and compositions for the treatment or prevention of Pierce's disease of grapevines are provided. Methods for the generation of transgenic Vitus vinefera plants expressing xylem-secreted anti-microbial chimeras are also provided.

  14. Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, Prue

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current progress and potential for regenerative medicine.progress toward development of new industrial prod- ucts and medicines.

  15. Questions and Answers About Kidney CancerCENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the tumor What are the treatments for kidney cancer? There are several treatment options for kidney cancer. They are usually used in combination. The treatment plan chosen is based on the type and stage of the cancer, as well as the age and general health of the patient. The treatments are: · Surgery - includes

  16. Estrogen regulation of glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function: Therapeutic implications for prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    glycolysis and citric acid cycle-driven oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. Data derived from, enhanced glycolysis coupled to the citric acid cycle (aerobic glycolysis), sustained and enhanced glycolysis (oxidative phosphorylation coupled to pyruvate metabolism). The enhanced aerobic glycolysis

  17. U.S. Department of Health And Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    system isn't adequate for the weather. When people must use space heaters and fireplaces to stay warm or wood stove, or - kerosene for a kerosene heater · furnace fuel (coal, propane, or oil) · electric space heater with automatic shut-off switch and non-glowing elements · blankets · matches · multipurpose, dry

  18. Evaluation of Two Methods to Prevent Bovine Respiratory Disease in Growing Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Word, Alyssa Brook

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1.2 kg while healthy animals gained 1.4 kg (McNeill, 2000). Although a definitive test does not exist for the diagnosis BRD, DMI and ADG may provide indicators of an animal’s overall health. Once an animal becomes sick with BRD, the economic... early detection or a more quantitative approach to predicting and diagnosing BRD. Ideally, a chute side test would be available to ascertain the risk of an individual animal developing BRD. Alternatively, quantitative assessment could be developed...

  19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    changing stations. Ventilation systems. HVAC systems. This stands for heating, ventilation, and air activity centers. Learning objectives, ventilation. At the end of this session, you will be able to list the inspection and cleaning frequencies for ventilation systems. You will also be able to list the acceptable

  20. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vessel Sanitation Program is proud to bring to you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be available at ­ Toilets rooms ­ Diaper changing stations #12;Ventilation Systems · HVAC Systems ­ Heating Objectives Ventilation · List the inspection and cleaning frequencies for ventilation systems · List ­ Ventilation ­ Air Conditioning #12;Air Handling Systems · Construction · Accessible · Inspection · Inspection

  1. Katelyn Hardy, Northeastern University Co-op at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, January

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    o Piercing/tattoo studios o Land use o Septic system complaints/permits Georgia Division of Public Restaurant research shadowing (restaurant cooling procedures) National Park Service o Ocmulgee o Kennesaw Future Plans I will be back in January 2010 to work on the standard operating protocol for new gel

  2. Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, Prue

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    94 (2), 310-321. George, S. ; Heng, B. C. ; Vinoth, K. J. ;1349. Cao, T. ; Lu, K. ; Fu, X. ; Heng, B. C. Differentiated

  3. The Use of Symbionts Expressing Pear PGIP to Delay or Possibly Prevent Development of Pierce's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charoenkajonchai, Surachet

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.S. (2007). The endophyte Curtobacterium flaccumfaciensJ.S. (2007). The endophyte Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens

  4. The Use of Symbionts Expressing Pear PGIP to Delay or Possibly Prevent Development of Pierce's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charoenkajonchai, Surachet

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leafhoppers (Insecta : Hemiptera : Cicadellidae) and theirleafhoppers (Insecta : Hemiptera : Cicadellidae) and theirGlassy-Winged Sharpshooter (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). J Econ

  5. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vessel Sanitation Program is proud to bring to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage Requirements · Air circulation · Covered · Labeled · 15 cm off deck #12;Date Marking Requirement;Receiving Fresh Meats, Poultry, and Fish 7°C (45°F) · Reject if: ­ Temperature abused ­ Off odor ­ Off color · Discard date must be on food container #12;Day Stores · 7°C (45°F) · 24 hours · Labels ­ Permanent label

  6. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  7. Optimal Preventive Maintenance Under Decision Dependent Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galenko, Alexander; Popova, Elmira [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Kee, Ernie; Grantom, Rick [South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company - STPNOC, P.O. Box 289, Wadsworth, Tx 77483 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a system of N components with dependent failure times. The goal is to obtain the optimal block replacement interval (different for each component) over a finite horizon that minimizes the expected total maintenance cost. In addition, we allow each preventive maintenance action to change the future joint failure time distribution. We illustrate our methodology with an example from South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company. (authors)

  8. Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BETSCH, M.D.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear sense of direction toward achieving environmental protection, cleanup, and research.

  9. The Cattle Tick: Biology, Preventive Measures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtice, Cooper; Francis, M

    1892-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STAFF. ................ GEO. W. CURTIS, M. S. A. .Agriculturist. Director. .............................. H. H. HARRINGTON, M. SC. Chemist. .............................. M. FRANCIS, D. V. M.. .Veterinarian. ............................... R. H.... 31. Francis, Veterinarian of this Station, to find, if possible, some means of preventing the ravages of ticks which might be effectively used with economy and dispatch ancl thus be o'f practical benefit, not only to the small farmer who handles...

  10. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  11. Large scale disease prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

  12. Health & Medicine Heart Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Health & Medicine Heart Disease· Medical Imaging· Vioxx· Matter & Energy Electronics· Technology· Medical Technology· Reference Artificial heart· Biosensor· Circuit design· Machine· Science and stretchable electronics can map waves of electrical activity in the heart with better resolution and speed

  13. PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN BIOLOGICAL Preventing Absenteeism and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A. Lesperance J. Miller1 1

  14. An Intelligent Threat Prevention Framework with Heterogeneous Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    An Intelligent Threat Prevention Framework with Heterogeneous Information Wenjun Ma 1 and Weiru Liu 1 Abstract. Three issues usually are associated with threat prevention intelligent surveillance, the de- mand of effectively predicting suspects' intention and ranking the potential threats posed

  15. 17.42 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Evera, Stephen

    The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. ...

  16. Adaptive Rollover Prevention for Automotive Vehicles with Differential Braking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    Adaptive Rollover Prevention for Automotive Vehicles with Differential Braking Selim Solmaz, switching, and tuning (MMST) paradigm [13, 14, 15] for preventing un­tripped rollover in automotive vehicles performance than its fixed robust counterpart. Keywords: Automotive control; Multiple models; Parameter

  17. Energy Efficiency and Pollution Prevention: Industrial Efficiency Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, M.; Elliott, R. N.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    successfully combined energy efficiency and pollution prevention technologies and strategies to enhance the environment, productivity and the bottom line....

  18. NNSA Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  19. air pollution prevention: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental impacts. Perform solventless reactions. unknown authors 2 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via...

  20. STRATEGIC REVIEW OF THE SEXUAL TRANSMISSION PREVENTION PROGRAM IN NIGERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    STRATEGIC REVIEW OF THE SEXUAL TRANSMISSION PREVENTION PROGRAM IN NIGERIA Data Analysis Prevention Technical Working Group (TWG) in Nigeria, in dialogue with the Office of the Global AIDS prevention program in Nigeria. Specifically, the following needs were agreed: to evaluate the effectiveness

  1. PHS 650, Fall 2011 1 PREVENTION OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    PHS 650, Fall 2011 1 PHS 650 PREVENTION OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY Course Syllabus Fall 2011 Credits knowledge to develop, implement, and evaluate obesity prevention interventions. This course will emphasize pediatric obesity prevention with a focus on nutrition and physical activity health behaviors

  2. Workforce-Constrained Preventive Maintenance Scheduling using Evolution Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Mark

    Workforce-Constrained Preventive Maintenance Scheduling using Evolution Strategies ABSTRACT Heavy of minimizing the makespan for a set of preventive maintenance (PM) tasks, requiring single- or multiple approach to the SA approach for this class of PM problems. Subject Area: Preventive Maintenance, Evolution

  3. Analysis of Preventive Maintenance in Transactions Based Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telek, Miklós

    Analysis of Preventive Maintenance in Transactions Based Software Systems Sachin Garg 1 , Antonio''. However, it incurs some overhead. The necessity to do preventive maintenance not only in general purpose to illustrate the usefulness and applicability of the models. Keywords: Preventive Maintenance, Transactions

  4. Combined Pollution Prevention Assessments 98-MP13B.02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Combined Pollution Prevention Assessments 98-MP13B.02 Harry W. Edwards Department of Mechanical-97 Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center (CSU IAC) combined pollution prevention assessments, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement. The total number of assessment recommendations is 176

  5. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

  6. ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 8 ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM............................................................8-13 Tables: 8-1 Accident Prevention Sign Requirements..........................8-17 8-2 Accident.......................................8-24 8-9 Accident Prevention Tags.............................................8-25 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX

  7. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY FACT SHEET Prevention/Treatm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    nosocomial post surgical transmission occurs. Fever, cough, chest pain, CNS disease, headache, lethargy/Treatm ent Photo Bacteria Bordetella pertussis Whooping Cough Humans Direct contact with discharges from respiratory mucous membranes of infected persons by the airborne route. Stage 1: Catarrhal: Irritating cough

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. D. Sellers

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively managed by the INL Site P2 Coordinator. Development and maintenance of this overall INL Site plan is ultimately the responsibility of DOE-ID. This plan is applicable to all INL Site contractors except those at the Naval Reactors Facility.

  9. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  10. Periodontal Disease and Heart Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Periodontal Disease and Heart Health Deaf HealthTalks Presenter: Christopher Lehfeldt, DDS Elmwood #12;X-ray showing bone loss rickwilsondmd.typepad.com Thursday, March 15, 12 #12;5. What is heart disease? · The medical name for heart disease is cardiovascular disease (CVD) · An American dies from CVD

  11. DOL: Role in EEOICPA – Part B and Part E

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOL is tasked with administering the EEOICPA, both Parts B and E. Part B covers current and former workers who have been diagnosed with cancer, chronic beryllium disease, beryllium sensitivity, or...

  12. L{sub g}?=?100?nm In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As quantum well metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with atomic layer deposited beryllium oxide as interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, D., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kwon, H. M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.-W., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org; Veksler, D.; Gilmer, D.; Kirsch, P. D. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kim, D.-H. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Malta, New York 12020 (United States); Hudnall, Todd W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, 78666 (United States); Bielawski, Christopher W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Maszara, W. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States); Banerjee, S. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we have fabricated nanometer-scale channel length quantum-well (QW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) incorporating beryllium oxide (BeO) as an interfacial layer. BeO has high thermal stability, excellent electrical insulating characteristics, and a large band-gap, which make it an attractive candidate for use as a gate dielectric in making MOSFETs. BeO can also act as a good diffusion barrier to oxygen owing to its small atomic bonding length. In this work, we have fabricated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As MOS capacitors with BeO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and compared their electrical characteristics. As interface passivation layer, BeO/HfO{sub 2} bilayer gate stack presented effective oxide thickness less 1 nm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As QW MOSFETs with a BeO/HfO{sub 2} dielectric, showing a sub-threshold slope of 100?mV/dec, and a transconductance (g{sub m,max}) of 1.1 mS/?m, while displaying low values of gate leakage current. These results highlight the potential of atomic layer deposited BeO for use as a gate dielectric or interface passivation layer for III–V MOSFETs at the 7?nm technology node and/or beyond.

  13. Preventive maintenance vital to cogen profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.R. (Mission Operation and Maintenance Inc. (US))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A power plant's efficiency is the key to its success in generating a profit. While the fuel used and the mechanical efficiency of the plant itself are key design factor, once the plat is on-stream the main factor becomes the plant's time on line. Any downtime detracts from its profitability, especially during peak periods. In the case of a cogeneration facility downtime becomes even more critical, since it has more than one customer to satisfy; and electrical customer and a thermal energy customer. This paper reports that an unscheduled outage has the potential to be very expensive: Costs and revenue losses escalate rapidly from thousands of dollars into millions of dollars, depending on length of downtime and time of year. During off-peak winter months, losses at the Harbor cogeneration plant can be dramatic; peak summer losses can be catastrophic. Not only are generation revenues loss, but bonus revenues, qualifying facility (QF) status, and contractual obligations are at risk. With these prospects looming over the option, management must practice not only preventive maintenance, but predictive and condition based maintenance as well. HCC's key to preventing unscheduled outages is a computerized maintenance management system (CMMS).

  14. Certification for DOE G 440.1-7A

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Guide 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 850 (10 C.F.R. 850), Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, dated January 4, 2001, has been reviewed by our organization and deemed to be in compliance with related Departmental directives, Secretarial delegations, organizational structure, budget guidelines, regulations, standards, Office of Management and Budget guidance, relevant Memoranda of Understanding and public laws.

  15. publication 450-236 The most effective form of plant disease control in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    publication 450-236 The most effective form of plant disease control in the landscape is prevention and is relatively drought-toler- ant. William Penn barberry is typically used as a low hedge or in border plantings, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2009

  16. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  17. If you have heart disease, or think you do, there's a lot you can do to protect your heart health. This fact sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    If you have heart disease, or think you do, there's a lot you can do to protect your heart health. This fact sheet gives you the key steps to control the disease, including how to survive a heart attack and prevent serious dam- age to heart muscle. Caring for your heart is worth the effort. Use the information

  18. Hanford site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the requirements of the Hanford Site Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Program. The plan specifies requirements for Hanford contractors to prevent pollution from entering the environment, to conserve resources and energy, and to reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary waste generated at Hanford. The Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE 5400.1 (DOE 1988A) is included in the Hanford WMin/P2 Program.

  19. Implementation Guide for Integrating Pollution Prevention into Environmental Management Systems

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide suggests approaches to integrating pollution prevention into Integrated Safety Management/Environmental Management Systems. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  20. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments: A Handbook for Businesses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook on how to perform a pollution prevention opportunity assessment prepared for environmentally focused professional or student. Currently being used in support of college-level courses.

  1. advancing prevention research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has given 90 million to Harvard Medical Yellen, Gary 28 DIVISION of EPIDEMIOLOGY, STATISTICS and PREVENTION RESEARCH Chemistry Websites Summary: Consortium on Safe Labor 30...

  2. accident prevention manual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wu, Mingshen 9 Chest--Manual Defrost Models Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: old refrigerator or freezer, please follow the instructions below to help prevent accidents....

  3. Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Hazardous Substance Release (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Natural Resources is authorized to establish rules regarding the prevention and mitigation of hazardous substance release. These sections contain information on the notification...

  4. alcohol abuse prevention: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assist units 53 Laws and Policies Relating to Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse in Federal Health Care Programs Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  5. alcohol prevention initiatives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control; Prevention Johns; Hopkins Bloomberg School; Judy Cushing; Daliah Heller; Care Treatment; Corrine Miller Phd; Jim Roeber Msph; Ari Russell Icps; Cynthia Shifler Cpp;...

  6. aided preventive program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teegarden (Department of Nutrition Ginzel, Matthew 23 INJURY AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAM September 2007 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of Public Health, Injury &...

  7. Inherited risk for common disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banava, Helen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

  8. Flexibility in Design, Outcomes and Analysis in “Evidence- Based” Drug Prevention Research: The Case of the Midwestern Prevention Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorman, Dennis M.

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , column 2]. h Dwyer et al. [20] used a number of different models in their analysis and concluded that these showed “no evidence of an effect on alcohol use” [20, p. 781]. Hence “?” appears in the table. i Data for the 1-year follow-up are from Pentz et...Citation: Gorman DM. Flexibility in Design, Outcomes and Analysis in “Evidence-Based” Drug Prevention Research: The Case of the Midwestern Prevention Project. J Addiction Prevention. 2013;1(3): 8. J Addiction Prevention November 2013 Vol.:1, Issue...

  9. CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children 1. Background: · Lead poisoning remains one of the most common and preventable pediatric environmental conditions in the United States. · Lead is a poison that affects virtually every system in the human body. · Lead

  10. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Community Awareness Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Community Awareness Pilot #12;1 THE GOOD NEWS- Exposure to Lead is Preventable Lead Poisoning Is a REAL Problem; Did You Know? Lead is a highly toxic substance the effects of lead poisoning, but lead poisoning is much more frequent in children than in adults. For many

  11. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  12. Towards the Prevention of Gadi Geiger & Domenic G. Amara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Gadi

    Towards the Prevention of Dyslexia Gadi Geiger & Domenic G. Amara AI Memo 2005-029 October 2005 -- computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory #12;Towards the prevention of dyslexia Gadi Geiger1 their ability to prepare the students perceptually for reading. Introduction Developmental dyslexia (dyslexia

  13. The Role of Parents in Preventing Childhood Obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    The Role of Parents in Preventing Childhood Obesity Ana C. Lindsay, Katarina M. Sussner, Juhee Kim of childhood overweight and in obesity prevention, studies of child nutrition and growth are detailing the ways overweight and obesity should involve parents as impor- tant forces for change in their children's behaviors

  14. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  15. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  16. 5/3/12 98-3 1/5www.phy.ornl.gov/divops/ESH/98-3.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuels, and nuclear moderators. Beryllium oxide inhalation can lead to chronic beryllium disease OXIDE EXPOSURE AT LLNL On February 12, 1998, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a facility supervisor reported that a researcher was potentially exposed to airborne beryllium oxide when he brushed

  17. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population.

  18. D&D Technologies for Pollution Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripp, Julia Lynn

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project was awarded in FY 2002 to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to deploy technologies that decrease pollution and waste in the areas of facility characterization, sludge treatment, dust and contamination control, and concrete demolition. This project was called "D&D Technologies for Pollution Prevention" and planned to deploy four different technologies. To reduce protective equipment requirements, waste generation, and risk of radiation exposure during facility characterization, the Russian Gamma Locater Device (GLD) and Isotopic Identification Device (IID) for remote characterization was investigated. The GLD detects gamma ray readings and video images remotely and uses radio communication to transmit the readings to personnel located a safe distance from the contaminated area. The IID, an integral part of the GLD, provides real-time spectrometric analysis of radiation sources for remotely identifying the specific radioactive isotopes present in the facility. At the INEEL, sludge has accumulated in the bottom of a fuel storage pool and the presence of heavy metals in the sludge makes it a mixed waste. This project planned to use LEADX® to treat sludge in place to effectively make all heavy metals in the sludge insoluble. LEADX® is a dry granular chemical additive (apatite) used for in-situ treatment of heavy-metal-contaminated material. LEADX® chemically bonds to any free heavy metals that it contacts and forms a stable, non-leachable molecule. After treating the sludge with LEADX®, it was to be left in the basin and the pool filled with grout. The successful treatment of the sludge with LEADX® will reduce the amount of waste to be disposed at the burial ground by eliminating the need to remove the sludge from the basin. Many off-gas and duct systems being dismantled contain dust and lint that has been contaminated. Encapsulation Technologies, LLC has developed a patented process for eliminating airborne radioactivity and fixing contamination in place remotely without the need for people or equipment to enter the area being treated. The process uses a device called the Passive Aerosol Generator (PAG) to create an aerosol of a capture coating. The aerosol condenses on surfaces, capturing the contaminants in place. Use of this fogging technology will reduce or eliminate the requirement for glovebags and extensive contamination control during cutting and removal of ductwork. Demolition of building slabs and foundations is necessary at most DOE facilities undergoing D&D. The baseline method for their demolition at the INEEL is to use a hydraulic hammer on the end of a backhoe or trackhoe. However, the vibration of the hammer typically causes

  19. Fabrication of solar cells with counter doping prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Timothy D; Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell fabrication process includes printing of dopant sources over a polysilicon layer over backside of a solar cell substrate. The dopant sources are cured to diffuse dopants from the dopant sources into the polysilicon layer to form diffusion regions, and to crosslink the dopant sources to make them resistant to a subsequently performed texturing process. To prevent counter doping, dopants from one of the dopant sources are prevented from outgassing and diffusing into the other dopant source. For example, phosphorus from an N-type dopant source is prevented from diffusing to a P-type dopant source comprising boron.

  20. Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    said. "In the same way we check the weather each morning, individuals and public health officials can monitor disease incidence and plan for the future based on today's...

  1. D&D TECHNOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripp, Julia L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project was awarded in FY 2002 to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to deploy technologies that decrease pollution and waste in the areas of facility characterization, sludge treatment, dust and contamination control, and concrete demolition. This project was called ''D&D Technologies for Pollution Prevention'' and planned to deploy four different technologies. To reduce protective equipment requirements, waste generation, and risk of radiation exposure during facility characterization, the Russian Gamma Locater Device (GLD) and Isotopic Identification Device (IID) for remote characterization was investigated. The GLD detects gamma ray readings and video images remotely and uses radio communication to transmit the readings to personnel located a safe distance from the contaminated area. The IID, an integral part of the GLD, provides real-time spectrometric analysis of radiation sources for remotely identifying the specific radioactive isotopes present in the facility. At the INEEL, sludge has accumulated in the bottom of a fuel storage pool and the presence of heavy metals in the sludge makes it a mixed waste. This project planned to use LEADX{reg_sign} to treat sludge in place to effectively make all heavy metals in the sludge insoluble. LEADX{reg_sign} is a dry granular chemical additive (apatite) used for in-situ treatment of heavy-metal-contaminated material. LEADX{reg_sign} chemically bonds to any free heavy metals that it contacts and forms a stable, non-leachable molecule. After treating the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign}, it was to be left in the basin and the pool filled with grout. The successful treatment of the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign} will reduce the amount of waste to be disposed at the burial ground by eliminating the need to remove the sludge from the basin. Many off-gas and duct systems being dismantled contain dust and lint that has been contaminated. Encapsulation Technologies, LLC has developed a patented process for eliminating airborne radioactivity and fixing contamination in place remotely without the need for people or equipment to enter the area being treated. The process uses a device called the Passive Aerosol Generator (PAG) to create an aerosol of a capture coating. The aerosol condenses on surfaces, capturing the contaminants in place. Use of this fogging technology will reduce or eliminate the requirement for glovebags and extensive contamination control during cutting and removal of ductwork. Demolition of building slabs and foundations is necessary at most DOE facilities undergoing D&D. The baseline method for their demolition at the INEEL is to use a hydraulic hammer on the end of a backhoe or trackhoe. However, the vibration of the hammer typically causes excessive wear and tear on the equipment (resulting in additional maintenance), and dust control can be a problem. The SureStrike rock breaker, or Hammerhead, is used commercially in the mining and demolition industries . The modular impact hammer attaches to a conventional frontend loader or excavator and can be used to break up oversized materials such as equipment pedestals and heavy reinforced concrete foundations. The Hammerhead uses a coiled spring that generates 100,000 psi of single-blow impact energy through a breaker rod. It takes about 3 seconds for the equipment operator to load the spring and deliver the blow. The Hammerhead reduces noise pollution because it uses no motors, hydraulics, or air, and it reduces dust pollution because the single-blow impact energy forces the energy down into the concrete, rubblizing the concrete below the surface while leaving the surface with only breaks/cracks instead of a lot of loose pieces. In addition, equipment maintenance is reduced, and safety is improved because the amount of ''fly rock'' is minimal.

  2. adapted hiv prevention: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - sexual, blood borne and mother to child. However, fewer than one in five people at high risk for HIV have access Bushman, Frederic 2 PROVEN HIV PREVENTION METHODS We...

  3. adapting hiv prevention: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - sexual, blood borne and mother to child. However, fewer than one in five people at high risk for HIV have access Bushman, Frederic 2 PROVEN HIV PREVENTION METHODS We...

  4. Are You Pregnant? Prevent Lead Poisoning. Start Now.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are You Pregnant? Prevent Lead Poisoning. Start Now. Lead poisoning is caused by breathing to keep your baby safe from lead poisoning. Here's what you can do: 1 Watch out for lead in your home

  5. Tennessee Pollution Prevention Partnership | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    status, the Y-12 team developed and completed a five-project plan to help prevent pollution of air, land and water, while reducing waste and conserving natural resources....

  6. Exploiting Opportunities for Pollution Prevention in EPA Enforcement Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Monica

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two relatively new EPA policies encourage the inclusion of pollution prevention in regulatory enforcement settlements. The advantages to a firm include reduction or elimination of environmental problems at the source (thus ...

  7. Nemesis: Preventing Authentication & Access Control Vulnerabilities in Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatini, David M.

    Nemesis: Preventing Authentication & Access Control Vulnerabilities in Web Applications Michael web applications. Authentication attacks occur when a web application authenticates users unsafely, granting access to web clients that lack the ap- propriate credentials. Access control attacks occur when

  8. Eating disorder prevention research: a meta-analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the overall effectiveness of eating disorder prevention programs and to investigate potential moderating variables that may influence the magnitude of intervention ...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Janet S.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. Pollution Prevention supports the goals and objectives to increase the procurement and use of environmentally friendly products and materials and minimize the generation of waste (nonhazardous, hazardous, radiological, wastewater). Through participation on the Interdisciplinary Team P2 provides guidance for integration of environmentally friendly purchasing and waste minimization requirements into projects during the planning phase. Table 7 presents SNL's corporate objectives and targets that support the elements of the Pollution Prevention program.

  10. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment: USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobol, S.P.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. The areas selected for this joint EPA/USDA study included general hazardous materials handling and usage, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) analyses, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. One pollution prevention option applicable to total Kjeldahl analyses involved use of an automated nitrogen analyzer. Acid and base wastes are virtually eliminated and costs for chemicals and labor are reduced significantly. Other pollution prevention options for total Kjeldahl include phenate auto analyzer, micro analysis, and alternate catalyst. Pollution prevention options for HPLC included solid phase extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, solvent recovery, and column/particle size reduction. The approach used to conduct this PPOA is present in EPA's Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003).

  11. 2011 Harassment Prevention Training Who must participate in 2011?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    , will be handled through live sessions. Excluded at this time: not supervisors Online training Our vendor Workplace This is a good time to review USC's policies on harassment prevention at http://policies.usc.edu/ emp

  12. 17.423 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Evera, Stephen

    Examines the causes of war, with a focus on practical measures to prevent and control war. Topics covered include: causes and consequences of national misperception; military strategy and policy as cause of war; US foreign ...

  13. Energy Conservation Thru Steam Trap Surveys and Preventive Maintenance Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, T.; Dewhirst, B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will deal with steam trap surveys and preventive maintenance programs and the energy savings that may be realized from such efforts. Trap survey organization, flexibility, simplicity, and mechanics will be reviewed, including the economic...

  14. Program to Prevent Accidental or Unauthorized Nuclear Explosive Detonations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the DOE program to prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear explosive detonations, and to define responsibilities for DOE participation in the Department of Defense program for nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system safety. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention The emergence of AIDS effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance. Nanotechnology of nanotechnology to provide more effective treatment and preven

  16. Accelerator production of tritium pollution prevention design assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.; Sheetz, S.O. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lanik, P. [Burns and Roe Engineering Inc. (United States)

    1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Design Assessment (PPDA) provides data for cost-benefit analysis of the potential environmental impact of the APT, is an integral part of pollution prevention/waste minimization, and is required by DOE for any activity generating radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. It will also better position the APT to meet future requirements, since it is anticipated that regulatory and other requirements will continue to become more restrictive and demanding.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories California Pollution Prevention Program Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. CDC Recommendations for Lead Poisoning Prevention in Newly Arrived Refugee Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDC Recommendations for Lead Poisoning Prevention in Newly Arrived Refugee Children Lead poisoning remains one of the most common and preventable pediatric environmental conditions even though Poisoning Prevention Branch and Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, in collaboration

  20. An Integrated ACO Approach for the Joint Production and Preventive Maintenance Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An Integrated ACO Approach for the Joint Production and Preventive Maintenance Scheduling Problem, an integrated ACO approach to solve joint production and preventive maintenance scheduling problem very effective solutions for this problem. Key words-- ACO, Production, Preventive maintenance

  1. Designing a Bayesian Network for Preventive Maintenance from Expert Opinions in a Rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Designing a Bayesian Network for Preventive Maintenance from Expert Opinions in a Rapid-Linear Model, Expert Opinion, Complexity Reduction, Maintenance. 1 Introduction Preventive maintenance became essential. Preventive maintenance of a system is taking into account expert knowledge, feedback

  2. Conversion of non-calendar to calendar-time based preventive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Emmanuel

    Conversion of non-calendar to calendar-time based preventive maintenance schedules-calendar based preventive maintenance (PM) schedules into calendar-time format for semiconductor manufacturing. Keywords Preventive maintenance, Semiconductors, Programming, Real time scheduling Paper type Research

  3. MFR PAPER 1300 Shellfish Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    promise for the efficient recycling of organic waste materials, such as agricultural wastes, and metazoan parasitic and infectious agents. In addition, predators, toxic agents, and fouling organisms studied. DISEASES OF SHELLFISH A list of organisms that cause com- mon diseases in oysters is shown

  4. MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE INFORMATION OVERVIEW/KEY POINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    and in the community? You can help prevent the spread of illnesses by: Covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around

  5. Modeling Economic Resilience and Animal Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hen-I

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    at the local level to prevent the outbreak from happening has grown to be a critical issue in the area of animal disease control, particularly within the context of modern agricultural industry. Because FMD is the most contagious animal disease of hoofed... to slaughter on infected premises, and the intensity of contagious and non-contagious premises. They found that the average time from the first lesion to slaughter control and the intensity of culling on non-contagious premises has a 15 significant...

  6. Lesson Title: CDC Recommendations for Lead Poisoning Prevention in Newly Arrived Refugee Children: Medical Service Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesson Title: CDC Recommendations for Lead Poisoning Prevention in Newly Arrived Refugee Children neurodevelopmental monitoring of children with elevated BLLs 8. Identify resources for lead poisoning prevention

  7. Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes is to prevent the excessive buildup of air pollutants during air pollution episodes, thus...

  8. A Simple Method for the Prevention of Non-Specific Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for the Prevention of Non-Specific Adsorption by Nanocrystals onto Surfaces. A Simple Method for the Prevention of Non-Specific Adsorption by Nanocrystals onto Surfaces....

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aicar preconditioning prevents Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prevents the development of hyperglycemia... and mass. Consistently, systemic AICAR infusion in prediabetic Zucker fatty rats prevents the development... : an emerging concept...

  10. Overview study of LNG release prevention and control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Holter, G.M.; Powers, T.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry employs a variety of release prevention and control techniques to reduce the likelihood and the consequences of accidental LNG releases. A study of the effectiveness of these release prevention and control systems is being performed. Reference descriptions for the basic types of LNG facilities were developed. Then an overview study was performed to identify areas that merit subsequent and more detailed analyses. The specific objectives were to characterize the LNG facilities of interest and their release prevention and control systems, identify possible weak links and research needs, and provide an analytical framework for subsequent detailed analyses. The LNG facilities analyzed include a reference export terminal, marine vessel, import terminal, peakshaving facility, truck tanker, and satellite facility. A reference description for these facilities, a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA), and a list of representative release scenarios are included. The reference facility descriptions outline basic process flows, plant layouts, and safety features. The PHA identifies the important release prevention operations. Representative release scenarios provide a format for discussing potential initiating events, effects of the release prevention and control systems, information needs, and potential design changes. These scenarios range from relatively frequent but low consequence releases to unlikely but large releases and are the principal basis for the next stage of analysis.

  11. Testing Spallation Processes With Beryllium and Boron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Fields; Keith A. Olive; Elisabeth Vangioni-Flam; Michel Casse

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The nucleosynthesis of Be and B by spallation processes provides unique insight into the origin of cosmic rays. Namely, different spallation schemes predict sharply different trends for the growth of LiBeB abundances with respect to oxygen. ``Primary'' mechanisms predict BeB $\\propto$ O, and are well motivated by the data if O/Fe is constant at low metallicity. In contrast, ``secondary'' mechanisms predict BeB $\\propto$ O$^2$ and are consistent with the data if O/Fe increases towards low metallicity as some recent data suggest. Clearly, any primary mechanism, if operative, will dominate early in the history of the Galaxy. In this paper, we fit the BeB data to a two-component scheme which includes both primary and secondary trends. In this way, the data can be used to probe the period in which primary mechanisms are effective. We analyze the data using consistent stellar atmospheric parameters based on Balmer line data and the continuum infrared flux. Results depend sensitively on Pop II O abundances and, unfortunately, on the choice of stellar parameters. When using recent results which show O/Fe increasing toward lower metallicity, a two-component Be-O fits indicates that primary and secondary components contribute equally at [O/H]$_{eq}$ = -1.8 for Balmer line data; and [O/H]$_{eq}$ = -1.4 to -1.8 for IRFM. We apply these constraints to recent models for LiBeB origin. The Balmer line data does not show any evidence for primary production. On the other hand, the IRFM data does indicate a preference for a two-component model, such as a combination of standard GCR and metal-enriched particles accelerated in superbubbles. These conclusions rely on a detailed understanding of the abundance data including systematic effects which may alter the derived O-Fe and BeB-Fe relations.

  12. Ionization energies along beryllium isoelectronic sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malyshev, A V; Glazov, D A; Tupitsyn, I I; Shabaev, V M; Plunien, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionization energies for the ground state of berylliumlike ions with nuclear charge numbers in the range Z=16-96 are rigorously evaluated. The calculations merge the ab initio QED treatment in the first and second orders of the perturbation theory in the fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ with the third- and higher-order electron-correlation contributions evaluated within the Breit approximation. The nuclear recoil and nuclear polarization effects are taken into account. The accuracy of the ionization energies obtained has been significantly improved in comparison with previous calculations.

  13. Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Testing (BeLPT)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowawe

  14. Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV andApril 8-9, Advisory

  15. LLNS Beryllium Consent Order Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting FactsWashersInspections- LLNS

  16. 2013 Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2Department of Energyof Environmental Table

  17. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResourcesThe Value The U.S. DepartmentWorkOakBeLPT

  18. Hanford Site Beryllium Questionnaire Affected Worker Questionnaire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil Hanford Traffic Safety

  19. Beryllium Facilities & Areas - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOTDiagnosticFAQs

  20. Beryllium Program Performance Assessments - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefitsProgram Information About