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Sample records for berkeley county landfill

  1. Dane County Landfill | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Berkeley County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Johnson County Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, Kansas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. Citizens of Shawnee, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Kansas that are particularly well suited for grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. This report assesses the Johnson County Landfill for possible grid-tied PV installations and estimates the cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. The report findings are applicable to other landfills in the surrounding area.

  6. Berkeley County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. An Archaeological Survey of the Polk County Landfill Expansion in Central Polk County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-23

    by the presence of sandy uplands overlooking a tributary of Barnett Creek to the north. Based on the potential for archaeological sites in the project area Po lk County retained BVRA to conduct a cultural resources survey. The proj ect number assigned.... 8 RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS A 100% pedestrian survey of the 60 ac re project area did not locate any archaeological sites. The project area cons ists of uplands adjac ent to a tributary of Barnett Creek to the north. Two sma ll tributaries...

  8. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  9. BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Creighton

    2012-03-13

    The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

  10. Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County,Benton, NewBergenfield, New

  12. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  13. DESIGNING AND SPECIFYING LANDFILL By: Timothy D. Stark,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 DESIGNING AND SPECIFYING LANDFILL COVERS By: Timothy D. Stark,1 Erik J. Newman,2 and Kenneth R, specification, and bidding issues for landfill covers. The case history involves a landfill near Somerset County, Maryland in the beautiful coastal lands of the Chesapeake Bay. The landfill operated from 1977 to 1998

  14. New record of an extinct fish, Fisherichthys folmeri Weems (Osteichthyes), from the lower Eocene of Berkeley County, South Carolina, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cicimurri, David J.; Knight, James L.

    2009-01-01

    folmeri teeth from South Carolina, scale bars = 0.5 mm. 2-5.Dorchester County, South Carolina. United States Geologicalsubsurface unit in the South Carolina Coastal Plain. United

  15. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  16. LANDFILL-GAS-TO-ENERGY PROJECTS: AN ANALYSIS OF NET PRIVATE AND SOCIAL BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Materials Table A1: Model Results for West Lake Landfill WEST LAKE IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Landfill WEST COUNTY IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average Landfill Gas Generation (mmcf/yr) 1,075 1,735 $1,250 Table A3: Model Results for Modern Landfill MODERN IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olis, D.; Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  18. Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

    2011-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

  19. Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Berkeley Lab

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  1. Berkeley Lab

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  2. Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  4. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  5. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  6. Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually.

  7. Conference Services .:. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference Services OCFO Home Berkeley Lab Home US Department of Energy Home Quicklinks: --- Search --- Berkeley Lab...

  8. Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor...

  9. Radioactive material in the West Lake Landfill: Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1988-06-01

    The West Lake Landfill is located near the city of St. Louis in Bridgeton, St. Louis County, Missouri. The site has been used since 1962 for disposing of municipal refuse, industrial solid and liquid wastes, and construction demolition debris. This report summarizes the circumstances of the radioactive material in the West Lake Landfill. The radioactive material resulted from the processing of uranium ores and the subsequent by the AEC of processing residues. Primary emphasis is on the radiological environmental aspects as they relate to potential disposition of the material. It is concluded that remedial action is called for. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation about the history, structure, and projects of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. BerkeleyGW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Controlling landfill closure costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millspaugh, M.P.; Ammerman, T.A. [Spectra Engineering, Latham, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Landfill closure projects are significant undertakings typically costing well over $100,000/acre. Innovative designs, use of alternative grading and cover materials, and strong project management will substantially reduce the financial impact of a landfill closure project. This paper examines and evaluates the various elements of landfill closure projects and presents various measures which can be employed to reduce costs. Control measures evaluated include: the beneficial utilization of alternative materials such as coal ash, cement kiln dust, paper mill by-product, construction surplus soils, construction debris, and waste water treatment sludge; the appropriate application of Mandate Relief Variances to municipal landfill closures for reduced cover system requirements and reduced long-term post closure monitoring requirements; equivalent design opportunities; procurement of consulting and contractor services to maximize project value; long-term monitoring strategies; and grant loan programs. An analysis of closure costs under differing assumed closure designs based upon recently obtained bid data in New York State, is also provided as a means for presenting the potential savings which can be realized.

  13. West Berkeley Public Library

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Berkeley, CA The West Berkeley Public Library, first opened in December 2013, is the first publicly funded Zero Net Energy public library in California. The library takes advantage of many innovative technologies and passive design strategies to achieve its Zero Net Energy goals. The project's Building Team, led by Harley Ellis Deveraux, partnered with PG&E's Savings By Design program to perform early-stage design analyses including climate modeling, computational fluid dynamics, daylighting, solar modeling, and energy simulations.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Moyer Landfill Site, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-30

    The Moyer Landfill is an inactive privately owned landfill located in Lower Providence Township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The site was operated as a municipal landfill from the 1940's until April 1981, during which time it received municipal refuse and sewage sludges. According to local Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) officials, the landfill accepted a variety of solid and liquid hazardous wastes, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solvents, paints, low-level radioactive wastes, and incinerated materials in bulk form and/or containerized in drums. In 1972, when the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Resources (PADER) rules and regulations became more restrictive, this landfill was cited, and finally in 1981, it was closed and brought into receivership of the U.S. District Court.

  15. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.L. . E-mail: d.jones@bangor.ac.uk; Williamson, K.L.; Owen, A.G.

    2006-07-01

    Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios.

  16. BerkeleyGW2013

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  17. BerkeleyGW2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. BerkeleyGW2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  20. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity...

  1. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

    2013-05-29

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  2. UC Berkeley Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    email: itai.trilnick@berkeley.edu EEP 147: Regulation of Energy and Environment Tu/Th 9:3011:00 AM OVERVIEW This course is about government regulation of energy with an emphasis on policies that seek to mitigate the impact of energy production and consumption on the environment. It is designed to give

  3. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  4. 7.4 Landfill Methane Utilization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A chapter on Landfill Methane Utilization from the Clean Energy Strategies for Local Governments publication.

  5. Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    about 955 landfills that recovered biogas. The largest number of such landfills were in the USA landfills in Denmark that in total captured 5,800Nm3 of biogas per hour, equivalent to 276.4MW of contained #12;Biomass US DATA ON GENERATION OF BIOGAS AT LANDFILLS Eileen Berenyi, a Research Associate of EEC

  6. LEXSEE 19 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2004 Berkeley Technology Law Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Page 1 LEXSEE 19 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2004 Berkeley Technology Law Journal Berkeley Technology Law Journal 2004 19 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 1 LENGTH: 8383 words FOREWORD: The Rise of Internet Berkeley Technology Law Journal & Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. + Senior Annual Review Editor

  7. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 58752 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Laboratory Evaluation of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 3 #12;Abstract A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility

  8. Berkeley Lab / EAA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT * LOWBenefits DOEBennoBerkeley

  9. Berkeley Lab Shares

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Berkeley Lab Shower Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab | Shares SHARES

  11. Berkeley Lab Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab | Shares SHARESSpace

  12. Berkeley Lab Strategic Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Berkeley Lab Tour Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab |

  14. Berkeley Lab Welcomes NUG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab

  15. Berkeley Lab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab ParticleSiteAbout

  16. Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -Section of Closure #12;Schedule III ­ Gazette 19 & 21 Specifications for Landfill Cover Daily cover of 10cm of soil;Post Closure Care-Requirements The Post-closure care of landfill site shall be conducted for at leastMunicipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities Arun

  17. Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”of Natural gas testing LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION Tapping into

  18. LEXSEE 16 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2001 Berkeley Technology Law Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Page 1 LEXSEE 16 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2001 Berkeley Technology Law Journal Berkeley Technology Law Journal 2001 16 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 1 LENGTH: 3937 words ANNUAL REVIEW OF LAW AND TECHNOLOGY Law Journal; J.D. candidate, 2001, Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley; Ph

  19. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Improving Grounding Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Coupled to Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM). Users in Berkeley, Bristol, Beijing, Brussels, and Berlin

  20. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-05-01

    This report for first quarter 1992 contains sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data for the Savannah River Plant. The data tables presented in this report are copies of draft analytical results and therefore do contain errors. These errors will be corrected when the finalized data is received from the laboratory.

  1. EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

  2. Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

    2005-03-30

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  3. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-08-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  4. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-05-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  5. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-12-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  6. Converting landfill gas to vehicle fuel: The results of over 30 months of operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheless, E.; Cosulich, J.; Wang, A.

    1996-11-01

    The Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (Districts) have successfully converted landfill gas to vehicle fuel for over 30 months with the Clean Fuels facility (Clean Fuels). The station has a design capacity equivalent to 1,000 gallons of gasoline per day. The Districts utilize the compressed landfill gas (CLG) produced at the station to run a fleet of 13 vehicles, ranging from passenger vans to large on-road tractors. This paper presents information on the operation, maintenance, theory, and economics of converting landfill gas to vehicle fuel. The compressed natural gas (CNG) industry is expanding rapidly. The US Department of Energy projects the number of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) to grow from 66,000 in 1995 to 85,000 in 1996. A variety of CNG-powered refuse collection vehicles are now available from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Many industry pundits predict that refuse trucks will be the next major vehicle group after transit buses to convert to CNG. CNG provides the benefit of lower emissions than diesel and gasoline, with typical fuel costs of only 70 to 80 percent of the price of gasoline at retail pumps. The primary economic advantage of CNG over conventional fuels is its tax rate, which can be lower by about $0.30 per gallon of diesel equivalent. The CNG market may offer the landfill gas industry the same opportunity the electrical generation market offered in the 1980s. The Clean Fuels facility is located within the Districts` Puente Hills Landfill complex. Puente Hills is a very large landfill with over 70 million tons of refuse in place. The current fill rate is approximately 10,000 tons per day. The landfill gas flow rate is approximately 27,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) at 42 percent methane.

  7. Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

  8. Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant Success story about LNG from landfill gas....

  9. Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problematic for landfill operations by generating undesirable heat, liquid leachate, and gases reactions. Another source of water in a MSW landfill is leachate recirculation, which is not recommended: Solid wastes; Aluminum; Chemicals; Waste disposal; Landfills. Author keywords: Solid waste; Leachate

  10. Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law...

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Lawrence Berkeley National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    even more to do so, Berkeley Lab has announced that it will start offering workplace EV charging. The workplace charging is just one of several initiatives Berkeley Lab is...

  12. PROPERTY MANUAL Berkeley Laboratory Property Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    B: Sensitive Item Policy · APPENDIX C: Glossary Property Management System Review Property Manual of Energy (DOE). The Property Management charter ensures the efficient and effective protection and controlPROPERTY MANUAL Issued by Berkeley Laboratory Property Management Lawrence Berkeley National

  13. Berkeley-Stanford Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *BerkeleyBerkeley Site Office EA

  14. BerkeleyGW Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW

  15. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

  16. Powering Microturbines With Landfill Gas, October 2002 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with LFG. microturbinelandfill.pdf More Documents & Publications 7.4 Landfill Methane Utilization CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

  17. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions - Case Study, 2013 Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...

  18. DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Teleconference: 2. DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation US Department of Energy July 2009 Slides prepared by CRESP DOE EM Landfill...

  19. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  20. UC BERKELEY LIBRARY MENTORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    The Library, promoting consistent and excellent public service. Goals of the Mentoring Program: z To createi UC BERKELEY LIBRARY MENTORING PROGRAM for Circulation Services Staff Developed by the Mentoring Program Subcommittee Of the Circulation Services Group © The Library, June 2002 Last Revision July 29

  1. Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is andFederal TestheFRANKLIN

  2. Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: EnergyIllinois: Energy Resources JumpParish,Winnebago

  3. University of California Berkeley Berkeley, CA 510.642.6000 www.berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    their undergraduate education. This document is meant to provide basic information across a range of Campus issues, and be a gateway to the many Campus web sites that deal with these issues in greater detail. Berkeley Undergraduate 377 Total 10,954 Social Sciences disciplines 20% Biological/Life Sciences 13% Engineering 10% English

  4. Surviving a Changing and Often Hostile Environment: The Berkeley Institute of Industrial Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, George

    2008-01-01

    THE BERKELEY INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AcademicHow Berkeley’s Institute of Industrial Relations (recentlyInterest in the field of Industrial Relations at Berkeley

  5. Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on geotechnical and stability analyses for the design of landfills and remedial closures. It is the mostLandfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100

  6. Algorithmic MEMS Karl Friedrich Bohringer, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Algorithmic MEMS Karl Friedrich B¨ohringer, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA technology for MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) increase the avail­ ability and diversity out tasks using large coordinated systems of MEMS units motivates the de­ velopment of automated

  7. Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

  8. Instrumentation of dredge spoil for landfill construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byle, M.J.; McCullough, M.L.; Alexander, R.; Vasuki, N.C.; Langer, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Delaware Solid Waste Authority's Northern Solid Waste Management Center is located outside of Wilmington Delaware at Cherry Island, a former dredge disposal site. Dredge spoils, of very low permeability, range in depths up to 30 m (100 feet) which form a natural liner and the foundation for the 140 ha (350-acre) municipal solid waste landfill. The soils beneath the landfill have been extensively instrumented to measure pore pressure, settlement and deflections, using inclinometer casings, standpipe piezometers, vibrating wire piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, settlement plates, liquid settlement gages, total pressure cells and thermistors. The nature of the existing waste and anticipated settlements (up to 6 m (19 feet)) have required some unique installation details. The instrumentation data has been integral in planning the landfilling sequence to maintain perimeter slope stability and has provided key geotechnical parameters needed for operation and construction of the landfill. The performance of the instrumentation and monitoring results are discussed.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Compliance Order, October...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Agreement Name Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 HWCA 9596-016 State California Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s)...

  10. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake U.C Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Energy (DOE) by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The South Dakota Science and Technology Berkeley National Laboratory 2150 Shattuck Avenue, Office 1001A, MC 1295 Berkeley, CA 94704 Abstract and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). With the National Science Board's decision to halt development of a NSF

  11. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group 'Landfill Aeration' contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProject |433014°,Information Berkeley Lab

  13. University of California Berkeley Research Administration and Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    University of California Berkeley Research Administration and Compliance Sponsored Projects Office Published by the Research Administration and Compliance Office University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94704-5940 510/642-0120 Assistant Vice Chancellor - Research Administration and Compliance: Marcia

  14. University of California Berkeley Research Administration and Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    University of California Berkeley Research Administration and Compliance Sponsored Projects Office Published by the Research Administration and Compliance Office University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94704-5940 510/642-0120 Assistant Vice Chancellor - Research Administration and Compliance

  15. Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing Earth System: Prospects and Challenges. From the 2014 NERSC User's Group Meeting Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks...

  16. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins...

  17. Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions (Other...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Other: Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions In this...

  18. Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First-of-Its-Kind Seismic Floor Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First-of-Its-Kind Seismic Floor...

  19. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT * LOWBenefits DOEBennoBerkeley How

  20. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT * LOWBenefits DOEBennoBerkeley How

  1. Berkeley Lab Trafficking Victims Protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab |Trafficking Victims

  2. Berkeley Lab Site Construction Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab ParticleSite

  3. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, BuildingWilliams, Energy Performance of Buildings Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA ABSTRACT A Best Residential HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2004

  4. Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

    2007-01-01

    Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

  5. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, E. L.; Cifuentes, L. A.; Cozzarelli, I. M.

    2002-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer adjacent to Norman Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobic processes impacting landfill-leachate contaminated aquifers. We collected groundwaters from a transect ...

  6. Graphene and Quantum Mechanics University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zworski, Maciej

    Graphene and Quantum Mechanics Minjae Lee University of California, Berkeley lee.minjae@math.berkeley.edu March 31, 2014 Minjae Lee (UC Berkeley) Graphene March 31, 2014 1 / 9 #12;Carbon structures Graphite 3 Berkeley) Graphene March 31, 2014 2 / 9 #12;Graphene Graphene A single layer of graphite The thinnest 2D

  7. US EPA record of decision review for landfills: Sanitary landfill (740-G), Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Record of Decision System (RODS) database search conducted to identify Superfund landfill sites where a Record of Decision (ROD) has been prepared by EPA, the States or the US Army Corps of Engineers describing the selected remedy at the site. ROD abstracts from the database were reviewed to identify site information including site type, contaminants of concern, components of the selected remedy, and cleanup goals. Only RODs from landfill sites were evaluated so that the results of the analysis can be used to support the remedy selection process for the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  8. FRASER BASIN LANDFILL INVENTORY DOE FRAP 1997-19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Fraser River Basin and characterize any associated leachate discharges. The objectives of this desktop; 2. Develop a quantitative estimate of landfill leachate discharges for each landfill; 3. Assess landfill compliance with regulatory requirements; 4. Assess leachate discharge impacts on the receiving

  9. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  10. Statistics Department University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    John Rice Statistics Department University of California, Berkeley Joint work with Peter Bickel problem Barycentric corrected arrival times 0 Energy, no matter how rich the dictionary from which you adaptively compose a detection statistic, no matter how

  11. Berkeley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Electric Cooperative (BEC) offers several rebates to residential customers for energy efficiency upgrades. The H2O Advantage Water Heater Rebate Program offers a rebate of up to $300 for...

  12. Berkeley Lab Creates Superfast Search Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at the Energy Department's Berkeley Lab developed a new approach to searching massive databases that can increase speeds by 10 to 100 times that of large commercial database software.

  13. LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E in the geological layer. Prior to drilling new boreholes on the site, a preliminary simplified model will be built with the numerical code TOUGH2-LGM. A description of the geological units, methane flux and the results

  14. SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN DOE FRAP 1997-07 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North Vancouver, B was funded by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution Abatement

  15. Photovoltaic olar nergy Development on Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a selfballasting photovoltaic solar racking system will affect a closed landfills dirt cap. The effects areas of remote and Photovoltaic solar panels with a self-ballasting system. Source: www to generate up to 7,000 megawatts of solar energy while avoiding sensitive biological resources. The data

  16. Turning waste into energy beats landfilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , not incineration. Miller and others also refer to incineration as a source of dioxins, and they're right. But let that the landfills throughout Ontario and Michigan release fewer dioxins than that, he needs to hire better advisers-to-waste plants generate heat and electricity, This incinerator in Malmo, Sweden, supplies electricity and heat

  17. Dutchess County Resource Recovery Task Force report: Dutchess County Pyrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Dutchess County initiated development of a long-range master plan for Solid Waste Management in 1971. The plan included development of a resource recovery facility to service the municipalities in the County population center. Based on early recommendations, a pyrolysis facility employing Purox technology was to be implemented. A feasibility study, paid for by County funds was completed in 1975. The study provided siting recommendations, estimation of available waste, and preliminary facility design. Because of various considerations, the project was not developed. Under the Department of Energy grant, the County reassessed the feasibility of a resource recovery facility, with emphasis on confirming previous conclusions supporting the Purox technology, waste availability, energy recovery and sale and siting of the plant. The conclusions reached in the new study were: a resource recovery facility is feasible for the County; sufficient waste for such a facility is available and subject to control; While Purox technology was feasible it is not the most appropriate available technoloy for the County; that mass burning with steam recovery is the most appropriate technology; and that resource recovery while presently more expensive than landfilling, represents the only cost effective, energy efficient, and environmentally sound way to handle the solid waste problem in the County.

  18. REMOTE OPERATION OF DOE-1 ON THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY CDC 7600, 6600 AND 6400 COMPUTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    to LBL should be sent prepaid. Lawrence Berkeley Labshipments should be sent prepaid to Greyhound West Berkeley

  19. Olmsted County Public Works | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.Information Olinda Landfill GasI Geothermal PowerCounty

  20. Request for Qualifications for Sacramento Landfill

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Request for Qualifications (RFQ) solicits experienced companies to design, permit, finance, build, and operate a solar photovoltaic farm (SPV Farm) on the City of Sacramento’s 28th Street Landfill. Respondents to this RFQ must demonstrate experience and capacity to design, permit, finance, build, and operate a SPV Farm that generates electricity that can be sold for electrical use through a power-purchase agreement. Submittals must be prepared and delivered in accordance with the requirements set forth in this document.

  1. Norman L. Miller Geography Department, University of California Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    Norman L. Miller Geography Department, University of California ­ Berkeley Earth Sciences Division. 2006 ­ present, Adjunct Professor, Geography Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA. 2000 on Water, ESSP Bioenergy and Earth Sustainability. Teaching Geography 171 ­ Special Topics in Geography

  2. Health of Older Californians: County Data Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Pourat, Nadereh; Enriquez-Haass, Vilma; Sripipatana, Alek

    2003-01-01

    San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare Central Coast Counties:Kings County (Kings and Tulare Counties combined) LakeCounty (see Lassen County) Tulare County (see Kings County)

  3. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as part of the River Corridor Closure Project - DOE's largest environmental cleanup closure project. The landfill is the largest disposal facility in the DOE cleanup complex....

  4. Centrifugal Modeling of Subsidence of Landfill Covers [abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Harry; Ronayne, Michael

    1984-01-01

    j "Centrifugal Moueling of Subsidence of Landfill Covers" bysites may result in subsidence of the soil cover system.Following subsidence, water flow through the cover may rise

  5. A Centrifuge Modeling Procedure for Landfill Cover Subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Harry J; Ronayne, Michael C

    1984-01-01

    J,, Evaluation of Trench Subsidence and Stabilization attor Landfill Cower Subsidence by Harr y J. Sterling 1 and02 ABSTRACT Trench cover subsidence has been a common and

  6. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impurities inherent in landfill gas and to compress the gas * Pipeline: Transports the gas to the power plant * Power plant: A combined cycle generating facility comprised of...

  7. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater...

  8. UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion Time Histories for the UC Berkeley Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    U.C. BERKELEY SEISMIC GUIDELINES APPENDIX II GROUND MOTIONthe deaggregation of the seismic hazard. These values at aK-net site whose soil and seismic wave velocity profiles are

  9. UC Berkeley 1 Bancroft Center Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    PP UC Berkeley 2 2 3 3 4 4 1 1 Bancroft Center Parking Inkstone Parking Garage Anna Head West Lot. Please prepay for parking at the vending machine located in the center of the lot. The west lot is for permit parking only. Located below Copy Central, this underground lot is the closest to the Visitor

  10. HANNAH APPEL University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the crude's gaseous byproducts. This vast, self-propelling, shiplike structure floated above an oil field, the production chain of Equatorial Guinea's oil was clearest to me by helicopter, far off the country's shoresHANNAH APPEL University of California, Berkeley Offshore work: Oil, modularity, and the how

  11. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  12. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U Handler Efficiency in Houses Iain S. Walker, Energy Performance of Buildings Group Lawrence Berkeley handler fans. As air conditioners have become more efficient, the fraction of total energy consumption

  13. UC Berkeley Welding/Cutting Permit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    #12;#12;UC Berkeley Welding/Cutting Permit MUST BE POSTED ON SITE All equipment to be used for welding or cutting has been inspected and approved. All personnel (including supervisors) are trained, or protected by fire-resistant shields. (Where floors have been wet down, personnel operating arc welding

  14. University of California, Berkeley Department of Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    1 University of California, Berkeley Department of Psychology Psychology W1 General Psychology to most upper-division courses in the Department of Psychology. Psychology 1 (or its online equivalent, Psychology W1) is required for prospective majors in Psychology, and is intended for lower-division students

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY PROPOSAL REVIEW FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    /Director/Dean of the Co-PI's Academic/Research Unit. If the Co-PI has included a cost share commitment, or Faculty ReleaseUNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY PROPOSAL REVIEW FORM SPONSORED PROJECTS OFFICE INDUSTRY the same Academic/Research Unit as the PI, enter the name, phone and email for the Chair

  16. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Berkeley, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2013-05-29

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  18. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 53484 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;HEAT RECOVERY because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide

  19. Suffolk County- LEED Program for County Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006, the Suffolk County Legislature enacted Resolution No. 126-2006, creating the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) Program for county construction projects. The program...

  20. Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover flow analyses performed for closure design at the OII site show that an ET cover is feasible for a wide

  1. Evaluation of three geophysical methods to locate undocumented landfills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brand, Stephen Gardner

    1991-01-01

    Placement The sand site landfill was started in the early 50's and closed in the early 60's. The landfill consists of a series of parallel trenches. The trenches are less than 15 ft deep, and were dug with a dragline. Because there has been considerable...

  2. Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2007-01-01

    University, New York, NY 10027, USA Received 1 July 2005; accepted 15 April 2006 Available online 2 AugustRenewable Energy 32 (2007) 1243­1257 Methane generation in landfills Nickolas J. Themelis energy source, to generate electricity or heat. As of 2001, there were about one thousand landfills

  3. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume E T H A N L . G R O S S M A N , * , L U I.3 to 11 m that were oriented parallel to the flow path. The center of the leachate plume was characterized of leachate contamination into underlying aquifers. Landfills are the U.S.'s largest anthropogenic source

  4. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. #12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill1 "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling" "A Sustainable Solution" Hĺkan in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse

  5. Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy ResourcesTurin, New York:Westbrook Center,Maine:Landfill

  6. Acme Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful Smart GridAchille,Wisconsin:AclaraLandfill

  7. Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to:Information 4thColorado/IncentivesColton Landfill

  8. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  9. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of market opportunities for CHP and bioenergy for landfills and wastewater treatment plants

  10. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  12. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Lantz

    2012-09-21

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized in the fact sheet.

  13. Landfill mining: A critical review of two decades of research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze two decades of landfill mining research regarding trends and topics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So far landfill mining has mainly been used to solve waste management issues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new perspective on landfills as resource reservoirs is emerging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of resource extraction from landfills is significant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline several key challenges for realization of resource extraction from landfills. - Abstract: Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill mining covering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research papers published during the period 1988-2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily been seen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space and local pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources, mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically, simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstrating moderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recent research findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resource extraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementation involves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying the conditions for realization and developing standardized frameworks for evaluating economic and environmental performance from a systems perspective. In order to address these challenges, a combination of applied and theoretical research is required.

  14. Creative financing of landfill gas utilization projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, J.P. Jr.; Laughlin, M.F.; McGuigan, M.J.

    1996-11-01

    The landfill gas utilization industry has gone through profound change in the last ten years and is in for further changes in the coming years. The first change is the probable expiration of Section 29 tax credits for newly developed projects and the second is the upcoming NSPS mandate to capture fugitive LFG emission from our nations larger landfills. In order to provide for the capital needs of LFG utilization project developers, lenders and investors must adapt to the changing nature of the industry as well. Lyon Credit Corporation has provided senior and subordinated financing as well as lease financing for the LFG utilization industry for the last three years. During this time, LCC has had to adapt its product offerings to meet the continuing needs of the borrowers in this industry. This presentation will focus on the changing nature of the industry and its effect on the economics, capital and financing requirements of newly developed LFG utilization projects. The two fundamental changes which have drastically altered the way projects are structured and financed include the changing nature of the LFG project product end-user and various regulatory and legislative measures which have significantly impacted the responsibilities of the project owner/developer and the future profitability of all LFG utilization projects. The successful LFG utilization project developers will be those who recognize that these changes are permanent departures from past practices, and those who will seek to exploit opportunities created by these changes. The lenders and investors to this industry will likewise have to adapt with these changes in order to continue to provide needed capital to this growing industry.

  15. Berkeley Lab Hosts Regional Science Bowl; Palo Alto Comes Out...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl include Mountain View High School and San Francisco's University High School. For more information: http:science.energy.govwdtsnsb About NERSC and Berkeley...

  16. CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Engineering Services 541330 Drafting Services 541340 Geophysical Surveying and Mapping Services...

  17. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Berkeley Site Office | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Berkeley Site Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the...

  18. Breakthrough Berkeley Mist Sealant Technology: Potential to Save...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    about the commercialization of Berkeley Lab technologies at the National Laboratory's Tech Transfer site. Addthis Related Articles New Jersey: Reducing Energy Bills for...

  19. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residentialparticularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage ofthese cities propose to offer their residents the ability to

  20. Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances September 17, 2015 | Tags: Climate Research,...

  1. Berkeley Lab: 80 Years of Excellence in Science | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a University of California Berkeley physicist who won the 1939 Nobel Prize in physics for his invention of the cyclotron, a circular particle accelerator that opened the...

  2. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 1. Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY ENERGY AND RESOURCES GROUP DANIEL M. KAMMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY ENERGY AND RESOURCES GROUP DANIEL M OF CALIFORNIA PROFESSOR IN THE ENERGY AND RESOURCES GROUP BERKELEY, CA 94720 and Appropriate Energy Lab (RAEL) http://rael.berkeley.edu Director, Transportation

  4. Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

  5. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    z Black Liquor z Blast Furnace Gas z Coalbed Methane z Coke Oven Gas z Crop Residues z Food Processing Waste z Industrial VOC's z Landfill Gas z Municipal Solid Waste z...

  6. Dirty Air Conditioners: Energy Implications of Coil Fouling Jeffrey Siegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/ UC Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkeley National Laboratory ABSTRACT Residential air conditioning is responsible for a substantial amount conditioning commissioning and maintenance practices. Introduction Residential air conditioning is responsible. For typical residential heat pump and air conditioning #12;systems, they predict a 10 ­ 25 % average energy

  7. Suggestions for the Road to Copenhagen University of California, Berkeley, karp@are.berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    Suggestions for the Road to Copenhagen Larry Karp University of California, Berkeley, karp than carbon taxes. A Central Bank maintains stability of car- bon prices by defending a price ceiling clause, emissions trade, taxes versus cap and trade, price stability, carbon leakage, trade restrictions

  8. UC President Mark Yudof Announces Appointment of Paul Alivisatos as Berkeley Lab Director

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yudof, Mark

    2013-05-29

    In this video, broadcast to Berkeley Lab staff on Nov. 20, 2009, UC President Mark Yudof announces Paul Alivisatos as the new director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  9. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. (ed.)

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  10. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. [ed.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  12. Berkeley Lab View -- March 28, 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab |TraffickingMarch

  13. Berkeley Algorithms Help Researchers Understand Dark Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1Ben AllenBenefits |Berkeley

  14. Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab Particle

  15. Berkeley Lab Welcomes the NERSC Users' Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab

  16. UC Berkeley- Energy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to: navigation,Berkeley- Energy

  17. University of California, Berkeley | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ ClimateFeed JumpAlberta Jump to:Berkeley Jump

  18. Berkeley Planning Journal Sustainable Transport in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    . Introduction New Urbanism is often proposed as a more sustainable form of urban growth at both the neighborhood) examined the sustainability of New Urban- #12;60 Berkeley Planning Journal, Volume 19, 2006 ismBerkeley Planning Journal Volume 19 2006 Sustainable Transport in the United States: From Rhetoric

  19. Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Goals for 2020 Solar PV & thermal to meet 11% of the GHG Reduction Goal in Climate Action PlanW #12;Berkeley FIRST ProgramBerkeley FIRST Program (Financing Initiative for Renewable Solar Technology for 38 solar PV installations · Maximum financing is $37,500 per property · Application period November 5

  20. San Diego County- Design Standards for County Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The San Diego County Board of Supervisors established design standards for county facilities and property. Among other requirements,  the policy requires that all new county buildings or major...

  1. Ocean County, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information AreaCounty Landfill BiomassNew

  2. Oliver County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.Information Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery PlantCounty,

  3. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustohalova, Veronika . E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim; Widmann, Renatus

    2006-07-01

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  4. Risk mitigation methodology for solid waste landfills. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, W.B.

    1995-05-01

    Several recent models have attempted to simulate or assess the probability and consequences of the leakage of aqueous contaminant leakage from solid waste landfills. These models incorporate common factors, including climatological and geological characteristics. Each model, however, employs a unique approach to the problem, assigns different relative weights to factors, and relies upon extrapolated small-scale experimental data and/or subjective judgment in predicting the full-scale landfill failure mechanisms leading to contaminant migration. As a result, no two models are likely to equally assess a given landfill, and no one model has been validated as a predictor of long-term performance. The United States Air Force maintains a database for characterization of potential hazardous waste sites. Records include more than 500 landfills, providing such information as waste, soil, aquifer, monitoring location data, and the results of sample testing. Through analysis of this information, nearly 300 landfills were assessed to have sufficiently, partially, or inadequately contained hazardous constituents of the wastes placed within them.

  5. Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and NREL recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study, as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized here.

  6. Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliam County, Oregon: EnergyGiraMundo

  7. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  8. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Facilities Division- Optimizing Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Ken Fletcher, Deputy Division Director for Facilities, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  9. Landfill gas study performance on a IC Engine with addition Liubov Melnikova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of the methods of catalytic reforming of portion of landfill gas and an experiment conducted to validate

  10. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. Lockley, Elaine; Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K.

    2008-07-01

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  11. Landfill Expansion and Permit Revision FEIR Addendum #1 2003 LRDP FEIR Addendum #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    and post-closure maintenance activities for Waste Management Unit 2 (WMU2) at the UC Davis campus landfillUC Davis Landfill Expansion and Permit Revision FEIR ­ Addendum #1 2003 LRDP FEIR ­ Addendum #2 August 2011 Page 1 1 August 2011 ADDENDUM #1 TO THE LANDFILL EXPANSION AND PERMIT REVISION FEIR (State

  12. Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system T. D. Stark containment, Strength, Stability, Shearbox test, Failure, Final cover system, Landfill REFERENCE: Stark, T. D. & Newman, E. J. (20 I0). Design of a landfill final cover systcm. Geosynthetics [ntemational17, No.3, 124

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  14. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during third quarter 1995 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit (DWP-087A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria.

  15. Broward County- Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, Board of County Commissioners of Broward County passed a resolution creating the County Green Building Policy. All new County-owned and operated buildings must achieve a minimum...

  16. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  17. EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Placer County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood?to?energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities. NOTE: After review of a final California Environmental Quality Act Environmental Impact Report, DOE has determined that preparation of an EA is not necessary. The propsed action fits within DOE's categorical exclusion B5.20. Therefore, this EA is cancelled.

  18. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  19. 1 Cyclotron Road, Building 23 Berkeley, CA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    1 Cyclotron Road, Building 23 Berkeley, CA 94720 (510) 495-8000 reservation queen or double twin rooms. Tax, parking, wifi and weekday shuttle pass are included in the rate

  20. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Berkeley Lab in three areas: hazardous waste (including thesite in various hazardous or regulatory areas of con- cern.Storage Area (diffuse 2.00 x IO" source) NW Hazardous Waste

  1. The UC Berkeley Strategic Academic Plan: Five-Year Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    ://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2003/05/sap/plan.pdf. A one-year review was done in 2003. This five-year review provides. Current projections indicate that the campus will enroll approximately 34,500 FTE by 2010-11, or 1 for the system over the next decade, and it is critical that Berkeley continues to play its leading role

  2. County Wind Ordinance Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assembly Bill 45 of 2009 authorized counties to adopt ordinances to provide for the installation of small wind systems (50 kW or smaller) outside urbanized areas but within the county's...

  3. Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

    2007-01-01

    Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

  4. EA-1065: Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to...

  5. EA-1087: Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments...

  6. Kiowa County Commons Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Kiowa County Commons Building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  7. Story Road Landfill Solar Site Evaluation: San Jose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the Story Road Landfill (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

  8. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-05-01

    This report for first quarter 1992 contains sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data for the Savannah River Plant. The data tables presented in this report are copies of draft analytical results and therefore do contain errors. These errors will be corrected when the finalized data is received from the laboratory.

  9. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayalon, O. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Economics and Management, Tel Hai College and NRERC, University of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Shani, E. [Dan Region Association of Towns, Sanitation and Waste Disposal (Israel)

    2006-07-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

  10. LANDFILL UNDERGROUND POLLUTION DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION USING INORGANIC TRACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    LANDFILL UNDERGROUND POLLUTION DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION USING INORGANIC TRACES M. O. LOOSER1 received 1 January 1998; accepted in revised form 1 January 1999) AbstractĐSince water is the main contamination arrow in the underground, it is necessary to get good indicators to be able to detect pollution

  11. Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced, as well as an increase in maintenance costs (6, 7). The presence of VMSs in biogas is thus a challenge recommended by most equipment manufacturers for un- hindered use (6). Of all VMSs in biogas

  12. Policy Analysis Landfill-Gas-to-Energy Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    perspectives in comparison to current subsidies. It was found that the private breakeven price of electricityPolicy Analysis Landfill-Gas-to-Energy Projects: Analysis of Net Private and Social Benefits P A U gas also has the potential to be used to generate electricity.In1994,the

  13. Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    landfill biomethane to liquefied natural gas for use as transportation fuel. The aim is to develop, and liquefaction of biomethane. The resulting liquefied natural gas will consist of cryogenically liquefied. This project will also serve as a model for similar facilities in California to use native biogas resources

  14. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. Singh, M.K.; Inkratas, C. Fleming, I.R. McBean, E.

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  15. Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Steven

    2012-11-15

    The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

  16. Berkeley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County,Benton, NewBergenfield, NewWest

  17. Berkeley, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County,Benton, NewBergenfield, NewWestIllinois:

  18. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Fadel, Mutasem; Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

  19. Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I.; Kontaksakis, M.; Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N.; Lazaridis, M.

    2010-11-15

    Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

  20. Department of Energy Selects U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium for U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center's Energy-Water Track Department of Energy Selects U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium for U.S.-China...

  1. BERKELEY: INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS RESEARCH Tenure, Tenure-Track Faculty -Decision Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    BERKELEY: INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS RESEARCH Tenure, Tenure-Track Faculty - Decision Analytics Department of Industrial Engineering & Operations Research and College of Engineering The DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS RESEARCH (IEOR) at University of California, Berkeley

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY CLARENCE CORY AND A HISTORY OF EARLY ELECTRICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY CLARENCE CORY AND A HISTORY OF EARLY ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT U 199 BY JOHN BLAKE TOROUS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE, 2007 BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA MAY............................................................................................2 Section 1. California's Need for Electrical Engineering...................................3 2

  3. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Budinger, Thomas [LBNL, Center for Functional Imaging

    2011-10-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  4. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. First Quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during first quarter 1994 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill Operating permit (DWP-0874A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF FOURTH BERKELEY CONFERENCE ON DISTRIBUTED DATA MANAGEMENT AND COMPUTER NETWORKS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    LBL-9433 PROCEEDINGS OF THE FOURTH BERKELEY CONFERENCE ONmemory, anpther is one-fourth as large, etc. This strategy

  6. Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

  7. 488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.

    2014-11-17

    At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

  8. King County Metro Transit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of King County Metro's articulated hybrid electric transit buses with Allison electric drives.

  9. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sanii, Babak

    2013-05-29

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  10. City Profile: Berkeley A part of the study entitled: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions through local government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    City Profile: Berkeley A part of the study entitled: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions through activism and a liberal political bent. Berkeley Commute Mode Split (2000) Car Transit Walk Other Source: US not own a car. 56 percent of Berkeley residents over 16 years of age are employed. The US Census reports

  11. Dear Friends of Berkeley Bioengineering, It has been another exciting year for bioengineering at UC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Berkeley BioE 2013 #12;Dear Friends of Berkeley Bioengineering, It has been another exciting year for bioengineering at UC Berkeley. After fifteen years our department continues to grow and change, and we could. The faculty also play key roles in several new bioengineering-focused research initiatives on the horizon

  12. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2010-05-24

    INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-02-0

  13. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2010-07-21

    INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-03-0

  14. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects," originally presented on July 17, 2012.

  15. Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

  16. Garbage In, Power Out: South Carolina BMW Plant Converts Landfill Gas to Hydrogen Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The largest fuel cell forklift fleet in the world is now being powered with hydrogen produced on-site from biomethane gas at a nearby landfill.

  17. University of California, Berkeley Fall 2003 Energy and Resources Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    University of California, Berkeley Fall 2003 Energy and Resources Group Advanced Graduate Seminar Public Policy 290 - Energy and Development Professor Daniel M. Kammen Energy and Resources Group as either: Public Policy 290 P019 (CC# 77265), or Energy and Resources 290 P 004 (CC# 27765) Course WWW page

  18. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2013-05-17

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  19. UC Berkeley, BEARS 20101 The Future of Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    as Mac, iPad, iPod Touch Sensors: ­ Camera, mic, GPS, compass, proximity, ambient light, ambient noise, 3 Berkeley, BEARS 20107 Replace the PC? Cellphone accessories: ­ Big screen (~200M sold per year rural deployment This is the real "digital divide" ­ Not between nations ­ ... but between urban

  20. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2014-09-15

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  1. Packaging Design for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory High Resistivity CCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packaging Design for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory High Resistivity CCDs R. J. Stovera* , W developed a four-side mosaic package fabricated from aluminum nitride. Our objectives have been to achieve a flatness of less than 10 micrometers peak-to-valley and a consistent final package thickness variation

  2. BERKELEY REVIEW OF LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 6 Switching to Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    as projectionsforfuturetechnologicaldevelopments,renewable energy potential, fuel costs, and public policy. Switch is designed to allowBERKELEY REVIEW OF LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 6 Switching to Sustainability The Sustainable Energy Imperative Emerging economies will account for more than 90 percent of new energy-generation capacity by 2035

  3. CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES, UC BERKELEY 11Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    . The future is promising, the foreign press says. Mexico has crossed the threshold and approved reformsCENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES, UC BERKELEY 11Spring 2014 M exico waking up. Mexico moving, propose reforms, and approve them. A country that no longer wants to be hostage to archaic traditions

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING SAFETY MANUAL EMERGENCY Hall 642-7789 NE Department Safety Officer Jeff Bickel, 4163 Etcheverry Hall 642-5015 Nuclear: 911 or from cell (510) 642-3333 Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) 642-3073 Hazardous spills

  5. How to See the Supernova Berkeley Lab Just Discovered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to astronomers, this is the closest and brightest supernova of this type detected in the last 30 years and will be closely studied for years to come. In this video, Berkeley Lab's Peter Nugent explains how to find the event with a small telescope or pair of binoculars.

  6. University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building (VLSB) Building Emergency Plan Date Revised: January 2014 Prepared By: Derek Apodaca #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS I. BUILDING INFORMATION 1. Building Name 2. Building Coordinator Name 3. Alternate BC Name 4. Emergency Assembly Area Location 5

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  8. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2013-05-29

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  9. Drain Disposal Restrictions for Chemicals University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    , Athletics Operations, Maintenance Operations, and Construction Sites Restrictions for Chemicals 2013 UC Berkeley ISSUED BY THE OFFICE OF EH&S AND THE LABORATORY OPERATIONS & SAFETY BY THE OFFICE OF EH&S AND THE LABORATORY OPERATIONS & SAFETY COMMITTEE Page 2 Table of Contents 1. Introduction

  10. Stormwater Best Management Practices Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormwater Best Management Practices Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lessons Learned LL-2004 and stormwater inspector noticed two dumpsters, one without a lid and one with the lid left open. Neither management practices for prevention of contamination to stormwater runoff. Employees had not been

  11. SWITCH-WECC http://rael.berkeley.edu/switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and unit commitment · Capacity installation decisions in each "investment period" · Operate or retire and solar power in California. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, Energy and Resources., 2013. SunShot solar power reduces costs and uncertainty in future low-carbon electricity systems

  12. LIBRARY COMMITTEE BERKELEY DIVISION of the ACADEMIC SENATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    LIBRARY COMMITTEE BERKELEY DIVISION of the ACADEMIC SENATE Annual Report 1996-97 The Library administration of the Library and perform[ing] such other duties relative to the Library as may be committed to the Division." · In accordance with this charge, the Library Committee took action on the following topics

  13. University of California, Berkeley Department of Nuclear Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    of reprisal. Nuclear Engineering Safety Committee The Nuclear Engineering Safety Committee has the ongoingUniversity of California, Berkeley Department of Nuclear Engineering Injury and Illness Prevention Program Updated 10/2011 #12;2 Nuclear Engineering Injury & Illness Prevention Program TABLE OF CONTENTS I

  14. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-01-01

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY COMPLIANCE INFORMATION FORM for RESEARCH GIFTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    ://researchcoi.berkeley.edu. The Compliance Information Form is to be included with 700-U information that is sent to the Conflict of Interest is to be filled out along with the Statement of Economic Interests for Principal Investigators (Form 700-U research (defined as publishable research about living people using interviews, surveys, tests

  16. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 2. Appendices to project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  17. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Jeremy W.F.; Crest, Marion; Barlaz, Morton A.; Spokas, Kurt A.; Akerman, Anna; Yuan, Lei

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  18. Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    1 Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley to the square root of the product of frequency of the signal and the mobility of the fluid in the reservoir. This provides an opportunity for locating the most productive zones of the field before drilling

  19. HIU (FIONA) CHEUNG 2534 Benvenue Avenue, Unit 7, Berkeley, CA 94704 | (408) 597-7036 | fcheung717@berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    .886 RESEARCH INTERESTS Predictive relationship of emotion coherence to mood disorders Self-esteem and emotion Behavior (EEB) coding system, entered data from subject surveys and questionnaires, and transcribed conversations of couples discussing a conflict Emotion and Emotion Regulation Lab ­ Berkeley, CA Research

  20. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  1. Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard methane (CH4 )annually to the world's total CH4 emission of ~550 Tg/yr. Recycling and thermal treatment destined for landfills and to mitigating CH4 emission. Waste generation is estimated to more than double

  2. Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate, for the automation of a bench-scale SBR treating leachate generated in old landfills. Attention was given confirm the effectiveness of the nitrite route for nitrogen removal optimisation in leachate treatment

  3. Bulletin of Entomological Research (1999) 89, 493498 493 Fly populations associated with landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    and composting sites used for household refuse disposal D. Goulson*, W.O.H. Hughes and J.W. Chapman Division at the following sites in Hampshire, UK during August to November 1998: a landfill and composting site (Paulsgrove), and a composting site with no landfill nearby. Overall, house flies Musca domestica (Linnaeus) and lesser house

  4. Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management By Evridiki Bersi -Kathimerini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    that Germany saves 3.7 billion euros a year thanks to recycling and the production of energy from waste. Proper landfills will be out of operation because by then Germany plans to make use of all garbage and the energyLandfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management rules By Evridiki Bersi

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VA 03WashingtonLake Landfill - MO

  6. I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited RockLLC Jump to:I 95 Landfill

  7. Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.Information Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass

  8. List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressed airGeothermal FacilitiesLandfill Gas

  9. Mid Valley Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysvilleMicrogravity-Hybrid MicrogravitySize HomeValley Landfill

  10. Proceedings Sardinia 2009, Twelfth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy; 5 -9 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings Sardinia 2009, Twelfth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium S). When the BOD/TKN ratio is low as in the case of leachate from "old" landfills for municipal solid waste International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium The nitrite oxidation rate is normally faster than

  11. TDR calibration for the alternative landfill cover demonstration (ALCD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, J.; Dwyer, S.F.; Swanson, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration is a large scale field test that compares the performance of various landfill cover designs in dry environments. An important component of the comparison is the change in the moisture content of the soils throughout the different cover test plots. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is the primary method for the measurement of the volumetric moisture content. Each of the covers is composed of layers of varying types and densities of soils. The probes are therefore calibrated to calculate the volumetric moisture content in each of the different soils in order to gain the optimum performance of the TDR system. The demonstration plots are constructed in two phases; a different probe is used in each phase. The probe that is used in Phase 1 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, compacted native soil mixed with 6% sodium bentonite by weight, and sand. The probe that is used in Phase 2 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, and sand. In addition, the probes are calibrated for the varying cable lengths of the TDR probes. The resulting empirically derived equations allow for the calculation of in-situ volumetric moisture content of all of the varying soils throughout the cover test plots in the demonstration.

  12. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, Vince

    2011-01-01

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  13. Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-11-14

    In this follow-up "Ask Berkeley Lab" video, energy efficiency expert Iain Walker answers some of your questions about home energy efficiency. How do you monitor which appliances use the most energy? Should you replace your old windows? Are photovoltaic systems worth the cost? What to do about a leaky house? And what's the single biggest energy user in your home? Watch the video to get the answers to these and more questions.

  14. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  15. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Battaglia, Vince

    2013-05-29

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  16. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  17. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere — university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  18. SBOT CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -Rob Roberts About Us RobCALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC

  19. Recovery Act Funded Projects at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI | Department8 AnnualDepartmentLawrence Berkeley

  20. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  1. Certification report for final closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This report represents the Geotek Engineering Company, Inc., (Geotek) record of activities to support certification of final closure Of the subject Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II. Ex as noted herein, final closure of the landfill was completed in accordance with the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill 11 Closure/Post Closure Plan, Revision 2, submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on April 14, 1992, and approved by TDEC on May 27, 1994 (the ``Closure Plan``). minor modification to the Closure Plan allowing partial closure of the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II (Phase 1) was approved by TDEC on August 3, 1994. The Phase I portion of the closure for the subject landfill was completed on March 25, 1995. A closure certification report entitled Certification Report for Partial Closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was submitted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES) on March 28, 1995. The final closure represents the completion of the closure activities for the entire Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II Site. The contents of this report and accompanying certification are based on observations by Geotek engineers and geologists during closure activities and on review of reports, records, laboratory test results, and other information furnished to Geotek by LMES.

  2. Limited site investigation of Landfills 1 and 4, Fort Lewis, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Eddy, P.A.; Airhart, S.P.; Olsen, K.R.; Raymond, J.R.; Dahl, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    The information presented in this report was collected during limited site investigation activities conducted in the vicinity of Landfills 1 and 4 at Fort Lewis. The purpose of this work was to provide a means of detecting and evaluating the impacts of these inactive landfills on ground-water quality and adjacent lands. This effort included the design and construction of ground-water monitoring systems for compliance with applicable federal and state regulations governing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type landfills. Ground-water samples were collected from both existing (1981 and 1984) wells and the newly installed (1988) wells. The analytical results from the water samples indicate that the ground water in and around Landfill 1 contains limited contamination. Contaminants may include volatile organic compounds and nitrate. The primary concern in the area around Landfill 1 was the determination that ground water from two wells may contain cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. Nitrate levels in the downgradient wells were greater than those in upgradient wells and exceeded drinking water standards in some of the less-representative samples. Analyses of ground-water samples from wells in and around Landfill 4 indicate several contaminants may be present. These include volatile organic compounds (principally cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene), coliform, oil and grease, and perhaps some metals (iron and magnesium). The primary concern in the area around Landfill 4 was the determination that ground water from five wells contained cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. The source of contaminants beneath either landfill cannot yet be identified. Insufficient data exist to disprove or confirm either landfill as possible contributors. 19 refs., 32 figs., 17 tabs.

  3. Harris County- Green Building Policy for County Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Harris County Facilities and Property Management (FPM) Division also requires all county buildings to meet minimum energy efficiency and sustainability measures, as described in the Best Gree...

  4. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  5. The Impact of Race, Culture, and Consciousness for Black Students at Berkeley High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trail, Sara K

    2015-01-01

    Youth”, in Social Justice Education for Teachers, ed. Carloshigh school curriculum and education as well as sociologyBerkeley High By: Sara Trail Education 190: Critical Studies

  6. #AskBerkeleyLab: A Pill to Treat Exposure to Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2014-10-30

    Berkeley Lab chemist, Rebecca Abergel, answers a question from Oakland resident Yelena on how a pill can treat exposure to radiation.

  7. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-Redshift Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01

    photometry curve for type Ia supernovae and the redshift vsdistributions for observed supernovae. Figure 5 from Millermain efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Brookhaven national Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA. AFRD-Berkeley National Laboratory,” LBNL Report LBNL 2670-E,performed in the laboratory and in-situ at-wavelength,”

  9. Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Beam from Deuteron Breakup”, inexperiments of atmospheric neutron effects on deep sub-Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley

  10. Berkeley Lab Dr. Elsie Quaite-Randall, MBA Chief Technology Transfer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 22, 2015 * Provide access to Berkeley Lab's unique user facilities and expertise * License LBNL developed technology to qualified companies * Create startup companies to...

  11. Walton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    to reduce coastal storm damages by constructing berms and dunes along 18.8 miles of Walton County shoreline;vegetation and replacement of dune walkover structures as required. Material for the berm and duneWalton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL 13 December 2012 ABSTRACT

  12. Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source; Highway and railway in the strong shaking area Highway #3 Taiwan High Speed Rail Taiwan Railway Epicenter before the earthquake hits. A 6-intensity earthquake with epicenter at Nantou County struck Taiwan at 10

  13. San Diego County- Solar Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has established zoning guidelines for solar electric systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. Photovoltaic (PV) systems which have their...

  14. Riverside County- Sustainable Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects...

  15. San Diego County- Wind Regulations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The County of San Diego has established zoning guidelines for wind turbine systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. Wind turbine systems can be classified as small,...

  16. Snohomish County Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

    2010-02-01

    Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to ���¢��������grow���¢������� this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

  17. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -Building 977: Berkeley West Biocenter, 717 Potter Street, Berkeley, CA 94710 -WASTE QUANTITIES 9 8 & 30 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    KG 1 0 01 1 GB 1 1 trichloroacetic acid 76039 N N VACUUM PUMP OIL oil 100% 000826-00-0 N N C WASTE: Berkeley West Biocenter, 717 Potter Street, Berkeley, CA 94710 - WASTE QUANTITIES 9 8 & 30 10 11 12 13 14 Name Cas N Secret EHS Class Mix State Haz Cat Waste days Cont Unit Daily Daily Waste Cont Press Temp

  18. Santa Clara County- Zoning Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santa Clara County's Zoning Ordinance includes standards for wind and solar structures for residential, agricultural, and commercial uses.

  19. Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Margrit Evelyn

    1995-01-01

    Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane...

  20. Overburden effects on waste compaction and leachate generation in municipal landfills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehevec, Adam Wade

    1994-01-01

    This thesis presents a model to predict the effects of overburden pressure on the formation of leachate within municipal solid waste landfills. In addition, it estimates the compaction and subsequent settlement that the ...

  1. Sorption model of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benezene in municipal landfill materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Yuh-Lin

    1995-01-01

    This research is intended to establish a mathematical model describing the mass transfer of trace gas in landfill. Experimental data used for calibration were reported by Stiegler et al. [ 1989]. Transfer mechanisms of TCE and benzene (trace gases...

  2. Field measurements of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses a paper sludge barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; LaPlante, C.; Zimmie, T.F.; Quiroz, J.

    1999-07-01

    Frost penetration is a major environmental concern in landfill design. Freezing and thawing cycles may deteriorate the permeability of the liner or cap. In this study, the depth of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses paper sludge as the impermeable barrier (the Hubbardston landfill in Massachusetts) was measured using a frost measurement system. A thermistor probe measured the temperature at various depths. Although temperature measurements are important, soil resistivity measurements are required to accurately predict the freezing level, since soil resistivity increases greatly upon freezing. A conductivity probe measured the half-bridge voltage between conductivity rings and a ground rod. Data were collected in data loggers. The data collected from 1992--1996 showed that the frost level did not penetrate the paper sludge capping layer. Heavy snow cover throughout the winters decreased the depth of frost penetration by insulating the landfill. The high water content in the sludge also contributed to the lack of freezing.

  3. WESTLAKE LANDFILL EPA Region 7 03/29/2012 City: Bridgeton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    threats are generally limited to people who might come into direct contact with landfilled waste materials and disposal either off-site or in a new, on-site engineered disposal cell outside of the Missouri River

  4. GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhenmei

    2010-01-01

    sites across the U.S. Leachate from the unlined landfillthe impact of the landfill leachate on the diversity andto the center of the leachate plume. Our analyses showed

  5. IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fćlles analyser og international forskningssamarbejde. Det Internationale Energi Agentur ( IEA) er organiseret i en

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruland, R.M.

    1986-10-01

    Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  8. Heinz Heinemann. The Berkeley Years (1978-1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Inger M.

    2009-08-27

    Heinz Heineman came to Berkeley in 1978 and stayed there for 15 years. This was the time of the energy crisis and we did not have anybody like him who had such a tremendous industrial experience with oil and coal conversion technology and science. He was interested in the conversion of coal to gaseous molecules and our studies with model catalysts appealed to him and attracted him. In a way, Heinz Heineman was bigger than life, since he played such a seminal role in the history of American catalysis science.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  10. Berkeley Lab Transportation and Parking Demand Management Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley Lab |Trafficking

  11. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *Berkeley LabDepartment of

  12. Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1Ben AllenBenefits |Berkeley

  13. Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1Ben AllenBenefits |BerkeleyClimate

  14. Berkeley Lab and NERSC Reach Out to Women in Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley LabNERSC Reaches Out to

  15. Berkeley Lab to Collaborate with Intel in Updating Scientific Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley LabNERSC Reaches Out

  16. Berkeley Lab » » A-Z Link

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley LabNERSC Reaches

  17. UC Berkeley-Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to: navigation,Berkeley-

  18. Six Berkeley Lab (Three ALS) Scientists Are 2012 APS Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks:Sites PendingSix Berkeley

  19. Sustainable Energy Options for Kosovo January 19, 2012 Page: 1 of 50 http://rael.berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Sustainable Energy Options for Kosovo ­ January 19, 2012 Page: 1 of 50 University of California, Berkeley ** Version 1 ** Sustainable Energy Options for Kosovo An analysis http://rael.berkeley.edu Renewable & Appropriate Energy Laboratory Energy & Resources Group

  20. Cost savings associated with landfilling wastes containing very low levels of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, C.J. [Argonne National Lab., Germantown, MD (United States); Shaddoan, W.T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Paducah, KY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has operated captive landfills (both residential and construction/demolition debris) in accordance with the Commonwealth of Kentucky regulations since the early 1980s. Typical waste streams allowed in these landfills include nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste (such as paper, plastic, cardboard, cafeteria waste, clothing, wood, asbestos, fly ash, metals, and construction debris). In July 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new requirements for the disposal of sanitary wastes in a {open_quotes}contained landfill.{close_quotes} These requirements were promulgated in the 401 Kentucky Administrative Record Chapters 47 and 48 that became effective 30 June 1995. The requirements for a new contained landfill include a synthetic liner made of high-density polyethylene in addition to the traditional 1-meter (3-foot) clay liner and a leachate collection system. A new landfill at Paducah would accept waste streams similar to those that have been accepted in the past. The permit for the previously existing landfills did not include radioactivity limits; instead, these levels were administratively controlled. Typically, if radioactivity was detected above background levels, the waste was classified as low-level waste (LLW), which would be sent off-site for disposal.

  1. ADDRESS PHONE FAX WEB 2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 230, Berkeley, CA 94704 510.643.2065 510.664.9078 nssc.berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    environment through faculty-mentored research projects studying nuclear and particle, CA 94704 510.643.2065 510.664.9078 nssc.berkeley.edu Nuclear Science) in National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) mission-relevant science by joint

  2. San Diego County Reservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    San Diego County Brenda Pisgah Iron Mountain Riverside East Imperial East Morongo Reservation Colorado River Reservation San Pasqual Reservation Santa Ysabel Reservation Torres-Martinez Reservation) Reservation 60 95 95 95 115 San Diego Banning Yucca Valley Twentynine Palms Desert Hot Springs Palm Springs

  3. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY to The Bancroft Library by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Hermann O. L. Fischer, whose late husband was for many years professor of biochemistry on the Berkeley campus. This splendid and significant gift to the Library includes

  4. REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY University of California, Berkeley EXECUTIVE SUMMARY I. TOWARD A NEW LIBRARY There is a worldwide crisis in research libraries caused by an explosion of both cost and quantity of scholarly information. The Berkeley Library is by no means unique in being

  5. Heidelberg DWL66 Direct Write Lithography System Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, UC Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Heidelberg DWL66 Direct Write Lithography System Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, UC Berkeley Standard Operating Procedure Prepared By: Frankie Myers (fbm@berkeley.edu) Updated: July 30, 2010, Peter Ledochowitz) may use this machine. Qualification must include one supervised run. SAFETY WARNING

  6. Spring 2014 View this email in your browser Hello from Berkeley Bioengineering!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Spring 2014 View this email in your browser Hello from Berkeley Bioengineering! It's been another program ranked 7th best in the U.S. New rankings from US News & World Report placed our bioengineeringth anniversary of the UC Berkeley - UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, AIMBE Fellows Herr

  7. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  9. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  10. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  11. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

  12. Statistical comparison of leachate from hazardous, codisposal, and municipal solid waste landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, R.D.; Dolan, D.G.; May, H.; O'Leary, K.; O'Hara, R.

    1999-09-30

    There has been considerable debate regarding the chemical characterization of landfill leachate in general and the comparison of various types of landfill leachate (e.g., hazardous, codisposal, and municipal) in particular. For example, the preamble to the US EPA Subtitle D regulation (40 CFR Parts 257 and 258) suggests that there are no significant differences between the number and concentration of toxic constituents in hazardous versus municipal solid waste landfill leachate. The purpose of this paper is to statistically test this hypothesis in a large leachate database comprising 1490 leachate samples from 283 sample points (i.e., monitoring location such as a leachate sump) in 93 landfill waste cells (i.e., a section of a facility that took a specific waste stream or collection of similar waste streams) from 48 sites with municipal, codisposal, or hazardous waste site histories. Results of the analysis reveal clear differention between landfill leachate types, both in terms of constituents detected and their concentrations. The result of the analysis is a classification function that can estimate the probability that new leachate or ground water sample was produced by the disposal of municipal, codisposal, or hazardous waste. This type of computation is illustrated, and applications of the model to Superfund cost-allocation problems are discussed.

  13. San Jacinto County Jail Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1973-01-01

    and part of the Houston metropolitan area. The County is bisected by the Trinity River from North to South and US Highway 90 from East to West. The County has a very strategic location, along the Trinity River, allowing access to the Port to the South... stream_source_info Emily Fan Reja Liberty County Poster_final (1).pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 14405 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Emily Fan Reja Liberty County Poster_final (1).pdf.txt Content-Type text...

  14. Clark County- Energy Conservation Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2010, Clark County adopted Ordinance 3897, implementing the Southern Nevada version of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial buildings...

  15. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  16. HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERCInformation 3.1 - Amendments to6EHDOTHMDC

  17. Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005Minnehaha County,Energy Information Pool

  18. Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBailey County ElecBaldWind

  19. Adams County- Energy from Community Solar Gardens

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When SunShare’s solar garden comes online, Adams County will be the first county in the nation to power its buildings with community solar energy. The county projects energy cost savings of $300,...

  20. Health assessment for Cedartown Municipal Landfill NPL Site, Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, Region 4. CERCLIS No. GAD980495402. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-08

    In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

  1. Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

  2. Bridging Brown County Case Study Bridging Brown County Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and Finding a Future Summary and Background Communities in the rural Midwest typically understand and solve unique issues facing rural communities? In Brown County, Minnesota, the community developed. But we also belong to a larger rural community: the community formed by all residents of Brown County. We

  3. Feasibility Study of Solar Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico (Second Study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a solar photovoltaics (PV) system on landfill sites in Puerto Rico. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). The report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system. The landfills and sites considered in this report were all determined feasible areas in which to implement solar PV systems.

  4. An Assessment of the Disposal of Petroleum Industry NORM in Nonhazardous Landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnish, John J.; Blunt, Deborah, L.; Haffenden, Rebecca A.; Herbert, Jennifer; Pfingston, Manjula; Smith, Karen P.; Williams, Gustavious P.

    1999-10-12

    In this study, the disposal of radium-bearing NORM wastes in nonhazardous landfills in accordance with the MDEQ guidelines was modeled to evaluate potential radiological doses and resultant health risks to workers and the general public. In addition, the study included an evaluation of the potential doses and health risks associated with disposing of a separate NORM waste stream generated by the petroleum industry--wastes containing lead-210 (Pb-210) and its progeny. Both NORM waste streams are characterized in Section 3 of this report. The study also included reviews of (1) the regulatory constraints applicable to the disposal of NORM in nonhazardous landfills in several major oil and gas producing states (Section 2) and (2) the typical costs associated with disposing of NORM, covering disposal options currently permitted by most state regulations as well as the nonhazardous landfill option (Section 4).

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Suffolk County Community...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Riverhead, Suffolk County Community College is the largest community college in New York State. Suffolk County Community College has a number of sustainability initiatives, as...

  6. Madison County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Madison County adopted a new land use ordinance in May 2010, which includes provisions for permitting wind turbines within the county.

  7. Santa Barbara County, California Data Dashboard | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Santa Barbara County, California, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Santa Barbara County Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications...

  8. Landfill impacts on aquatic plant communities and tissue metal levels at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, P.M. [National Biological Service, Porter, IN (United States). Lake Michigan Ecological Station; Scribailo, R.W. [Purdue Univ.North Central, Westville, IN (United States). Section of Biology and Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    One important environmental issue facing Northwest Indiana and park management at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INOU) is the contamination of water, sediment and biota by persistent toxic substances. Aquatic plant communities were used to evaluate the water/organismal quality of the Grand Calumet Lagoons and two dunal ponds (pannes) at Gary, Indiana, which are partially located in the Miller Woods Unit of INDU. The lagoon is divided into several areas, the USX Lagoon is located between sections of a large industrial landfill (steel slag and other material). The Marquette Lagoon is located further away from the landfill and tends to be upgradient from the landfill. The West Panne (WP) is located next to the landfill, while the East Panne (EP) is separated from the landfill and the WP by a high dune ridge. Plant populations shift toward fewer submergent aquatics, with a higher abundance of tolerant taxa in the western section of the USX Lagoon. These differences are supported by cluster analysis. Heavy metals in root tissue of Scirpus americanus and other plant species from the pannes were significantly higher than those found in shoots. Shoot tissue metal levels in plants collected from the lagoons were higher than root tissue metal levels. The WP site has the most elevated tissue metal levels for most metals assayed, while the EP site shows similar contaminant levels. The plant distributions observed and tissue metal concentrations measured suggest that INDU`s aquatic plant community has been affected by the industrial landfill and that there exists a hydrological connection between the ponds.

  9. Vegetation N A County

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A County road 39 Community D Bottomland Hardwood _

  10. Systems and methods for measuring a parameter of a landfill including a barrier cap and wireless sensor systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.

    2007-03-06

    A method of measuring a parameter of a landfill including a cap, without passing wires through the cap, includes burying a sensor apparatus in the landfill prior to closing the landfill with the cap; providing a reader capable of communicating with the sensor apparatus via radio frequency (RF); placing an antenna above the barrier, spaced apart from the sensor apparatus; coupling the antenna to the reader either before or after placing the antenna above the barrier; providing power to the sensor apparatus, via the antenna, by generating a field using the reader; accumulating and storing power in the sensor apparatus; sensing a parameter of the landfill using the sensor apparatus while using power; and transmitting the sensed parameter to the reader via a wireless response signal. A system for measuring a parameter of a landfill is also provided.

  11. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  12. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Bad Sugars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  13. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Good Sugars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  14. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 4, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    will be held on Sun- day, April 23, 1961, in the Bancroft Library, Berkeley Campus. Mr. O. Cort Majors (U. C collectors, he and Clegg touch lightly upon the years before the Civil Wa

  15. ERNEST LUTHER MAJER Ph.D., June 1978 Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , and for tracking fluid injection fronts. Staff Scientist, Group Leader Geophysics/Geomechanics Group Earth Sciences/Subsurface Geosciences, Geophysics/ Geomechanics Earth Sciences Division, 1994 - 2002 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Recent

  16. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  17. Vice Chancellor Real Estate Bob LalanneUC Berkeley Real Estate Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Vice Chancellor Real Estate Bob LalanneUC Berkeley ­ Real Estate Division Org Chart Parking Craig Elmo Cox Antoine Davis Michael Pariseau Zegal Tesfai Director Real Estate Dev & Portfolio Rajiv

  18. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-29

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  19. Understanding Women in Universities Around the Globe: Perspective from the University of California at Berkeley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    of California at Berkeley 3 Figure 3 shows a pie chart of the overall percentages of our faculty broken down on an agreed upon format for the alliance institutions. The chart below gives a snapshot of the "gender pyramid

  20. DESIGNING AN ENVIRONMENTAL SHOWCASE: THE SAN FRANCISCO Dale Sartor, Rick Diamond, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    have conducted energy audits, reviewed retrofit design strategies and renovation plans and recommended, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Andy Walker, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Michael Giller, National Park Service Karl Brown, California Institute for Energy Efficiency Anne Sprunt Crawley, US

  1. Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L.A.

    2000-10-20

    This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery. Work was done in the following areas: (1) production of natural gas pipeline methane for liquefaction at an existing LNG facility, (2) production of LNG from sewage digester gas, (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling in the production of LNG, liquid CO{sub 2} and pipeline methane, (4) cost estimates for an LNG production facility at the Arden Landfill in Washington PA.

  2. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  3. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, FY 1993 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) 1993 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1 B, and is coupled to the 1993 Laboratory Integrated Facilities Plan (LIFP). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The plan is reviewed and approved by the DOE San Francisco Field Office. The specific purposes of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; Describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; Describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and Describe site planning issues and potential infrastructure replacement solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1993 LIFP and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document.

  5. Liberty County State of the Community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Emily; Gao, Fan; Reja, Md Yousuf

    2015-01-01

    Tyler County and parts of what later became Hardin, Chambers, San Jacinto, and Polk counties. The County’s early development focused on agriculture, especially timber production, since timber could be floated down the Trinity River to Houston-area ports...

  6. LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL (BEGBROKE SITE) Landfill (England & Wales) Regulations 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    labelled or is inadequately packaged will NOT be accepted. WASTE OIL To dispose of waste oil, please contact Trevor Knibbs (83711) who will arrange for you to bring your oil to the waste oil store. Trevor1 LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL (BEGBROKE SITE) Landfill (England & Wales) Regulations 2002

  7. Washington Closure Hanford Report of Settlement Monitoring of the ERDF Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. T. Cameron

    2008-07-30

    This report summarizes the results of the ERDF Settlement Monitoring Program conducted between August 9, 2007, and April 29, 2008, on the 35-foot and 70-foot levels of the ERDF landfill. The purpose of this monitoring program was to verify that the materials already placed under the 35-foot and 70-foot levels satisfy the settlement criteria of the conceptual cap design.

  8. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  9. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-09

    A maximum of fifty-three wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water permit and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  10. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  11. Stability monitoring system for the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomann, T.G.; Khoury, M.A.; Rosenfarb, J.L.; Napolitano, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, New York, serves as the repository of all municipal solid waste from the five boroughs of New York City. Because of the existence of compressible soils under most of the filling areas and the urban environment surrounding the landfill, considerable importance is being placed on the relationship between filling operations and the stability of the landfill. As a result of this concern and to address Order on Consent requirements, a program of geotechnical site characterizations, stability analyses, and design and implementation of a geotechnical instrumentation program was undertaken. Geotechnical instruments have been installed within the refuse fill and foundation soils to monitor both the magnitude and rate of change of pore pressure, lateral and vertical movements, and temperature. This paper presents an overview of the subsurface conditions, the overall instrumentation plan for assessing the landfill stability, a description of the various instruments, the performance of these instruments to date, an overview of the collected measurements, and a description of how these measurements are used to monitor the stability.

  12. A water balance study of four landfill cover designs varying in slope for semiarid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; Salazar, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and to the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose a hazard. In order to achieve this, the performance of a landfill cover design without an engineered barrier (Conventional Design) was compared with three designs containing either a hydraulic barrier (EPA Design) or a capillary barrier (Loam and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier Designs). Water balance parameters were measured since 1991 at six-hour intervals for four different landfill cover designs in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Whereas runoff generally accounted for only 2-3% of the precipitation losses on these designs, similar values for evapotranspiration ranged from 86% to 91%, with increased evapotranspiration occurring with increases in slope. Consequently, interflow and seepage usually decreased with increasing slope for each landfill cover design. Seepage consisted of up to 10% of the precipitation on the Conventional Design, whereas the hydraulic barrier in the EPA Design effectively controlled seepage at all slopes, and both of the capillary designs worked effectively to eliminate seepage at the higher slopes.

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOTECHNICAL AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / JULY 1999 / 583 RETENTION OF FREE LIQUIDS IN LANDFILLS UNDERGOING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    - ther measured or estimated hydraulic properties. In this ap- proach, the hydraulic properties-situ moisture distribution, and the unit weight profiles of the waste in the case history landfill capacity of waste is the quantity of water per unit volume that can be held within the refuse against

  14. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Bennington Municipal Sanitary Landfill, Bennington, VT, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected No Further Action decision for the Bennington Landfill Site (the Site), located in Bennington, Vermont. EPA will perform 10 years of additional monitoring of the groundwater, surface water, and sediments starting with the completion of the NTCRA.

  16. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions - Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-30

    BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The two projects received a total of $25 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Private-sector cost share for the projects totaled approximately $186 million.

  17. Stability Analysis for a Landfill Experiencing Elevated Temperatures Timothy D. Stark1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and possible leachate levels. The MSW that was thermally degraded at this site was modeled using an effective). Such a situation can develop when aluminum wastes have been previously deposited and then leachate recirculation is initiated in areas of the aluminum waste. Thus, initiation of leachate recirculation in an existing landfill

  18. Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial in leachate-contaminated groundwater using only microbiological data for input. The data-driven methodology leachate. We modified a self-organizing map (SOM) to weight the input variables by their relative

  19. Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor A. Spagni, S was operated for almost three years in an attempt to optimise the treatment of leachates generated in old and N removal were usually higher than 98% and 90%, respectively, whereas COD (of the leachate) removal

  20. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  1. B9783rdFLOORPLAN E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -Building 978: JBEI & ABPDU, 5885 Hollis Street, Suite 320 & 400, Berkeley, CA 94608 -WASTE QUANTITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    50% 108-95-2 551 chloroform 50% 67-66-3 VACUUM PUMP OIL oil - 100% 000826-00-0 N N C WASTE LIQ 221 - Building 978: JBEI & ABPDU, 5885 Hollis Street, Suite 320 & 400, Berkeley, CA 94608 - WASTE QUANTITIES 9 8 Max Ave Ann Common Name Cas N Secret EHS Class Mix State Haz Cat Waste days Cont Unit Daily Daily

  2. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 10): Northwest Transformer/Mission Pole Superfund Site, Whatcom County, Everson, WA, December 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The remedial action at the Northwest Transformer Mission/Pole site in Whatcom County, Washington, is nearly complete. The purpose of this document is to inform the public that the final two piles of excavated soil containing 53 and 70 parts per million Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), respectively, will be disposed of at a hazardous waste landfill rather than by incineration. This document also discusses the results of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reassessment of the selected remedy for groundwater (which was and remains no further action) in light of sampling results and the apparent removal of the source of groundwater contamination during remediation.

  3. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: A case study of the Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) in England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • LATS has been effective to achieve a reduction of the amount of landfilled waste. • LATS has been one of the few environmental instruments for waste management with a cap and trade methodology. • LATS has achieved to increase recycling of the biodegradable and other waste fractions. - Abstract: The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years – which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) – being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06–2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02–2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as a waste management policy, make a comparison with the Landfill Tax, discuss its main features as regards efficiency, effectiveness and the application of the “polluter pays” principle and finally discuss if the effect of the increase in the Landfill Tax is what made the LATS ultimately unnecessary.

  4. County Council Comments Collin Lynch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckhardt, Dave

    County Council Comments Collin Lynch June 6, 2006 My name is Collin Lynch. I reside at 2301 Tilbury Avenue in Squirrel Hill. I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Intelligent Systems at the University of Pittsburgh. I

  5. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  6. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 4, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of their industry. The selected spot, located on the western slope of the Sierra in Tulare County, included valley

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory FY 1992 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL's role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California for the DOE. It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1B and based on revisions to the 1991 Technical Site Information (TSI). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The specific purposed of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and describe site planning issues and potential solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1992 TSI document and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document. Preparation of the SDP was coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development with technical support and data preparation by the Plant Engineering Department. Programmatic data and information are from program divisions and technical resource divisions, including the Environment, Health Safety Division. The 1992 SDP is consistent with approved university guidelines and future building area, land use, and population projections identified in the 1987 LRDP and the 1987 Site Development Plan Environmental Impact Report prepared under the California Environment Quality Act.

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory FY 1992 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California for the DOE. It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1B and based on revisions to the 1991 Technical Site Information (TSI). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The specific purposed of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and describe site planning issues and potential solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1992 TSI document and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document. Preparation of the SDP was coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development with technical support and data preparation by the Plant Engineering Department. Programmatic data and information are from program divisions and technical resource divisions, including the Environment, Health & Safety Division. The 1992 SDP is consistent with approved university guidelines and future building area, land use, and population projections identified in the 1987 LRDP and the 1987 Site Development Plan Environmental Impact Report prepared under the California Environment Quality Act.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  12. Canning Coaches Josephine Caldwell (Bamberg County), Miriam Roman (Sumter County), Lil Stolzfus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Canning Coaches ­ Josephine Caldwell (Bamberg County), Miriam Roman (Sumter County), Lil Stolzfus right provides very low cost, delicious, safe food for families. Canning done wrong wastes money

  13. Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galenianou, Olympia

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

  14. EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

  15. Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landfill gas (LFG), composed largely of methane and carbon dioxide, is used in over 450 operational projects in 43 states. These projects convert a large source of greenhouse gases into a fuel that...

  16. Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Koslow Arthur Rood

    2009-08-31

    This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

  17. Katalin Voros, Operations Manager of the University of California at Berkeley's Microfabrication Laboratory since 1986, came to the University with 14 years of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Engineers. She is a recipient of the UC Berkeley, Administrative & Professional Staff Distinguished. (http://microlab.berkeley.edu/~voros) Katalin maintains professional contacts with professors at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics and invited young professionals as visiting researchers

  18. Joint Link Prediction and Attribute Inference using a Social-Attribute NEIL ZHENQIANG GONG, University of California at Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    GONG, University of California at Berkeley AMEET TALWALKAR, University of California at Berkeley LESTER inference, Social-Attribute Network, Hetero- geneous network, Google+ ACM Reference Format: Gong, N. Z of the funding agencies. Author's addresses: N. Z. Gong, A. Talwalkar, L. Mackey, R. Shin, E. Stefanov, D. Song

  19. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High EnergyJanuaryLawrence BerkeleyLawrence Berkeley

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and behavior, and transport processes in geologic systems; and (6) Materials and Molecular Research--microstructures, electron microscopy, surfaces, and interfaces; solid-state and atomic physics; chemical energy, chemical physics, and reaction dynamics. Research and support activities conducted by LBL's Information and Computing Sciences and Engineering Divisions are central to the achievement of DOE goals. These divisions provide essential computational, instrumentation, and fabrication capability that strengthen the unique role of this national laboratory. The Laboratory's future is based on the multidisciplinary capability of its staff, its beneficial interactions with universities and industry, and the scientific and technical value of its programs and research facilities.

  1. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capella, Arthur

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants and loans to assist up to $15,000 projects per commercial structure with a mixture of a grant and financing at 0% for up to three – (3) years. The maximum award can be a $5,000 grant and a $10,000 loan. For projects less than $15,000, the award will have a ratio of 1/3 grant and 2/3 loan.

  2. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

  3. Subscriber access provided by -Access paid by the | UC Berkeley Library The Journal of Physical Chemistry A is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Subscriber access provided by - Access paid by the | UC Berkeley Library The Journal of Physical, and Chemical Sciences DiVision, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 Recei that play a key role in aqueous solution chemistry.22 A key factor in the versa

  4. EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinalin Fairbault, MN8: Finding ofFindingLandfill,

  5. Paleo-channel deposits of natural uranium at a Former Air Force Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, C.; Weismann, PGJ.; Nelson, CHPK. [Cabrera Services, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The US Air Force has sought to understand the provenance of radionuclides that were detected in monitor wells surrounding a closed solid-waste landfill at the former Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado. Groundwater concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, and total uranium were thought to exceed regulatory standards. Down-gradient concentrations of these parameters exceeded up-gradient concentrations, suggesting that the landfill is leaching uranium to groundwater. Alternate hypotheses for the occurrence of the uranium included that either equipment containing refined uranium had been discarded or that uranium ore may have been disposed in the landfill, or that the uranium is naturally-occurring. Our study has concluded that the elevated radionuclide concentrations stem from naturally-occurring uranium in the regional watershed which has been preferentially deposited in paleo-channel sediments beneath the site. This study shows that a simple comparison of up-gradient versus down-gradient groundwater samples can be an inadequate method for determining whether heterogeneous geo-systems have been contaminated. It is important to understand the geologic depositional system, plus local geochemistry and how these factors impact contaminant transport. (authors)

  6. Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The primary advantages of establishing such operating limits include (a) technically defensible screening criteria for landfill-destined solid wastes, (b) significant reductions in the required capacity of radioactive waste storage and disposal facilities, and (c) reductions in costs associated with storage and disposal of radioactive materials. The approach was based on analyses of potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (a) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to groundwater, (b) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (c) calculations of operating limits from the dose objective and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted.

  7. Solar Applications to Multiple County Buildings Feasibility Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study was requested by Salt Lake County in an effort to obtain a cursory overview of solar electric and solar thermal application possibilities on the rooftops of existing county buildings. The subject buildings represent various County Divisions: Aging Services, Community Services, County Health, County Library, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, County Sheriff and Youth Services. There are fifty two buildings included in the study.

  8. San Bernardino County- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was...

  9. Carroll County- Green Building Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits Carroll County (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-308(e)) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if it chooses to do so.* Carroll County has exercised...

  10. Miami-Dade County- Sustainable Buildings Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution to incorporate sustainable building measures into county facilities. In 2007, Ordinance 07-65 created the Sustainable...

  11. UF IFAS EXTENSION ALACHUA COUNTY PROVIDING SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Services, Alachua County Board of County Commissioners and strives to impact the well-being of the citizens. Injecting soil-marking dyes into irrigation systems and digging the soil to show the water movement within

  12. Pitt County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pitt County Board of Commissioners adopted amendments to the county zoning ordinance in March 2010 which classify wind energy systems as an accessory use and establish siting and permitting...

  13. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  14. Jefferson County State of the Community Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xi; Lee, Kanghyun; Aldalbahi, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    of metropolitan Denver. The county itself covers 774 square miles of total land. With a current overall population of approximately 551,798, it is the fourth populous county in Colorado. Lakewood is the largest city in the county. Motherland of the famous... of Incorporation 1861 Square Miles 773 Square Miles Unincorporated Je?erson County Area 653 Miles Percentage days of Sunshine 70% sunshine Hottest Month July (74 degree average) Coldest Month January (30 degrees average) Annual Precipitation 15.4 inches...

  15. Burleson County State of the Community Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousins, Tiffany; English, Jeffrey; Meng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    1846. Burleson County joined the Brazos Valley Council of Governments in 1966. In recent history, current County Judge Mike Sutherland has been in office since 2003. METHODS • Input / Output Analysis; Showing the importing and exporting of employed... Centers along side Citizen Collection Stations to reduce carbon footprint. • San Antonio Water Pipeline deal could create some local jobs through construction. CENSUS/ACS DATA CHARTS REFERENCES • Burleson County: Office of County Judge, Mike...

  16. Benton County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County, Colorado: Energy ResourcesCounty Jump to:

  17. Archuleta County CO Lineaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067.165795 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Asbestos Emission Control Plan Dakota County, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Prepared for University of Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009 UMP005460 #12;Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County.0.doc iii Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009

  19. Liberty County State of the Community Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkes, Scott; Deng, Sitong; Rojas, Ricardo J. Maga

    2015-01-01

    Republic of Texas. ? Liberty was incorporated as a city and the county seat in 1837. ? 1,176 Square Miles ? Borders Harris County (contains City of Houston) ? Rural county with approximately 88% of its land used for agricultural purposes. State of Texas...

  20. Public Health County of Santa Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Public Health Division County of Santa Cruz HEALTH SERVICES AGENCY POST OFFICE BOX 962, 1080 Date: December 3, 2009 Phone: 831-454-4000 Email: hsadocpio@co.santa-cruz.ca.us County Health Department Announces Flu Vaccine Clinic Santa Cruz County Public Health will hold an additional walk

  1. EIS-0441: Mohave County Wind Farm Project, Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, prepared by the Bureau of Land Management with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy project on public lands in Mohave County, Arizona. Power generated by this project would tie to the electrical power grid through an interconnection to one of Western’s transmission lines.

  2. Energy Efficient Buildings and Appliances: From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Art [Commissioner, California Energy Commission

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Art Rosenfeld, an appointee to the California Energy Commission and one of the architects of energy efficiency research at Berkeley Lab in the 1970s, discusses what it takes to shepherd innovative energy efficiency research from the lab to the real world.

  3. The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1/4 The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov 7 May 2012 Solar reflective "cool" roofs save energy, money, and CO2 when applied to air on the electrical grid by reducing late-afternoon peak power demand. Widespread use of cool roofs can lower outdoor

  4. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    a statistical study of microscopic life of the Illi- nois River in connection with lawsuits over water quality and the proper disposal of Chi- cago's sewage. In 1901 Kofoid came to Berke- ley, where he taught for the rest in protozoology, parasitology, and the biological study of water. Not long after his arrival in Berkeley, Ko- foid

  5. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Berkeley, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  6. NITASH P. BALSARA Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Shiv K.

    #12;NITASH P. BALSARA Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Faculty/98-6/00 Professor 9/96-8/98 Associate Professor 1/92-8/96 Assistant Professor Department of Chemical Engineering 04/88 - 06/90 Post-doctoral researcher, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

  7. August 2002 Doe Moffitt Web Usability Testing University Library, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    August 2002 Doe Moffitt Web Usability Testing University Library, University of California Quigley, University Library | bquigley@library.berkeley.edu 1 Doe Moffitt Web Usability Testing Round 1 of August 12, 2002. On August 21, they reported their findings to the Doe/Moffitt Web Design Team

  8. Wood Products-Utilization Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Products-Utilization 231 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Utilization products. California's native and exotic hardwoods offer a wide range of utilization opportunities

  9. Injunctions, Hold-Up, and Patent Royalties Carl Shapiro, University of California at Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Injunctions, Hold-Up, and Patent Royalties Carl Shapiro, University of California at Berkeley Send royalty negotiations between a patent holder and a downstream firm whose product is more valuable if it includes a feature cov- ered by the patent. The downstream firm must make specific investments to de- velop

  10. The Overall Energy Balance of the Hydrogen Bus in Berkeley, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Overall Energy Balance of the Hydrogen Bus in Berkeley, CA T. W. Patzek1 , K. Kappler, A. F Energy Roadmap (8), tabulates the planned hydrogen production capacity in the U.S., shown here as Table 1 with an extra column to specify the main energy/hydrogen sources for a hydrogen economy. As one can see, almost

  11. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    material areas (work areas where unsealed radioactive material is handled) and radioactive material storage) 75A Old Hazardous Waste Facility 75S Tritium Storage Locker 76 Radioanalytical Laboratory 83 LifeE.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Environmental

  12. Green Solar In 2009 researchers at Berkeley helped shift research into new solar cell materials by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    ­2077). Given the proposed scales of PV adoption, the health and environmental impacts of PV technology shouldGreen Solar In 2009 researchers at Berkeley helped shift research into new solar cell materials also be considered. This project would examine the proposed solar cell materials and designs and create

  13. Salary Setting Re-delegation July 1, 2010 Page 1 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Salary Setting Re-delegation July 1, 2010 Page 1 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY OFFICE UNIT DIRECTORS ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGERS RE: Re-delegation of Salary Setting Dear Colleagues, As you to restrict units to salary setting at the midpoint or Step 3. In an attempt to find solutions which alleviate

  14. Marvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab Chapter 5.31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Win21 Rapid Thermal Processor ­ RTP1. 2.0 Purpose This manual describes the operating procedures for rtpMarvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab Chapter 5.31 AccuThermo 610 rtp is in the manual located on Mercury. 5.0 Definitions & Process Terminology 5.1 RTP: Rapid

  15. Committee for Protection of Human Subjects University of California, Berkeley EXEMPT RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Committee for Protection of Human Subjects University of California, Berkeley EXEMPT RESEARCH subjects which may qualify as "exempt" from federal regulatory requirements. Should you need additional subjects that may be exempt from the requirements of the Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (45

  16. Marvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab Chapter 8.24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Marvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab Chapter 8.24 Netscope device). This microscope can do both bright field and dark field imaging. 4.0 Applicable Documents the focus as needed. 9.5 Dark field: You can select dark field mode by clicking on the DF button on the Ergo

  17. Marvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab UVSCOPE Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Marvell Nanolab Member login Lab Manual Index Mercury Web Berkeley Microlab UVSCOPE (uvscope) 1 for Bright Field, Dark Field, Interference contrast, and UV sub- micron operations. It also includes ­ Microscopic image of reflected light. 5.3 Dark Field Image ­ Microscopic image of scattered light. 5

  18. Berkeley Educator | SPRING 2015 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION decade even as technology has ad-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    20 21 Berkeley Educator | SPRING 2015 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION decade even as technology has ad train teachers so that they are less fearful of technology? That's what I'm trying to work out," Siu (Twitter, blogs, Facebook groups, etc.), Siu also sees the need for more pre-service training. "We want

  19. Jenn Baka, Frank Ling, and Daniel Kammen UC Berkeley Towards Energy Independence in 2025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2005 Annual Energy Outlook, Table 11, Energy Information Agency. 2 Ibid. 3 Davis, S., Diegel, S, Algeria and Gabon. Sources: Oil use and import projections from 2005 EIA Annual Energy Outlook, Table 11Jenn Baka, Frank Ling, and Daniel Kammen UC Berkeley 1 Towards Energy Independence in 2025 Prepared

  20. University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Graduate Program in Bioengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    in Bioengineering BY-LAWS Article I Purpose The purpose of this Program is to establish and administer a graduate program of instruction and research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Bioengineering, in conformity is as the primary graduate program for the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley. The Department

  1. Retrofit Savings for Brazos County 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Shao, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the energy and dollar savings for the period May 2000 - April 2001 for 10 of the Brazos County facilities that have been retrofit. The electricity use saved was 555,170 kWh and the demand was 1062 kW, which is equivalent to a...

  2. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-03-03

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), each an individual landfill located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Landfill A3-1 is CAS No. 03-08-001-A301. (2) Landfill A3-2 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A302. (3) Landfill A3-3 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A303. (4) Landfill A3-4 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A304. (5) Landfill A3-5 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A305. (6) Landfill A3-6 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A306. (7) Landfill A3-7 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A307. (8) Landfill A3-8 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A308. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (6) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. In June and July 1997, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated four groupings of site characteristics as shown in Table ES-1. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for CAU No. 424: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing waste. (2) Remediate the site per applicable state and federal regulations (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the TTR, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Landfill Complex CAU: Alternative 1 - No Action; Alternative 2 - Administrative Closure; Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Backfill, and Recontouring The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy-selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, preferred alternatives were selected for each CAS as indicated in Table ES-2. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. These alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contents of the landfills. During corrective action implementation, these alternatives will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  3. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis in a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.; Batlle, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > A quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis method was proposed. > The proposed method is a good engineering tool for 3D slope stability analysis. > Factor of safety from 3D analysis is higher than from 2D analysis. > 3D analysis results are more sensitive to cohesion than 2D analysis. - Abstract: Limited space for accommodating the ever increasing mounds of municipal solid waste (MSW) demands the capacity of MSW landfill be maximized by building landfills to greater heights with steeper slopes. This situation has raised concerns regarding the stability of high MSW landfills. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis based on the finite element stress analysis was applied in a case study at a MSW landfill in north-east Spain. Potential slides can be assumed to be located within the waste mass due to the lack of weak foundation soils and geosynthetic membranes at the landfill base. The only triggering factor of deep-seated slope failure is the higher leachate level and the relatively high and steep slope in the front. The valley-shaped geometry and layered construction procedure at the site make three-dimensional slope stability analyses necessary for this landfill. In the finite element stress analysis, variations of leachate level during construction and continuous settlement of the landfill were taken into account. The 'equivalent' three-dimensional factor of safety (FoS) was computed from the individual result of the two-dimensional analysis for a series of evenly spaced cross sections within the potential sliding body. Results indicate that the hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis adopted in this paper is capable of locating roughly the spatial position of the potential sliding mass. This easy to manipulate method can serve as an engineering tool in the preliminary estimate of the FoS as well as the approximate position and extent of the potential sliding mass. The result that FoS obtained from three-dimensional analysis increases as much as 50% compared to that from two-dimensional analysis implies the significance of the three-dimensional effect for this study-case. Influences of shear parameters, time elapse after landfill closure, leachate level as well as unit weight of waste on FoS were also investigated in this paper. These sensitivity analyses serve as the guidelines of construction practices and operating procedures for the MSW landfill under study.

  4. Mixed waste storage facility CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Solid waste landfill CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    This report consists of two papers reviewing the waste storage facility and the landfill projects proposed for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant complex. The first paper is a review of DOE`s conceptual design report for a mixed waste storage facility. This evaluation is to review the necessity of constructing a separate mixed waste storage facility. The structure is to be capable of receiving, weighing, sampling and the interim storage of wastes for a five year period beginning in 1996. The estimated cost is assessed at approximately $18 million. The review is to help comprehend and decide whether a new storage building is a feasible approach to the PGDP mixed waste storage problem or should some alternate approach be considered. The second paper reviews DOE`s conceptual design report for a solid waste landfill. This solid waste landfill evaluation is to compare costs and the necessity to provide a new landfill that would meet State of Kentucky regulations. The assessment considered funding for a ten year storage facility, but includes a review of other facility needs such as a radiation detection building, compactor/baler machinery, material handling equipment, along with other personnel and equipment storage buildings at a cost of approximately $4.1 million. The review is to help discern whether a landfill only or the addition of compaction equipment is prudent.

  5. Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

    2013-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Namhoon, E-mail: nhlee@anyang.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  7. Groundwater Strategy for the Ou-1 Landfill Area, Miamisburg Closure Project, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOONEY, BRIANB.

    2004-01-01

    The general objective of the study was to assist the Miamisburg Closure Project in their efforts to develop and refine a comprehensive, technically sound strategy for remediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the vicinity of the landfill in Operable Unit 1. To provide the necessary flexibility to the site, regulators and stakeholders, the resulting evaluation considered a variety of approaches ranging from ''no further action'' to waste removal. The approaches also included continued soil vapor extraction, continued groundwater pump and treat, monitored natural attenuation, biostimulation, partitioning barriers, hydrologic modification, and others.

  8. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation,

  10. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    is a fine fat, jolly little animal and is to be made a Christian of next Thursday," wrote Colonel Thomas afterward accompanied her parents from the Ionian islands to Drishane House, Skib- bereen, County Cork born in 1862 at Ross House, near Ougbterard, County Galway. The two formed a close friendship

  11. EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct...

  12. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  13. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  14. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  15. Nuclear Science and Physics Data from the Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Isotopes Project pages at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been a source of nuclear data and reference information since the mid-nineties. Almost all of the data, the results of analyses, the specialized charts and interfaces, and the extensive bibiographic references are fed to the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and maintained there. The Isotope Project pages at LBNL provide a glimpse of early versions for many of the nuclear data resources.

  16. Near-infrared photometry of the young open clusters NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonella Vallenari; Andrea Richichi; Giovanni Carraro; Leo Girardi

    1999-09-03

    We present photometry in the J and K near-infrared bands for two regions centered on the young open clusters NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86. We study 700 stars down to K = 17 in the field of NGC 1893, and about 2000 stars in the field of Berkeley 86 down to K$\\sim$ 16.5, for which near-infrared photometry was insofar not available. Coupling J-K data with UBV photometry taken from literature, we produce reddening corrected colour-magnitude diagrams. We find that our data are consistent with previous determinations: the clusters are roughly coeval with an age between 4 and 6 million years. The mean reddening (measured as E(J-K)) values turn out to be 0.35 and 0.50 for NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86, respectively.Using colour-colour plots we discuss the presence of candidate pre-main sequence stars showing infrared excess. Candidates are found in both cluster regions, confirming the young age of these clusters.

  17. Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

  18. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-03-13

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999.

  19. Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

    1994-05-24

    The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

  20. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  1. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  2. A new route to financing landfill gas-to-energy projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siever, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    For the last several years, just over half of the nation`s new power capacity has been supplied by private, independent power project developers. Of this, virtually all the projects over 10 megawatts in size have been financed with non-recourse debt - that is, where the lender can look only to cash flows from the project for repayment, rather than to the financial resources of the project developer. This has allowed relatively small, entrepreneurial development companies to compete on an equal footing with much larger companies, including the utilities themselves. But developers of the 140 or so landfill gas projects operating in North America haven`t shared the advantages of these other independent projects. While equity financing for landfill gas projects has been available for some time, most LFG developers have found it extremely difficult to attract non-recourse debt due to the small size and perceived technology/environmental risk of LFG projects. Lenders` attitudes are changing however, and more are looking more favorably at providing non-recourse loans for LFG projects. Fulfilling certain requirements, project developers may be able to qualify for this financing technique.

  3. Clallam County PUD- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clallam County PUD offers a variety of rebates for residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Eligible measures and incentives include window upgrades, insulation, air and duct...

  4. Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Courthouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the renovated high-performing Kiowa County Courthouse building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  5. Catawba County- Green Construction Permitting Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catawba County is providing incentives to encourage the construction of sustainably built homes and commercial buildings. Rebates on permit fees and plan reviews are available for certain...

  6. Explosion at Easington Colliery County Durham 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, H. C. W.

    Report On the causes of, and circumstances attending, the explosion which occurred at Easington Colliery, County Durham, on the 29th May, 1951.

  7. Carteret County- Wind Energy System Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carteret County passed an ordinance to specify the permitting process and establish siting requirements for wind energy systems. There are different rules and a different permitting process...

  8. Arlington County, Virginia: Community Energy Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation features Richard Dooley, community energy coordinator with Arlington County's Office of Sustainability and Environmental Management. Dooley provides an overview of the development...

  9. Maricopa County- Renewable Energy Systems Zoning Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance contains provisions for siting renewable energy systems. The ordinance defines renewable energy as "energy derived primarily from sources other than fossil...

  10. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  11. EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed 150 megawatt Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, in Hyde County, South Dakota, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s existing Fort Thompson Substation in Buffalo County, South Dakota.

  12. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local...

  13. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Central Office, Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements.1 million m~) of waste making it the largest slope failure in a municipal solid waste facility

  14. Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of...

  15. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania:...

  16. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  17. The University Maryland Baltimore County Office of Sponsored Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    The University Maryland Baltimore County Office of Sponsored Programs Subaward Policies and Procedures Purpose The purpose of the University Maryland Baltimore County Subaward Policies and Procedures

  18. Department of Information Systems 1 University of Maryland, Baltimore County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutters, Wayne G.

    Department of Information Systems 1 University of Maryland, Baltimore County Baltimore, MD 21250, Baltimore County Baltimore, MD 21250 Grading Policies GRADING STANDARDS The University's Undergraduate

  19. EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction...

  20. Elko County School District District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elko County School District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Elko County School District District Heating Low Temperature...

  1. EECBG Success Story: A Michigan County Unearths Savings with...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    County Courthouse Goes Solar EECBG Success Story: Florida County Helping Homeowners Save Energy and Money Seniors check out the new energy-efficient fitness facility at the...

  2. FAYETTE COUNTY TRAINS TOMORROW'S WORKFORCE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WHAT'S NEXT? Fayette County's low-income households (less than 200% of the federal poverty level) continue to receive energy efficiency improvements through the county's...

  3. Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy...

  4. Puge County Gongdefang Hydropower Station Investment and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Puge County Gongdefang Hydropower Station Investment and Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Puge County Gongdefang Hydropower Station Investment and Development...

  5. Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Photo of an energy-efficient home with modern architecture. The...

  6. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  7. EECBG Success Story: Solar Projects Provide Energy to County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Projects Provide Energy to County Fairgrounds September 23, 2010 - 1:01pm Addthis Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. |...

  8. Rutland County Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Rutland County, Vermont. Rutland County Summary of Reported Data More Documents & Publications Virginia --...

  9. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Santa Barbara County, California. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data More Documents &...

  10. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  11. EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    89: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction...

  12. GHG emission factors developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South African municipalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena; Trois, Cristina

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? An average GHG emission factor for the collection and transport of municipal solid waste in South Africa is calculated. ? A range of GHG emission factors for different types of landfills (including dumps) in South Africa are calculated. ? These factors are compared internationally and their implications for South Africa and developing countries are discussed . ? Areas for new research are highlighted. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors are used with increased frequency for the accounting and reporting of GHG from waste management. However, these factors have been calculated for developed countries of the Northern Hemisphere and are lacking for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South Africa. As such it presents a model on how international results and methodology can be adapted and used to calculate country-specific GHG emission factors from waste. For the collection and transport of municipal waste in South Africa, the average diesel consumption is around 5 dm{sup 3} (litres) per tonne of wet waste and the associated GHG emissions are about 15 kg CO{sub 2} equivalents (CO{sub 2} e). Depending on the type of landfill, the GHG emissions from the landfilling of waste have been calculated to range from ?145 to 1016 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when taking into account carbon storage, and from 441 to 2532 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when carbon storage is left out. The highest emission factor per unit of wet waste is for landfill sites without landfill gas collection and these are the dominant waste disposal facilities in South Africa. However, cash strapped municipalities in Africa and the developing world will not be able to significantly upgrade these sites and reduce their GHG burdens if there is no equivalent replacement of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) resulting from the Kyoto agreement. Other low cost avenues need to be investigated to suit local conditions, in particular landfill covers which enhance methane oxidation.

  13. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and once in ten year events, respectively, whereas corresponding values for runoff were 13% and 16%; these changes were accompanied by corresponding decreases in evapotranspiration, which accounted for 86% and only 78% of the precipitation occurring on the average and once in ten year even~ respectively.

  14. Public Health County of Santa Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Public Health Division County of Santa Cruz HEALTH SERVICES AGENCY POST OFFICE BOX 962, 1080 at the two Public Health clinics located at 1080 Emeline Ave. in Santa Cruz and at 9 Crestview Dr. in Watsonville, on a walk-in basis. County health clinic services are limited to those who reside in Santa Cruz

  15. SPATIAL DATA ON ENERGY, ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIOECONOMIC, HEALTH AND DEMOGRAPHIC THEMES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY: 1978 INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhart Ed., B.R.

    2012-01-01

    FILES AT LBL • • • vi ENERGY DATA FILES Arlvanced EnergyFile, Code DOE-l . • • . Energy Data System (EDS), ExtractDescription: The County Energy Data Base (COENDA) describes

  16. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  17. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  18. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  19. Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

  20. Siting landfills and incinerators in areas of historic unpopularity: Surveying the views of the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Williams, Ian D.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Opinions and knowledge of young people in Italy about waste were studied. • Historic opposition to construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome. • Awareness of waste management develops with knowledge of environmental issues. • Many stakeholders’ views are needed when siting a new waste management facility. • Respondents’ opinions were influenced by their level of environmental knowledge. - Abstract: The Campania Region in Southern Italy has suffered many problems with municipal solid waste management since the mid-1990s, leading to significant public disturbances and subsequent media coverage. This paper reports on the current views and knowledge of young people (university students) in this region about waste management operations and facilities, specifically the siting of landfills and incinerators. By means of a structured questionnaire, opinion and knowledge were systematically examined by degree type and course year. The study took place in 2011 at the University of Salerno campus. A sample of 900 students, comprising 100 students for each of the nine considered faculties, and 20 students for every academic course year, was randomly selected. Only about a quarter of respondents were not opposed to the siting of a landfill or an incinerator in their city. This clearly highlights that historic opposition to the construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome and that distrust for previous poor management or indiscretions is long-lived and transcends generations. Students from technical faculties expressed the most reasonable opinion; opinion and knowledge were statistically related (Chi-square test, p < 0.05) to the attended faculty, and the knowledge grew linearly with progression through the university. This suggests that awareness of waste management practices develops with experience and understanding of environmental issues. There is general acceptance that many stakeholders – technicians, politicians and citizens – all have to be part of the decision process when siting a new waste management facility. The opinions of the young respondents were significantly influenced by their level of environmental knowledge.