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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Benzene rectifying column performance optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benzene rectifying column control at the actual petroleum refinery is studied. Certain approaches to increase the performance of precise rectification of benzene and toluene are suggested. An algorithm of evaluating the optimal regulation parameters ...

D. A. Smirnova; V. I. Fedorov; N. V. Lisitsyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Selective toluene disproportionation over pore size controlled MFI zeolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective disproportionate of toluene to p-xylene was studied over modified MFI aluminosilicate. The relationship between extent of silica deposition and para selectivity was established. The effect of reaction parameters such as temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) on para selectivity was considered. Kinetics of reaction in the temperature range 723--773 K was carried out. The estimated activation energy value is lower than reported for toluene disproportionation in the literature. This has been explained on the basis of enhanced intracrystalline diffusion in the modified zeolite.

Das, J.; Bhat, Y.S.; Halgeri, A.B. (Indian Petrochemicals Corp. Ltd., Gujarat (India). Research Centre)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Printed in Great Britain 107 The Decomposition of Toluene by Soil Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strains of two bacteria, a Pseudomonas and an Achromobacter, which grow with toluene, benzene or certain other related aromatic compounds as sole carbon source were isolated from soil. The use of aromatic compounds by these bacteria was an induced phenomenon. Toluene-grown organisms oxidized without lag toluene, benzene, catechol, &methylcatechol, benzyl alcohol and, more slowly, o- and m-cresol, but not benzaldehyde or benzoic acid. 3-Methylcatechol, acetic acid, pyruvic acid, and a yellow ether-soluble acidic substance which was colourless in acid solution, were detected in toluene-oxidizing cultures. Acetic and pyruvic acids were also formed during the bacterial oxidation of 8-methylcatechol. 3-Methylcatechol is probably an early stage in the bacterial metabolism of toluene; benzaldehyde and benzoic acid seem not to be intermediates in this metabolism.

D. Claus

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions  

SciTech Connect

A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toluene, ethyl benzene, and isomeric xylene (BTEX). Underground coal gasification and oil shale retorting tests resulted in the ground water contamination. NETL does not generate,...

7

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the SRS Petroleum Tanks that were closed in 1984. The 17 new wells will monitor BTEX (Benzene, Toluene. Ethylbenzene, & Xylene) at the abandoned gas station (715-D). Install...

8

Catalytic reforming boosts octane for gasoline blending - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because reformate contains significant amounts of benzene, toluene, and xylene, it also is an important source of feedstock for the petrochemical industry.

9

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural...

10

Why Sequence a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium? a Benzene-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium? As recently as the 1990's, aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene and toluene were thought to be resistant to degradation under anaerobic conditions. It is now appreciated that biodegradation in the absence of oxygen contributes significantly to the attenuation of hydrocarbons and other pollutants in the environment. Unravelling the yet unknown pathways and mechanisms of anaerobic benzene metabolism is a critical milestone for hydrocarbon bioremediation. While many pathways have been suggested, none has been proven, and no genes or enzymes are known. The elucidation of this pathway, including the identification of the genes and enzymes involved, is vital for the demonstration, validation, and regulatory acceptance of in-situ

11

Benzene Monitor System report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

Livingston, R.R.

1992-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene, decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C{sub 4} + C{sub 2} species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics.

Tian, Z; Pitz, W J; Fournet, R; Glaude, P; Battin-Leclerc, F

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

An Analysis of Simultaneous Online GC Measurements of BTEX Aromatics at Three Selected Sites in the Greater Munich Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During two field campaigns in 1993 and 1994, measurements of aromatic compounds [benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-/o-xylenes (BTEX)] were carried out at urban and rural sites in the greater Munich area. These field campaigns represent a ...

B. Rappenglück; P. Fabian

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility, Mail Stop 9055, Sandia National Laboratories,is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia authors and some of theDepartment of Energy. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory

Trevitt, Adam J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transcription Factor-Based Small-Molecule Screens and Selections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L - homoserine lactone (3OC 6 HSL) P pu -XylR Toluene 50--300 µM P pu -XylR BenzeneNA P pu -XylR 4-Xylene NA P pu -XylR O -xylene 0.05--5 mM P

Dietrich, Jeffrey Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Toluene Solubilization Induces Different Modes of Mixed Micelle Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L V(1 ts - 1 t0 ) (2) Figure 2. Effect of surfactant concentration on turbidimetric titrations in 0 of toluene, the effect of surfactant concentrationonsizewassimilartothatobservedforother nonionic surfactants the ratio of toluene/surfactant decreases with increased surfactant concentration, the effect of toluene

Dubin, Paul D.

20

DYNAMIC MODELING AND CONTROL OF REACTIVE DISTILLATION FOR HYDROGENATION OF BENZENE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a modeling and control study of a reactive distillation column used for hydrogenation of benzene. A steady state and a dynamic model have been developed to investigate control structures for the column. The most important aspects of this control problem are that the purity of the product streams regarding benzene need to be met. At the same time as little toluene as possible should be converted. The former is a constraint imposed by EPA regulations while the latter is tied to process economics due to the high octane number of toluene. It is required to satisfy both of these objectives even under the influence of disturbances, as the feed composition changes on a regular basis. The dynamic model is used for developing transfer function models of two potential control structures. Pairing of inputs and outputs is performed based upon the Relative Gain Array (RGA) and PI controllers were designed for each control structure. The controller performance was then compared in simulation studies. From our results, control structure 2 performed better than control structure 1. The main advantage of CS2 over CS1 is noticed in the simulation of feed composition disturbance rejection, where CS2 returns all variables back to steady state within 3 hrs while it take CS1 more than 20 hrs to return the temperature variables back to steady state.

Aluko, Obanifemi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0253-2451, Pan American Health Organization, Bogota, Colombia, South America  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the Pan American Health Organization, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the ECOPETROL Oil Refinery in Barrancabermeja, Colombia. The study was to evaluate employee exposure to benzene, toluene, xylene, ethyl-benzene, and cyclohexane in various areas of the refinery. ECOPETROL was an integrated oil refinery with a refining capacity of 200,000 barrels per day. In the aromatics facility benzene, toluene, xylene, ethyl-benzene, and cyclohexane were refined from napththa. The author concludes that a hazard existed for some workers from exposure to benzene. The author recommends that benzene exposure be controlled through the use of personal protective equipment and environmental monitoring programs.

Kelly, J.; Echt, A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Methods for the synthesis and polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-p-xylenes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention describes an improved method for the polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.-dihalo-p-xylene's such as the .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-xylene's. The procedure for synthesis is based on the specific order of addition of reagents and the use of an anionic initiator that allows control of the molecular weight of the polymer. The molecular weight control allows processability of the polymer which is important for its utility in applications including in light-emitting-diodes, field effect transistors and photovoltaic devices.

Ferraris, John P. (Coppell, TX); Neef, Charles J. (Garland, TX)

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Performance test plan for a space station toluene heater tube  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a toluene heater tube integral to a heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. This heat pipe is a subassembly of the heat receiver. The heat receiver, the heat absorption component of the ORC solar dynamic power system, consists of forty liquid metal heat pipes located circumferentially around the heat receiver`s outside diameter. Each heat pipe contains a toluene heater, two thermal energy storage (TES) canisters and potassium. The function of the heater tube is to heat the supercritical toluene to the required turbine inlet temperature. During the orbit of the space station, the heat receiver and thereby the heat pipe and heater tube will be subjected to variable heat input. The design of the heater must be such that it can accommodate the thermal and hydraulic variations that will be imposed upon it.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Refiners have several options for reducing gasoline benzene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the linkage between gasoline benzene content and evaporative, running, and tailpipe emission is not yet defined, the U.S. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate a benzene content of less than 1.0 vol% in reformulated gasolines. Likewise, the California Air Resources Board plans to restrict benzene to less than about 0.8 vol %. Mobil Research and Development Corp. and Badger Co. Inc. have developed several alternatives for reducing benzene levels in gasoline. Where benzene extraction is viable and maximum catalytic reformer hydrogen is needed, the companies' cumene and ethylbenzene processes are desirable. Mobil's benzene reduction process can be an alternative to benzene hydrosaturation. All of these processes utilize low-value offgas from the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit.

Goelzer, A.R.; Hernandez-Robinson, A. (Badger Co. Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Ram, S. (Raytheon Engineers and Constructors Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Chin, A.A. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)); Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States))

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

UNCORRECTEDPROOF Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Ulrich and Edwards, 2003), and a dry cell weight (dcw) of 1.33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985) [i.e. X = (Y ¥ DS/dcw)]. DNA samples extracted from this consortium at time 0 (no benzene present) and 51 days and Edwards, 2003), dcw = 1. 33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985), and a soil bulk density (rb) of 1.6 kg l-1

Alvarez, Pedro J.

26

Simultaneous biodegradation of chlorobenzene and toluene by a Pseudomonas strain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 grows on a wide range of chloro- and methylaromatic substrates. The simultaneous degradation of these compounds is prevented in most previously studied isolates because the catabolic pathways are incompatible. The purpose of this study was to determine whether strain JS6 could degrade mixtures of chloro- and methyl-substituted aromatic compounds. Strain JS6 was maintained in a chemostat on a minimal medium with toluene or chlorobenzene as the sole carbon source, supplied via a syringe pump. Strain JS6 contained an active catechol 2,3-dioxygenase when grown in the presence of chloroaromatic compounds; however, in cell extracts, this enzyme was strongly inhibited by 3-chlorocatechol. When cells grown to steady state on toluene were exposed to 50% toluene-50% chlorobenzene, 3-chlorocatechol and 3-methylcatechol accumulated in the medium and the cell density decreased. After 3 h, the enzyme activities of the modified ortho ring fission pathway were induced, the metabolites disappeared, and the cell density returned to previous levels. In cell extracts, 3-methylcatechol was degraded by both catechol 1,2- and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase. Strain JS62, a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase mutant of JS6, grew on toluene, and ring cleavage of 3-methylcatechol was catalyzed by catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. The transient metabolite 2-methyllactone was identified in chlorobenzene-grown JS6 cultures exposed to toluene. These results indicate that strain JS6 can degrade mixtures of chloro- and methylaromatic compounds by means of a modified ortho ring fission pathway.

Pettigrew, C.A.; Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. (Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling and Optimal Regulation of Erythropoiesis Subject to Benzene Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. Benzene is used in manufacturing products such as pesticides, drugs, detergents, lubricants, and rubber in China from 1972 to 1987, workers in small factories, especially in shoe manufacturing, had an incidence

30

Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low Concentrations in Air under 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation Title Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low Concentrations in Air under 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Quici, Natalia, María L. Vera, Hyeok Choi, Gianluca Li Puma, Dionysios D. Dionysiou, Marta I. Litter, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental Volume 95 Issue 3-4 Pagination 312-319 Date Published 04/2010 Keywords air treatment, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, heterogeneous photocatalysis, indoor environment department, indoors, oxidation, photocatalytic, tio2, titania, toluene, uvpco, volatile organic compounds

31

EXPRESSION AND LONGEVITY OF TOLUENE DIOXYGENASE IN PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA F1 INDUCED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the rate of toluene disappearance normalized to the dry cell weight (dcw) concentration. Toluene degra- dation assays were conducted in 250 mL bottles containing 50 mL of cell suspension (170 mg LÃ?1 dcw), 100 PpF1 cells. Data corre- sponds to cells (170 mg LÃ?1 dcw) grown at 1 mg LÃ?1 DO, Run A. Error bars

Alvarez, Pedro J.

32

Effect factors of benzene adsorption and degradation by nano-TiO2 immobilized on diatomite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Difference between adsorption of benzene by diatomite and nano-TiO2 immobilized on diatomite was investigated. And effects of temperature, light intensity, relative humidity, and initial benzene concentration on adsorption and degradation ...

Lijun Cheng, Yong Kang, Guishui Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

New packing in absorption systems for trapping benzene from coke-oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of benzene removal from coke-oven gas in absorption units OAO Alchevskkoks with new packing is assessed.

V.V. Grabko; V.M. Li; T.A. Shevchenko; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

A sequential Monte Carlo/Quantum Mechanics study of the dipole polarizability of liquid benzene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metropolis Monte Carlo classical simulation and quantum mechanical calculations are performed to obtain the dipole polarizability of liquid benzene. Super-molecular configurations are sampled from NVT Monte Carlo simulation of liquid benzene at room ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, density-functional theory, intermediate-neglect of differential overlap (INDO), liquid benzene, polarizability

Eudes E. Fileti; Sylvio Canuto

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed.

Irie, S.; Doi, S.; Yorifuji, T.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material to provide fuels or chemical feed stock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for hydrocracking coal or other carbonaceous material to produce various aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, phenol and cresols in variable relative concentrations while maintaining a near constant maximum temperature. Variations in relative aromatic concentrations are achieved by changing the kinetic severity of the hydrocracking reaction by altering the temperature profile up to and quenching from the final hydrocracking temperature. The relative concentration of benzene to the alkyl and hydroxyl aromatics is increased by imposing increased kinetic severity above that corresponding to constant heating rate followed by immediate quenching at about the same rate to below the temperature at which dehydroxylation and dealkylation reactions appreciably occur. Similarly phenols, cresols and xylenes are produced in enhanced concentrations by adjusting the temperature profile to provide a reduced kinetic severity relative to that employed when high benzene concentrations are desired. These variations in concentrations can be used to produce desired materials for chemical feed stocks or for fuels.

Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation of the In Situ Aerobic Cometabolism of Chlorinated Ethenes by Toluene-Utilizing Microorganisms Using Push-Pull Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single-well-push-pull tests were used in a contaminated aquifer to evaluate the ability of toluene-oxidizing microorganisms to aerobically cometabolize chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) such as trichloroethene (TCE). Groundwater containing dissolved toluene was injected into the saturated zone in biostimulate indigenous toluene-utilizers. The test solution was injected into the aquifer using a standard monitoring well and then was transported under natural-gradient conditions. Transport tests demonstrated similar transport characteristics of the conservative tracer and the reactive solutes. Biostimulation tests were then performed by injecting a test solution containing dissolved toluene substrate, hydrogen peroxide, bromide and nitrate in order to increase the biomass of toluene-utilizing microorganisms. During the biostimulation tests, decreases in toluene concentration and the production of o-cresol as an intermediate oxidation product, indicated the simulation of toluene-utilizing microorganisms containing an ortho-monooxygenase enzyme. Transformation tests conducted after biostimulation demonstrated that indigenous microorganisms have the capability to transform the surrogate compounds (e.g. isobutene). Isobutene was transformed to isobutene oxide, indicating transformation by a toluene ortho-monooxygenase.

Azizian, Mohammad F.; Istok, Jonathan; Semprini, Lewis

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Soil Contaminated by Benzene ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Soil Contaminated by Benzene, Lead and Cadmium by Marcia Bragato and Jorge Alberto Soares Tenorio ...

39

Ab initio investigation of intermolecular interactions in solid benzene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computational strategy for the evaluation of the crystal lattice constants and cohesive energy of the weakly bound molecular solids is proposed. The strategy is based on the high level ab initio coupled-cluster determination of the pairwise additive contribution to the interaction energy. The zero-point-energy correction and non-additive contributions to the interaction energy are treated using density functional methods. The experimental crystal lattice constants of the solid benzene are reproduced, and the value of 480 meV/molecule is calculated for its cohesive energy.

O. Bludsky; M. Rubes; P. Soldan

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Toluene 4-Monooxygenase and its Complex with Effector Protein T4moD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a multiprotein diiron enzyme complex that catalyzes the regiospecific oxidation of toluene to p-cresol. Catalytic function requires the presence of a small protein, called the effector protein. Effector protein exerts substantial control on the diiron hydroxylase catalytic cycle through protein-protein interactions. High-resolution crystal structures of the stoichometric hydroxylase and effector protein complex described here reveal how protein-protein interactions and reduction of the diiron center produce an active site configuration poised for reaction with O{sub 2}. Further information from crystal structures of mutated isoforms of the hydroxylase and a peroxo adduct is combined with catalytic results to give a fuller picture of the geometry of the enzyme-substrate complex used for the high fidelity oxidation of hydrocarbon substrates.

Bailey, Lucas J.; Fox, Brian G. (UW)

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene Transformation Reaction Compared with its Transalkylation Reaction with Toluene over USY Zeolite Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for transformation of TMB. Cejka et al.3 studied the effect of the structure of large-pore zeolites of beta, Y, L yield of xylenes compared to that under large- pore and high acidity zeolites.5-8 Roger et al.7 studied

Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

42

Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Biofiltration of benzene contaminated air streams using compost-activated carbon filter media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three laboratory-scale biofilter columns were operated for 81 days to investigate the removal of benzene from a waste gas stream. The columns contain a mixture of yard waste and sludge compost as biomedia. Different amounts of granular activated carbon (GAC) are mixed with the compost in two of the three columns to evaluate the extent to which biofilter performance can be enhanced. The effects of different operating conditions on the performance of the removal of benzene from air were evaluated. More than 90% removal efficiency was observed for an influent benzene concentration of about 75 ppm and an air flow rate of 0.3 L/min. in all 3 columns under steady-state conditions. Under most cases of shock loading conditions, such as a sudden increase in the air flow rate, or the benzene concentration in the influent, the biofilters containing GAC provided higher removal efficiencies and more stable operation than the biofilter containing compost only.

Zhu, L.; Kocher, W.M. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Abumaizar, R.J. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

45

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Economic analysis: impact of CS/R process on benzene market  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET10159 (formerly ET-78-C-01-3117) between UOP/SDC and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) requires UOP/SDC to provide specific engineering and technical services to the DOE Office of Coal Processing in support of the Coal Gasification Program. This report covers an economic study on the projected price of benzene through the next decade based on the market factors and production costs. The impact of the CS/R process on the benzene market was evaluated. In addition, the cost of gas from the CS/R process was determined as a function of the byproduct credit for benzene.

Spielberger, L.; Klein, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

Wan, Joanne [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Winn, Louise M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada) and School of Environmental Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Inputs & Utilization Inputs & Utilization Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline.

49

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, D.S.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, David S. (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Make aromatics from LPG  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

Doolan, P.C. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., London (GB)); Pujado, P.R. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas National Laboratory Brian Looney, Savannah River Site Background and Objectives: In 1999 the Pantex Plant by these sampling results, Pantex Plant personnel initiated an internal investigative program to determine

Hazen, Terry

53

On the role of delocalization in benzene: Theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of strained ring fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an important compound`s discovery dates back as far as 1825, one would imagine that every facet of its chemical and physical properties has been illuminated in the meantime. Benzene, however, has not ceased to challenge the chemist`s notion of structure and bonding since its first isolation by Michael Faraday. This report is divided into the following six chapters: 1. Aromaticity -- Criteria, manifestations, structural limitations; 2. The role of delocalization in benzene; 3. The thermochemical properties of benzocyclobutadienologs; 4. Ab initio study of benzenes fused to four-membered rings; 5. Non-planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and 6. Experimental details and input decks. 210 Refs.

Faust, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, reactive transport simulations were used to assess the mobilization and transport of organics with supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCC), and the co-injection and transport of H{sub 2}S with SCC. These processes were evaluated at conditions of typical storage reservoirs, and for cases of hypothetical leakage from a reservoir to an overlying shallower fresh water aquifer. Modeling capabilities were developed to allow the simulation of multiphase flow and transport of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, as well as specific organic compounds (benzene), coupled with multicomponent geochemical reaction and transport. This included the development of a new simulator, TMVOC-REACT, starting from existing modules of the TOUGH2 family of codes. This work also included an extensive literature review, calculation, and testing of phase-partitioning properties for mixtures of the phases considered. The reactive transport simulations presented in this report are primarily intended to illustrate the capabilities of the new simulator. They are also intended to help evaluate and understand various processes at play, in a more qualitative than quantitative manner, and only for hypothetical scenarios. Therefore, model results are not intended as realistic assessments of groundwater quality changes for specific locations, and they certainly do not provide an exhaustive evaluation of all possible site conditions, especially given the large variability and uncertainty in hydrogeologic and geochemical parameter input into simulations. The first step in evaluating the potential mobilization and transport of organics was the identification of compounds likely to be present in deep storage formations, and likely to negatively impact freshwater aquifers if mobilized by SCC. On the basis of a literature review related to the occurrence of these organic compounds, their solubility in water and SCC, and their toxicity (as reflected by their maximum contaminant levels MCL), benzene was selected as a key compound for inclusion into numerical simulations. Note that considering additional organic compounds and/or mixtures of such compounds in the simulations was beyond the scope of this study, because of the effort required to research, calculate, and validate the phase-partitioning data necessary for simulations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was simulated, followed by modeling the leaching of benzene by SCC and transport of benzene to an overlying aquifer along a hypothetical leakage pathway. One- and two-dimensional models were set up for this purpose. The target storage formation was assumed to initially contain about 10{sup -4} ppm benzene. Model results indicate that: (1) SCC efficiently extracts benzene from the storage formation. (2) Assuming equilibrium, the content of benzene in SCC is roportional to the concentration of benzene in the aqueous and solid phases. (3) Benzene may co-migrate with CO{sub 2} into overlying aquifers if a leakage pathway is present. Because the aqueous solubility of benzene in contact with CO{sub 2} is lower than the aqueous solubility of CO{sub 2}, benzene is actually enriched in the CO{sub 2} phase as the plume advances. (4) For the case studied here, the resulting aqueous benzene concentration in the overlying aquifer is on the same order of magnitude as the initial concentration in the storage formation. This generic modeling study illustrates, in a semi-quantitative manner, the possible mobilization of benzene by SCC. The extent to which the mobilization of this organic compound evolves temporally and spatially depends on a large number of controlling parameters and is largely site specific. Therefore, for more 'truly' predictive work, further sensitivity studies should be conducted, and further modeling should be integrated with site-specific laboratory and/or field experimental data. The co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was also simulated. In addition, the model considered leakage of the supercritical CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}S mixture along a preferential p

Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Apps, J.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

Brown, E.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Multiple activation pathways of benzene leading to products with varying genotoxic characteristics. Environ Health Perspect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benzene and 13 potential metabolites were investigated for genotoxicity in Salmonella typhimurium and V79 Chinese hamster cells. In the presence of NADPH-fortified hepatic postmitochondrial fraction (S9 mix), benzene reverted his- S. typhimurium strains. The effect was strongest in strain TA1535. Among the potential metabolites, only the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol, in the presence of S9 mix, and the diol epoxides, in the presence and absence of S9 mix, proved mutagenic in this strain. The anti-diol epoxide was more potent than the syndiastereomer. Both enantiomers of the anti-diastereomer showed similar activities. S9 mix did not appreciably affect the mutagenicity of the anti-diol epoxide. However, detoxification was observed when purified rat liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.20) was used at concentrations comparable to that present in the liver. The (1S)-anti-diol epoxide was a much better substrate than the (1R)-enantiomer, as was true also for (iS)versus (1R)-trans-1,2-dihydrodiol. The anti-diol epoxide reverted all six strains of S. typhimurium used and induced all four genotoxic effects studied in V79 cells (sister chromatid exchange> acquisition of 6-thioguanine resistance, acquisition of ouabain resistance, micronuclei). However, other potential benzene metabolites showed genotoxic effects in V79 cells, as well: sister chromatid exchange was induced by the syn-diol epoxide, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene, hydroquinone, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene. Elevated frequencies of micronucleated cells were observed after treatment with hydroquinone, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene,

Hansruedi Glatt; Robert Padykula; Glenn A. Berchtold; T Gabriele Ludewig; Karl L. Platt; Jochen Klein; Franz Oesch

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

acronyms.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEALTH AND SAFETY ACRONYMS HEALTH AND SAFETY ACRONYMS AFRD Accelerator and Fusion Research Division ACFD Alameda County Fire Department AHD Activity Hazard Documentation ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ALCO Alameda County (Fire Department) ALS Advanced Light Sources ASD Administrative Services Department ASPCP Accidental Spill Prevention and Containment Plan AST Above ground storage tank BAAQMD Bay Area Air Quality Management District Basin Plan Water Quality Control Plan BBAP Behavior-Based Accident Prevention (peer-based safety observation program to identify and communicate at-risk work behaviors - see WOW) Berkeley Lab Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory BSO Berkeley Site Office (DOE) Bq becquerel BTEX benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene CAA Clean Air Act CARB California Air Resources Board

59

Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation potential using 16S rRNA gene-targeted real-time PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Edwards, 2003), and a dry cell weight (dcw) of 1.33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985) [i.e. X = (Y ¥ DS/dcw of benzene consumed and assuming Y = 9.4 g cells mol benzene-1 (Ulrich and Edwards, 2003), dcw = 1. 33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985), and a soil bulk density (rb) of 1.6 kg l-1 [i.e. X = (Y ¥ DS/rb ¥ dcw

Alvarez, Pedro J.

60

Auto-ignition of toluene-doped n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures: High-pressure shock-tube experiments and kinetics modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toluene is often used as a fluorescent tracer for fuel concentration measurements, but without considering whether it affects the auto-ignition properties of the base fuel. We investigate the auto-ignition of pure toluene and its influence on the auto-ignition of n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures under engine-relevant conditions at typical tracer concentrations. Ignition delay times {tau}{sub ign} were measured behind reflected shock waves in mixtures with air at {phi}=1.0 and 0.5 at p=40 bar, over a temperature range of T=700-1200 K and compared to numerical results using two different mechanisms. Based on the models, information is derived about the relative influence of toluene on {tau}{sub ign} on the base fuels as function of temperature. For typical toluene tracer concentrations {<=}10%, the ignition delay time {tau}{sub ign} changes by less than 10% in the relevant pressure and temperature range. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C. [Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics (IVG), University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Gushterova, I.; Schiessl, R.; Maas, U. [Institute for Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ANOMALOUS EFFECTS OF WATER IN FIREFIGHTING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As shown in Figures 1 - 3 for benzene, xylene, and water, the boiling point of any liquid or mixture of liquids is that temperature at which the vapor ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

High-temperature heat-capacity measurements and critical property determinations using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter: Results of measurements on toluene, tetralin, and JP-10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid-phase heat capacities (from near 300 K to near the critical temperature) and critical properties were determined for toluene, tetralin, and the specialty fuel JP-10 with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) using high-temperature/high-pressure sample cells and procedural methods developed at NIPER. A complete description of the methods and calculational procedures is included as an appendix to the report. The results for toluene and tetralin compare very favorably with available literature values, while those for JP-10 are the first reported high-temperature heat capacity and critical property measurements for this material. This research was completed to demonstrate the type and scope of measurements needed for materials key to new process development, and in particular to the development of ''endothermic fuels'' for the development of new High-Speed Flight Vehicles. 20 refs., 5 figs., 21 tabs.

Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Smith, N.K.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermodynamic properties of adsorbed mixtures of benzene and cyclohexane on graphitized carbon and activated charcoal at 30/degree/c  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data at 30/degree/C are reported for the adsorption of mixtures of benzene and cyclohexane on two types of carbon surface: graphitized carbon and activated charcoal. The properties of the adsorbed solution approach those of bulk liquid at vapor saturation for graphitized carbon, but not for activated charcoal. The mixtures adsorbed on graphitized carbon are nonideal, and the deviations from ideality increase with surface coverage. For activated charcoal, the adsorbed mixtures are nearly ideal at all coverages. Mixture behavior for both adsorbents can be predicted without using experimental data for the adsorbed mixtures. 11 refs.

Myers, A.L.; Minka, C.; Ou, D.Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

DIVALENT LANTHANIDE CHEMISTRY; BIS (PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II) DERIVATIVES: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF BIS(PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) YTTERBIUM (II)TETRAHYDROFURAN HEMI (TOLUENE) AT 176K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Red, paramagnetic ({mu}{sub B} = 7.99 B.M., 5-50K) bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) europium (II)(tetrahydrofuran)(diethylether), (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Eu(THF)(Et{sub 2}O) is isolated from reaction of three molar equivalents of sodium pentamethylcyclopentadienide and europium trichloride in refluxing tetrahydrofuran, after crystallization from diethyl ether. The monotetrahydrofuran complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Eu(THF), may be isolated by use of toluene rather than diethyl ether as the crystallization solvent. Red, diamagnetic bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium(II)(tetrahydrofuran) is isolated from the reaction of ytterbium dichloride and sodium pentamethylcyclopentadienide in refluxing tetrahydrofuran. The diethyl ether complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(OEt{sub 2}), may be isolated by crystallization of the tetrahydrofuran complex from diethylether, The hemi-toluene complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2} Yb(THF) {center_dot} 1/2 toluene, can be isolated by recrystallization of the tetrahydrofuran complex from toluene. As these divalent metallocenes are the first hydrocarbon-soluble lanthanide derivatives to be isolated we have examined the latter complex by X-ray crystallography. Crystals of (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(OC{sub 4}H{sub 8}) {center_dot} 1/2(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}cH{sub 3}) crystalline in the monoclinic system, P2{sub 1}/n, with a = 11.358(8) {angstrom}, b = 21.756(19) {angstrom}, c = 10.691(7) {angstrom}, and {beta} = 101.84(5){sup o} at 176K. For Z = 4 the calculated density is 1.37 g cm{sup -3}. The ytterbium atom is coordinated to the oxygen atom of a tetrahydrofuran molecule and to two pentamethyl cyclopentadienyl rings. The molecule has approximate c{sub 2} symmetry about the Yb-0 bond. The Yb-0 distance is 2.41 {angstrom}, the Yb-C distances average 2.66 {angstrom}, and the Yb-Cp (centroid) distances average 2.37 {angstrom}. The Me{sub 5}C{sub 5} rings are in a staggered configuration with respect to each other. The methyl groups of the Me{sub 5}C{sub 5} groups are displaced by .03 to .21 {angstrom} from the planes of the five-membered rings away from the ytterbium atom. The toluene molecule is not coordinated to the complex and is on a center of symmetry in a disordered configuration. The 3466 data with F{sup 2} > 3{sigma} refined by full matrix least-squares to a conventional R factor of 0.036.

Tilley, T.Don; Andersen, Richard A.; Spencer, Brock; Ruben, Helena; Zalkin, Allan; Templeton, David H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area of Entry Area of Entry Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

66

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Stocks Total Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

67

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Definitions Key Terms Definition Alkylate The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Aromatics Hydrocarbons characterized by unsaturated ring structures of carbon atoms. Commercial petroleum aromatics are benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

68

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stocks by Type Stocks by Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Alaskan in Transit Alaskan crude oil stocks in transit by water between Alaska and the other States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

69

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin U.S. Imports by Country of Origin Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

70

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Stocks Refinery Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

71

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Blender Net Inputs and Blender Net Inputs Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline.

72

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply and Disposition Balance Supply and Disposition Balance Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

73

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports & Exports Imports & Exports Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

74

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PAD District Imports by Country of Origin PAD District Imports by Country of Origin Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

75

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports by Destination Imports by Destination Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

76

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes ox- ygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are re- ported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel

77

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exports by Destination Exports by Destination Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

78

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Speaker(s): Miranda Loh Date: February 1, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Boston Exposure Assessment in Microenvironments (BEAM) study was designed to examine the concentration distributions of VOCs in various microenvironments in and around Boston with the main objective of reducing the uncertainties in predicting exposure levels. A suite of VOC's with potential health effects including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, several chlorinated compounds and aldehydes were collected in all microenvironments. Phase I. BEAM examined common non-residential microenvironments that have not been extensively studied, in particular, dining, shopping, and transportation microenvironments. Sampling using scripted activities in these microenvironments. For some compounds,

79

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Input Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include:

80

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Products Supplied Products Supplied Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

84

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel (petroleum): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass Waste:

85

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly Supply Estimates Weekly Supply Estimates Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

86

Assessment of toxicological interactions of benzene and its primary degradation products (catechol and phenol) using a lux-modified bacterial bioassay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bacterial bioassay has been developed to assess the relative toxicities of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soils, river waters, and ground waters. The assay utilized decline in luminescence of lux-marked Pseudomonas fluorescens on exposure to xenobiotics. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterium in the terrestrial environment, providing environmental relevance to soil, river, and ground water systems. Three principal environmental contaminants associated with benzene degradation were exposed to the luminescence-marked bacterial biosensor to assess their toxicity individually and in combination. Median effective concentration (EC50) values for decline in luminescence were determined for benzene, catechol, and phenol and were found to be 39.9, 0.77, and 458.6 mg/L, respectively. Catechol, a fungal and bacterial metabolite of benzene, was found to be significantly more toxic to the biosensor than was the parent compound benzene, showing that products of xenobiotic biodegradation may be more toxic than the parent compounds. Combinations of parent compounds and metabolites were found to be significantly more toxic to the bioassay than were the individual compounds themselves. Development of this bioassay has provided a rapid screening system suitable for assessing the toxicity of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soil, river, and ground-water environments. The assay can be utilized over a wide pH range is therefore more applicable to such environmental systems than bioluminescence-based bioassays that utilize marine organisms and can only be applied over a limited pH and salinity range.

Boyd, E.M. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Meharg, A.A.; Wright, J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom); Killham, K. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Dependence of the Vertical Excitation Energy of Benzene on the Size and Force Constant of the Excited State  

SciTech Connect

Griffing1 computed the vertical excitation energy for the first electronic transition of benzene as a function of the carbon-carbon distance (rn) within the Sklar valence bond (SVB) and Goeppert-Mayer and Sklar molecular orbital (G1SMO) methods to evaluate the change on excitation of the carbon-carbon equilibrium internuclear separation (rn0) and of the corresponding stretching force constant, f. While ring expansion was correctly predicted, both methods appeared to predict that f increases on excitation, contrary to experiment. We shall demonstrate a) that Griffing's paradox may be resolved if terms higher than the second power in rn are included in the energy expressions for the states and b) that a Huckel calculation leads to results qualitatively similar to those obtained from the more elaborate calculations.

Ehrenson, S; Wolfsberg, Max

1966-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.

Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Attenuation of dilute aromatic hydrocarbon transport by a block copolymer in a compacted vertisol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste landfills in the United States are built with a composite bottom liner consisting of a flexible membrane liner of high-density polyethylene overlying a compacted soil liner. Hydrocarbons have been shown to pass through the flexible membrane liner by diffusion. Flexible membrane liners often have flaws allowing direct contact between the leachate and the compacted soil liner. The transmission of hydrocarbons to the compacted soil liner presents a threat to groundwater supplies. The study was performed to determine if the modification of a compacted soil liner with a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer could successfully sequester benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and meet the United States Environmental Protection Agency's saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of 1x10?? cm sec?¹. Compacted Ships clay modified with 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10% weight of a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer was tested for saturated hydraulic conductivity using 10.2 cm fixed wall permeameters. The compacted Ships clay met the United States Environmental Protection Agency's mandated saturated hydraulic conductivity of 10?? cm sec?¹ at polymer contents of 3% (wt) polymer or less. The presence of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons had no effect on the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The ability of the polymer to attenuate the transport of dilute aromatic hydrocarbons was tested by permeating the compacted soil/polymer treatments with a 0.01N CaSO4 solution contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Leachate from permeameters packed with soil containing more than 1% (wt) polymer had BTEX concentrations below the drinking water standard for 3 or more pore volumes. The findings of this research were applied to a hypothetical compacted soil liner constructed with Ships clay modified to include 3% (wt) polymer and having a saturated hydraulic conductivity of 4.23 x 10?? cm sec?¹. It was assumed that the soil liner was in direct contact with landfill leachate. The hypothetical liner would protect the groundwater from contamination above the maximum contamination limit for drinking water by benzene for 350 years, toluene for 140 years, and ethylbenzene for 260 years.

Akin, James Browning

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ThermoML Data for TCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Correlation and prediction of the phase behavior and thermal properties of binary and ternary systems of 2,2 -oxybis[propane] + benzene, toluene ...

91

Table 1. Halocarbons Dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2. Hydrocarbons Ethane n-Heptane Propane Benzene Propene n-Octane n-Butane iso-Octane iso-Butane Toluene iso-Butene Nonane n ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particularly chemicals, can have many valid synonyms. For example, toluene, methyl benzene, and phenyl methane, are commonly used names for the same chemical. EPA programs...

93

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fractionation of reformate: A new variant of gasoline production technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery is the largest domestic producer of the unique high-octane unleaded automotive gasolines AI-93 and AI-95 and the aviation gasolines B-91/115 and B-92. The base component for these gasolines is obtained by catalytic reforming of wide-cut naphtha; this basic component is usually blended with certain other components that are expensive and in short supply: toluene, xylenes, and alkylate. For example, the unleaded gasoline AI-93 has been prepared by blending reformate, alkylate, and toluene in a 65:20:15 weight ratio; AI-95 gasoline by blending alkylate and xylenes in an 80:20 weight ratio; and B-91/115 gasoline by compounding a reformate obtained with light straight-run feed, plus alkylate and toluene, in a 55:35:10 weight ratio. Toluene and xylenes have been obtained by process schemes that include the following consecutive processes: redistillation of straight-run naphtha cuts to segregate the required narrow fraction; catalytic reforming (Platforming) of the narrow toluene-xylene straight-run fraction; azeotropic distillation of the reformate to recover toluene and xylenes. A new technology based on the use of reformate fractions is proposed.

Karakuts, V.N.; Tanatarov, M.A.; Telyashev, G.G. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

An evaluation of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term exposure levels of benzene under field conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring I (OVMI) Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term benzene exposures under field conditions. In general, a diffusive badge is a device which is capable of taking samples of gas or vapor pollutants from the atmosphere at a rate controlled by a physical process such as diffusion through a static layer. Diffusive badges continue to flood the industrial hygiene market as an alternative means to charcoal tubes for sampling organic vapors. The OVMI badge has been on the market since 1990, and is the only diffusive sampler that offers dual sampling rates for measuring organic vapors. This dual sampling rate feature allows one the flexibility of sampling at 3 5 to I 00 mL/@n depending on the vapors being sampled. The OVM I badge has been designed to monitor short-term exposure limits (STEL) and long-term limits with only negligible modifications to the badge housing. Side-by-side benzene STEL concentrations were measured in a Texas Gulf Coast refinery implementing two OVM I badges, an SKC charcoal tube, and a Tedlar bag used for gas chromatograph analyses. The results of the study indicated that a) no significant concentration differences were found between the badges; b) the badges overestimated the charcoal tube on average by 54%, although their performance comparisons were highly predictable based on linear regression; and c) the results of the Tedlar baga?s chromatograph comparisons were inconclusive. Factors which might have contributed to the discrepancy between the charcoal tube and badges are possible concentration gradients and starvation effects occurring at the samplers' inlet face, interference from other competing vapors, and an overestimated badge sampling rate when sampling at the maximum uptake rate. Collectively, the outcomes of this research suggests that a correction factor in the badge's sampling rate might prove useful as a means of correcting for short-term overestimations when sampling for benzene under field conditions. It is hoped that the contents of this research serve as an useful aid for those specifically interested in the OVMI badge and for those whose line of work involve passive sampling.

Pierce, Mark Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been employed to determine the structures and energies of the isomers of the OH-toluene adduct, the methyl hydroxycyclohexadienyl radical, and their corresponding transitio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons (DOE Award No. DE-FG02-02ER63098) Prepared by Luisa T. Molina, Renyi Zhang and Mario J. Molina Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories. (1) Measurements of Gas-Phase Kinetics and Mechanism Work has been accomplished to develop laboratory instrumentation to conduct kinetic and mechanistic measurements of the aromatic hydrocarbon reactions initiated by OH, using

104

Adequacy of benzo(a)pyrene and benzene soluble materials as indicators of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a Sderberg aluminum smelter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occupational and environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs as a complex mixture that is evaluated using specific components, such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and benzene soluble materials (BSM). Factors that influence the relationship between BaP, BSM, and other PAHs within an aluminum smelter were investigated. Personal samples collected from 1978 to 2001 were used. Differences in the log-transformed ratios (PAH/BaP, BaP/BSM) due to anode paste composition, pot group, season, and job were examined using linear regression. In linear regression, 27% of the variability in the log-transformed BaP/BSM ratio was explained by coal tar pitch, work area, and job; no seasonal or pot group differences were observed. Within the potrooms, BaP was very strongly correlated with other PAHs (majority 0.9). Depending on the PAH, between 23% and 89% of the variability in the log-transformed PAH/BSM was explained by season, coal tar pitch, pot group, and job. The BaP toxic equivalency factors of the mixture varied more across job (2.1-3.5) than across coal tar pitch source (1.8-2.8) or pot group (2.3-2.5). Seasonal and work area differences in the relationship between BaP and other PAHs have not been reported previously.

Friesen, M.C.; Demers, P.A.; Spinelli, J.J.; Le, N.D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling of 1,3-hexadiene, 2,4-hexadiene and 1,4-hexadiene-doped methane flames: Flame modeling, benzene and styrene formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have developed a detailed chemical kinetic model and reacting flow simulation for the hexadiene-doped 2-d methane diffusion flames studied experimentally by McEnally and Pfefferle. The GRI-Mech 2.11 methane oxidation and Lawrence Livermore butane oxidation mechanisms were used as the base mechanism to which hexadiene chemistry generated by Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) was added. Some important chemically activated pathways leading to aromatic species formation, including the reactions on C{sub 5}H{sub 7}, C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, C{sub 6}H{sub 7}, C{sub 8}H{sub 8} and C{sub 8}H{sub 9} potential energy surfaces, are examined in great detail using quantum chemistry (CBS-QB3) and master equation analysis as implemented in Variflex. An efficient program to solve the doped methane diffusion flame was developed. The solver uses the method of lines to solve the species mass balance equation arising in the diffusion flame. It assumes that the temperature and velocity profiles of the doped flame are the same as those of the undoped flame. The mole fractions of various species as predicted by our model are compared to the experimentally measured mole fractions. The agreement between theory and experiments is quite good for most molecules. The added hexadiene dopants to the flame decompose to produce significant amount of cyclopentadienyl radical, which combines with methyl radical to produce benzene. We also show that styrene is formed primarily by recombination of cyclopentadienyl and propargyl radicals, a pathway which to our knowledge, has not been included in prior flame simulations. (author)

Sharma, Sandeep; Harper, Michael R.; Green, William H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compounds (e.g. , 80% catechol formation from phenol, OlariuO 2 Isoprene Benzene Phenol Catechol Toluene o-/m- Cresol NObenzene, phenol, and catechol), ~0.5 for C 7 species (

Nakao, Shunsuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Authors: Joshua A. Simpson and Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural gas production (produced water). The BTEX sorption isotherms are linear and noncompetitive, suggesting that the removal mechanism is partitioning into the surfactant’s hydrophobic bilayer formed on SMZ. Even though BTEX sorption in batch systems is rapid, chemical equilibrium models do not accurately describe BTEX transport through packed beds of SMZ. Comparison with transport of a nonreactive tracer (tritium) suggests that two-site, diffusive nonequilibrium sorption-desorption controls BTEX transport. We conducted batch experiments with SMZ to determine the nonequilibrium sorption kinetics of each BTEX constituent. The kinetic measurements were used to parameterize a nonequilibrium transport model to predict BTEX removal under varying flow conditions. The accuracy of predictions is being tested using laboratory column experiments with produced water from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico

108

The Influence of MSI (Metal-Support Interactions) and the Solvent in Liquid-Phase Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results were repeatedly obtained that were consistent with a hypothesis proposed at the beginning of this program, i.e., due to Metal-Support Interactions (MSI), unique active sites can be created in the metal-support interfacial region to enhance activity and improve selectivity in certain types of reactions, especially those involving the hydrogenation of carbonyl and unsaturated C=C bonds. Higher turnover frequencies (TOF-molecule/s/site) and increased selectivity for C=O bond versus C=C bond hydrogenation was established in the hydrogenation reactions of: acetone, crotonaldehyde, acetophenone, phenylethanol, acetylcyclohexane, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, phenylacetaldehyde and citral over Pt/TiO{sub 2} MSI catalysts. Higher rates of hydrogenation benzene, toluene and xylene could be obtained over certain supported Pt and Pd catalysts. Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were developed that were active for CO hydrogenation at subambient temperatures. The influence of support and metal crystallite size were established for the adsorption of H{sub 2}, CO and O{sub 2} on families of Pt and Pd catalysts.

Vannice, M. A.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Health assessment for Adrian Municipal Well Field, Adrian, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND980904023. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Adrian Municipal Well Field is listed on the National Priorities List. Adrian is located in Nobles County which is in southwestern Minnesota. In September 1983, 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a volatile organic compound (VOC), was detected in Municipal Wells 3 and 4. Subsequent sampling in January 1984 indicated increased levels of VOC contamination in Wells 3 and 4. In these sampling events, a number of VOCs were detected. Source identification has also focused on a number of underground storage tanks (USTs) used to store gasoline and fuel oil. Twelve contaminants have been identified in ground water from the surficial aquifer. Subsurface soil contamination has also been detected. A Soil Organic Vapor survey measured both total ionizable hydrocarbons and the gasoline constituents benzene, toluene, and total xylenes at 2-3 feet feet above the water table. Because of the high concentrations of gasoline contaminants in the soil and ground water at the site, there exists the potential for combustion or explosion if gasoline vapors migrate from these media into nearby businesses or homes. Several of the USTs contained or did contain fuel oil. Fuel oil contains semi-volatile constituents (e.g., polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) not found in gasoline. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water, and potentially surface water, air, and biota.

Not Available

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of EPA Region IV Standard Operating Procedures for decontamination of field equipment when sampling for volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination procedures for use at CERCLA sites where the US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region IV is the lead agency are specified in their Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) document. Under certain circumstances, the objectives of proper decontamination can be obtained without utilizing the full procedure as specified in the SOP. Because some treatment methods may introduce low levels of organic constituents into water (e.g., chlorination), the use of treated potable water would actually have an adverse effect on the decontamination procedure compared to the use of an untreated potable supply. Certified organic-free water, the cost of which ranges from five dollars per gallon to over sixty dollars per gallon may also be unnecessary in some cases. Distilled water samples from seven different suppliers (at a cost of less than a dollar per gallon) were analyzed for Target Compound List (TCL) volatile, organic compounds (VOCs) or benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Fifty of the samples analyzed for BTEX contained no detectable amounts of these compounds, and twenty-six of the samples analyzed for TCL VOCs contained no detectable concentration. The use of solvent rinses may cause false positives during sampling. Field experiments have shown that isopropanol may degrade to acetone under some circumstances. In many cases, particularly when sampling ground water or decontaminating drilling equipment, the elimination of this step should not adversely affect sample quality. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Brice, D.A. (Westinghouse Materials Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Feed Materials Production Center); Kelley, M.E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 4, October 1--December 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this program is to experimentally study the process variables and chemistry of the Flash Hydropyrolysis Process, a rapid gas-phase, non-catalytic coal hydrogenation technique developed at BNL for the conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels. The experimental equipment used for this purpose is a highly instrumented 1 inch down-flow tubular reactor originally designed to operate at up to 4000 psi and 800/sup 0/C, with coal feed up to 1 lb/hr. These conditions are being extended to include temperatures to 900/sup 0/C at pressures equal to or less than 2500 psi and coal feed to 2 lbs/hr. Coal and char analyses are performed on a routine basis. A second distillation curve was performed on the total organic liquid product, this time extending the distillation temperature range to 350/sup 0/C. The results were similar to the first curve indicating that the liquid contains approximately 50% BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) and 50% heavier hydrocarbons. A major portion of the experimental effort was devoted to the study of the effect of coal particle residence time. A number of exploratory runs were also conducted and results are reported here, including the use of a Battelle Treated Coal (BTC-caking coal treated with CaO), a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal, a mixture of lignite and lignite char and a lignite impregnated with iron.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): New Lyme, Ashtabula County, Ohio, September 1985. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Lyme Landfill is located near State Route 11 on Dodgeville Road in Ashtabula County, approximately 20 miles south of the City of Ashtabula, Ohio. The landfill occupies about 40 acres of a 100-acre tract. Operations began at the site in 1969, and were initially managed by two farmers. In 1971, the landfill was licensed by the State of Ohio and operations were taken over by a licensed landfill operator. According to documentation, the New Lyme Landfill received household, industrial, commercial, and institutional wastes and construction and demolition debris. However, numerous violations of the license occurred, including: open dumping; improper spreading and compacting of wastes; no State approval for disposal of certain industrial wastes; and excavation of trenches into the shale bedrock. In August 1978, the landfill was closed by the Ashtabula County Health Department. Documents indicate that wastes at the New Lyme Landfill site included: coal tar distillates, asbestos, coal tar, resins and resin tar, paint sludge, oils, paint lacquer thinner, peroxide, corrosive liquids, acetone, xylene, toluene, kerosene, naptha, benzene, linseed oil, mineral oil, fuel oil, chlorinated solvents, 2,4-D, and laboratory chemicals. The selected remedial action is included.

Not Available

1985-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) from High Efficiency Clean Combustion: Catalytic Exhaust Treatment Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) strategies such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and pre-mixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer much promise for the reduction of NOx and PM from diesel engines. While delivering low PM and low NOx, these combustion modes often produce much higher levels of CO and HC than conventional diesel combustion modes. In addition, partially oxygenated species such as formaldehyde (an MSAT) and other aldehydes increase with HECC modes. The higher levels of CO and HCs have the potential to compromise the performance of the catalytic aftertreatment, specifically at low load operating points. As HECC strategies become incorporated into vehicle calibrations, manufacturers need to avoid producing MSATs in higher quantities than found in conventional combustion modes. This paper describes research on two different HECC strategies, HCCI and PCCI. Engine-out data for several MSAT species (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, PAHs, diesel PM) as well as other HC species are presented and compared when possible with conventional operation. In addition, catalyst-out values were measured to assess the destruction of individual MSATs over the catalyst. At low engine loads, MSATs were higher and catalyst performance was poorer. Particle sizing results identify large differences between PM from conventional and HECC operation.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon standard for cleanup of petroleum contaminated sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) cleanup standard for petroleum contaminated soils (PCS). A survey of 13 state regulators was performed to characterize current standards and regulatory viewpoints on the use of a TPH versus a BTEX cleanup standard. The regulatory community considers the BTEX constituents the greatest threat to groundwater, yet expressed concern that the use of a compound specific standard, without an accompanying analysis for TPH, might result in residual soil contamination that may present risk. This study also evaluated the ratio of BTEX TPH in soil over time. Based on JP-4 contaminated site soil data, this study demonstrated that the ratio of BTEX to TPH declines with time. The results indicate that the constant ratio of BTEX to TPH assumed by the California LUFT manual and Stokman and Dime's research is not valid for soils contaminated with JP-4. Lastly, this research identifies the cost savings potential that would result if a BTEX based standard, versus a TPH standard, were required at all Air Force sites. The research shows that only 13% of sites which would require cleanup under a TPH standard would require cleanup under a BTEX based standard. Soil cleanup standards, Petroleum hydrocarbons, Total petroleum hydrocarbons, TPH, Bezene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Ethyl-benzene, Xylene, BTEX, Petroleum contamination, JP-4.

Blaisdell, R.A.; Smallwood, M.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics. Quarterly technical report, March 1, 1984-May 31, 1984. [Metalloorganic deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was demonstrated that the nature of the initial solvent used to extract the silver neodecanoate during synthesis or to render it into solution for ink formulation has a profound influence on fired film properties. The lower the boiling point of the initial solvent, the more of it was removed during rotary vacuum evaporation, and the less effect it had on fired film properties. Benzene and tetrahydrofuran were superior to xylene and toluene, and inks which used them in their preparation produced fired films with excellent appearance and adhesion if the proper firing sequence was used. The best films also had electrical resistivities very close to that of pure silver, which indicates that near theoretical density was achieved. Platinum and palladium metallo-organic compounds were investigated so that fired films with good solder leach resistance could be produced. Six metallo-organic compounds were synthesized, four of them were used to make inks, and the properties of films made from these inks were evaluated. The most promising compound evaluated was Pt 2,4 pentane dionate, but additional studies are required.

Vest, G.M.; Vest, R.W.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Purification of reformer streams by catalytic hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Reforming is one of the most important processes to produce high grade motor gasolines. Feedstocks are mainly gasoline and naphtha streams from the crude oil distillation boiling in the range of 212 F to 350 F. By catalytic reforming the octane number of these gasoline components is increased from 40--60 RON to 95--100 RON. Besides isomerization and dehydrocyclization reactions mainly formation of aromatics by dehydrogenation of naphthenes occur. Thus, catalytic reformers within refineries are an important source of BTX--aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Frequently, high purity aromatics are recovered from these streams using modern extractive distillation or liquid extraction processes, e.g. the Krupp-Koppers MORPHYLANE{reg_sign} process. Aromatics product specifications, notably bromine index and acid wash color, have obligated producers to utilize clay treatment to remove trace impurities of diolefins and/or olefins. The conventional clay treatment is a multiple vessel batch process which periodically requires disposal of the spent clay in a suitable environmental manner. BASF, in close cooperation with Krupp-Koppers, has developed a continuous Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation Process (SCHP) as an alternative to clay treatment which is very efficient, cost effective and environmentally compatible. In the following the main process aspects including the process scheme catalyst and operating conditions is described.

Polanek, P.J. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States); Hooper, H.M. [Krupp Wilputte Corp., Bridgeville, PA (United States); Mueller, J.; Walter, M. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Emmrich, G. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effect of reaction pressure on octane number and reformate and hydrogen yields in catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of reaction pressure in catalytic reforming was studied in a pilot reactor with a commercial Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalyst and a hydrotreated naphtha from a North Sea crude. Reformate and hydrogen yields, research octane numbers (RON), and reformate composition at reactor pressures in the range of 12--25 bar were measured as a function of temperature in the range of 95--105 RON. Reformate and hydrogen yields increased as the pressure range. For the lower reaction pressures the hydrogen yields increased with increasing severity, but for the higher pressures the hydrogen yields started to decline above certain severities. RON was linearly dependent on the concentration of aromatics in the reformate, although the selectivity toward aromatics depends on both pressure and temperature. Less hydro dealkylation of C{sub 8} and heavier aromatics to benzene and toluene resulted in a shift toward xylenes and heavier aromatic components when pressure was lowered. Variations in the degree of paraffin isomerization did not influence RON significantly at those severities.

Moljord, K.; Hellenes, H.G.; Hoff, A.; Tanem, I. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway); Grande, K. [Statoil Research Centre, Trondheim (Norway); Holmen, A. [Univ. of Trondheim (Norway). Dept. Industrial Chemistry

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Leak potential index model for use in priority ranking of underground storage tanks at formerly used defense sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs) that have not been properly closed at formerlC used defense sites (FUDS) may present potential leaking problems, spilling their hazardous contents into nearby soils, groundwater, and well water. The leaking USTs are potential sources of contaminants generally classified as containerized hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (CON/HTRW). CON/IITRW includes petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and radioactive waste products. The risk to the environment and population associated with the leaking USTs depends not only on the source, but on the migration pathway factor (MPF) (i.e., the ability of the medium of transport such as soil or water-to effectively transport the contaminants to the receptor) and finally on the relative vulnerability of the potential receptor. Thus, the assessment of the relative risk begins with the calculation of the potential of the UST to leak. A method of predicting the risk of leakage of these USTs is therefore desirable. presently, however, leak prediction index (LPI) models (which are used to predict the age at which a UST will leak or the probability of a UST leak at any given age) require soil data that are not readily available, or not easily and economically obtained by LPI.model users. The Warren Rogers leak prediction model was developed circa 1981, and has been used for USTs and incorporated into leak prediction models for other types of underground steel structures.

Stephenson, L.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 1, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coke plant at the Sparrows Point Plant consist of three coke oven batteries and two coal chemical plants. The by-product coke oven gas (COG) consists primarily of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and contaminants consisting of tars, light oils (benzene, toluene, and xylene) hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, water vapor and other hydrocarbons. This raw coke oven gas needs to be cleaned of most of its contaminants before it can be used as a fuel at other operations at the Sparrows Point Plant. In response to environmental concerns, BSC decided to replace much of the existing coke oven gas treatment facilities in the two coal chemical Plants (A and B) with a group of technologies consisting of: Secondary Cooling of the Coke oven Gas; Hydrogen Sulfide Removal; Ammonia Removal; Deacification of Acid Gases Removed; Ammonia Distillation and Destruction; and, Sulfur Recovery. This combination of technologies will replace the existing ammonia removal system, the final coolers, hydrogen sulfide removal system and the sulfur recovery system. The existing wastewater treatment, tar recovery and one of the three light oil recovery systems will continue to be used to support the new innovative combination of COG treatment technologies.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coke plant at the Sparrows Point Plant consist of three coke oven batteries and two coal chemical plants. The by-product coke oven gas (COG) consists primarily of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and contaminants consisting of tars, light oils (benzene, toluene, and xylene) hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, water vapor and other hydrocarbons. This raw coke oven gas needs to be cleaned of most of its contaminants before it can be used as a fuel at other operations at the Sparrows Point Plant. In response to environmental concerns, BSC decided to replace much of the existing coke oven gas treatment facilities in the two coal chemical Plants (A and B) with a group of technologies consisting of: Secondary Cooling of the Coke oven Gas; Hydrogen Sulfide Removal; Ammonia Removal; Deacification of Acid Gases Removed; Ammonia Distillation and Destruction; and, Sulfur Recovery. This combination of technologies will replace the existing ammonia removal system, the final coolers, hydrogen sulfide removal system and the sulfur recovery system. The existing wastewater treatment, tar recovery and one of the three light oil recovery systems will continue to be used to support the new innovative combination of COG treatment technologies.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention comprises the steps of first reacting particulate coal with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C and at a partial pressure of methane of less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. More preferably, the method of the subject invention is carried out at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C to 1000/sup 0/C and a pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 1.5 seconds. Surprisingly, it has been found that in the practice of the subject invention not only are commercially significant quantities of ethylene produced, namely yields in excess of 10% (percent carbon converted to product), along with economically significant quantities of-benzene and light oils, namely toluene and xylene, but also that there is little, if any, net consumption of methane in the reaction and possibly even a small net production. Since it is apparent that the carbonaceous solids or char remaining after the reaction is carried out may be burned to provide the necessary energy to carry out the process of the subject invention, it is apparent that the subject invention advantageously provides a method for the conversion of coal to economically significant quantities of ethylene, benzene and light oils while requiring only coal and, possibly, small amounts of make-up methane. Other objects and advantages of the subject invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from a consideration of the attached drawings, the detailed description of the invention, and the experimental examples set forth below.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

28 July 1995 ELSEVIER ChemicalPhysics Letters241(1995) 301-310  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope ratio analysis is an important tool for geology, meteoritics, medicine, biology, ecology isotope ratios of aromatic molecules without the need for chemical preparation. The technique employs present the measurement of carbon isotope ratios for m-xylene-d,, (C,D,(CD,),), toluene (C

Zare, Richard N.

126

Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

Maya, L.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we conducted batch and column laboratory SMZ and VPB experiments with synthetic and actual produced waters. Based on the results of the laboratory testing, a pilot scale study was designed and conducted to evaluate the combined SMZ/VPB process. An economic and regulatory feasibility analysis was also completed as part of the current study to assess the viability of the process for various water re-use options.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Use of Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Volatile Organic Compound Sources at the La Porte Super Site During the Texas Air Quality Study 2000  

SciTech Connect

Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was deployed for continuous real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a site near the Houston Ship Channel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000. Overall, 28 ions dominated the PTR-MS mass spectra and were assigned as anthropogenic aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, xylenes) and hydrocarbons (propene, isoprene), oxygenated compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, C7 carbonyls), and three nitrogencontaining compounds (e.g., HCN, acetonitrile and acrylonitrile). Biogenic VOCs were minor components at this site. Propene was the most abundant lightweight hydrocarbon detected by this technique with concentrations up to 100+ nmol mol-1, and was highly correlated with its oxidation products, formaldehyde (up to ~40 nmol mol-1) and acetaldehyde (up to ~80 nmol/mol), with typical ratios close to 1 in propene-dominated plumes. In the case of aromatic species the high time resolution of the obtained data set helped in identifying different anthropogenic sources (e.g., industrial from urban emissions) and testing current emission inventories. A comparison with results from complimentary techniques (gas chromatography, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) was used to assess the selectivity of this on-line technique in a complex urban and industrial VOC matrix and give an interpretation of mass scans obtained by ‘‘soft’’ chemical ionization using proton-transfer via H3O+. The method was especially valuable in monitoring rapidly changing VOC plumes which passed over the site, and when coupled with meteorological data it was possible to identify likely sources.

Karl, Thomas G.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, Eric; Stutz, Jochen P.; Shetter, Rick; Hall, Samual R.; Goldan, P. D.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Lindinger, Werner

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction  

SciTech Connect

High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of sulfide is a limiting factor to BTEX biodegradation at this site, and that treating the groundwater with FeCl{sub 2} is an effective remedy to facilitate and enhance BTEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population. On another site in Moore, OK, studies were conducted to investigate barium in the groundwater. BTEX biodegradation by SRB is suspected to mobilize barium from its precipitants in groundwater. Data from microcosms demonstrated instantaneous precipitation of barium when sulfate was added; however, barium was detected redissolving for a short period and precipitating eventually, when active sulfate reduction was occurring and BTEX was degraded through the process. SEM elemental spectra of the evolved show that sulfur was not present, which may exclude BaSO{sub 4} and BaS as a possible precipitates. The XRD analysis suggests that barium probably ended in BaS complexing with other amorphous species. Results from this study suggest that SRB may be able to use the sulfate from barite (BaSO{sub 4}) as an electron acceptor, resulting in the release of free barium ions (Ba{sup 2+}), and re-precipitate it in BaS, which exposes more toxicity to human and ecological health.

Song Jin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Metabolic analysis of the soil microbe Dechloromonas aromatica str. RCB: indications of a surprisingly complex life-style and cryptic anaerobic pathways for aromatic degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial interest in Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB arose from its ability to anaerobically degrade benzene. It is also able to reduce perchlorate and oxidize chlorobenzoate, toluene, and xylene, creating interest in using this organism for bioremediation. Little physiological data has been published for this microbe. It is considered to be a free-living organism. The a priori prediction that the D. aromatica genome would contain previously characterized 'central' enzymes involved in anaerobic aromatic degradation proved to be false, suggesting the presence of novel anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways in this species. These missing pathways include the benzyl succinyl synthase (bssABC) genes (responsible for formate addition to toluene) and the central benzoylCoA pathway for monoaromatics. In depth analyses using existing TIGRfam, COG, and InterPro models, and the creation of de novo HMM models, indicate a highly complex lifestyle with a large number of environmental sensors and signaling pathways, including a relatively large number of GGDEF domain signal receptors and multiple quorum sensors. A number of proteins indicate interactions with an as yet unknown host, as indicated by the presence of predicted cell host remodeling enzymes, effector enzymes, hemolysin-like proteins, adhesins, NO reductase, and both type III and type VI secretory complexes. Evidence of biofilm formation including a proposed exopolysaccharide complex with the somewhat rare exosortase (epsH), is also present. Annotation described in this paper also reveals evidence for several metabolic pathways that have yet to be observed experimentally, including a sulphur oxidation (soxFCDYZAXB) gene cluster, Calvin cycle enzymes, and nitrogen fixation (including RubisCo, ribulose-phosphate 3-epimerase, and nif gene families, respectively). Analysis of the D. aromatica genome indicates there is much to be learned regarding the metabolic capabilities, and life-style, for this microbial species. Examples of recent gene duplication events in signaling as well as dioxygenase clusters are present, indicating selective gene family expansion as a relatively recent event in D. aromatica's evolutionary history. Gene families that constitute metabolic cycles presumed to create D. aromatica's environmental 'foot-print' indicate a high level of diversification between its predicted capabilities and those of its close relatives, A. aromaticum str EbN1 and Azoarcus BH72.

Salinero, Kennan Kellaris; Keller, Keith; Feil, William S.; Feil, Helene; Trong, Stephan; Di Bartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transport of point-source contaminant plumes across the estuarine transition zone. This paper presents at the site is impacted with dissolved-phase petroleum hydrocarbons, including the BTEX (benzene, toluene approximately 80 m from the river's edge. The plume follows an easterly flow path from the UST source

Clement, Prabhakar

134

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

136

GAS INDUSTRY GROUNDWATER RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the research described in this report was to provide data and insights that will enable the natural gas industry to (1) significantly improve the assessment of subsurface glycol-related contamination at sites where it is known or suspected to have occurred and (2) make scientifically valid decisions concerning the management and/or remediation of that contamination. The described research was focused on subsurface transport and fate issues related to triethylene glycol (TEG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and ethylene glycol (EG). TEG and DEG were selected for examination because they are used in a vast majority of gas dehydration units, and EG was chosen because it is currently under regulatory scrutiny as a drinking water pollutant. Because benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (collectively referred to as BTEX) compounds are often very closely associated with glycols used in dehydration processes, the research necessarily included assessing cocontaminant effects on waste mobility and biodegradation. BTEX hydrocarbons are relatively water-soluble and, because of their toxicity, are of regulatory concern. Although numerous studies have investigated the fate of BTEX, and significant evidence exists to indicate the potential biodegradability of BTEX in both aerobic and anaerobic environments (Kazumi and others, 1997; Krumholz and others, 1996; Lovely and others, 1995; Gibson and Subramanian, 1984), relatively few investigations have convincingly demonstrated in situ biodegradation of these hydrocarbons (Gieg and others, 1999), and less work has been done on investigating the fate of BTEX species in combination with miscible glycols. To achieve the research objectives, laboratory studies were conducted to (1) characterize glycol related dehydration wastes, with emphasis on identification and quantitation of coconstituent organics associated with TEG and EG wastes obtained from dehydration units located in the United States and Canada, (2) evaluate the biodegradability of TEG and DEG under conditions relevant to subsurface environments and representative of natural attenuation processes, and (3) examine the possibility that high concentrations of glycol may act as a cosolvent for BTEX compounds, thereby enhancing their subsurface mobility. To encompass a wide variety of potential wastes representative of different natural gas streams and dehydration processes, raw, rich, and lean glycol solutions were collected from 12 dehydration units at eight different gas-processing facilities located at sites in Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Alberta. To generate widely applicable environmental fate data, biodegradation and mobility experiments were performed using four distinctly different soils: three obtained from three gas-producing areas of North America (New Mexico, Louisiana, and Alberta), and one obtained from a North Dakota wetland to represent a soil with high organic matter content.

James A. Sorensen; John R. Gallagher; Steven B. Hawthorne; Ted R. Aulich

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Synthesis of cresols and xylenols from benzene and methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to compare two processes for manufacturing cresols and xylenols: (1) a conventional catalytic process, and (2) a photo-thermal catalytic process, in order to determine the relative process economics. The products are used primarily as chemical intermediates for manufacture of antioxidants, pesticides, polymerization inhibitors, resins, and other products. The market is approximately 500 million pounds per year. This report is the second of two reports, presenting results of a process evaluation for manufacturing the products by a photo-thermal catalytic process.

Prengle, H.W. Jr.; Bricout, F.A.; Alam, S. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Oxoanion Recognition by Benzene-based Tripodal Pyrrolic Receptors  

SciTech Connect

Two new tripodal receptors based on pyrrole- and dipyrromethane-functionalised derivatives of a sterically geared precursor, 1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)-2,4,6-triethylbenzene, are reported; these systems, compounds 1 and 2, display high affinity and selectivity for tetrahedral anionic guests, in particular dihydrogen phosphate, pyrophosphate and hydrogen sulphate, in acetonitrile as inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry measurements. Support for the anion-binding ability of these systems comes from theoretical calculations and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure of the 2:2 (host:guest) dihydrogen phosphate complex is obtained in the case of the pyrrole-based receptor system, 1. Keywords anion receptors, dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen sulphate, X-ray structure, theoretical calculations.

Bill, Nathan [University of Texas, Austin; Kim, Dae-Sik [University of Texas, Austin; Kim, Sung Kuk [University of Texas, Austin; Park, Jung Su [University of Texas, Austin; Lynch, Vincent M. [University of Texas, Austin; Meisner, Mr. Jeffrey S. [University of Oregon; Young, Neil J [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Anslyn, Eric [University of Texas, Austin; Sessler, Jonathan L. [University of Texas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

PREPARATION OF HIGH PURITY UF$sub 4$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A process for preparing very highly pure uranous tetrafluoride from impure uranium laden solvent extraction strip solutions, ion exchange process and resin-inpulp process eluate solutions which are at least 8M in hydrochloric acid is described. The process first comprises treating any of the above-mentioned solutions with a reducing agent to reduce the uranium to the + 4 oxidation state, and then contacting the reduced solution with an extractant phase comprising about 10 to 70% of tri-butyl phosphate in an organic solvent-diluent selected from benzene, ethyl-benzene, chlorobenzene, xylene, kerosene, or the like. The uranium is extracted into the extractant phase and is subsequently precipitated by treating the extractant with an aqueous fluoride solution. The highly pure uranous tetrafluoride precipitate is separated from the phases and recovered for subsequent utilization. (AEC)

Magner, J.E.; Long, R.S.; Ellis, D.A.; Grinstead, R.R.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working fluids including butane, pentane, isopentane,xylene p-xylene pentane butane Alkanes cyclopentane BACKONEalkanes (pentane, butane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Key parameters influencing the performance of photocatalytic oxidation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key parameters influencing the performance of photocatalytic oxidation Key parameters influencing the performance of photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) air purification under realistic indoor conditions Title Key parameters influencing the performance of photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) air purification under realistic indoor conditions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Mohamad Sleiman, Douglas P. Sullivan, Catherine Jacquiod, Jean Sablayrolles, and Laurent Molins Journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental Volume 128 Pagination 159-170 Date Published 11/30/2012 Abstract Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) air cleaning is a promising technology suitable for the elimination of a broad range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, performance of poorly designed PCO systems may be affected by the formation of volatile aldehydes and other partially oxidized byproducts. This study explored the role of key design and dimensioning parameters that influence the effective removal of primary pollutants and can help reduce or eliminate the formation of secondary byproducts. A model pollutant mixture containing benzene, toluene, o-xylene, undecane, 1-butanol, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was introduced at a constant rate in a 20-m3 environmental chamber operating at an air exchange rate of 1 h-1. Individual pollutant concentrations were kept at realistically low levels, between 2 and 40 μg m-3. A prototype air cleaner provided with flat or pleated PCO filtering media was operated in an external ductwork loop that recirculated chamber air at flow rates in the range 178-878 m3 h-1, corresponding to recycle ratios between 8.5 and 38. Air samples were collected upstream and downstream of the air cleaner and analyzed off-line to determine single-pass removal efficiency. The final-to-initial chamber concentration ratio was used to determine the global chamber removal efficiency for each pollutant. In the flat filter configuration, longer dwelling times of compounds on the TiO2 surface were attained by reducing the recirculation airflow by a factor of ∼5, leading to increasing total pollutant removal efficiency from 5% to 44%. Net acetaldehyde and formaldehyde removal was achieved, the later at airflow rates below 300 m3 h-1, illustrating the critical importance of controlling the contact time of primary and secondary pollutants with the TiO2 surface. The use of pleated media was shown to increase significantly the system performance by extending the dwelling time of pollutants on the irradiated surface of the PCO media, with a 70% degradation of target pollutants. With the pleated media, formaldehyde removal efficiency increased to 60%. Irradiation using either a UVC or a UVA lamp under identical flow conditions produced similar pollutant elimination. A simple correlation between the steady-state single pass removal efficiency and the global chamber removal efficiency was used to rationalize these experimental results and identify optimal operating conditions.

143

Final Technical Report - Autothermal Styrene Manufacturing Process with Net Export of Energy  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the project were to: (a) develop an economically competitive processing technology for styrene monomer (SM) that would reduce process energy requirements by a minimum 25% relative to those of conventional technology while achieving a minimum 10% ROI; and (b) advance the technology towards commercial readiness. This technology is referred to as OMT (Oxymethylation of Toluene). The unique energy savings feature of the OMT technology would be replacement of the conventional benzene and ethylene feedstocks with toluene, methane in natural gas and air or oxygen, the latter of which have much lower specific energy of production values. As an oxidative technology, OMT is a net energy exporter rather than a net energy consumer like the conventional ethylbenzene/styrene (EB/SM) process. OMT plants would ultimately reduce the cost of styrene monomer which in turn will decrease the costs of polystyrene making it perhaps more cost competitive with competing polymers such as polypropylene.

Trubac, Robert , E.; Lin, Feng; Ghosh, Ruma: Greene, Marvin

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electron reactions in nonpolar liquids: Pressure effects  

SciTech Connect

Theory predicts that electron energy levels in nonpolar molecular hydrocarbons should increase in energy with density/pressure increase, and therefore electron attachment rates in solution should change with pressure. Studies of pressure effect on electron mobility show that some contraction occurs around trapped electrons, but more contraction occurs around ions in hydrocarbons. After a brief discussion of pressure effects on electron energy levels and mobility, this paper reports studies of electron attachment reactions of N{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and n-C{sub 5}F{sub 12} in tetramethylsilane, and of toluene, benzene, CO{sub 2}, and 1,3-butadiene in several solvents.

Holroyd, R.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.  

SciTech Connect

A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Servantes, Brandon Lee

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of diphenylmethane and sulphur-containing compounds immobilised on silica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of high pressures and dispersed catalysts, such as sulphided molybdenum (Mo) in fixed-bed hydropyrolysis of coals give rise to increased tar yields. In order to improve our understanding of these phenomena, Particularly in relation to cleavage of C-C and C-S bonds, experiments have been conducted on samples of silica-immobilised benzene, diphenylmethane, thioanisole and dibenzothiophene (DBT). These model substrates have the inherent advantage that they do not soften and thus stay in the reactor. Moreover, for the surface-immobilized benzene, the SiO-C bond linking the substrate to the surface is reasonably stable and does not show significant cleavage until 550{degrees}C (peak maximum) with a high yield of benzene being achieved at 150 bar hydrogen pressure. For the diphenylmethane substrate, the use of 150 bar hydrogen pressure and the Mo catalyst both reduced the peak evolution temperatures for benzene and toluene clearly demonstrating their separate contributions to promoting C-C bond cleavage. Desulphurisation of the DBT substrate occurred only in hydrogen and the thermal decomposition of the thioanisole substrate was altered markedly by the Mo catalyst.

Mitchell, S.C.; Lafferty, C.J.; Garcia, R.; Ismail, K.; Snape, C.E. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pure and Applied Chemistry; Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Klavetter, E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); en

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Experimental and theoretical STM imaging of xylene isomers on Pd,,111... D. N. Futaba, J. P. Landry, A. Loui, and S. Chiang*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, A. Loui, and S. Chiang* Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis of the molecule orientation based on height profiles. D. N. FUTABA, J. P. LANDRY, A. LOUI, AND S. CHIANG PHYSICAL, and B bridge. D. N. FUTABA, J. P. LANDRY, A. LOUI, AND S. CHIANG PHYSICAL REVIEW B 65 045106 045106

Chiang, Shirley

148

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong S.; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

STMVOC User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xylene saturation distribution and steam front loca- tionphase xylene saturation distribution prior to steam injec-saturation distribution along with the steam front location

Falta, R.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydrologic and geochemical controls on soluble benzene migration in sedimentary basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

springs and exploration wells can be useful only when the oil reservoir is located within about 20 km sampled from exploration wells are thus used as indicators of undiscovered oil fields (Hunt 1979; Jones as the primary transport mechanism (Fig. 1). Moreover, BTEX soil gas anomalies in the vicinity of oil fields have

Zhang, Ye

151

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

The reaction of benzene with a ground state carbon atom, C,,3 Holger F. Bettingera)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­hydrogen exchange channel, i.e., a carbon atom is incorporated into the molecule and a hydro- gen atom is ejected. With ethylene, the incoming triplet car- bon atom is known to attack the electrons to form triplet

Kaiser, Ralf I.

153

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of produced water from four offshore oilOrganic matrix in produced water from the Osage-Skiatookfrom sulfide-rich produced water using gas chromatography/

Zheng, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brines co-produced with crude oil (Zarrella et al. , 1967)brines co-produced with crude oil (Zarrella et al. , 1967)of Production Condensate Crude oil Crude oil Crude oil Crude

Zheng, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Chemical Engineering Journal 87 (2002) 101110 Co-treatment of H2S and toluene in a biotrickling filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations are forc- ing POTWs to treat their off-gases. In most cases, treatment is accomplished in caustic,7]. The contaminants are absorbed and de- graded by naturally occurring mixed cultures immobilized on the packing filter which pH is allowed to decrease as a result of sulfate accumulation. The H2S-free off-gas

156

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Forces between Mica Surfaces in PEO/Water and PEO/Toluene Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper ( 1) Marra and Hair present results on force-distance profiles between mica surfaces in a PEO/water solution) indicated that the PEO was aggregating from the solution and that ad- sorption, R. K., and White, L. R., J. Colloid Interface Sci. 78, 430 (1980). 3. Klein, J., and Luckham, P. F

Klein, Jacob

157

Experimental study of ethylene counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of jet fuel and jet fuel surrogates under incipiently sooting conditions  

SciTech Connect

The structure of an ethylene counterflow diffusion flame doped with 2000 ppm on a molar basis of either jet fuel or two jet fuel surrogates is studied under incipient sooting conditions. The doped flames have identical stoichiometric mixture fractions (z{sub f} = 0.18) and strain rates (a = 92 s{sup -1}), resulting in a well-defined and fixed temperature/time history for all of the flames. Gas samples are extracted from the flame with quartz microprobes for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Profiles of critical fuel decomposition products and soot precursors, such as benzene and toluene, are compared. The data for C7-C12 alkanes are consistent with typical decomposition of large alkanes with both surrogates showing good qualitative agreement with jet fuel in their pyrolysis trends. Olefins are formed as the fuel alkanes decompose, with agreement between the surrogates and jet fuel that improves for small alkenes, probably because of an increase in kinetic pathways which makes the specifics of the alkane structure less important. Good agreement between jet fuel and the surrogates is found with respect to critical soot precursors such as benzene and toluene. Although the six-component Utah/Yale surrogate performs better than the Aachen surrogate, the latter performs adequately and retains the advantage of simplicity, since it consists of only two components. The acetylene profiles present a unique multimodal behavior that can be attributed to acetylene's participation in early stages of formation of soot precursors, such as benzene and other large pyrolysis products, as well as in the surface growth of soot particles. (author)

Jahangirian, Saeed; Gomez, Alessandro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States); McEnally, Charles S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Where do Biosolids come from? Sally Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adults. For example biphenylol is a bactericide in dishwashing detergent. Musk xylene is a fragrance

Brown, Sally

159

Trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylene mercury as a building block for supramolecular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylene mercury (1) constitutes one of the simplest trifunctional Lewis acidic hosts. Cooperative effects arising from the proximity of the mercury(II) centers, the electron-withdrawing properties of the backbone and the accessibility of the electrophilic sites leads to the facile complexation of neutral and electron rich substrates. The planarity of the structure as well as its overall polarizability compounded with relativistic effects at mercury also permits the occurrence of non-covalent interactions. The main objective of this dissertation was to explore the potential of 1 as a building block for supramolecular materials. Compound 1 was investigated using single crystal x-ray diffraction and was found to display a rich polymorphism. The electronic structure, probed by DFT methods, shows that the LUMO of 1 has a large contribution from the mercury 6p orbitals and features a large lobe protruding above and below the center of the trinuclear mercury core. Complexes in which two nitronyl nitroxide radicals (NIT-Ph = 2-(phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) coordinate to the trinuclear core of 1 above and below the Hg3 plane reveal that 1 does not significantly mediate magnetic interactions. The ability of 1 to complex ?-basic molecules such as tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, mesitylene, biphenyl, naphthalene, acenaphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, triphenylene, perylene, and coronene was also investigated and show that 1 and arenes form extended binary stacks in which the two components alternate. The photoluminescence observed in some of these supramolecular complexes corresponds to the phosphorescence of the arene indicating a mercury heavy atom effect. Complexation of 1 in solution was observed with hexaalkoxytriphenylenes (HATn, n = 1, 6) by fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. Finally, compound 1 forms electrophilic double sandwich structures with ferrocene and nickelocene in which a molecule of 1 caps each of the Cp ligands. The nickelocene adduct is stabilized towards oxidation, and the photophysical and magnetic properties indicate the occurrence of a mercury heavy atom effect.

Haneline, Mason Reames

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Increased Radical Cation Yields: Arenes in DCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Yields of Radical Cations by Arene Addition to Irradiated Increased Yields of Radical Cations by Arene Addition to Irradiated 1,2-Dichloroethane Alison M. Funston and John R. Miller Radiat. Phys. Chem., 72, 601-611 (2005). [Find paper at Elsevier Science Direct] Abstract: Pulse radiolysis in chlorinated hydrocarbon liquids such as 1,2-dichloroethane is a versatile and effective method for the generation of solute radical cations. The addition of a large concentration of toluene or benzene to solutions of 1,2-dichloroethane is found to increase the yield of solute radical cations (G = 0.68 molecules/100 eV in 1,2-dichloroethane (Wang et al., 1979) by a factor of 2.5. The increased yield is found for solutes which have a potential of ~ 1.1 V (vs SCE) or below for the S+·/S couple and is due to reaction of the chlorine

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161

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

162

Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Molecular Dynamics Study of a Surfactant-Mediated Decane-Water Interface: Effect of Molecular Architecture of Alkyl Benzene Sulfonate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics Study of a Surfactant-Mediated Decane-Water Interface: Effect of Molecular; In Final Form: May 25, 2004 The effect of molecular architecture of a surfactant, particularly and molecular alignment at the interface, than other surfactants simulated in this study. Furthermore

Goddard III, William A.

164

Journal of Research Volume 68A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... I. Apparatus and initial observations on acetylene, acetylene-d 2 , benzene, and benzene-d 6 , p. 409 Dibeler, Vernon H.; Reese, Robert M. http://dx ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co-solvents were investigated. Supercritical fluid is the fluid at the temperature and pressure above its critical values. Toluene was the main supercritical fluid used in this study. Tetralin and water as co-solvents can contribute hydrogen to stabilize the free radicals produced during liquefaction reaction. The total conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid were increased. Water is not as good as tetralin in producing hydrogen, but it can increase the polarity of the solvent, which increases the solvency of supercritical fluids. The liquid product was found to consist primarily of saturated hydrocarbons. It illustrated that the free radicals were saturated by hydrogen during liquefaction. Alkylated aromatics and furans are also common chemical species present in the liquid products. The aromatic species were predominantly alkylated phenols, benzenes, indenes, pyridines and naphthalenes. At the supercritical conditions of this study, temperature and flowrate of the solvent were not important to the conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid, since supercritical fluids have gas-like viscosities with very high solubilities. To get more liquid products, the main point is to produce more free radicals from coal, inhibit the recombination of these radicals, and prevent the decomposition of these radicals to gas. Tetralin and water are good co-solvents for coal hydroliquefaction. Further research on the mechanism of water as a co-solvent in coal hydroliquefaction was recommended.

Chen, Hui

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

L. van Dyk, L. Lorenzen, S. Miachon, and J.-A. Dalmon, Xylene isomerization in an extractor type Catalytic Membrane Reactor, Catal. Today, 104 (2005) 274. Page 1 / 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rabinovich, N. Alexeev, Plasma catalytic reforming of methane, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 24

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Genome analysis and physiological comparison of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601T  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genomes of the Betaproteobacteria Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601T have been sequenced to get insight into the physiology of the two strains. Strain BC degrades benzene with chlorate as electron acceptor. The cyclohexanol-degrading denitrifying strain K601T is not able to use chlorate as electron acceptor, while strain BC cannot degrade cyclohexanol. The 16S rRNA sequences of strains BC and K601T are identical and the fatty acid methyl ester patterns of the strains are similar. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis of predicted open reading frames of both strains showed most hits with Acidovorax sp. JS42, a bacterium that degrades nitro-aromatics. The genomes include strain-specific plasmids (pAlide201 in strain K601T and pAlide01 and pAlide02 in strain BC). Key genes of chlorate reduction in strain BC were located on a 120 kb megaplasmid (pAlide01), which was absent in strain K601T. Genes involved in cyclohexanol degradation were only found in strain K601T. Benzene and toluene are degraded via oxygenase-mediated pathways in both strains. Genes involved in the meta-cleavage pathway of catechol are present in the genomes of both strains. Strain BC also contains all genes of the ortho-cleavage pathway. The large number of mono- and dioxygenase genes in the genomes suggests that the two strains have a broader substrate range than known thus far.

Oosterkamp, Margreet J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Veuskens, Teun [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Saia, Flavia Talarico [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Weelink, Sander A.B. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Langenhoff, A. M. [Deltares, The Netherlands; Gerritse, Jan [Deltares, The Netherlands; Van Berkel, Willem J. H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Pieper, Dietmar [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Junca, Howard [CorpoGen, Bogota Colombia; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Schraa, Gosse [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Davids, Mark [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Schaap, Peter J [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Plugge, Caroline M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Stams, Alfons J. M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solar-thermal energy conversion and storage: cyclohexane dehydrogenation. Progress report, 30 September 1977-30 June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide research support for the benzene/cyclohexane heat pipe development program at Sandia. The kinetics of the cyclohexane decomposition (energy collection) reaction over a commercially available naphtha reforming catalyst (RD-150, Englehard Industries) in the temperature range 400 to 800/sup 0/F and pressures of 1 to 40 atmospheres were measured. Significant amounts of side products such as toluene and butane were identified at temperatures above 550/sup 0/F at atmospheric pressure and significant mass transfer limitations on conversions were observed at the higher space velocities and higher temperatures. No significant decreases in catalyst activity were measured at temperatures below 800/sup 0/F. However, at 800/sup 0/F there was a significant decrease in catalyst activity which does not appear to be a poisoning problem but a thermal limitation on catalyst effectiveness. A test facility has been fabricated to study the behavior of the benzene/cyclohexane (or any other gas phase catalytic reaction) system and its catalysts under long term cycling at temperatures up to 1000/sup 0/F, and pressures up to 1000 psig at a wide variety of space velocities. A mathematical model was developed which simulates the dynamic behavior of the collector (endothermic) reactor and allows the evaluation of such things as startup, shutdown, switching and process control algorithms.

Ritter, A.B.; DeLancey, G.B.; Schneider, J.; Silla, H.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas. Topical report February 1994--February 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were made on use of H and CH plasmas for converting waste materials and heavy oils to H-rich transportation fuels. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted with an industrial microwave generator and a commercial microwave oven. A continuously circulating reactor was constructed for conducting experiments on flowing oils. Experiments on decomposition of scrap tires showed that microwave plasmas can be used to decompose scrap tires into potentially useful liquid products. In a batch experiment using a commercial microwave oven, about 20% of the tire was converted to liquid products in about 9 minutes. Methane was decomposed in a microwave plasma to yield a liquid products composed of various compound types; GC/MS analyses identified unsaturated compounds including benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, methyl and ethyl naphthalene, small amounts of larger aromatic rings, and olefinic compounds. Experiments on a crude oil in a continuously flowing reactor showed that distillate materials are produced using H and CH plasmas. Also, the recycle oils had an overall carbon aromaticity lower than that of starting feed material, indicating that some hydrogenation and methanation had taken place in the recycle oils.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Process Simulation and Evaluation of Alternative Solvents for Jatropha Curcas L. Seed Oil Extraction in Biodiesel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jatropha curcas L. is a drought-resistant plant which can be grown in poor soil and marginal lands. The use of Jatropha seed oil to produce biodiesel has been widely studied in recent years. Results showed that it is one of the most promising alternatives for conventional petro-diesel. Currently, hexane is still the most commonly used solvent for commercial oil extraction. However, the increasing price and flammability properties of hexane are motivating industry to seek alternative solvents. The objectives of this study are to design and analyze the Jatropha seed oil extraction for use in biodiesel production, and to provide a systematic safety-economic analysis of alternative solvents that can be used in Jatropha seed oil extraction. First, a base-case flowsheet is synthesized for oil extraction. Then, the base-case extraction process and each solvent Fire and Explosion Index (F & EI) and the Solvent Safety Index (SSI). Eight solvents, including n-heptane, toluene, xylene, dichloromethane, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, methanol and ethanol are selected for candidates by comparing these results to those for hexane. Two cases are developed to evaluate the economic potential of these candidates. Furthermore, heat integration is applied to the process to minimize energy usage. Finally, a comprehensive solvent comparison is developed based on F & EI, SSI, solvent makeup cost, utilities cost, and capital investment. The results show that chloroform is the optimal solvent, while dichloromethane is the next best.

Chiou, Ming-Hao

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sorption of organic compounds in the aqueous phase onto tire rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch sorption tests were conducted to investigate the sorption capacity of organic compounds by ground tire and to assess the effects of the presence of other organic compounds, ionic strength, pH, ground tire particle size, and temperature on sorption. None of the factors were significant under the conditions tested, m-Xylene had the highest partition coefficient, followed by ethylbenzene, toluene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and methylene chloride (13 L/kg). The partition coefficients had a logarithmic linear relationship with the octanol-water partition coefficients. The diffusion coefficients of the compounds tested were in the range of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s. The diffusion coefficients did not correlate well with the physical/chemical properties, such as molecular size, of the compounds tested. The heat of solutions of the compounds tested had relatively low values. Thus, the sorption may not be affected significantly by temperature change. Organic compounds sorbed onto tire rubber appear to be sorbed primarily onto tire rubber polymeric materials and partially carbon black in the tire rubber. Overall, ground tire shows significant capacity as a sorbent of organic compounds.

Kim, J.Y.; Park, J.K.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes That Impact Bioremediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial Community Diversity at a Mixed Waste Contaminated Site The correlation between bacterial population structure and lead, chromium and organic compounds present along a 21.6 m transect was examined. There was a gradient of heavy metal (Cr and Pb) and petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in these soils. A 16S rDNA analysis method and fatty acid methyl esters derived from phospholipids (PLFA) analysis were used to compare microbial communities. Soil microbial DNA was extracted and community fingerprint patterns for each sample location were produced by DGGE separation of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes amplified by PCR. Visual analysis of DGGE patterns indicated that sample locations with high concentrations of total toluene (12,000 mg kg-1), xylenes (8,000 mg kg-1), methylene chloride (10,000 mg kg-1), lead (17,000 mg kg-1) and chromium (3,200 mg kg-1) have a different community composition from the community with lower metals (200 mg kg-1) and organics (1200 mg kg-1) content. Microbial biomass, indicated by total phospholipid-P, was greatest in soils with highest organic contamination.

Konopka, Allan E.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Abstract submission for consideration for a poster at HOTWC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrochloric acid; Hydrobromic acid; Bromomethane; Bromoethene; Chlorobenzodioxole; Benzene; Dibromoethane; Chlorobenzene ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Quasielastic gamma-ray scattering from polydimethylsiloxane ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... polydimethylsiloxane in benzene solutions B ... Fig. 2) and other PDMS/Benzene solutions at various concentrations (see TABLE ...

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbons (toluene), alkanes (butane, methane, heptane),tube/GC (NIOSH 1 5 0 0 ) a Butane 300ppm Charcoal tube/GC (O toluene toluene + C O butane butane + C O methane methane

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 °C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

David Fairén-jiménez; Francisco Carrasco-marín; David Djurado; Françoise Bley; Françoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gen; radiation correction; thermal con- with measurements on liquid toluene as ductivity; thermal diffusivity; toluene; well as argon and nitrogen gas. ...

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID:5092  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

overtaken by a number of processes: The sources are now: catalytic reforming, hydrodealkylation of toluene

Mailhes, Corinne

179

A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

PREPARATION OF ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE EXTRACTANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for providing superior solvent extractants for metal recovery processes is given wherein the extractant comprises an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid ester dissolved in an organic solvent diluent. Finely divided solid P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is slurried in an organic solvent-diluent selected from organic solvents such as kerosene, benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, etc. An alcohol selected from the higher alcohols having 4 to 17 carbon atoms. e.g.. hexanol-1. heptanol-3, octanol-1. 2.6-dimethyl-heptanol-4, and decanol-1, is rapidly added to the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ slurry in the amount of about 2 moles of alcohol to 1 mole of P/sub 2/ O/sub 5/. The temperature is maintained below about 110 deg C during the course of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-alcohol reaction. An alkyl pyrophosphate extractant compound is formed as a consequence of the reaction process. The alkyl pyrophosphate solvent-diluent extractant phase is useful in solvent extraction metal recovery processes.

Levine, C.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Moore, G.R.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

ligand_searches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 042951_chain1_1 042951_chain1_1, 139 139, 2,5-dimethylbenzal dehyde 2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde, benzene benzene. ...

184

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

185

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE WITH CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, FY 78 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agents used by painters include butane, calcium carbonate,Benzene* Laboratory - Reagent Butane* Painters - PropellentBenzene* Laboratory - Reagent Butane* Painters - Propellent

DeRoos, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, 0021-9193/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/JB.183.16.47184726.2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, catechol, ,2,5,6- dibenz(a)anthracene, ethyl benzene, furan, furfural, hydrogen peroxide, hydroquinone

Sheridan, Jennifer

187

Laboratory - Supplies, Chemicals and PPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulator; Stopwatch. Solvents: Acetone; Benzene (By Request); Chloroform; Deuterated Solvents (By Request); Ethanol; ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon nanotube metrology for science and manufacturing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Environmental Science and Technology, 2009. naphthalene acenaphthylene 1,3-butadiene benzene fluoranthene 4 Page 33. ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Results of Reference List Query  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Publications on Photon Cross Sections Bibliographic Database. that include Benzene. Measurements of Gamma-Ray Mass ...

190

I. Pt-Catalyzed Tandem Epoxide Fragmentation/Pentannulation of Propargylic Esters II. Progress Toward the Kopsia Family of Indole Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N H NO 2 BnO N H xylenes, catechol BnO N H 2 , Pd/C NH 2 BnOBnO N H NO 2 BnO N H xylenes, catechol 3-(2-Nitroethyl)-5-1.1 equiv. ), and 3-methyl-catechol (250 mg, 2.3 mmol, 0.1

Pujanauski, Brian Gerard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ultrafiltration is a potentially viable method of removing finely dispersed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L V(1 ts - 1 t0 ) (2) Figure 2. Effect of surfactant concentration on turbidimetric titrations in 0 of toluene, the effect of surfactant concentrationonsizewassimilartothatobservedforother nonionic surfactants the ratio of toluene/surfactant decreases with increased surfactant concentration, the effect of toluene

Abubakr, Said

192

Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the inorganic species measured in the leachate do not exceed the MCL, SMCL or TW limits. (4) The inorganic waste species that exceeded the MCL by more than a factor of 10 were nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite. (5) Analyses met all quality assurance specifications of US EPA SW-846. (6) The organic species (benzene, toluene, 1-butanol, phenol) were either not detected or were less than reportable for the vault classification samples. (7) The gross alpha and radium isotopes could not be determined to the MCL because of the elevated background which raised the detection limits. (8) Most of the beta/gamma activity was from 137Cs and its daughter 137mBa. (9) The concentration of 137Cs and 90Sr were present in the leachate at concentrations 1/40th and 1/8th respectively than in the 2003 vault classification samples. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the SCHWMR R.61-79.261.24(b) RCRA metals requirements for a nonhazardous waste form. The TCLP leachate concentrations for nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite were greater than 10x the MCLs in SCDHEC Regulations R.61-107.19, Part I A, which confirms the Saltstone Disposal Facility classification as a Class 3 Landfill. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the R.61-79.268.48(a) non wastewater treatment standards.

Eibling, R.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from October 2002 to March 2003. In this starting stage of this study, we have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Two saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. Preliminary results suggest that BTEX sorption actually increases with the number of saturation/regeneration cycles. Furthermore, the experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and are currently being assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Final report, September 1991--February 1995  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various probe compounds on 60-200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed. the probe compounds include m-cresol, p-cresol, o-cresol, phenol, n-octanol, n-heptanol, n-propanol, isopropanol n-butanol, s-butanol, 2-butanol, t-butanol, 2-naphthol, cyclohexanol, 2-methyl-1-pentanol (2M1P), 4-methyl-2-pentanol (4M2P), benzene and toluene. Equilibrium adsorption of various probe compounds on the coals were measured with the inverse liquid chromatography method. Experiments on flotation of various 60-200 mesh treated coals such as Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed. The chosen coals were treated with steam, nitrogen and air at 1 atm and 125-225{degrees}C for 24 hours. The coals were treated with water as well as 20-1000 ppm aqueous alcohol solutions for 3-24 hours at 150-225{degrees}C. The coals also were treated with 20-ppm alcohol aqueous solutions for 1-24 hours at the 0.002-g/min mass flow rate of alcohol aqueous solutions and at 225{degrees}C. Flotation experiments were conducted with a 500-cm{sup 3} batch-type micro flotation apparatus, introducing nitrogen at the bottom of the apparatus. This final report was prepared with the experimental data obtained during the period of September 1991-March 1994.

Kwon, K.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Experimental and computational study of methane counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of either jet fuel or a 6-component surrogate under non-sooting conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame and of the same flame doped with 1000 ppm (molar) of either jet fuel or a 6-component jet fuel surrogate was analyzed experimentally, by gas sampling via quartz microprobes and subsequent GC/MS analysis, and computationally using a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend. Conditions were chosen to ensure that all three flames were non-sooting, with identical temperature profiles and stoichiometric mixture fraction, through a judicious selection of feed stream composition and strain rate. The experimental dataset provides a glimpse of the pyrolysis and oxidation behavior of jet fuel in a diffusion flame. The jet fuel initial oxidation is consistent with anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes to smaller and smaller fragments and the survival of ring-stabilized aromatics at higher temperatures. The 6-component surrogate captures the same trend correctly, but the agreement is not quantitative with respect to some of the aromatics such as benzene and toluene. Various alkanes, alkenes and aromatics among the jet fuel components are either only qualitatively characterized or could not be identified, because of the presence of many isomers and overlapping spectra in the chromatogram, leaving 80% of the carbon from the jet fuel unaccounted for in the early pyrolysis history of the parent fuel. Computationally, the one-dimensional code adopted a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend that is based on an existing hierarchically constructed kinetic model for alkanes and simple aromatics, extended to account for the presence of tetralin and methylcyclohexane as reference fuels. The computational results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones for the surrogate behavior, with the greatest discrepancy in the concentrations of aromatics and ethylene. (author)

Bufferand, H.; Tosatto, L.; La Mantia, B.; Smooke, M.D.; Gomez, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8286 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation model to accurately predict gas temperatures and thus soot formation rates. When including such a radiation model, the LES model predicts mean soot concentrations within 30% in the ethylene jet flame.

Wang, Hai (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ligand_searches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 000247_chain1_1, 000247_chain1_3 000247_chain1_3, 1KOBC_chain1_1 1KOBC_chain1_1, 3-methylbutanal 3-methylbutanal, benzene benzene ...

200

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Structure Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Naphthalene 4 1,2-(1,8-Naphthalenediyl)benzene 18 Naphthalin 4 ... Structure Name Formula MW L/B CAS# 1 Benzene 78 1.099 1 2 3 4 5 6 CH6 6 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

J. F. Wishart - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Containing Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes and Benzene: Bis2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5,7-octanetrionatodicopper(II)-Benzene and...

202

E&S TRAINING MATRIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

who work at a site that contains asbestos (including floor tiles). 29CFR- 1910.1001 BENZENE One-time Anyone potentially exposed to benzene 29 CFR 1910.1028 BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS...

203

Method for making thin polypropylene film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is provided for making uniform thickness polypropylene film as thin as 100 Angstroms. A solution of polypropylene dissolved in xylene is formed by mixing granular polypropylene and xylene together in a flask at an elevated temperature. A substrate, such as a glass plate or microscope slide is immersed in the solution. When the glass plate is withdrawn from the solution at a uniform rate, a thin polypropylene film forms on a flat surface area of the glass plate as the result of xylene evaporation. The actual thickness of the polypropylene film is functional of the polypropylene in xylene solution concentration, and the particular withdrawal rate of the glass plate from the solution. After formation, the thin polypropylene film is floated from the glass plate onto the surface of water, from which it is picked up with a wire hoop.

Behymer, R.D.; Scholten, J.A.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Gas Chromatographic Retention Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lee retention indices are determined by analogy with Kovats indices for the following reference compounds: benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Tensile Behavior of Long Period Stacking Ordered Structured Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

206

Glove-Solvent Recommendation Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Acids & Bases, --, --, E, --, --. Acetone, E, --, G (hw), --, --. Acetonitrile, E, --, G, F, --. Benzene, --, --, F, F, E. Carbon tetrachloride, --, --, -, E, E. Chlorobutane ...

207

Diffusion Coefficients and Equilibrium Solubility of Scandium and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

208

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Designing Coatings for Improved Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

222

Dopant-dependent Rearrangement of Point Defects in Ceria Studied ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

223

Effect of Magnesium Doping on the Structure, Particle Size and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

224

Low-temperature Synthesis of Silicon Carbide Porous Ceramics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

225

Session G: Materials-Environment Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method: Nuri Zreiba1;  ...

226

Synthesis and Structural Evolution of Glass Composite Prepared by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

227

Design and Manufacture of Fluidized Bed Reactor in Pilot Scale for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

228

Polymer Fractography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Furthermore, gas chromatography revealed the presence of potential stress cracking agents (benzene and several hydrocarbons). Potential ...

229

Boualem Hammouda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... B. Hammouda, G. Schupp and S. Maglic, Quasielastic Gamma-ray Scattering from Polydimethylsiloxane in Benzene Solutions, J. Chem. Phys. ...

230

Synthesis of Diamond-like Carbon Films by Electro-Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

231

MS&T'13 Poster Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2013 ... Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method.

232

Precipitate Prediction Model of Mg-xAl(x=3,6,9) Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

233

Grease Basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Silicones Chlorofluorocarbon Alkylated benzene Phosphate esters Polyphenyl ethers Chemical structures are shown in Fig. 4, whereas Table 2

234

Electrochemical Fabrication of High Performance Ni-Fe Multilayer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

235

Correlation between Microstructure and Corrosion Properties of Die ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

236

Ambient Temperature Synthesis of Ba  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

237

One Dimensional Multiferroic Nanomaterials/Nanocomposites for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

238

Crystal Growth with Low Temperature from Polycarbosilane by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

239

Effect of Strain Rate and Triaxiality on the Constitutive Response of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

240

Effect of Aluminum Content on Mechanical Properties and Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mechanical Properties of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

242

S-graded Metamorphic Buffer Layers for Lattice Mismatched Si1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

243

Preparation of Vanadium Dioxide Nanoparticle with Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

244

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) ...

245

Development of Y-doped ZnO Thin Films via Novel Ink Jet Printing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

246

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Consolidation of Silica/Graphene Oxide Composite by Spark ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

262

Development of a High Toughness Bainite in a 38MnV7 Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

263

UV-Vis Absorption and Luminescence Spectrum of LAS : Tb3+ ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

264

Characterization of the Micro Galvanic Activity in Coupled Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

265

Shearography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

266

Study on Tuyere Theoretical Flame Temperature of COREX Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

267

Alumina Plant –Third Generations “Greenfield & Computerized”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

268

NIST: Photon Cross Section Bibliography - Material List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chloride Cadmium iodide Calcium carbonate Calcium fluoride Calcium hydride ... Freon 23) Triiodomethane Trimethyl benzene Uranium (IV) fluoride ...

269

Contact: Dr. Michael Pishko at mpishko@tamu.edu or 979.845.3348. Also, visit che.tamu.edu/people/faculty Note from the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Tomberlin, Jeff

270

Contact: Dr. Charles Glover at c-glover@tamu.edu.edu or 979.845.3389. Also, visit che.tamu.edu/people/faculty Faculty Index -2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Tomberlin, Jeff

271

Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

272

Displacement by SV Waves in Fluid Saturated Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dihydroxy benzenes are of considerable interest because the stabilities of the molecular H-bond as well as the interaction between the ? charges of the benzene ring and the OH group[1]. The three isomers of di-hydroxy benzene namely, catechol, resorcinol, ... Keywords: diffusion, density, insoluble and soluble mediums

Dennis Ling Chuan Ching; Zainal Abdul Aziz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Large-Scale Structures in TetrahydrofuranÀWater Mixture with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... photodiode. The LLS cell was held in a thermostat refractive index matching vat filled with purified and dust-free toluene. ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

ThermoML Data for JCT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... equilibria for the ternary (water + acetic acid + toluene) system ... aqueous solutions of butyric acid with n ... halobenzoic esters and of their parent acids. ...

275

JOM Subject Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2011 ... Water and glacial acetic acid allow stable plasmas. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methanol, and toluene quench plasmas. Other organic ...

276

Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics  

SciTech Connect

Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced {approximately}7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe{reg_sign} rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The system was tested in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC. The contaminant plume there is approximately 10 m deep, 50 m wide and contains up to 4 {micro}g/L total BTEX and 75 {micro}g/L dissolved iron. An extensive pilot test was first performed to estimate the zone of influence for a single well. At this site an air injection rate of 1.2 L/min resulted in a water flow rate of 1 to 2 L/min based on bromide dilution tests in the GCW. The GCW increased the dissolved oxygen concentration in the discharge water to between 6 and 8 {micro}g/L and reduced contaminant concentrations to less than 20 {micro}g/L total BTEX. Monitoring results from a 73 day pilot test were then used to define the zone of influence for a single DP-GCW and to design a full scale barrier system.

Borden, R.C.; Cherry, R.S.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics  

SciTech Connect

Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced ~7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe® rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The system was tested in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC. The contaminant plume there is approximately 10 m deep, 50 m wide and contains up to 4 µg/L total BTEX and 75 µg/L dissolved iron. An extensive pilot test was first performed to estimate the zone of influence for a single well. At this site an air injection rate of 1.2 L/min resulted in a water flow rate of 1 to 2 L/min based on bromide dilution tests in the GCW. The GCW increased the dissolved oxygen concentration in the discharge water to between 6 and 8 µg/L and reduced contaminant concentrations to less than 20 µg/L total BTEX. Monitoring results from a 73 day pilot test were then used to define the zone of influence for a single DP-GCW and to design a full scale barrier system.

Borden, R. E.; Cherry, Robert Stephen

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process. These columns will be used both in the laboratory and in the proposed field testing to be conducted next year. Innocula for the columns that degrade all of the BTEX columns have been developed.

LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Toxic emissions from a cyclone burner boiler with an ESP and with the SNOX demonstration and from a pulverized coal burner boiler with an ESP/wet flue gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

Emission factors for VOC and aldehydes, dioxins/furans, and PAH/SVOC are presented in Tables 6--8, respectively. Each table includes results for Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and the SNOX process. As shown in Table 6, benzene and toluene were measured in the Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and SNOX stack emissions in highly variable concentrations. Over 90 percent of the VOC analyzed were not detected in the stack gases, and the emission factor for these VOC ranges from 1.1 to 1.4 {mu}g/MJ for the three systems. Emission factors for the four aldehydes that were measured range from 0.47 to 31 {mu}g/MJ for Coal Creek, 1.7 to 38 {mu}g/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 3.6 to 167 {mu}g/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetaldehyde is at the highest concentration of the four aldehydes in all three units, a finding which is consistent with previous work. Dioxin/furan emission factors are provided in Table 7. Emission, factors for these compounds range from 0.40 to 6.51 pg/MJ for Coal Creek and 0.45 to 8.14 pg/MJ for the Niles Boiler. Dioxins/furans were not determined in the SNOX process. The compounds 1,2,3,4,6,7,8heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran were detected in both units. The predominance of these species in high SO{sub 2} environments has been previously observed. All other 2,3,7,8 substituted dioxin/furan isomers listed in Table 8 were not detected in either unit. Table 8 lists the emission factors for PAH/SVOC. Emission factors range from 0.3 to 233 ng/MJ for Coal Creek, 0.5 to 273 ng/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 0.3 to 130 ng/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetophenone is at the highest concentration of the PAH/SVOC in all three units. Naphthalene, dibenzofuran, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene are also present at relatively high concentrations in comparison to the other PAH/SVOC.

Sverdrup, G.M.; Riggs, K.B.; Kelly, T.J.; Barrett, R.E. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Peltier, R.G.; Cooper, J.A. [Chester Environmental, Monroeville, PA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Activity-dependent fluorescent labeling of bacterial cells expressing the TOL pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-Ethynylbenzoate functions as an activity-dependent, fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for Pseudomonas putida mt-2, which is known to degrade toluene via conversion to benzoate, followed by meta ring fission of the intermediate, catechol. This direct physiological analysis allows the fluorescent labeling of cells whose toluene-degrading enzymes have been induced by an aromatic substrate.

William K. Keener; Mary E. Watwood

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

UNITED STATES Calendar Year 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Department, King Fahd UniVersity of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia 1 with toluene. Thus, these processes offer a way to utilize the low-cost toluene and TMB to produce the much to having total constant pressure since the total number of moles remains constant. Coke deposited on spent

US Army Corps of Engineers

284

Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin Natural Gas Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Department, King Fahd UniVersity of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia 1 with toluene. Thus, these processes offer a way to utilize the low-cost toluene and TMB to produce the much to having total constant pressure since the total number of moles remains constant. Coke deposited on spent

Texas at Austin, University of

285

Dissolved Hydrocarbons and related microflora in a fjordal seaport: sources, sinks, concentrations, and kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The continuous addition of toluene as a solute of treated ballast water from oil tankers into a well-defined estuary facilitated the study of the dynamics of dissolved hydrocarbon metabolism in seawater. Near the ballast water injection point, a layer of warm ballast water, rich in bacteria, that was trapped below the less-dense fresh surface water was located. Toluene residence times were approximately 2 weeks in this layer, 2 years elsewhere in Port Valdez, and 2 decades in the surface water of a more oceanic receiving estuary adjacent. The origin of bacteria in this layer was traced to growth in oil tanker ballast during shipments. The biomass of toluene oxidizers in water samples was estimated from the average affinity of pure-culture isolates for toluene (28 liters per g of cells per h) and observed toluene oxidation kinetics. Values ranged from nearly all of the total bacterial biomass within the bacteria-rich layer down to 0.2% at points far removed. Because the population of toluene oxidizers was large with respect to the amount of toluene consumed and because water from a nearby nonpolluted estuary was equally active in facilitating toluene metabolism, we searched for an additional hydrocarbon source. It was found that terpenes could be washed from spruce trees by simulated rainfall, which suggested that riparian conifers provide an additional and significant hydrocarbon source to seawater. (JMT)

Button, D.K.; Robertson, B.R.; Craig, K.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Process for the preparation of cumene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cumene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic by feeding propylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with propylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the propylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and cumene and diisopropyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the cumene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diisopropyl benzene to cumene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Process for the preparation of cumene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cumene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding propylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with propylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the propylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and cumene and diisopropyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the cumene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diisopropyl benzene to cumene which is again separated and recovered.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of the absorption capacity of various absorbers by reversed-phase chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of the separation of alkanes, alkenes, and cycloalkanes from benzene in coke oven gas was presented. The absorption index was determined for benzene and n-octane as a function of temperature in methylnaphthalene, coal oil, solar oil, polyalkylbenzenes, tetraline, and 1,7-dimethylnaphthalene by gas chromatography. It was concluded that the best absorbers for the recovery of benzene were tetraline and coal oil. The most efficient absorber present in wash oil was methylnaphthalene. (JMT)

Mariich, L.I.; Ambrozevich, F.N.; Platonova, L.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Materials-Environment Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012... Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method : Nuri Zreiba1; hisham abourayana2; 1Tripoli University; 2plasma research lab.

290

FIRST BERKELEY CATALYSIS AND SURFACE SCIENCE CONFERENCE JULY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arco Chemical Company Ashland Oil, Inc. Celanese CorporationCarbide Corporation Union Oil Co. of California iii FIRSTboth distillates and lube oils; alkylation of benzene with

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Journal of Research Volume 44  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Heat of fluorination of cobaltous fluoride, and the heats of reaction of cobaltic fluoride with hydrogen and with bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene (a,a,a,a',a ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

them, including ones containing aromatic compounds (i.e., compounds with one or more benzene rings). The presence of so many hydrophobic and aromatic residues explains how,...

295

Previous Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a specific selective catalyst for the hydrogenation of the pyridine ring without affecting the benzene ring in aryl-substituted pyridines, including those ...

296

Advanced Concepts for Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Framework", Nature, 402, 276-279 (1999). Mesoporous Organosilica Material benzene-silica hybrid material Hydrogen storage behavior? S. Inagaki, S. Guan, T. Ohsuna, and...

297

Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inspection reveals small splittings of some lines due to long-range (at least four-bond) homonuclear couplings to protons on the benzene ring. ...

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Characteristics of Polymer Films Deposited via Microwave Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of ...

299

new  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The equations of state have been revised for benzene, cyclohexane, deuterium, dimethyl carbonate, ethanol, helium, R161, and R1234ze. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

ThermoML Data for FPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As"). Title: Volumetric behavior of the ternary system benzene-2-methoxy-2- methylbutane-2,2,4-trimethylpentane and all binary sub-systems at ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrothermal Growth of the TiO2 Nanowire Array on Ti Plates for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of the aligned TiO2 nanowire array were studied in both the photoanalytic mineralization of acetone, benzene and dye molecules in water and the ...

302

NIST Chemical Kinetics Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 46 records will be returned, representing all the records for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with benzene. If C6H5 is ...

303

Coatings for Wear and Corrosion III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of deposited films ...

304

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

305

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How did you resolve that? The Top Nine Indoor Contaminants Acetaldehyde Acrolein Benzene 1,3-butadiene 1,4-dichlorobenzene Formaldehyde Naphthalene Nitrogen dioxide...

306

Neutron scattering and hydrogenous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The next molecules, shown in brown, reside above the line defined by adjacent oxygen atoms, and in the sites above the benzene ring, shown in ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Methane Olefins H 2 CO CO 2 Olefins ethylene + propylene + C 4 -ene + benzene Water pump off Water pump on Fully reformed local pump diesel Equilibrium...

308

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Reference Correlation of the Thermal Conductivity of Benzene from the Triple Point to 725 K and up to 500 MPa. Published: October 26, 2012. ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dr. Tom Allison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hartree-Fock Dispersion Probe of the Equilibrium Structures of Small Microclusters of Benzene and Naphthalene: Comparison with Second-Order ...

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Results for four of the eleven monoterpenes, monitored versus an internal standard of benzene, indicated stability in these treated aluminum gas ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Journal of Research Volume 41  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dipole moments and molecular association of some picrates of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in benzene and dioxane, p. 1 Maryott ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nanowire-based Sensors Offer Improved Detection of Volatile ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Highly selective GaN-nanowire/TiO2-nanocluster hybrid sensors for detection of benzene and related environment pollutants. Nanotechnology. ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ni and Co Hydrometallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Cobalt sulfate solution was refined by PC88A levextrel Resins which produced from HPD-100 type of ethylene benzene -divinylbenzene ...

314

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

benzene extracted from the reformulated motor gasoline pool in their conventional motor gasoline. Importers lacking 1990 motor gasoline quality data with which to

315

Personal Body Armor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... studies of the PBO reaction process that indicate that the phosphoric acid can react with the diamino-dihydroxy benzene compounds used to ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Linking Environmental Exposures to Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies conducted by his group, including occupational and environmental exposures to benzene and other VOCs and air levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following the World...

317

Structural and Vibrational Characterization of Tetracene as a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tetracene, an aromatic molecule consisting of 4 fused benzene rings, adopts a layered, herringbone structure in the solid state ( Figure 1 ). When a ...

318

NIST Tech Beat - Aug. 17, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... emissions and so look like excellent candidates for “green solvents” to replace hazardous, air-polluting organic solvents like acetone and benzene. ...

319

Dr. Gregory T. Linteris  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kinetics. During his first year, he studied the oxidation of n-butyl benzene in a turbulent chemical kinetic flow reactor. In ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microsoft Word - Gerdes.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tin (Sn), zinc (Zn), and antimony (Sb). The effects of higher hydrocarbons including benzene and naphthalene and process chemicals such as Selexol are also considered. Results...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Studies on Refining Cobalt Salt Solution by Extraction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cobalt sulfate solution was refined by PC88A levextrel Resins which produced from HPD-100 type of ethylene benzene -divinylbenzene porous adsorption resin  ...

322

RFS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The chemical properties of sulfur, olefin content, aromatics, benzene, and oxygen content also affect emission levels. For example, when sulfur is reduced, ...

323

ThermoML Data for FPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As"). Title: Ternary (liquid liquid) equilibria of nitrate based ionic liquid + alkane + benzene at 298.15 K: Experiments and correlation. Pages: 35-41. ...

324

OL YMERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is phosphoric acid that is chemically attached to the hydroxyl groups on the DADHB (ie, 1,3-diamino-4,6-dihydroxy benzene) molecules, forming ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effects of Impurities of Fuel Cell Performance and Durability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Monoxide Pt Catalyst Gas Reactants Sulfur Dioxide Membrane Air Near Battlefield Benzene Membrane Air Near Battlefield Ammonia Membrane Air Pollution SO 2 Catalyst Air...

326

Quantitative Infrared Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table II: Compound#, Compound Name, 001, Benzene, 002, Ethylene, 003, Acetone, 004, Ethanol, 005, Methanol, 006, 2-propanol, 007, Ethyl Acetatev ...

327

Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Dataset | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mesothelioma, 1330-20-7, 5989-27-5, dichloromethane, methylmercury, mibk, bentazon, benzene, fromaldehyde, 1,4-dioxane, quickview, arsenic, chromium, hexavalent chromium,...

328

NERSC Helps Researchers Discover a Potential On-Off Switch for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a junction between gold electrodes and bipyridine-an aromatic molecule with two benzene-like rings, each containing one nitrogen atom. They hypothesized about the...

329

DFT Exercises - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 24, 2008 ... benzene silicon sodium graphite comparison of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding. Van Hove singularities surface reconstruction on silicon

330

Extraction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Triethylene Glycol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

introduced in LG 35-8/300B benzene reforming unit. (Kirishinefteorgsintez Production Association). The sulfolane content in the extractant was gradually brought ...

331

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a) soot particles from propane-benzene combustion in air;tempera­ downstream from a propane Photoelectron spectraand carbon (Is) regions of propane soot particles produced

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SYNTHESES AND REACTIONS OF POLYMER-BOUND MOLYBDENUM COMPLEXES AND HYDROGENOLYSES OF AN ALKYNYL COBALT CARBONYL CLUSTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dehydrated by azeotropic distillation with benzene. Diethyloxane were purified distillation from sodium benzophenoneby a vpc-monitored fractional distillation from 4A sieves.

Frommer, Jane Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Free Rud. Re,>.(ot?im.\\.. Vol. 15. No. 5, pp. 285-296 Reprints available directly from the publisher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydroquinone in bone marrow. the target organ of benzene-induced myelotoxicity. KEY WORDS: Benzene202,Hydrogen peroxide; HO', Hydroxyl radical; HQ, Hydro- quinone; HRP. Horseradish peroxidase; HX to phenol. Cytochrome P-450 has also been shown to hydroxylate phenol".I2 to hydroquinone (HQ) and catechol

California at Berkeley, University of

334

Quantitative Infrared Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Benzene, 2.1 %, Boxcar, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. Triangular, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. ... Ethyl benzene, 2.1 %, Boxcar, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Applications for tantalum equipment...Both reflux and product condensers Chloral HCl absorption Chemical HCl absorbers Recovery of by-product HCl Chlorine Brine cooling Chemical Heat exchangers � Chloroacetic acid HCl absorption Chemical HCl absorbers Recovery of by-product HCl Chlorobenzene, also monochloro-benzene and paradichloro-benzene...

337

The Total Synthesis of Galbulimima Alkaloid (+/-) G. B. 13 and the Development of an Anomalous Heck Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miura (see eq 25). 91 O [RhCl(cod)] 2 , o-xylene NaBPh 4 R Rcyclization studies using [Rh(cod)(OH)] 2 with dppbenz inthe more active catalyst [Rh(cod)(MeCN) 2 ] + BF 4? , whose

Larson, Kimberly Katherine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Characterizing time decay of bibenzyl scintillator using time correlated single photon counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time decay of several scintillation materials has been measured using the time correlated single photon counting method and a new organic crystal with a highly suppressed delayed light has been identified. Results comparing the light decay of the bibenzyl crystal with a xylene based detector, which is currently installed at National Ignition Facility will be presented.

Hatarik, R.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Number, Mass and Volume Distributions of Mineral Aerosol and Soils of the Sahara  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct method will be described to determine the complete mineral size distribution in aerosol (xylene-insoluble component) and soils (water-insoluble component) covering a size range from 0.01 up to 100 ?m and 1000 ?m radius, respectively, by ...

Guillaume A. d'Almeida; Lothar Schütz

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Molecular-Beam Mass-Spectrometric Analyses of Hydrocarbon Flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Laminar flat flame combustion has been studied with molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS) for a fuel-rich cyclohexane (? = 2.003) flame, a fuel-lean toluene (? = 0.895),… (more)

Gon, Saugata

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Literature Review of Mobility Control Methods for CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an organic co-solvent such as toluene; although this thickened CO 2 was shown to improve oil recovery from cores, the co-solvent requirement (roughly 10% co-solvent, 90% CO 2 )...

342

Classification of Adhesive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Benefits and limitations of various adhesive types...very good moisture resistance on plastics. (d) Motor oil, toluene, gasoline, automatic transmission fluid. (e) Uncured liquid adhesives may

343

Mesoporous silica SBA-16 functionalized with alkoxysilane groups: preparation, characterization, and release profile study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoporous material sphere based on silica, SBA-16, was chemically modified with alkoxysilane using two different solvents: methanol and toluene. The influence of the chemical modification of the matrix on the release rate of a model drug was also ...

Gracielle Ferreira Andrade; Daniel Cristian Ferreira Soares; Ramon Kenned de Sousa Almeida; Edésia Martins Barros Sousa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

AOCS Official Method H 19-58  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Toluene AOCS Official Method H 19-58 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION   SCOPE 0D1E8358356817FBF3DC9CFBF89F2752 MC-H1958 2424

345

Development of a Next-Generation Environmental Chamber Facility for Chemical Mechanism and VOC Reactivity Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene wereas ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene and 30 mpropane, propylene, n-butane, n-hexane, toluene, n-octane

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene werepropane, propylene, n-butane, n-hexane, toluene, n-octaneas ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene and 30 m

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Single pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

b) Energy level diagram of the CARS process. Fig. 2. (a)of pump/Stokes, probe and CARS signal detection (i and j). (spectrometer. Fig. 3. DQSI-CARS of toluene: (a), (b) The

Lim, Sang-Hyun; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hybrid membranes and their use in volatile organic compound/air separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid organic/inorganic membranes were produced by chemical grafting of octadecyltrichlorosilane onto ?-alumina membranes. Separation factors are presented showing strong evidence of capillary condensation in ungrafted membranes. The grafted membranes exhibit a much improved separation factor, over the bare membranes, in the low-toluene feed concentration range. The separation factor appeared to decrease slightly with increasing feed toluene concentration, and it was approximately 1/8 the magnitude of the separation factors reported for polydimethylsiloxane under similar feed conditions.

Krohn, John Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oceanography Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16 3/17 3/18 3/19 3/20 3/21 3/22 Toluene(ppbv) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 COMEX DOAS PTR-MS PEMEX DOAS the intercomparison of toluene measurements between the PTR-MS and two ground level DOAS light paths, T0-PEMEX and T0-COMEX, where PEMEX is 220 m to the west northwest of the T0 site and COMEX is 1026 m to the northwest

350

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 53715389, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/5371/2010/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16 3/17 3/18 3/19 3/20 3/21 3/22 Toluene(ppbv) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 COMEX DOAS PTR-MS PEMEX DOAS the intercomparison of toluene measurements between the PTR-MS and two ground level DOAS light paths, T0-PEMEX and T0-COMEX, where PEMEX is 220 m to the west northwest of the T0 site and COMEX is 1026 m to the northwest

Meskhidze, Nicholas

351

High-Temperature Characterization of SiCN Ceramics for Wireless...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Si12B1 Si6B1 Si4B1 Si2B1 CHCH 2 Si-H N-H Toluene-H Toluene-CH 3 S-CH 3 B-H BDS 1 H NMR 6.2 6.0 5.8 5.6 CHCH 2 Chemical Shift (ppm) HT1800 Si16B1 Si12B1 x 0.1 1....

352

The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

Paul Fallgren

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report – Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2–NaCl–H2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 9, 2007, the EPA released its MSAT2 rule, which will establish controls on gasoline, passenger vehicles, and portable fuel containers. The controls are designed to reduce emissions of benzene and other hazardous air pollutants. Benzene is a known carcinogen, and the EPA estimates that mobile sources produced more than 70 percent of all benzene emissions in 1999. Other mobile source air toxics, including 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and naphthalene, also are thought to increase cancer rates or contribute to other serious health problems.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

A New Type of pi-Molecular Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Containing Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes and Benzene: Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5, 7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Benzene and Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7- ((4-nitrophenyl)imino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Bis(benzene) James F. Wishart, Christopher Ceccarelli, Richard L. Lintvedt, Jeremy M. Berg, David P. Foley, Tom Frey, James E. Hahn, Keith O. Hodgson and Robert Weis Inorg. Chem. 22, 1667-1671 (1983) Abstract: The title compounds have been crystallized and examined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The structure of Cu2(PAAan)2°C6H6 consists of stacks of alternating bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II), Cu2(PAAan)2, and benzene molecules in an ADAD... pattern. Crystal data are

358

Originally published: January 1, 2012 EcoFocus: More research, regulation needed before  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have been reluctant to divulge the exact ingredients in fracking fluid. But, scientific analyses have revealed benzene and other carcinogens. And sadly, groundwater pollution by fracking fluids is currently

Berkowitz, Alan R.

359

Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the conversion of benzene to phenol, phenol to catechol,and catechol degradation to substrates for the tricarboxylicwas degraded by both catechol 1,2- and catechol 2,3-

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Characterization and hydrogen storage of surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for fuel cell application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synthesis, identification, and H2 storage of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been investigated in the present work. MWCNTs were produced from the catalytic-assembly solvent (benzene)-thermal (solvothermal) route. Reduction of ...

Kuen-Song Lin, Yao-Jen Mai, Shin-Rung Li, Chia-Wei Shu, Chieh-Hung Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 4-1 Predicting the Heats of Formation of Model Hydrocarbons up to Benzene D. F. Feller and D. A. Dixon... 4-2 Evidence for a Lower Enthalpy of...

363

Pollution Prevention Performance Summaries, Attachment 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

drawdown: - 77,000 tons of VOCs - 283 tons of hydrogen sulfide - 210 tons of benzene - 144 million Highlights: SPR avoided 238,000 in labor and material costs by...

364

Appendix B Essential Statistical Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ih 60 Sn n/2 Cn, Cnv, Cnh n Dn, Dnh, Dnd 2n For example, the benzene molecule (C6H6) belongs to the D6h point group. From Table II, = 12. ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

General Poster Session (Electronic Format)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... 47-52]In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Soil Contaminated by Benzene, Lead and Cadmium[pp. 53-59]Development and Validation of High ...

366

sr0924.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

half-life of 24,000 years. It also contains hazardous materials, such as mercury and benzene. We simply were not permitted, or equipped, to handle the final disposition of this...

367

Support vector machine for recognition of bio-products in gasoline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the application of Support Vector Machine for recognition and classification of the bio-products in the gasoline. We consider the supplement of such bio-products, as ethanol, MTBE, ETBE and benzene. The recognition system contains ...

Kazimierz Brudzewski; Stanis?aw Osowski; Tomasz Markiewicz; Jan Ulaczyk

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ta s Review million gal tank gal of high-lev olution that also which can relea ns of benzene v ntial treatment s organic-beari O) and Fluidize is assessment technology sho 8H...

369

Carbon nanostructures production by AC arc discharge plasma process at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanostructures have received much attention for a wide range of applications. In this paper, we produced carbon nanostructures by decomposition of benzene using AC arc discharge plasma process at atmospheric pressure. Discharge was carried out ...

Shenqiang Zhao; Ruoyu Hong; Zhi Luo; Haifeng Lu; Biao Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Synthesis, characterization, and microwave-absorbing properties of polypyrrole/MnFe2O4 nanocomposite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conductive polypyrrole (PPy)-manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanocomposites with core-shell structure were synthesized by in situ polymerization in the presence of dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) as the surfactant and dopant and ...

Seyed Hossein Hosseini; Ahmad Asadnia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bounded by all flight legs. Instruments in the G-1 recorded a high concentration of benzene in the plume, with the same spike picked up by ground instruments near I-80 at...

374

Detailed GC/MS Fragmentation Mechanisms for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 39. Ionization Potentials ?Nitrogen lone pair ? 8.97 eV for CH 3 NH 2 ? Benzene ? electrons ? 9.25 eV for C 6 H 6 ? Oxygen non-bonding e- ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

NIST: Freq. Interstellar Molec. Micro. Trans. - Table 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ber89. C 6 H 2, 1,3,5-Hexatriyne, HCCCCCCH, IR, [3161-99-7], Cer01a. C 6 H 6, Benzene, C 6 H 6, IR, [71-43-2], Cer01. HN, Imidogen, ...

376

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

NCNR NG3-SANS Instrument Schedule B. Hammouda Tel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Carnegie S15-49 Peptide Nucleic Acid Mellon U) (PNA) Mixed Micelles for Sep 24 2 B. Hammouda+D. Ho 2304 PEO/benzene solutions 10CB ...

378

Catalytic reactive separation system for energy-efficient production of cumene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an atmospheric pressure, reactive separation column packed with a solid acid zeolite catalyst for producing cumene from the reaction of benzene with propylene. Use of this un-pressurized column, where simultaneous reaction and partial separation occur during cumene production, allow separation of un-reacted, excess benzene from other products as they form. This high-yielding, energy-efficient system allows for one-step processing of cumene, with reduced need for product purification. Reacting propylene and benzene in the presence of beta zeolite catalysts generated a selectivity greater than 85% for catalytic separation reactions at a reaction temperature of 115 degrees C and at ambient pressure. Simultaneously, up to 76% of un-reacted benzene was separated from the product; which could be recycled back to the reactor for re-use.

Buelna, Genoveva (Nuevo Laredo, MX); Nenoff, Tina M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of benzene, butene, or butane with oxygen over V 203all U.S. production is butane-based (17). Studies of theby the catalytic initial of butane the vapor phase; either

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope Effects on Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over SupportedSe'iactivity of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts," LBL-13578.On the Purported Fischer-Tropsch Alkylation of Benzene: The

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

acs_MA_ma-2011-00986d 1..7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a mixture of (v:v 1:3) methanol and benzene, followed by dropwise addition of a stoichiometric amount of dimethyl sulfate needed to achieve the required degree of...

385

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XYLENE XYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES September 1994 Prepared by Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D. and Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis

386

Metal-doped organic gels and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a sol-gel polymerization process for synthesizing metal-doped organic gels. The process polymerizes metal salts of hydroxylated benzenes or hydroxylated benzene derivatives with alkyl or aryl aldehydes to form metal-doped, wet, organic gels. The gels can then be dried by supercritical solvent extraction to form metal-doped aerogels or by evaporation to form metal-doped xerogels. The aerogels and xerogels can then be pyrolyzed.

Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames. Progress report for year beginning 15 August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated ``weak collision`` formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

TOXICITY CHARACTERISTIC LEACHING PROCEDURE APPLIED TO RADIOACTIVE SALTSTONE CONTAINING TETRAPHENYLBORATE: DEVELOPMENT OF A MODIFIED ZERO-HEADSPACE EXTRACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess the effect of extended curing times at elevated temperatures on saltstone containing Tank 48H waste, saltstone samples prepared as a part of a separate study were analyzed for benzene using a modification of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). To carry out TCLP for volatile organic analytes (VOA), such as benzene, in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) shielded cells (SC), a modified TCLP Zero-Headspace Extractor (ZHE) was developed. The modified method was demonstrated to be acceptable in a side by side comparison with an EPA recommended ZHE using nonradioactive saltstone containing tetraphenylborate (TPB). TCLP results for all saltstone samples tested containing TPB (both simulant and actual Tank 48H waste) were below the regulatory limit for benzene (0.5 mg/L). In general, higher curing temperatures corresponded to higher concentrations of benzene in TCLP extract. The TCLP performed on the simulant samples cured under the most extreme conditions (3000 mg/L TPB in salt and cured at 95 C for at least 144 days) resulted in benzene values that were greater than half the regulatory limit. Taking into account that benzene in TCLP extract was measured on the same order of magnitude as the regulatory limit, that these experimental conditions may not be representative of actual curing profiles found in the saltstone vault and that there is significant uncertainty associated with the precision of the method, it is recommended that to increase confidence in TCLP results for benzene, the maximum curing temperature of saltstone be less than 95 C. At this time, no further benzene TCLP testing is warranted. Additional verification would be recommended, however, should future processing strategies result in significant changes to salt waste composition in saltstone as factors beyond the scope of this limited study may influence the decomposition of TPB in saltstone.

Crapse, K.; Cozzi, A.; Crawford, C.; Jurgensen, A.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Heat Recovery in Distillation by Mechanical Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant reduction in distillation tower energy requirements can be achieved by mechanical vapor recompression. Three design approaches for heating a distillation tower reboiler by mechanical vapor recompression are presented. The advantages of using a screw compressor are discussed in detail. An example of a xylene extraction tower is sited, illustrating the economic attractiveness in which a simple payback period of less than two years is achievable.

Becker, F. E.; Zakak, A. I.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tape Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Typical nonaqueous formulations of tape systems...g oz Oxidizing sintering atmospheres Menhaden fish oil (dispersant) 1.8 0.06 Xylene (solvent) 21.0 0.74 Anhydrous ethyl alcohol (solvent) 13.7 0.48 Aluminum oxide (ceramic powder) 100.0 3.5 Mixed phthalates (plasticizer) 3.6 0.13 Polyalkylene glycol (plasticizer) 4.3 0.15 Polyvinyl butyral (binder)...

392

ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY Analytical Biochemistry 327 (2004) 184--199  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for measurement of the main urinary metabolites of benzene, namely, phenol, catechol, hydroquinone, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (trihydroxybenzene), t,t-muconic acid (muconic acid), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (phenylmercapturic acid), is reported. The method is considerably simpler than existing assays. It was applied to urine from benzene -exposed subjects and controls from Shanghai, China. When subjects were divided into controls (n 44), those exposed to 631ppm benzene (n 21), and those exposed to 131ppm benzene (n 19), Spearman correlations with exposure category were 70.728 (p 0 0.0001) for all metabolites except trihydroxybenzene. When exposed subjects were compared on an individual basis, all metabolites, including trihydroxybenzene, were signiWcantly correlated with benzene exposure (Pearson r 7 0.472, p 6 0.002) and with each other (Pearson r 7 0.708, p 0 0.0001). Ratios of individual metabolite levels to total metabolite levels provided evidence of competitive inhibition of CYP 2E1 enzymes leading to increased production of phenol, catechol, and phenylmercapturic acid at the expense of hydroquinone, trihydroxybenzene, and muconic acid. Since all metabolites were detected in all control subjects, the method can be applied to persons exposed to environmental levels of benzene.

Www Elsevier Com; Suramya Waidyanatha; A Nathaniel Rothman; B Guilan Li; C Martyn T. Smith; Songnian Yin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tolumonas auensis Fischer-Romero et al. 1996 is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Oth- er than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292 bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Alison M [California Institute of Technology, University of California, Davis; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Beller, Harry R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tolumonas auensis (Fischer-Romero et al. 1996) is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Other than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292-bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Lucas1, Susa; Lapidus, Alla; Berry, KerrieW.; Detter, JohnC.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, NikosC.; Ivanova, Natalia; Göker, Markus; Beller, HarryR.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

Tom, a new aromatic degradative plasmid from Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia PR1{sub 23} has been shown to constitutively express a toluene catabolic pathway distinguished by a unique toluene ortho-monooxygenase (Tom). This strain has also been shown to contain two extrachromosomal elements of 100 kb. A derivative strain cured of the largest plasmid, PR1{sub 23} Cure, was unable to grow on phenol or toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy, which requires expression of the Tom pathway. Transfer of the larger plasmid from strain G4 J(the parent strain inducible for Tom) enabled PR1{sub 23} Cure to grow on toluene or phenol via inducible Tom pathway expression. Conjugal transfer of TOM{sub 23c} from PR1{sub 23} to an antibiotic-resistant derivative of PR1{sub 23} Cure enabled the transconjugant to grow with either phenol or toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy through constitutive expression of the Tom pathway. A cloned 11.2-kb EcoRI restriction fragment of Tom{sub 23c} resulted in the expression of both Tom and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in Escherichia coli, as evidenced by its ability to oxidize trichloroethylene, toluene, m-cresol, o-cresol, phenol, and catechol. The largest resident plasmid of PR1 was identified as the source of these genes by DNA hybridization. These results indicate that the genes which encode Tom and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase are located on TOM, an approximately 108-kb degradative plasmid of B. cepacia G4. 35 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Shields, M.S.; Reagin, J.J.; Campbell, R. [Univ. of West Florida, Pensacola, FL (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Polyol-mediated synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods and nanocomposites with poly(methyl methacrylate)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnO nanorods (length 30-150 nm) were synthesized in di(ethylene glycol) using Zn(CH3COO)2 as a precursor and para-toluene sulphonic acid, p-TSA, as an end-capping agent. Increasing the concentration of p-TSA above 0.1M causes the ...

Alojz Anžlovar; Zorica Crnjak Orel; Ksenija Kogej; Majda Žigon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Complete Genome Sequences of Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM765(T), Desulfosporosinus youngiae DSM17734(T), Desulfosporosinus meridiei DSM13257(T), and Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus DSM22704(T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulfosporosinus species are sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. Their genomes will give insights into the genetic repertoire and evolution of sulfate reducers typically thriving in terrestrial environments and able to degrade toluene (Desulfosporosinus youngiae), to reduce Fe(III) (Desulfosporosinus meridiei, Desulfosporosinus orientis), and to grow under acidic conditions (Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus).

Pester, Michael [University of Vienna, Austria; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Alazard, Didier [Universite d'Aix-Marseille; Rattei, Thomas [Vienna University; Weinmaier, Thomas [Vienna University; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wei, Chia-Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wagner, Michael [Vienna University; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Olliver, Bernard [Universite d'Aix-Marseille; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Loy, Alexander [Vienna University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Efficiency enhancement of luminescent solar concentrations for photovoltaic technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4.2 Concentration Study for CdSe/ZnS QD LSC PVs 3.4.3properties of visible CdSe/ZnS QDs in toluene at di?erentPbS quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, Rhodamine B dye.

Wang, Chunhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seeded Growth of Highly Luminescent CdSe/CdS Nano-Heterostructures with Rod and Tetrapod Morphologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

image of a central part of CdSe/CdS nano-tetrapod showingof toluene solutions of CdSe/CdS nano-tetrapods with 50 nmlong arms grown from 3.6 nm zb-CdSe seeds. Gray line shows

Talapin, Dmitri

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Communication www.rsc.org/chemcomm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the state (gas or liquid) or chemical nature of the process target.1 However, its techno- logical) as surfactant and hexanol as co- surfactant. The resulting mixture was stirred for 24 h, centrifuged, decanted activities of the highly doped Ti­M mixed oxides in the gas phase toluene mineralization are presented

402

Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

D.L. Schulz; J.M. Hoey; J. Smith; J. Lovaasen; C. Braun; X. Dai; K. Anderson; A. Elangovan; X. Wu; S. Payne; K. Pokhodnya; I. Akhatov; L. Pederson; P. Boudjouk

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

Doug Schulz

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas by using oxygen-permeable ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas (HCOG) was investigated in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor combined with a Ni/Mg(Al)O catalyst by the partial oxidation with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. The reaction results indicated that toluene was completely converted to H{sub 2} and CO in the catalytic reforming of the simulated HCOG in the temperature range from 825 to 875{sup o}C. Both thermodynamically predicated values and experimental data showed that the selective oxidation of toluene took precedence over that of CH{sub 4} in the reforming reaction. At optimized reaction conditions, the dense oxygen-permeable membrane has an oxygen permeation flux around 12.3 mL cm{sup -2} min{sup -1}, and a CH{sub 4} conversion of 86%, a CO{sub 2} conversion of 99%, a H{sub 2} yield of 88%, and a CO yield of 87% have been achieved. When the toluene and methane were reformed, the amount of H{sub 2} in the reaction effluent gas was about 2 times more than that of original H{sub 2} in simulated HCOG. The results reveal that it is feasible for hydrogen production from HCOG by reforming hydrocarbon compounds in a ceramic oxygen-permeable membrane reactor. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 abs.

Hongwei Cheng; Yuwen Zhang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding; Qian Li [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for BENZENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for BENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. September 1992 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division*, , Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Benzene is absorbed via ingestion, inhalation, and skin application.

406

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Various Carbon to Carbon Bond Lengths Inter-related via the Golden Ratio, and their Linear Dependence on Bond Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents the relations between the carbon to carbon bond lengths in the single, double and triple bonds and in graphite, butadiene and benzene. The Golden ratio, which was shown to divide the Bohr radius into two parts pertaining to the charged particles, the electron and proton, and to divide inter-atomic distances into their cationic and anionic radii, also plays a role in the carbon-carbon bonds and in the ionic/polar character of those in graphite, butadiene and benzene. Further, the bond energies of the various CC bonds are shown to vary linearly with the bond lengths.

Raji Heyrovska

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

ITP Materials Compatibility Issues  

SciTech Connect

Based on information provided by ITP, normal operation will consist of controlled exposure to benzene and TBP concentrations of 300 and 100 ppm, respectively, in an approximate 5M NaOH solution at temperatures as high as 50 degrees C. Other compounds present in the filtrate solution were much lower in concentration and were not tested. In addition, levels as high as 1000 ppm benzene or TBP may be reached. It is assumed that the TBP will be maintained at a constant concentration to control foaming behavior.

Skidmore, T.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Protease activated receptors 1 and 4 sensitize TRPV1 in nociceptive neurones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/streptomycin solution and 1% L-gluta- mine, GIBCO), 10 ?M cytosine arabinoside (Sigma) and, where appropriate, 50 ng/ml nerve growth factor (Pro- mega) or 100 ng/ml neurturin or GDNF (Peprotech). Neu- rones were plated onto glass coverslips (BDH, UK), coated with 10 ?g... Superfrost/Plus slides (BDH, UK). Sections were dewaxed in xylene, incubated in 0.3% hydrogen peroxide in methanol to quench endo- genous peroxidase activity and hydrated through an ethanol series. Sections were then blocked in 5% normal goat serum in 0.01 M...

Vellani, Vittorio; Kinsey, Anna M; Prandini, Massimiliano; Hechtfischer, Sabine C; Reeh, Peter; Magherini, Pier C; Giacomoni, Chiara; McNaughton, Peter A

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Characterization of a heat resistant beta-glucosidase as a new reporter in cells and mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, bladder and small intestinal samples from Ahcre/R26(SYNbglA)R mice induced with ?- napthoflavone 1-6 weeks previously were fixed in various fixatives for 1-6 h, processed through an ascending series of ethanols, xylene and into paraffin wax at 65°C... - neal injections of 80 mg/kg ?-napthoflavone (?NF; Sigma) dissolved in corn oil (8 mg/mL) at the frequencies stated and controls received either no treatment or corn oil only. Tissues and immunohistochemistry Whole tissues for BCI-glu staining were...

McCutcheon, Susan C; Jones, Ken; Cumming, Sarah A; Kemp, Richard; Ireland-Zecchini, Heather; Saunders, John C; Houghton, Carol A; Howard, Louise A; Winton, Douglas J

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

CASTING SLIPS FOR FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY METAL WARE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is given for slip casting tungsten metal. The composition consists essentially of tungsten metal with an average particle size of 0.9 micron, an organic vehicle such as methyl chloroform, o-xylene, n-butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, and 1, 1, 2, 2-tetrachlorethane, and a suspending agent such as ethyl cellulose, with the approximate ratio of said vehicle to the tungsten metal being 12 cc of a solution containing from 5 to about 20 grams of said ethyl cellulose in 400 cc of said organic vehicle per 100 grams of metal. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gases Natural Gas Petroleum Coke Source: U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010gpetroleum products Tar Benzene IEA-Typical IEA-Typical Sourcepetroleum 0.45% Electricity products LPG 0.01% Raw coal Purchased coke Washed coal Other washed coal Source:

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons NOAA and CIRES here at CU went to the oil spill in an aircraft that was equipped with instruments to measure the air quality. 1/3 of the oil dissolved into the water column (methane completely, benzene and ethane almost completely) Showed

Toohey, Darin W.

416

Application of the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field to Reactive Dynamics of Hydrocarbon Chemisorption and Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on nickel clusters. 1.0. Introduction Nickel is the primary catalyst in the steam reforming process1 of the adsorption and decomposition of a gas of 20-120 methane, ethyne, ethene, benzene, cyclohexane, or propene species (methane and cyclohexane), we observe an activation energy associated with dissociative

Goddard III, William A.

417

Production of chemical feedstock by the methanolysis of wood  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is discussed for the production of ethylene, benzene and carbon monoxide from particulated biomass such as wood by reaction with methane at a temperature of from 700/sup 0/C to 1200/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from 20 psi to 100 psi for a period of from 0.2 to 10 seconds.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

181 151 4011 Benzene --- --- 10.5 Beryllium 1.4 6.5 7 Boron --- --- --- Cadmium 2 6.5 7 Calcium 1465 --- --- Chromium 28.6 21 17.5 Cobalt 28.2 13 91 Copper 32.6 21 22.5 Cyanide,...

419

Production of chemical feedstock by the methanolysis of wood  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of ethylene, benzene and carbon monoxide from particulated biomass such as wood by reaction with methane at a temperature of from 700.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C., at a pressure of from 20 psi to 100 psi for a period of from 0.2 to 10 seconds.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Fallon, Peter (East Moriches, NY)

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Uncertainties in Air Toxics Calculated by the Dispersion Models AERMOD and ISCST3 in the Houston Ship Channel Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in simulations of annually averaged concentrations of two air toxics (benzene and 1,3-butadiene) are estimated for two widely used U.S. air quality models, the Industrial Source Complex Short-Term, version 3, (ISCST3) model and ...

Steven R. Hanna; Robert Paine; David Heinold; Elizabeth Kintigh; Dan Baker

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang Department of Physics. Ohtani, R.J. Wilson, S. Chiang, and C.M. Mate, "Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzene. V.M. Hallmark, S. Chiang, J.F. Rabolt, J.D. Swalen, and R.J. Wilson, "Observation of Atomic

Chiang, Shirley

422

Colloidal polyaniline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

Armes, Steven P. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldissi, Mahmoud (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Table  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

b(E) 10 6 cm 2 g -1 for Benzene C 6 H 6 ZA 0.53769 E GeV b brems b pair b nucl b tot 2. 0.2319 0.0995 0.4765 0.8079 5. 0.3146 0.2475 0.5035 1.0656 10. 0.3835 0.3777...

425

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzene C6H6 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.53769 Density 0.879 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 63.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.951 MeV g-1cm2 1.715 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

426

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Table  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muons in Benzene C 6 H 6 ZA gcm 3 I eV a k m s x 0 x 1 C 0 0.53769 0.879 63.4 0.16519 3.2174 0.1710 2.5091 3.3269 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total...

429

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Colloidal polyaniline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes the preparation of a processable electrically conductive latex polymer. The compositions include colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions.

Armes, S.P.; Aldissi, M.

1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Numerical Simulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Formation in n-Heptane HCCI Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By modifying the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN chemical kinetics package, the combustion processes and the characteristics of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide(CO) emissions of a HCCI engine were simulated. Furthermore, the formation of benzene (A1) and ... Keywords: n-neptane, HCCI, multi-zone model, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Zeng Wen; Ma Hong-an

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Environmental Effects Resulting in Coating Deterioration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Absorptive wavelengths of chromophores...Table 4 Absorptive wavelengths of chromophores Chromophore Absorptive wavelength, nm C=C 162 C C 182, 220 C N 167 C=O 295 N=O 665 Cl 173 Oâ??H 166 Benzene ring (aromatic) 255 Câ??H 150 Source: Adapted from Ref 4...

433

Platinum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 13   Corrosion of platinum in acids...2 Benzoic, all concentrations 130 265 Benzene sulfonic, pure Room <0.05 2 Boric, saturated Boiling <0.05 2 Butyric, all concentrations Boiling <0.05 2 Carbonic, pure 1400 2550 <0.05 2 Chloric, all concentrations Room <0.05 2 Chlorosulfonic, all concentrations Boiling <0.05 2...

434

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tetrahedron Letters N0.15, pp. 1011-1017, 1965. Perg=on Press Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coul_dbe detected sometimes as late as 2000 usec after photclysis. Bands at about 339 and 328 rq their known band spectra: benzene (2li8.9,247.1, 241.5 w, as early as 1800 usec); and phenol (27,..g,268

Berry, R. Stephen

436

Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse (INP Toulouse) cole doctorale et discipline ou spcialit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), 2) the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA), and 3) the U, benzene, alcohols, and various ether oxygenates. The purpose of the NIPER survey is generally to provide Number of samples Participation National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) survey U

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

437

A Study of EndtoEnd Web Access Failures Venkata N. Padmanabhan + Sriram Ramabhadran Sharad Agarwal + Jitendra Padhye +  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), 2) the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA), and 3) the U, benzene, alcohols, and various ether oxygenates. The purpose of the NIPER survey is generally to provide Number of samples Participation National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) survey U

Padmanabhan, Venkata N.

438

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xylene C8H10 Xylene C8H10 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54631 Density 0.870 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 61.8 eV Minimum ionization 1.986 MeV g-1cm2 1.728 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 57.1 g cm-2 65.66 cm Nuclear interaction length 80.8 g cm-2 92.90 cm Pion collision length 84.6 g cm-2 97.28 cm Pion interaction length 112.8 g cm-2 129.6 cm Radiation length 44.05 g cm-2 50.63 cm Critical energy 95.94 MeV (for e-) 93.43 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.74 g cm-2 11.19 cm Plasma energy 19.87 eV Muon critical energy 1214. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 10.00 0.094935 C 6 8.00 0.905065 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

439

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOLUENE TOLUENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES JANUARY 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

440

Measurement of genotoxic air pollutant exposures in street vendors and school children in and near Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

The effects of air pollution on human health are a great concern, particularly in big cities with severe traffic problems such as Bangkok, Thailand. In this study, exposure to genotoxic compounds in ambient air was studied by analysis of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene through direct measurement of concentrations in air as well as through the use of different biomarkers of exposure: urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) for PAHs and urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) for benzene. The study was conducted in various susceptible groups of the population with different occupations in 5 traffic-congested areas of Bangkok, as well as in primary school children. The level of total PAHs on the main roads at various sites ranged from 7.10 to 83.04 ng/m{sup 3}, while benzene levels ranged from 16.35 to 49.25 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels in nearby temples, the control sites, ranged from 1.67 to 3.04 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 10.16 to 16.25 ppb benzene. Street vendors selling clothes were exposed to 16.07 {+-} 1.64 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 21.97 {+-} 1.50 ppb benzene, levels higher than in monks and nuns residing in nearby temples (5.34 {+-} 0.65 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 13.69 {+-} 0.77 ppb benzene). Grilled-meat vendors in the same area were exposed to both total PAHs and benzene at even higher levels, possibly due to additional formation of PAHs during the grilling of meat (34.27 {+-} 7.02 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 27.49 {+-} 2.72 ppb benzene). At the end of the workday, urinary 1-OHP levels in street vendors (0.12 and 0.15 {mu}mol/mol creatinine in clothes and grilled-meat vendors, respectively) were significantly higher than in controls (0.04 {mu}mol/mol creatinine; P < 0.01). Afternoon urinary t,t-MA levels in both groups of street vendors (0.12 mg/g creatinine) were also significantly higher than in controls (0.08 mg/g creatinine; P < 0.05). School children from two schools in Bangkok were exposed to total PAHs and benzene at levels of 6.70 {+-} 0.47 ng/m{sup 3} and 4.71 {+-} 0.25 ppb, respectively, higher than those to which children living outside the city were exposed (1.25 {+-} 0.24 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 2.10 {+-} 0.16 ppb benzene). At the end of the school day, levels of urinary 1-OHP and t,t-MA were significantly higher (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) in Bangkok school children (0.23 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.27 mg/g creatinine, respectively) than in school children from outside Bangkok (0.10 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.08 mg/g creatinine, respectively)

Ruchirawat, Mathuros [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand) and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)]. E-mail: mathuros@tubtim.cri.or.th; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Settachan, Daam [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Tuntaviroon, Jantamas [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Buthbumrung, Nantaporn [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Sharma, Suman [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand)

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on coal surface properties. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various probe compounds on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh{number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed during the January--March period. The probe compounds include m-cresol, p-cresol, n-octanol, n-heptanol, n-butanol, phenol and toluene.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Steam-foam pilot project in Guadalupe field, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of a formulated alkyl toluene sulfonate (ATS) as a foaming agent for improving mobility control in a mature steamdrive. Selection of ATS was based on laboratory experiments and a series of field injectivity tests. The field results show production response to both the injectivity tests and the 9 months of continuous ATS injection. Overall, ATS was found to improve steam mobility and result in incremental oil production.

Mohammadi, S.S.; McCollum, T.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Automated Analysis and Validation of Chemical Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society of Chemistry are thanked for funding. iii Contents Disclaimer i Abstract ii Acknowledgements iii Table of contents vii List of tables viii List of figures xii Glossary xiii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Data-Driven Science... angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 8.18 Torsion angles of toluene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 xii Glossary BNF Backus-Naur form CAS Chemical Abstracts Service CCDC Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre CIF...

Townsend, Joseph A

444

Self-Assembly and Orientation of Hydrogen-Bonded Oligothiophene Polymorphs at Liquid?Membrane?Liquid Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges in organic systems with semiconducting function is the achievement of molecular orientation over large scales. We report here on the use of self-assembly kinetics to control long-range orientation of a quarterthiophene derivative designed to combine intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding among amide groups. Assembly of these molecules in the solution phase is prevented by the hydrogen-bond-accepting solvent tetrahydrofuran, whereas formation of H-aggregates is facilitated in toluene. Rapid evaporation of solvent in a solution of the quarterthiophene in a 2:1:1 mixture of 1,4-dioxane/tetrahydrofuran/toluene leads to self-assembly of kinetically trapped mats of bundled fibers. In great contrast, slow drying in a toluene atmosphere leads to the homogeneous nucleation and growth of ordered structures shaped as rhombohedra or hexagonal prisms depending on concentration. Furthermore, exceedingly slow delivery of toluene from a high molecular weight polymer solution into the system through a porous aluminum oxide membrane results in the growth of highly oriented hexagonal prisms perpendicular to the interface. The amide groups of the compound likely adsorb onto the polar aluminum oxide surface and direct the self-assembly pathway toward heterogeneous nucleation and growth to form hexagonal prisms. We propose that the oriented prismatic polymorph results from the synergy of surface interactions rooted in hydrogen bonding on the solid membrane and the slow kinetics of self-assembly. These observations demonstrate how self-assembly conditions can be used to guide the supramolecular energy landscape to generate vastly different structures. These fundamental principles allowed us to grow oriented prismatic assemblies on transparent indium-doped tin oxide electrodes, which are of interest in organic electronics.

Tevis, Ian D.; Palmer, Liam C.; Herman, David J.; Murray, Ian P.; Stone, David A.; Stupp, Samuel I. (NWU)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Statistical comparison of the effect of relative and absolute humidity on fixed-bed carbon adsorption capacity. Report for January 1987-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes statistical methods used to evaluate data for toluene (at several typical operating temperatures and humidity levels) and to determine which measure of humidity (relative or absolute) is more important in determining carbon adsorption efficiency. The water content of a solvent-laden stream is critical for its control via carbon adsorption, especially at relative humidities about 50-70%. (Relative humidity is the percent of saturation: absolute humidity is the total water content.)

Dunn, J.E.; Nunez, C.; Kosusko, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Addendum to methods for assessing the stability and compatibility of residual fuel oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved method for predicting the compatibility or incompatibility which will result on the blending of two or more residual fuel oils is presented. Incompatability (formation of sludge on blending of two fuels) results when the solvency power of a blend is inadequate to keep asphaltenes in solution. Prediction and thereby prevention of incompatibility requires the use of two fuel parameters. One is a measure of solvency power (i.e.,aromaticity); an adequate measure is the Bureau of Mines Correlation Index (BMCI). The second parameter required is a measure of solvency required to completely dissolve the asphaltenes. This parameter is the toluene equivalence which is expressed as the minimum percent of toluene which is required in a toluene/heptane blend to completely dissolve the asphaltene. In earlier work, complete solubility was determined by a spot test. That method was a tedious trial and error procedure but a more important problem was that it was not possible to obtain reproducible results with a number of fuels. A new method which appears to have overcome both of these problems has been developed. The new procedure is a titration method in which the fuel is dissolved in toluene and titrated in the endpoint,''i.e., the point at which precipitation of asphaltenes occurs. Precipitation of asphaltenes is detected by examination of a drop of solution under a microscope. Polarized light is used to distinguish between waxes and precipitated asphaltenes. The entire procedure can be completed in 30 minutes and does not require expensive equipment. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Anderson, R.P.; Pearson, C.D. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Quantitative laser-induced incandescence measurements of soot in turbulent pool fires.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laser-induced incandescence measurements have recently been obtained from 10% and 30% toluene in methanol blended fuel pool fires of 2-m diameter. Calibration of the instrument was performed using an ethylene/air laminar diffusion flame produced by a Santoro-type burner which allowed the extraction of absolute soot-volume-fractions from these images. Performance of the optical probe was characterized using the laminar diffusion flame and corrections were implemented for signal dependence upon detector gain, flat field, and location within the probe laser sheet when processing the images. Probability density functions of the soot-volume fraction were constructed for the blended fuels used in this study and the mean values were determined to be 0.0077 and 0.028 ppm for the 10% and 30% blended fuels, respectively. Signal trapping was estimated for the two types of blended fuel and it was determined to be negligible for the 10% toluene/methanol blend and require {approx}10% correction for the 30% toluene/methanol blend.

Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation  

SciTech Connect

The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert (France)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots  

SciTech Connect

The structural and electronic properties of CdSe quantum dots in toluene and drop-casted on Si wafer were investigated by in-situ micro X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy. The in-situ micro diffraction data show that the CdSe quantum dots capped with TOPO or hexadecylamine (HDA) in toluene exhibit predominantly wurtzite crystal structure, which undergoes a phase transformation to zinc blende crystal structure following drop casting on Si and this phase transition increases with decreasing the size of the CdSe quantum dots. Decreasing the size of quantum dots also increases the Se vacancies that facilitate the phase transformation. The X-ray photoelectron spectra show a systematic increase in the core level binding energies of Cd 3d and Se 3d, the band gap and the Cd/Se ratio as the size of the quantum dots decreases from 6.6nm to 2.1nm. This is attributed to the quantum confinement of CdSe crystallites by the capping ligands in toluene which increases with decreasing the size of the quantum dots. However, drop-casting quantum dots on Si alter the density and arrangement of capping ligands and solvent molecules on the quantum dots which causes significant phase transformation.

Karakoti, Ajay S.; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Yang, Ping; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

450

Treatment of SRS Tank 48H Simulants Using Fenton's Reagent  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level-waste Tank 48H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) contains about 50,000 lb of tetraphenylborate (TPB), which must be destroyed to return the tank to active service. Laboratory-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the use of Fenton's Reagent (hydrogen peroxide and a metal catalyst) to treat simulants of the Tank 48H waste. Samples of the treated slurry and the off-gas were analyzed to determine the reaction products. Process parameters developed earlier by AEA Technology were used for these tests; namely (for 500 mL of waste simulant), reduce pH to 7.5 with nitric acid, heat to boiling, add hydrogen peroxide at 1 mL/min for 1 h, reduce pH to 3.5, and add the remaining peroxide at 2 mL/min. These parameters were developed to minimize the formation of tarry materials during the early part of the reaction and to minimize the concentration of total organic carbon in the final treated slurry. The treated samples contained low concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and no detectable TPB. Tests using a mixture of iron and copper salts as the Fenton's catalyst had a lower TOC concentration in the final treated slurry than did tests that used a copper-only catalyst. TPB is known to hydrolyze to benzene, particularly at high temperature and low pH, and copper is known to increase the rate of hydrolysis. Significant amounts of benzene were present in the off-gas from the tests, especially during the early portion of the treatment, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction was occurring in parallel with the oxidation of the TPB by Fenton's reagent. For the reaction conditions used in these tests, approximately equal fractions of the TPB were converted to benzene and carbon dioxide. Minimizing the formation of benzene is important to SRS personnel; however, this consideration was not addressed in the AEA-recommended parameters, since they did not analyze for benzene in the off-gas. Smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and other organics were also produced. One test used a simulant with much lower concentrations of salts, representing washed sludge, and this test produced much smaller amounts of benzene. The nitrite ions in the simulant were oxidized to nitrate, which would increase the amount of peroxide required to oxidize all of the organic carbon. Oxygen is the primary constituent of the off-gas produced from treatment of the samples.

Taylor, PA

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

451

Structure and capillary properties of carbon materials. Influence of various types of treatment of charcoal  

SciTech Connect

Activated charcoal KM-2 with a large volume of micropores served as the object of investiations to find the adsorption properties and the porous structure of the activated charcoals. The sorption isotherms of benzene vapor were measured at 20 C. On the basis of the experimental data obtained, the authors calculated the volumes of the principle types of pores, the surface ofthe mesopores, and the parameters of the microporous structure of the charcoals. Results show that decalcification results in an appreciable decrease in the ash content of the charcoal, and some increase in the total volume of the pores, mainly in the volume of the mesopores. The surface of the mesopores increases accordingly. The sorption isotherms of water vapor and benzene vapor on activated charcoal samples are compared.

Dribinskii, A.V.; Kukushina, I.A.; Shteinberg, G.V.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Pathways for formation of catechol and 1,2,4-benzenetriol in rabbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benzene, an established human leukemogen, was once widely used as an industrial solvent and is currently an important material for organic synthesis. Its metabolism in man and animals has also been studied extensively, and phenolic compounds were identified as major metabolites in urine after benzene exposure. One point yet to be elucidated is the pathway for formation of catechol (or 1,2-benzenediol). Early studies suggested that catechol will be formed via phenol whereas a later study failed to identify catechol in the urine of men and rabbits after oral administration methods of {sup 14}C-phenol. Sensitive HPLC methods have been recently developed in our laboratory to measure urinary phenolic metabolites and t,t-muconic acid. The methods were applied to show that phenol is not a precursor of catechol in rabbits. Evidence is also presented that 1,2,4-benzenetriol is formed only from quinol (1,4-benzenediol) and not from catechol.

Inoue, Osamu; Seiji, Kazunori (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan) Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ikeda, Masayuki (Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Characterization of carbonaceous materials using extraction with supercritical pentane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of carbonaceous adsorbents is limited by irreversible adsorption of some compounds so the use of supercritical pentane as an extracting solvent was examined. Carbon black appeared to be broken down slowly, but continuously, by the penane. To see if other types of carbon behaved similarly, high purity graphite, technical grade graphites, active carbons, and charcoals were examined. The extracts were characterized by uv spectroscopy, packed column chromatography using flame ionization and flame photometric detectors, and capillary GC/MS. The extracts were characteristic for each class of carbonaceous material. The high purity graphite yielded large, polycyclic aromatic compounds; the technical grade graphites yielded alkanes and alkyl-substituted benzenes and naphthalenes; the active carbons yielded alkanes, dienes, and small amounts of alkyl-substituted benzenes; and the charcoals yielded almost entirely alkanes in small amounts.

Fetzer, J.C.; Graham, J.A.; Arrendale, R.R.; Klee, M.S.; Rogers, L.B.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Why Sequence Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC? Sequence Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC? Chlorate contamination of groundwater is a big problem that is often associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and munitions. To clean up chlorate-contaminated areas, some researchers turn to bacteria that can break down these compounds. These microbes can produce oxygen in anaerobic conditions, which can speed up the process of breaking down other compounds that do not degrade quickly in anaerobic environments such as the hydrocarbon benzene. Adding chlorate-reducing bacteria to contaminated, oxygen-poor environments could therefore encourage the growth of other bacteria that need oxygen to break down other compounds found at these sites. well Photo: istockphoto Microbes usually need oxygen to break down benzene; in anaerobic

457

Session #1: Cutting Edge Methodologies--Beyond Current DFT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session #1: Cutting Edge Methodologies (beyond Current DFT) Moderator: Shengbai Zhang (RPI/ REL) Topics to be addressed: Benchmarking state-of-the-art approaches, accurate energy landscape. Identify problems with the current DFT-LDA and GGA approaches and possible pathways to overcome these problems. PBE PBE How Bad is DFT for vdW Interactions? fcc Ar Benzene dimer PBE LDA Exp CCSD(T) LDA PBE vdW Interaction between H 2 and Carbon � PBE Graphene CCSD(T) LDA Benzene omitted in the LDA and GGA van der Walls (vdW)-DFT: Langreth, Kohn � Fully nonlocal � functional: � � Long-range nonlocal correlation energy functional (omitted in the LDA and GGA) ) ( � Computational cost considerably more than GGA � Added as post-GGA energy correction but force

458

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-009108: Categorical Exclusion Determination Precipitation of Mixed Actinide Solid Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 27, 2012 CX-009107: Categorical Exclusion Determination Xylene Measurement for Saltstone Antifoams CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 27, 2012 CX-008998: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-scale Physics-based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-informed Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Golden Field Office" August 27, 2012 CX-009006: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

459

Fast-growing acacia as an example of a vegetable source for synthetic liquid fuel  

SciTech Connect

The liquefaction of biomass, employing acacia sawdust, is described. Tests were conducted in a 1-liter vibratory autoclave at 26 vibrations per minute. The solvents used were tetralin, o-xylene, and decalin. The tests were conducted to evaluate the possibility of producing different hydrocarbons from acacia by alternative liquefaction processes (extraction under supercritical conditions or in a hydrogen donor medium). Gas and liquid fractions were comparatively determined for the different solvents and for their different ratios by chromatographic analysis. Optimum weight ratios and temperatures were established. It was concluded that thermal liquefaction of acacia can produce a broad gamut of different hydrocarbons, depending on solvent type and the liquefaction conditions, which can serve as motor fuel components or raw material for petrochemical synthesis.

Paushkin, Ya.M.; Gorlov, E.G.; Alaniya, V.P.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05 Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hooker Chemical Co. (NY.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Occidental Chemical Corporation Hooker Electrochemical Corporation NY.05-1 NY.05-2 Location: Niagara Falls , New York NY.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.05-1 NY.05-2 Site Operations: Design, engineering, construction, equipping and operation of a plant for the manufacture of Product 45 (xylene hexachloride); MFL (Miller's fluorolubricant); P-45Cl; and recovered P-45Cl2 from residues produced in the manufacture of P-45Cl; used hydrochloric acid (a byproduct of the P-45 Program) in the chemical processing of uranium-bearing slag as a precursor to recovery. NY.05-2 NY.05-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NY.05-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New concept for coal wettability evaluation and modulation. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to evaluate the surface wettability and flotation of coal and pyrite in order to establish a new separation strategy for advanced coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. During this quarter, mini-cell flotation tests were carried out on Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 coals, and two pyrite samples. Flotation media used were kerosene, benzene, and amyl-xanthate. Test results are given and discussed.

Hu, W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Bases for pump pit requirements calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A task team is preparing the Process Requirements for the interarea transfer pump pits at the Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF). The team is developing requirements to prevent flammable mixtures from forming and requires values to use on the generation of various components such as benzene, hydrogen, and N20. The purpose of this memorandum is to document values to be used and to provide sample calculations using these values. There are no recommendations contained in this document.

Jacobs, R.A.

1992-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Nano-Quantum Photonic Model for Justification of Dispersion in Single Crystal Film of NPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a nano-quantum photonic model for justification of normal dispersion in a thin crystal film of NPP. In this method, we assume a laser beam consists of a flow of energetic particles. By precise analyzing of photon interaction with pi-electron system of benzene ring in NPP crystal, we will attain refractive index (RI) in any wavelength and compare the results with experimental data.

Hassan Kaatuzian; AliAkbar Wahedy Zarch

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

464

Deflagration analysis of the ITP facility utilizing the MELCOR/SR code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under certain accident conditions, waste tanks in the In-Tank Processing (ITP) facility may contain significant concentrations of benzene and hydrogen. Because these gases are flammable, a safety analysis was required to demonstrate that the risk posed by the possible combustion of these gases is acceptable. In support of this analysis, the MELCOR/SR computer code was modified to simulate the combustion of benzene-hydrogen mixtures. MELCOR/SR was developed originally to analyze severe accidents that may occur in the SRS production reactors but many of its modules can be used also for non-reactor applications such as combustion and aerosol and radionuclide transport. The MELCOR/SR combustion model (package) was originally configured for the deflagration analysis of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures. With minor changes to the coding in the combustion package subroutines, and the addition of benzene thermodynamic and transport properties to the input decks, MELCOR/SR was modified to analyze deflagrations in benzene-hydrogen gas mixtures. A MELCOR/SR model was created consisting of two control volumes connected by flow paths. One volume represents a type III waste tank; the other, the environment. The flow paths represent vents that open during the deflagration. Choked flow and radiative heat transfer from the hot gas to the cooling coils and tank walls are phenomonalogical aspects accounted for in the model. Results from MELCOR/SR compared favorably with results from two other codes: COMPACT, a code similar to MELCOR/SR used in the preliminary ITP analysis and DPAC, a code developed specifically to analyze deflagrations in SRS waste tanks. Peak pressures predicted by MELCOR/SR (and by DPAC) for realistic waste tank conditions do not exceed the pressure required to fail the primary line of the tank. ({approximately}23 psig)

Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6-(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6- .sup.18 F!fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb.sub.3 ; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to .ltoreq.7.

Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Bishop, Allyson J. (Wahnemuhle, DE); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Bida, Gerald T. (Shreveport, LA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Corrosion in Specific Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Effects of miscellaneous corrosive reagents on tantalum...Room E Baking oven gases � � E Beer � � E Benzene � Room E Benzol � Hot E Bleaching powder Solution Hot V Blood (meat juices) � Cold E Body fluids � � E Borax � Fused NR Bromine Dry Below 300 (570) E Wet � E Bromine water � Room E Buttermilk � Room E Carbon bisulfide � Room E Carbon tetrachloride...

467

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is revealed for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb{sub 3}; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to {<=}7. 1 fig.

Satyamurthy, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Bishop, A.J.; Namavari, M.; Bida, G.T.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Silver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Corrosion resistance of silver in organic compounds...2 Benzaldehyde, pure and aqueous Boiling Benzene, pure Boiling <0.05 2 Benzotrifluoride, pure Boiling <0.05 2 Benzyl chloride, pure 180 355 <0.05 2 -bromoisovaleryl bromide, pure 100 212 <0.05 2 -bromoisovaleryl urea, pure Melting point <0.05 2 Butyl acetate, pure Boiling <0.05 2 Butyl alcohol,...

471

Plasma Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Deposition rates for various compounds...Table 3 Deposition rates for various compounds Compound Deposition rate (D), 10 8 � gm/cm 2 /min D/D 0 Hexamethyldisiloxane 233 = D 0 1.00 Acrylic acid 28 0.12 Styrene 173 0.74 Tetramethyldisiloxane 191 0.82 Divinyltetramethyldisiloxane 641 2.75 Ethylene 42 0.18 Benzene 110 0.47 Source: Ref 49...

472

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tagawa.ppt [Read-Only  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distribution of Electron r 0 3.2 nm D 2.8 x 10 -3 cm 2 s 2.284 n-Dodecane Benzene OH CH 2 CH 3 O OH R O O R OH O O R O O R O O O O O O O O O R R' O O Rf O O O CF 3 F 3...

473

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about [minus]10 C to about 30 C or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

Effect of reformer conditions on catalytic reforming of biomass-gasification tars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric tests on catalytic reforming of tars produced in biomass gasification are performed using a bench-scale, fluid-bed catalytic reformer containing a commercial nickel-based catalyst. The product gas composition and yield vary with reformer temperature, space time, and steam: biomass ratio. Under certain catalytic tar reforming conditions, the gas yield increases by 70%; 97% of the tars are cracked into gases; and benzene and naphthalene, the predominant tar species, are virtually eliminated from the product gas.

Kinoshita, C.M.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Laboratory Studies on Rendering Remediation Wastes Nonhazardous: Blending of Tar and Tarry Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some remediation wastes and tarry soils from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites will be classified as hazardous waste based on the results of Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests. This report presents the results of bench-scale mixing tests of nine blending agents on several former MGP tars and tarry soils known to exceed the toxicity characteristic (TC) for benzene. These mixing studies were designed to measure the dilution, loss by volatilization, or fixation by adsorption of ...

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Non-destructive analysis of organic hydrogen getter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have developed both static and dynamic sampling approaches to monitor percent saturation and deuteration of 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene (DEB). To develop this method, it was necessary to separate and identify all partially saturated cis and trans isomers and developed algorithms to determine percent deuteration from the isotope distribution. The advantage of this approach is that the sample remains hermetically sealed in a protective headspace vial and is not destroyed.

Chambers, D M; King, H A; LeMay, J D

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

(E)-4-[(4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl]phenyl anthracene-9-carboxylate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the title compound, C{sub 27}H{sub 17}N{sub 3}O{sub 4}, the azo group displays a trans conformation and the dihedral angles between the central benzene ring and the pendant anthracene and nitrobenzene rings are 82.94 (7) and 7.30 (9){sup o}, respectively. In the crystal structure, weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds, likely associated with a dipole moment present on the molecule, help to consolidate the packing.

Vance, Andrew L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Nichol, Jessica L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wong, Bryan Matthew (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Oil production by Candida curvata and extraction, composition and properties of the oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain of the yeast C. curvata was grown in cheese whey permeate under conditions that allowed for oil production. The N-C ratio of the fermentation medium influenced the amount of oil produced. Concentrated permeate could be used as a substrate, but the efficiency of conversion to oil was reduced. The yeast grew well and produced oil in several different types of whey and milk permeates and also in nonsterile systems. The lipid of C. curvata amounted to approximately 50% of its dry weight and could be extracted by sequential treatment with ethanol, hexane, and benzene. The extraction with benzene was necessary for good yields even though nearly all the material extracted with benzene was soluble in hexane. The lipid was 80-90% triglyceride, contained little free fatty acid, and could be degummed by traditional methods. The triglyceride was 30.4% palmitic, 0.84% palmitoleic acid, 11.4% stearic, 51.0% oleic, 6.2% linoleic, and 0.4% linolenic acid. The saturated acyl groups were almost completely on the sn-1 and 3 positions of the glycerol. The oil melting point was -10 to 22 degrees. No tocopherol was detected and the oil oxidized at a rate similar to that for soybean oil at 55 degrees. The oil contained a variety of linear hydrocarbons and 4 sterols. The polar lipids include phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid.

Hammond, E.G.; Glatz, B.A.; Choi, Y.; Teasdale, M.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Feet on the potential energy surface, head in the pie clouds  

SciTech Connect

This work presents explorations of the potential energy surface of clusters of atoms and of the interactions between molecules. First, structures of small aluminum clusters are examined and classified as ground states, transition states, or higher-order saddle points. Subsequently, the focus shifts to dispersion-dominated ?-? interactions when the potential energy surfaces of benzene, substituted benzene, and pyridine dimers are explored. Because DNA nucleotide bases can be thought of as substituted heterocycles, a natural extension of the substituted benzene and pyridine investigations is to model paired nucleotide bases. Finally, the success of the dispersion studies inspires the development of an extension to the computational method used, which will enable the dispersion energy to be modeled – and the potential energy surface explored – in additional chemical systems. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is described, as well as various quantum mechanical methods. An ab inito quantum mechanical study of 13-atom aluminum clusters is described. EFP studies of aromatic dimers are reported in which dispersion energy makes a significant contribution to the attraction between monomers. Theory and code development toward a means of computing dispersion energy in mixed ab inito-EFP systems are described.

Smith, Quentin

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benzene toluene xylene" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Design and evaluation of Cities Service/Rockwell hydrogasification commercial plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers a preliminary conceptual design and economic evaluation of a commercial scale plant capable of converting high-sulfur bituminous caking coal to a high-Btu pipeline quality SNG. The plant, which has a rated capacity of 250 Billion Btu per day SNG, is based on Cities Service/Rockwell hydrogasification technology. Two cases of plant design were examined to produce cost estimates accurate to +-25% in 1979 dollars. The base case, designed for moderate production of liquids (5.8% conversion of carbon to liquid product), has a cost of SNG of $4.43/MMBtu using the utility financing method (UFM) and $6.42/MMBtu using the discounted cash flow method (DCFM) of financing. The alternate case, zero liquids production, has gas costs of $5.00 (UFM) and $6.96 (DCFM). Further tests by Rockwell have indicated that 11.4% carbon conversion to liquid products (99% benzene) is possible. If the plant is scaled up to produce the same amoung of SNG with this increased yield of liquid, and if the value of the benzene produced is estimated to be $0.90 per gallon, the costs of gas for this case are $4.38/MMBtu (UFM) and $6,48/MMBtu (DCFM). If the value of benzene is taken as $2.00 per gallon, these costs become $3.14/MMBtu (UFM) and $5.23/MMBtu (DCFM). The economic assumptions involved in these calculations are detailed.

Agrawal, P.D.; Butt, N.M.; Sarma, K.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Coal conversion processes. Quarterly report, December 13, 1983-March 12, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental work is continuing on four separate projects related to coal conversion processes. The direct digital control of exothermic multiphase reactions is being studied in an experimental adiabatic flow reactor. The existence of two stable steady states for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction network at the same temperature and feed condition has been verified and quantified. Various absorbents for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub X/ are being studied. The absorption of NO/sub 2/ by methanol and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone has been extensively examined. Preliminary data have been obtained with triethylene-tetraamine. Hindered amines will be studied next. Procedures for the preparation of liquid membranes have been tested and the incorporation of hindered amines in them will now be examined. Isotopic switching is being used to study the way in which promoters affect supported metal catalysts. With improved resolution from the mass spectrometer, early quantitative results give indications of three different surface species and of non-statistical ingrowth of /sup 13/C into the product molecules. A program for the study of the extraction of coal and oil shale using supercritical fluids is being carried out. The effect of the presence of piperidine on the amount of toluene solubles produced by supercritical extraction of coal with toluene/piperidine mixture has been determined. A new kinetic model for the extraction/liquefaction of coal by supercritical toluene and THF has been developed and proven satisfactory. Bruceton coal and Hi Na lignite have been extracted with supercritical water. 3 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Biloen, P.; Holder, G.D.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Development of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system for a solar receiver  

SciTech Connect

The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) is one of the candidates for Space Station prime power application. In the low earth orbit of the Space Station approximately 34 minutes of the 94-minute orbital period is spent in eclipse with no solar energy input to the power system. For this period the SDPS will use thermal energy storage (TES) material to provide a constant power output. Sundstrand Corporation is developing a ORC-SDPS candidate for the Space Station that uses toluene as the organic fluid and LiOH as the TES material. An integrated heat-pipe thermal storage receiver system is being developed as part of the ORC-SDPS solar receiver. This system incorporates potassium heat pipe elements to absorb and transfer the solar energy within the receiver cavity. The heat pipes contain the TES canisters within the potassium vapor space with the toluene heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the heat pipe in the ORC-SDPS receiver cavity. The heat pipe transforms the non-uniform solar flux incident in the heat pipe surface within the receiver cavity to an essentially uniform flux at the potassium vapor condensation interface in the heat pipe. During solar insolation, part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the balance stored in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.; Heidenreich, G.; Johnson, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Organic Rankine-Cycle Power Systems Working Fluids Study: Topical report No. 3, 2-methylpyridine/water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mixture of 35 mole percent (mol %) 2-methylpyridine and 65 mol % water was tested at 575, 625, and 675/degree/F in a dynamic loop. Samples of the degraded fluid were chemically analyzed to determine the identities of major degradation products and the quantity of degradation. Computed degradation rates were found to be higher than those for Fluorinol 85 or toluene. For this reason (and other reasons, related to fluid handling), other fluids are recommended as the first choice for service in organic Rankine-cycle systems in preference to 2-methylpyridine/water. 7 refs., 39 figs., 39 tabs.

Cole, R.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

Lewandowski, G.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Process for fullerene functionalization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Di-addended and tetra-addended Buckminster fullerenes are synthesized through the use of novel organoborane intermediates. The C.sub.60, C.sub.70, or higher fullerene is reacted with a borane such as BH.sub.3 in a solvent such as toluene to form an organoborane intermediate. Reaction of the organoborane such as hydrolysis with water or alcohol results in the product di-addended and tetra-addended fullerene in up to 30% yields. Dihydrofullerenes and tetrahydrofullerenes are produced by the process of the invention.

Cahill, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Henderson, Craig C. (Dublin, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyethylenimine composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyethylenimine for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ethanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanate solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structures showed high selectivity in permeating ethanol or water over a wide range of feed concentrations.

Neidlinger, Hermann H. (Lakewood, CO); Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Orth, Richard A. (Denver, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyacrylic acid composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyacrylic acid salts for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ehthanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanata solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structure showed selectivity in permeating water over a wide range of feed concentrations. 4 tabs.

Neidlinger, H.H.

1985-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyethylenimine composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyethylenimine for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ethanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanate solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structures showed high selectivity in permeating ethanol or water over a wide range of feed concentrations. 2 tabs.

Neidlinger, H.H.; Schissel, P.O.; Orth, R.A.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

490

Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyethylenimine composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyethylenimine for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ethanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanate solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structures showed high selectivity in permeating ethanol or water over a wide range of feed concentrations.

Neidlinger, H.H.; Schissel, P.O.; Orth, R.A.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL`s findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication