National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for benefits reduced electricity

  1. Reduces electric energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

  2. Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

    2005-06-15

    Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

  3. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    reflect the benefit of electricity demand displacement bystorage electricity supplied by EVs electricity demand fromthe building electricity demand from local storage

  4. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy...

  5. Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratheal, R.

    2004-01-01

    -site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and/or producing electricity... and steam while maintaining or reducing TEX air emissions. TEX entered into an agreement with Eastex Cogeneration to build, own and operate a 440 MW gas-fired steam and electric cogeneration facility on site. Implementation of the project was complex...

  6. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high market prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity...

  7. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    If you are planning to install a small renewable energy system to make your own electricity, such as a solar electric system or small wind turbine, reducing your electricity...

  8. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  9. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore »the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  10. POLICY BRIEF Electric Vehicle Benefits and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    climate change. Economics: Reduce cost of driving, use local energy sources, and lead new technology electrification Energy Security: Reduce our dependency on foreign oil. Air Quality: Reduce air pollution and its weather regions than on the balmy west coast. On the coldest or hottest days, PEV range can drop by 40

  11. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Consideringthe Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budhraja, Vikram; Mobasheri, Fred; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Silverstein, Alison; Eto, Joseph

    2009-03-02

    Current methods of evaluating the economic impacts of new electricity transmission projects fail to capture the many strategic benefits of these projects, such as those resulting from their long life, dynamic changes to the system, access to diverse fuels, and advancement of public policy goals to integrate renewable-energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

    2006-10-01

    Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

  13. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2011-07-01

    Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

  14. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    S. Das, (2006) Reducing Electricity Deficit through EnergyLV supply. Figure 12: Electricity Productivity (Commercialan interesting result. The electricity productivity in both

  15. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  16. Reducing Electricity Demand Charge for Data Centers with Partial Execution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Reducing Electricity Demand Charge for Data Centers with Partial Execution Hong Xu Department Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto Toronto, ON, Canada bli@eecg.toronto.edu ABSTRACT Data centers consume a large amount of energy and incur substantial electricity cost

  17. Reducing Transient and Steady State Electricity Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of their large energy footprint. One type of equipment that is common in homes and some offices is an electrical for the amount of heating due to occupancy as it varies throughout the day and year. Experiments on BRITE show Learning-Based Model-Predictive Control Energy efficiency improvement in HVAC systems is investigated

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

  19. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 APPLICATION FOR THE BENEFIT OF A REDUCED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 APPLICATION FOR THE BENEFIT OF A REDUCED TUITION RATE AS A MEMBER OF THE ARMED SERVICES OR DEPENDENT RELATIVE PLEASE RETURN TO: Under North Carolina General Statues the benefit through a member are living together in North Carolina incident to the supporting member's active

  20. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

  1. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onEV storage output electricity storage losses in the batterydoc/2001/012022p.pdf) [18] Electricity Storage Association,

  2. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Gupta, Arjun

    2010-04-30

    Electricity demand has consistently exceeded available supply in India. While the electricity deficit varies across states, nationally it was estimated to be of the order of 12percent on peak and 11percent for electricity during 2008-09. This paper explores a demand-side focused potential for energy efficiency improvement to eliminate the electricity deficit compared to a business as usual (BAU) supply-side focused scenario. The limited availability of finance and other legal and administrative barriers have constrained the construction of new power plant capacity in India. As a result, under the BAU scenario, India continues to face an electricity deficit beyond the end of the Twelfth Five Year Plan. The demand-side cost-effective potential achieved through replacement of new electricity-using products, however, is large enough to eliminate the deficit as early as 2013 and subsequently reduce the future construction of power plants and thus reduce air pollutant emissions. Moreover, energy efficiency improvements cost a fraction of the cost for new supply and can lead to a substantial increase in India's economic output or gross domestic product (GDP). Eliminating the deficit permits businesses that have experienced electricity cutbacks to restore production. We estimate the size of the cumulative production increase in terms of the contribution to GDP at a $505 billion between 2009 and 2017, the end of India's Twelfth Five Year Plan, which may be compared with India's 2007-08 GDP of $911 billion. The economic output is influenced by the size of the electricity savings and rate of penetration of energy efficient technologies, and that of self-generation equipment and inverters used by businesses faced with electricity cuts. Generation and inverters are estimated to service 23percent of these customers in 2009, which increase to 48percent by 2020. The reduction in the construction and operation of new power plants reduces the cumulative CO2 emissions by 65 Mt, and those of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides by 0.4 Mt each, while also reducing India's imports of coal and natural gas. By 2020, the cumulative GDP benefit increases to $608 billion, the CO2 savings expand to 333 Mt and SO2 and NOx to 2.1 Mt.

  3. Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Lodging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauch, Emily M.

    2011-09-01

    Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are the loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. This report reviews methods to reduce MELs in lodging.

  4. Strategic Use of Electric Vehicle Charging to Reduce Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Use of Electric Vehicle Charging to Reduce Renewable Energy Curtailment on Oahu An analysis of the use of electric vehicle charging to mitigate renewable energy curtailment based on detailed using petroleum is typically used to fill the gap. When the renewable energy supply exceeds that which

  5. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    capacity can help mitigate market dysfunction and vulnerability to runaway market prices by reducing local scarcity of electricity

  6. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by...

  7. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  8. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Indexing Big Data with Map-Reduce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arampatzis, Avi

    A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Indexing Big Data with Map-Reduce Dimitrios Siafarikas Argyrios@ee.duth.gr Abstract--We reflect upon the challenge a Big Data analyst faces when dealing with the complex problem the system we developed works. Keywords: Information Retrieval, Big Data, Data Mining, Cluster, Inverted

  9. Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel Use and Emissions from On policy harmonized Tax credits Anti-idling Low Carbon Fuel Standard #12;Lifecycle Emissions Modeled in TOP-HDV 5 Fuel production, refining, and distribution Material acquisition, processing, and vehicle assembly

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a Vehicle Fuel Benefits and

  11. reiner@hartenstein.de R. Hartenstein: Massively Reducing Electricity Consumption and Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Reiner

    reiner@hartenstein.de R. Hartenstein: Massively Reducing Electricity Consumption and Greenhouse Electricity Consumption and Greenhouse Gases by Innovative Computing Education Reiner Hartenstein CCC 2009 complete #12;reiner@hartenstein.de R. Hartenstein: Massively Reducing Electricity Consumption

  12. Social Network Users Share Electricity Consumption Habits to Reduce Energy Costs for Consumers and Utility Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Social Network Users Share Electricity Consumption Habits to Reduce Energy Costs for Consumers approximately 74 percent of the nation's electricity consumption. During peaks in electricity demand, generators companies keep generators on, ready to respond to sudden upswings in electricity consumption

  13. Economic benefits of an economizer system: Energy savings and reduced sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, D.C. with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The annual financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  14. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    renewable and fuel based), new transmission, and energy conservation. Extreme- Event Benefits (Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Consensus – Delphi Approach Assemble stakeholders Define societal benefitrenewable energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Incorporating more formal evaluations of these important benefits

  15. Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Banks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauch, Emily M.

    2012-09-01

    Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. MELs are a large percentage of total building energy loads. This report reviews methods for reducing MELs in Banks. Reducing MELs in a bank setting requires both local and corporate action. Corporate action centers on activities to prioritize and allocate the right resources to correct procurement and central control issues. Local action includes branch assessment or audits to identify specific loads and needs. The worksheet at the end of this guide can help with cataloging needed information and estimating savings potential. The following steps provide a guide to MEL reductions in Bank Branches. The general process has been adapted from a process developed for office buildings the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, 2011).

  16. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  17. G. J. Lee, G. T. Heydt, "An interactive -dynamic mechanism conceptualizing the cost and benefit of electric power quality," Journal of Electric Power Components and Sys-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Lee, G. T. Heydt, "An interactive - dynamic mechanism conceptualizing the cost and benefit. #12;An Interactive - Dynamic Mechanism Conceptualizing the Cost and Benefit of Electric Power Quality control mechanism to conceptualize the cost and benefit of power qual- ity. The basic objective

  18. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  19. Electric utility transmission and distribution upgrade deferral benefits from modular electricity storage : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M.

    2009-06-01

    The work documented in this report was undertaken as part of an ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Electricity Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study characterizes one especially attractive value proposition for modular electricity storage (MES): electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) upgrade deferral. The T&D deferral benefit is characterized in detail. Also presented is a generalized framework for estimating the benefit. Other important and complementary (to T&D deferral) elements of possible value propositions involving MES are also characterized.

  20. Benefits and Challenges of Achieving a Mainstream Market for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ungar, Edward [Taratec Corporation; Mueller, Howard [Taratec Corporation; Smith, Brett [Center for Automotive Research

    2010-08-01

    The Plug-in Hybrid electric Vehicle (PHEV) Market Introduction Study Final Report identified a range of policies, incentives and regulations designed to enhance the probability of success in commercializing PHEVs as they enter the automotive marketplace starting in 2010. The objective of the comprehensive PHEV Value Proposition study, which encompasses the PHEV Market Introduction Study, is to better understand the value proposition that PHEVs (as well as other plug-in electric vehicle platforms - PEVs) provide to the auto companies themselves, to the consumer and to the public at large as represented by the government and its public policies. In this report we use the more inclusive term PEVs, to include PHEVs, BEVs (battery electric vehicles that operate only on battery) and EREVs (extended range electric vehicles that combine battery electric vehicles with an internal combustion engine that charges the battery as needed). The objective of Taratec's contribution to Phase 2 of the PHEV Value Proposition Study is to develop a clear understanding of the benefits of PEVs to three stakeholders - auto original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), utilities, and the government - and of the technical and commercial challenges and risks to be overcome in order to achieve commercial success for these vehicles. The goal is to understand the technical and commercial challenges in moving from the 'early adopters' at the point of market introduction of these vehicles to a 'sustainable' mainstream market in which PEVs and other PEVs represent a normal, commercially available and attractive vehicle to the mainstream consumer. For the purpose of this study, that sustainable market is assumed to be in place in the 2030 timeframe. The principal focus of the study is to better understand the technical and commercial challenges in the transition from early adopters to a sustainable mainstream consumer market. Effectively, that translates to understanding the challenges to be overcome during the transition period - basically the middle years as the second and third generation of these vehicles are developed and come to market. The concern is to understand those things that in the near term would delay that transition. The study looked at identifying and then quantifying these technical and commercial risks and benefits from three perspectives: (1) The auto industry original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) themselves; (2) The utilities who will provide the electric 'fuel' that will fully or partially power the vehicles; and (3) The government, representing public policy interest in PEV success. By clarifying and quantifying these benefits and the technical and commercial risks that could delay the transition to a sustainable mainstream market, the study provides the basis for developing recommendations for government policies and support for PHEV and PEV development.

  1. Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    present concerns about natural gas prices and the findingsEconomy (ACEEE). 2003. Natural Gas Price Effects of EnergyGas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity

  2. MEW Efforts in Reducing Electricity and Water Consumption in Government and Private Sectors in Kuwait 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Tayar, I.

    2011-01-01

    of Engineers, membership No. 1715. MEW EFFORTS IN REDUCING ELECTRICITY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN KUWAIT Eng. Iqbal Al-Tayar Manager ? Technical Supervision Department Planning and Training Sector Ministry... of Electricity & Water (MEW) - Kuwait Historical Background - Electricity ? In 1913, the first electric machine was installed in Kuwait to operate 400 lambs for Al-Saif Palace. ? In 1934, two electric generators were installed with a total capacity of 60 k...

  3. NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    NREL demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation.

  4. Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of KeyElectrical Products: The Case of India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert,Virginie; McMahon, James E.

    2005-12-20

    The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These products--refrigerators, room air conditioners, electric motors, and distribution transformers--are important targets for efficiency improvement in India and in other developing countries. India is an interesting subject of study because of it's size and rapid economic growth. Implementation of efficient technologies in India would save billions in energy costs, and avoid hundreds of megatons of greenhouse gas emissions. India also serves as an example of the kinds of improvement opportunities that could be pursued in other developing countries.

  5. R&D program benefits estimation: DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-12-04

    The overall mission of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance the security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. In support of this mission, OE conducts a portfolio of research and development (R&D) activities to advance technologies to enhance electric power delivery. Multiple benefits are anticipated to result from the deployment of these technologies, including higher quality and more reliable power, energy savings, and lower cost electricity. In addition, OE engages State and local government decision-makers and the private sector to address issues related to the reliability and security of the grid, including responding to national emergencies that affect energy delivery. The OE R&D activities are comprised of four R&D lines: High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS), Visualization and Controls (V&C), Energy Storage and Power Electronics (ES&PE), and Distributed Systems Integration (DSI).

  6. Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerkmann, Ralf

    Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk Prof. Dr. Meyer. Februar 2010, 16:15 Uhr Seminarraum, Ludwigstraße 33 I The recent deregulation of electricity markets has led to the creation of energy exchanges, where the electricity is freely traded. We study the most

  7. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs.

  8. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    impacts of new electricity transmission projects generallyof high- voltage electricity transmission projects, such asby others. Electricity transmission facilities fit these

  9. Will electricity market reform likely reduce retail rates?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, C.K.; Zarnikau, Jay

    2009-03-15

    To win public support, proponents for electricity market reform to introduce competition often promise that the post-reform retail rates will be lower than the average embedded cost rates that would have prevailed under the status quo of a regulated monopoly. A simple economic analysis shows that such a promise is unlikely to occur without the critical assumption that the post-reform market has marginal costs below average costs. (author)

  10. Reducing the Vulnerability of Electric Power Grids to Terrorist Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Thekla Boutsika; Jin Hur; Manho Joung; Yin Wu; Minqi Zhong

    2009-01-31

    This report describes the development of a cascading outage analyzer that, given an initial disturbance on an electric power system, checks for thermal overloads, under-frequency and over-frequency conditions, and under-voltage conditions that would result in removal of elements from the system. The analyzer simulates the successive tripping of elements due to protective actions until a post-event steady state or a system blackout is reached.

  11. Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fischer, William H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

  12. A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-12-01

    During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

  13. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    of Value Added and Electricity Consumption Data.. 10and per capita electricity consumption have increased slowerPlan Per Capita Electricity Consumption Source: Planning

  14. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    Upgrading California’s Electric Transmission System: Issuesshould be adapted to transmission electric system planning,Mobasheri, (Electric Power Group, LLC). 2008. Transmission

  15. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    j designates the plant generating electricity from apowered electricity generating plants in a) urban and b)from electricity generating plants in California. Exposure

  16. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    Business as Usual (BAU) Scenario 1 – Electricity Demand andEnergy Efficiency (SEE) Scenario 2– Electricity Demand andCA 94720 Abstract Electricity demand has consistently

  17. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    for Electricity Generation Efficiency of Fuel Requirementof Electricity Generation ..7 Table 3: Fuel2:Variable (Fuel and O&M) Costs of Electricity Generation

  18. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  19. Application of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    fast analysis of the circuit designs and reduce the manufacturing cost and time. Typical dimensions models [12]. Due to the growing complexities in circuit designs, linear models are often inadequateApplication of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

  20. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    Economic Survey of India (ESI) and statistics provided by2006). All India Electricity Statistics - General Review

  1. Improving the Power Grid with Superconducting Technology New superconducting technology will help America reduce the demand for additional electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    will help America reduce the demand for additional electric power generation and increased delivery because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric@ornl.gov #12;Working with Industry to Develop Electric Power Applications Superconducting technologies

  2. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    energy efficiency improvement to eliminate the electricity deficit compared to a business as usual (BAU) supply-side

  3. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  4. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    is fraction of total electricity consumption for commercialy) ! calculate total electricity consumption for the end-useis fraction of total electricity consumption for residential

  5. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

  6. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  7. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    refrigeration generation type coal nuclear ngcc renewableby fuel type. %TWh Reduction Commercial coal ngcc nuclearType and Technology : Electricity : Electric Power Electric Power Projections for EMM Region : Electricity : Emissions Quantity Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Steam Coal

  8. Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M.; Corey, Garth P.

    2010-02-01

    This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

  9. Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

  10. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH? gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g?¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m?¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg?¹ at a current density of 1 A g?¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g?¹ was retained at 50 A g?¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorptionmore »fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of ?-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.« less

  11. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youn, Hee-Chang [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Bak, Seong-Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Myeong-Seong [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lee, Chang-Wook [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roh, Kwang Chul [Korea Inst. of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul (Republic of Korea); Kim, Kwang-Bum [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea)

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH? gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g?¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m?¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg?¹ at a current density of 1 A g?¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g?¹ was retained at 50 A g?¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of ?-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.

  12. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31

    The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  13. Demonstrating Dynamic Wireless Charging of an Electric Vehicle - The benefit of Electrochemical Capacitor Smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller , John M.; Onar, Omer C; White, Cliff P; Campbell, Steven L; Coomer, Chester; Seiber, Larry Eugene; Sepe, Raymond B; Steyerl, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The wireless charging of an electric vehicle (EV) while it is in motion presents challenges in terms of low-latency communications for roadway coil excitation sequencing and maintenance of lateral alignment, plus the need for power-flow smoothing. This article summarizes the experimental results on power smoothing of in-motion wireless EV charging performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using various combinations of electrochemical capacitors at the grid side and in the vehicle. Electrochemical capacitors of the symmetric carbon carbon type from Maxwell Technologies comprised the in-vehicle smoothing of wireless charging current to the EV battery pack. Electro Standards Laboratories (ESL) fabricated the passive and active parallel lithium-capacitor (LiC) unit used to smooth the grid-side power. The power pulsation reduction was 81% on the grid by the LiC, and 84% on the vehicle for both the LiC and the carbon ultracapacitors (UCs).

  14. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

  15. Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jehlik, Forrest; LaClair, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

  16. Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    . Although many electricity providers will offer their services in a restructure U.S. electricity market, it is not clear which pow r producers industrial customers wil1 buy from. James Rouse, associate director of energy policy for Praxair, Inc., thinks... the Seventeenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 5-6, 1995 choices we will have will force [utilities 'J rates down" (1). Electric Industry Restructuring in the United Kingdom The open access system for electricity being implemented...

  17. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  18. Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads in response to a utility signal, represent a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Issue Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads (Figure 1). The testing covered four Lighting the Way to Demand ResponseLighting the Way to Demand Response California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief PIER

  19. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    pdf. ———. 2011b. Residential Demand Module of the Nationaland the Commercial and Residential Demand Modules (DOE EIAcommercial and residential electricity demand projections

  20. Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a new technology with the potential to reduce operating costs and increase productivity in bar and flat-rolled products for the steel industry.

  1. Grounding electrode and method of reducing the electrical resistance of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A first solution of an electrolyte is injected underground into a volume of soil having negative surface charges on its particles. A cationic surfactant suspended in this solution neutralizes these surface charges of the soil particles within the volume. Following the first solution, a cationic asphalt emulsion suspended in a second solution is injected into the volume. The asphalt emulsion diffuses through the volume and electrostatically bonds with additional soil surrounding the volume such that an electrically conductive water repellant shell enclosing the volume is formed. This shell prevents the leaching of electrolyte from the volume into the additional soil. The second solution also contains a dissolved deliquescent salt which draws water into the volume prior to the formation of the shell. When electrically connected to an electrical installation such as a power line tower, the volume constitutes a grounding electrode for the tower.

  2. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  3. Evaluation of Utility System Impacts and Benefits of Optimally Dispatched Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Short, W.

    2006-10-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles with the capability of being recharged from the grid may provide a significant decrease in oil consumption. These ''plug-in'' hybrids (PHEVs) will affect utility operations, adding additional electricity demand. Because many individual vehicles may be charged in the extended overnight period, and because the cost of wireless communication has decreased, there is a unique opportunity for utilities to directly control the charging of these vehicles at the precise times when normal electricity demand is at a minimum. This report evaluates the effects of optimal PHEV charging, under the assumption that utilities will indirectly or directly control when charging takes place, providing consumers with the absolute lowest cost of driving energy. By using low-cost off-peak electricity, PHEVs owners could purchase the drive energy equivalent to a gallon of gasoline for under 75 cents, assuming current national average residential electricity prices.

  4. ELECTRICAL STIMULATION REDUCES AGE RELATED ATROPHY AND WEAKNESS IN EDL MUSCLES OF RATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Robert G.

    the atrophy and weakness. We electrically stimulated EDL muscles of adult and old rats during a 2 month period of denervation. The control muscles of old rats had declines in muscle mass and maximum force compared with adult control muscles. Denervated muscles of either adult or old rats had even larger declines. Stimulated

  5. Aalborg Universitet Negative Sequence Controllers to Reduce Power Oscillations During Electric Faults in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    -HVDC transmission connecting an offshore wind power plant to an onshore grid. To develop a PSCAD/EMTDC simulation Faults in the Offshore Wind Power Grid Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar Publication date: 2010 Document Version During Electric Faults in the Offshore Wind Power Grid. Poster session presented at IEEE PES General

  6. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request of Senators James M. Jeffords and Joseph I. Lieberman. This report describes the impacts of technology improvements and other market-based opportunities on the costs of emissions reductions from electricity generators, including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, mercury, and carbon dioxide.

  7. SMART Wind Consortium Virtual Meeting on Installation: Reducing Electrical and Foundation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 90-minute SMART Wind Consortium virtual meeting is intended to foster dialogue on actions to improve safety and efficiency and to reduce installation costs for distributed wind turbines. Gary...

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

  9. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Will; Walker, Iain; Roux, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  10. Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    estimates of health and emission reduction benefits, economic development benefits, and wholesale electricity market price

  11. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

  12. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    century. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) reduce emissionsas plug-in HEVs and full electric vehicles to market. In theon their design, hybrid electric vehicles employ electric

  13. Electrical and thermal conductivities of reduced graphene oxide/polystyrene Wonjun Park, Jiuning Hu, Luis A. Jauregui, Xiulin Ruan, and Yong P. Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    conductive polymer composites are used as heat sinks for device packaging requiring a high thermalElectrical and thermal conductivities of reduced graphene oxide/polystyrene composites Wonjun Park. The electrical conductivity (r) of RGO/PS composites with different RGO concentrations at room temperature shows

  14. KTP BENEFITS Knowledge Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    of the new oil and to see if the amount discarded as waste could be reduced. BENEFITS The KTP project has from reduced oil waste Better production, storage and management practices Professional development healthy unsaturated oil blend for frying. The Company recognised the benefits of looking at the use

  15. Dynamic Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicle Demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Benefit of Electrochemical Capacitor Smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John M; Onar, Omer C; White, Cliff P; Campbell, Steven L; Coomer, Chester; Seiber, Larry Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wireless charging of an electric vehicle while in motion presents challenges in terms of low latency communications for roadway coil excitation sequencing, and maintenance of lateral alignment, plus the need for power flow smoothing. This paper summarizes the experimental results on power smoothing of in-motion wireless EV charging performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using various combinations of electrochemical capacitors at the grid-side and in-vehicle. Electrochemical capacitors of the symmetric carbon-carbon type from Maxwell Technologies comprised the in-vehicle smoothing of wireless charging current to the EV battery pack. Electro Standards Laboratories fabricated the passive and active parallel lithium-capacitor unit used to smooth grid-side power. Power pulsation reduction was 81% on grid by LiC, and 84% on vehicle for both lithium-capacitor and the carbon ultracapacitors.

  16. Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-11-15

    FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

  17. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

  18. Does competition reduce costs? : assessing the impact of regulatory restructuring on U.S. electric generation efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Nancy L.

    2004-01-01

    Although the allocative efficiency benefits of competition are a tenet of microeconomic theory, the relation between competition and technical efficiency is less well understood. Neoclassical models of profit-maximization ...

  19. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01

    energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

  20. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits...

  1. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEPE.ELECTRIC

  2. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  3. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J. (Rexford, NY); Rhudy, Ralph G. (Scotia, NY); Bushman, Ralph E. (Lathem, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  4. The potential benefits of distributed deneration and rate-related...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability,...

  5. Retiree Benefits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications|Retiree Benefits Retiree Benefits

  6. A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel School Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Average Electricity Carbon Emission Rate 1.18 lbs/kWh Cdr Diesel Carbon Emission Rate 22.2 lbs/kWh D Miles $0.106/kWh PR Regulation Price for V2G Revenue $28/MWh R Range of Battery 100 miles rd Discount Rate of Replacement Battery $300/kWh CD Seating Capacity of Diesel Bus 32 CE Seating Capacity of Electric Bus 24 Cer

  7. Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ' desire a shift away from carbon intensive electricity generation. Wind power is increasingly becomingEconomics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O

  8. Cooling the greenhouse effect: Options and costs for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from the American Electric Power Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helme, N.; Popovich, M.G.; Gille, J. [Center for Clean Air Policy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the earth is likely to face a doubling of preindustrial greenhouse gases in the next half century. This doubling could be expected to push average global temperatures. up from between 1.8 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Much of the potential for human impacts on the global climate is linked to fossil fuel consumption. Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption in the US totals about one-quarter of the world`s total emissions from energy consumption. Global warming is different from other environmental problems because CO{sub 2} emissions can be captured naturally by trees, grasses, soil, and other plants. In contrast, acid rain emissions reductions can only be accomplished through switching to lower-polluting fuels, conserving energy, or installing costly retrofit technologies. Terrestrial biota, such as trees, plants, grasses and soils, directly affect the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the atmosphere. A number of reports have concluded that forestry and land-use practices can increase CO{sub 2} sequestration and can help reduce or delay the threat of global warming.

  9. Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2004-01-01

    modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrainsare advanced, clean diesel engines and hybrid-electricmarkets for diesel powered and hybrid-electric vehicles in

  10. Microsoft Word - DR_benefits_Congress_v9_2 03 06 12pm.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benefits of Demand Response The most important benefit of demand response is improved resource-efficiency of electricity production due to closer alignment between customers'...

  11. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    renewable electricity generation for the foreseeable future. The extent to which geothermal energy ultimately benefits

  12. Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Brandon Keith Mauch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with compressed air energy storage (CAES) participating freely in the day-ahead electricity market without the benefit of a renewable portfolio standard or production tax credit. CAES is used to reduce the risk of committing uncertain quantities of wind energy and to shift dispatch of wind generation to high price periods

  13. International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and...

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    hedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedhedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedRenewable Energy Standard: Economic and Employment Benefits.

  15. Modeling the vehicle cycle impacts of hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.; Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

    1997-03-13

    Pure and hybrid electric vehicles, considered environmentally benign, are being developed to reduce urban air pollutant emissions. The obvious emissions benefit of pure electric vehicles is that they produce no tailpipe emissions. Hybrid electric vehicles have the potential of improving fuel economy and reducing emissions. However, both electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) do have their own environmental impacts. In order to quantify the potential benefits from introducing such vehicles, it is necessary to compare their impacts with those from the conventional vehicles they would replace. These impacts include energy use and emissions from the entire energy cycle, including fuel production, vehicle and battery production and recycling, and vehicle operation. Argonne`s previous work in collaboration with other national laboratories analyzed the total energy cycle of electric vehicles; this paper compares energy use and emissions for the total energy cycles of several HEV designs with those from modern conventional vehicles. The estimates presented indicate that use of HEVs can reduce energy use and emissions of greenhouse gases, volatile organic gases, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 micrometers. HEVs may, in some cases, increase emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. Although some of the HEV designs illustrated in this paper could run a significant proportion of annual miles in all electric operation, no calculation of the emission reductions that result from using electricity from the utility grid is presented in this paper.

  16. Evaluation of a Current Source Active Power Filter to Reduce the DC Bus Capacitor in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    combustion engine, electric motor, and energy storage device (for example, batteries and ultracapacitors the size of the heat sink by running the inverter at a higher temperature (>150°C), possibly using silicon

  17. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  18. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-15

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  19. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-27

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  20. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01

    California houses are improved energy utilization and reduced operating costs.Costs = Increased Funds for Other Purposes Improving the energy efficiency of California’costs, and environmental impacts. Energy Consumption Our evaluation of the benefits from commissioning California’

  1. Buying Clean Electricity | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from your current electricity service. Learn More Tips: Smart Meters and a Smart Power Grid Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates Reducing Your Electricity Use External Resources...

  2. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    hedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedRenewable Energy Standard: Economic and Employment Benefits.risk-mitigation benefits of renewable energy are sizable.

  4. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  5. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental...

  6. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.

    2010-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)--which include all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles--provide a new opportunity for reducing oil consumption by drawing power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure--from battery manufacturing to communication and control between the vehicle and the grid--must provide access to clean electricity, satisfy stakeholder expectations, and ensure safety. Currently, codes and standards organizations are collaborating on a PEV infrastructure plan. Establishing a PEV infrastructure framework will create new opportunities for business and job development initiating the move toward electrified transportation. This paper summarizes the components of the PEV infrastructure, challenges and opportunities related to the design and deployment of the infrastructure, and the potential benefits.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    investment for reducing US gasoline consumption Scott B. Peterson a , Jeremy J. Michalek a,b,n a Dept per gal than oil premium estimates. c Current subsidies are misaligned with fuel savings. We discuss increased battery capacity per gallon saved, and both approaches have higher costs than US oil premium

  8. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  9. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  10. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    solar generation can reduce costs and emissions associated with supplying vehicle electricity demand dramatically. Sensitivity Analysis of Long-term

  11. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  12. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  13. Benefits at a Glance 2014 Benefit Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OF OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY BASIC BENEFITS OSU PAYS (Cost Per Month) EMPLOYEE PAYS (Cost Per Month) WHAT literature for detailed information. VISION PLAN VSP, Primary Vision Care, United Health Care, SuperiorStar Life OSU pays Basic Employee Life and Accidental Death & Dismemberment. Employee-Paid Supplemental

  14. Graduate Assistant Benefits Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    benefits at the full State subsidized rate You must enroll within 60 days of your date of hire #12 Eligibility Enrollment Procedures State Sponsored Benefits Please Feel Free to Ask Questions at Anytime #12 in the month of October Changes made during Open Enrollment become effective on January 1 #12;State Sponsored

  15. Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage Technologies for Hybrid and Electric Cars and Trucks Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy...

  16. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  17. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  18. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  19. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridL ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a

  20. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridwith Connection of Electric Vehicles TABLE IV D ECISION V

  1. Electrical Demand Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below...

  2. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  3. Rethinking community benefits agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economos, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01

    Across the United States, conflicts often erupt when large-scale real estate development projects are proposed and executed in low-income neighborhoods of large cities. Communities increasingly ask for benefits to offset ...

  4. New pilot saves customers money and reduces BPA reserve requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increasing the electric grid's flexibility to absorb changes in wind energy generation and reducing costs for both the customers and BPA. Portland General Electric and...

  5. Nanomagnetism research: benefit from reduced dimensionality and interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    electronics, so called “spintronics”, would open the door to1.2 Nanomagnetism and Spintronics Chapter 2 Experimentalon nanomagnetism and spintronics. 1.1 Magnetic Storage

  6. Nanomagnetism research: benefit from reduced dimensionality and interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) 2.2.3 Reflection HighEnergy Electron Diffraction ( LEED), Reflection High EnergyLow Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) Low-energy electron

  7. Scaling of economic benefits from Green Roof implementation in Washington, DC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, H.; Clark, C. E.; Zhou, J.; Adriaens, P.; Environmental Science Division; Dalian Univ. of Technology; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-06-01

    Green roof technology is recognized for mitigating stormwater runoff and energy consumption. Methods to overcome the cost gap between green roofs and conventional roofs were recently quantified by incorporating air quality benefits. This study investigates the impact of scaling on these benefits at the city-wide scale using Washington, DC as a test bed because of the proposed targets in the 20-20-20 vision (20 million ft{sup 2} by 2020) articulated by Casey Trees, a nonprofit organization. Building-specific stormwater benefits were analyzed assuming two proposed policy scenarios for stormwater fees ranging from 35 to 50% reduction for green roof implementation. Heat flux calculations were used to estimate building-specific energy savings for commercial buildings. To assess benefits at the city scale, stormwater infrastructure savings were based on operational savings and size reduction due to reduced stormwater volume generation. Scaled energy infrastructure benefits were calculated using two size reductions methods for air conditioners. Avoided carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide (NOx), and sulfur dioxide emissions were based on reductions in electricity and natural gas consumption. Lastly, experimental and fugacity-based estimates were used to quantify the NOx uptake by green roofs, which was translated to health benefits using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency models. The results of the net present value (NPV) analysis showed that stormwater infrastructure benefits totaled $1.04 million (M), while fee-based stormwater benefits were $0.22-0.32 M/y. Energy savings were $0.87 M/y, while air conditioner resizing benefits were estimated at $0.02 to $0.04 M/y and avoided emissions benefits (based on current emission trading values) were $0.09 M-0.41 M/y. Over the lifetime of the green roof (40 years), the NPV is about 30-40% less than that of conventional roofs (not including green roof maintenance costs). These considerable benefits, in concert with current and emerging policy frameworks, may facilitate future adoption of this technology.

  8. Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines...

  9. Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    and the U.S. costs of oil consumption, including supply disruption risks, increases in world oil prices dueAir Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits from Plug-in Vehicles The electrification of passenger; and (3) reduce gasoline consumption, helping to diminish dependency on imported oil. Current policy

  10. Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1Ben Allen HPC1BenefitsBenefits

  11. Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Flash Register Input/Output Emitters Light emitting diode (LED) Light emitting diode (LED) Liquid crystal display (LCD)displays are light emitting diodes (LEDs) and vacuum

  12. Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V.

    2013-03-05

    A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

  13. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecoveryWater Heating

  14. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedox Shuttle Additive, Wins

  15. copayment summary infertility benefit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    SERVICES -- 50% COPAYMENT* · Services and supplies for diagnosis and treatment of involuntary infertility for the treatment of Infertility Genetic testing and counseling are covered benefits when medically indicated lavage as part of infertility diagnosis or treatment is excluded. · All services related to the sperm

  16. Transmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Energy System #12;Transmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Dale Osborn, Consulting Advisor, Transmission Management, MidwestTransmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Forward Future Grid

  17. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  18. Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

  19. Promise of Solar Energy is Boundless: A Smarter Electric Grid Delivers on that Promise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01

    This brochure summarizes the benefits of a smart electric grid, the Solar Program's Solar Energy Grid Intergration Systems efforts, and the Office of Electricity's "The Smart Grid" booklet.

  20. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

  1. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  2. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

  3. Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, C.; Pless, J.; Logan, J.; Zhou, E.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business solutions that are transforming electricity sectors around the world. Renewable deployment is expected to continue due to: increasingly competitive economics; favorable environmental characteristics such as low water use, and minimal local air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; complementary risk profiles when paired with natural gas generators; strong support from stakeholders. Despite this positive outlook for renewables, the collapse in global oil prices since mid-2014 and continued growth in natural gas supply in the United States--due to the development of low-cost shale gas--raise questions about the potential impacts of fossil fuel prices on RE. Today, oil plays a very minor role in the electricity sectors of most countries, so direct impacts on RE are likely to be minimal (except where natural gas prices are indexed on oil). Natural gas and RE generating options appear to be more serious competitors than oil and renewables. Low gas prices raise the hurdle for RE to be cost competitive. Additionally, although RE emits far less GHG than natural gas, both natural gas and RE offer the benefits of reducing carbon relative to coal and oil (see Section 4.1 for more detail on the GHG intensity of electricity technologies). However, many investors and decision makers are becoming aware of the complementary benefits of pairing natural gas and renewables to minimize risk of unstable fuel prices and maintain the reliability of electricity to the grid.

  4. SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ELENA YUDOVINA AND GEORGE MICHAILIDIS Abstract. Electric vehicles represent a promising technology for reducing emissions and dependence. This pa- per studies decentralized policies that assign electric vehicles to a network of charging

  5. Electricity rate effects of 150 MW shop assembled turbocharged boiler generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drenker, S.; Fancher, R.

    1984-08-01

    Major upheavals in the environment in which electric utilities operate began in the 1960's. Modular construction, developed and perfected by process industry engineering firms, in conjuction with small turbocharged boiler power plants (currently under development), can respond to these forces by shortening construction time. Benefits from this approach, resulting from better matching of load growth and reducing planning horizon, can equal 15% to 60% of the capital cost of large pulverized coal plants.

  6. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFITS A Motor Challeng NEW WATER BOOSTER PUMP SYSTEM REDUCES ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY 80 PERCENT AND INCREASES RELIABILITY Summary Due to major renovations at their Pontiac...

  7. Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz -Technologies for Hybrid andBenefits

  8. Investment Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Investment Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an Electricity Generation Capacity Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an Electricity Generation Capacity Expansion, that facilitate renewable integration and reduce the total system cost. 1 Introduction The Investment Model

  9. Optimizing Electric Motor Systems at a Corporate Campus Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFITS * Saves over 375,000 annually * Reduces annual energy consumption by 170 billion Btu * Reduces air emissions APPLICATIONS Improving control strategies can increase the...

  10. Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    ) in residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties. These electricity savings will then be converted to NOx reductions using the appropriate...

  11. Electric germs Source: scenta Rate this item

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Electric germs Source: scenta Rate this item People in remote areas could benefit from fuel cells that contain bacteria that grows prolifically on the graphite anodes of fuel cells and can conduct electricity surface that conducted electricity. Presenting his findings at the Society for General Microbiology

  12. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  13. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    Figure 1 shows electricity rates that provide the same costgasoline prices. Lower electricity rates than the ones shown2006 US residential electricity rates averaged about $0.083

  14. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    and Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for Compactand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options. (EPRI: PaloEvaluation of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Toyota’s Prius vs.

  15. Transmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Energy System #12;Transmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Planning, Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) · Dale Osborn, Consulting Advisor, Transmission to move electric energy interregionally is limited to the capacity of the existing transmission system

  16. Garrett Electric Boosting Systems (EBS) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Arnold; Craig Balis; Pierre Barthelet; Etienne Poix; Tariq Samad; Greg Hampson; S. M. Shahed

    2005-03-31

    Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-Turbo{trademark} designs do both The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-Turbo{trademark}, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-Turbo{trademark} can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-Turbo{trademark} consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration is slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-Turbo{trademark} wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-Turbo{trademark}. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-Turbo{trademark}. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. e-Turbo{trademark} provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-Turbo{trademark} performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

  17. The Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in Chinese Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Christopher; Weinert, Jonathan; Ma, Chaktan

    2007-01-01

    Wang (2005). Environmental Impacts and Benefits of Regionalincludes energy and environmental impacts due to the miningsection discusses the environmental impacts of electric bike

  18. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

  19. Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  20. Student HouSing BenefitS of Living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    Student HouSing #12;BenefitS of Living in Student HouSing · Live with your peers in an exciting with housing costs for eligible students · Onsite parking at housing lots · Living Learning Communities the leadership of these units, students will enjoy the usual perks of living in campus housing, but will also

  1. Electricity Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

  2. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Howard L. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the benefits they provide. A small wind system can be connected to the electric grid through your power provider or it can stand alone (off-grid). This makes small wind...

  4. Hybrid and Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-20

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity either as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. This new generation of vehicles, often called electric drive vehicles, can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles(PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum use.

  5. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

  6. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power Adoption”, Journal ofstorage, and combined heat and power (CHP) systems with andheat exchanger (using combined heat and power capabilities),

  7. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    storage, and combined heat and power (CHP) systems with and without absorption chillers. Definition of a microgrid

  8. The Direct Costs and Benefits of US Electric Utility Divestitures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triebs, Thomas P.; Pollitt, Michael G.; Kwoka, John E.

     output variables. The two inputs are the sum of  distribution  O&M,  customer  service  expenses,  and  sales  expenses  (Opex)  and  capital  expenses  (Capex).  Both  include  shares  of  general  and  administrative  expense  and  general plant expense. We...  of own generation plus the cost of purchased power.  The total cost of own generation is measured as the sum of O&M and capital expenses.  For  generation  we  measure  Capex  differently  to  make  costs  of  own  generation  and  purchased power more comparable. Similar  to Farsi and Filippini  (2005...

  9. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    stationary batteries, thermal storage, and combined heat andelectrical storage, TS – thermal storage, AC - absorptionelectrical storage, TS – thermal storage; S U S DER GT S M

  10. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    can be used to offset EV charging at home. In this work,to very different EV charging tariffs at the residentialdifference in residential EV charging rates both cases show

  11. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    energy source or CHP system at the building can be used tobuildings [GW] stationary storage [GWh] combined heat and power (CHP) and

  12. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, stationary batteries,AC - absorption cooling, ST-solar thermal, PV-Photovoltaicsbe used during times when solar thermal is not available or

  13. ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to

  14. EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Benefits | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements Report of the

  15. Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EV Everywhere|Muscle Car |EcoCAR: The|

  16. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc |Bartlesville

  17. Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.

    1986-01-01

    UTILITY DEMAND-SIDE EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES* Nat Treadway Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The electric. util ity industry's demand-side management programs can be analyzed ?from various points of view using a standard... cost and certification proceedings. A s~andard benefit-cost methodology analyzes demand-slde management programs from various ~oints of view. The benefit-cost methodology now ln use by several electric utilities and the * The views presented...

  18. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan The REVi plan addresses the electric...

  19. Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    a benefit-cost analysis of a relicensing agreement for two hydroelectric dams in Michigan. The agreement and benefits: pro- ducer costs of adapting electricity production to the new time profile of hydroelectric of an environmental constraint on hydroelectric dams. (JEL Q43, Q57) I. INTRODUCTION A reallocation of river resources

  20. Electrical + Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Electrical + Computer Engineering Electrical + Computer Engineering 2013 PROFILE PEOPLE Faculty Students Electrical Engineering - 330 Computer Engineering - 224 Graduate Students EE and EE:Systems MSE - 301 EE and EE:Systems PhD - 296 Degrees Awarded Electrical Engineering BSE - 123 Computer Engineering

  1. Advanced Electrical, Optical and Data Communication Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon Cobb

    2011-04-30

    The implementation of electrical and IT infrastructure systems at the North Carolina Center for Automotive Research , Inc. (NCCAR) has achieved several key objectives in terms of system functionality, operational safety and potential for ongoing research and development. Key conclusions include: (1) The proven ability to operate a high speed wireless data network over a large 155 acre area; (2) Node to node wireless transfers from access points are possible at speeds of more than 50 mph while maintaining high volume bandwidth; (3) Triangulation of electronic devices/users is possible in areas with overlapping multiple access points, outdoor areas with reduced overlap of access point coverage considerably reduces triangulation accuracy; (4) Wireless networks can be adversely affected by tree foliage, pine needles are a particular challenge due to the needle length relative to the transmission frequency/wavelength; and (5) Future research will use the project video surveillance and wireless systems to further develop automated image tracking functionality for the benefit of advanced vehicle safety monitoring and autonomous vehicle control through 'vehicle-to-vehicle' and 'vehicle-to-infrastructure' communications. A specific advantage realized from this IT implementation at NCCAR is that NC State University is implementing a similar wireless network across Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC in 2011 and has benefited from lessons learned during this project. Consequently, students, researchers and members of the public will be able to benefit from a large scale IT implementation with features and improvements derived from this NCCAR project.

  2. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    directs federal agencies to: Ensure 25% of their total energy (electric and thermal) consumption is from clean energy sources by 2025. Reduce energy use in federal buildings...

  3. Do recommender systems benefit users?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, Chi Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are present in many web applications to guide our choices. They increase sales and benefit sellers, but whether they benefit customers by providing relevant products is questionable. Here we introduce a model to examine the benefit of recommender systems for users, and found that recommendations from the system can be equivalent to random draws if one relies too strongly on the system. Nevertheless, with sufficient information about user preferences, recommendations become accurate and an abrupt transition to this accurate regime is observed for some algorithms. On the other hand, we found that a high accuracy evaluated by common accuracy metrics does not necessarily correspond to a high real accuracy nor a benefit for users, which serves as an alarm for operators and researchers of recommender systems. We tested our model with a real dataset and observed similar behaviors. Finally, a recommendation approach with improved accuracy is suggested. These results imply that recommender systems ...

  4. Benefits Office Use Only ID# __________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on this form is true and complete. I further certify that the child I am adopting is not married and not my documentation to: Vanderbilt Benefits Administration, VU Station B #357700, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN

  5. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Date: 28 November 2011 From: DON Benefits Officer and Flexible Spending Account. The Department of the Navy Benefit Civilian Human Resources Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits/Pages/BenefitsOpenSeason.aspx is an excellent source of Open Season

  6. Why did British electricity prices fall after 1998?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce high electricity prices in England and Wales the government has reduced concentration among generators and introduced New Electricity Trading Arrangements (NETA). Econometric analysis on monthly ...

  7. Vacuum-ultraviolet photoreduction of graphene oxide: Electrical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vacuum-ultraviolet photoreduction of graphene oxide: Electrical conductivity of entirely reduced single sheets and reduced micro line patterns Citation Details In-Document Search...

  8. Climate benefits from alternative energy uses of biomass plantations in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    to the grid. High electricity prices, frequent power outages, and high line losses pose hurdles to increasing UNIQUE Forestry Consultants Ltd, Schnewlinstraße 10, 79098 Freiburg, Germany a r t i c l e i n f o electricity sources and unsustainable forest use. The study evaluates the greenhouse gas benefits that could

  9. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developingin reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annualwill drive total electricity demand significantly above

  10. Conservation The Role of ElectricThe Role of Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To Hear Energy Efficiency and the Current PNW ResourceEnergy Efficiency and the Current PNW Resource Mix Council Energy Efficiency ResourcesEnergy Efficiency Resources Significantly Reduced ProjectedNorthwest Power and Conservation Council The Role of ElectricThe Role of Electric Energy Efficiency

  11. A Dynamic Algorithm for Facilitated Charging of Plug-In Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taheri, Nicole; Ye, Yinyu

    2011-01-01

    Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) are a rapidly developing technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change the way vehicles obtain power. PEV charging stations will most likely be available at home and at work, and occasionally be publicly available, offering flexible charging options. Ideally, each vehicle will charge during periods when electricity prices are relatively low, to minimize the cost to the consumer and maximize societal benefits. A Demand Response (DR) service for a fleet of PEVs could yield such charging schedules by regulating consumer electricity use during certain time periods, in order to meet an obligation to the market. We construct an automated DR mechanism for a fleet of PEVs that facilitates vehicle charging to ensure the demands of the vehicles and the market are met. Our dynamic algorithm depends only on the knowledge of a few hundred driving behaviors from a previous similar day, and uses a simple adjusted pricing scheme to instantly assign feasible and satisfactory c...

  12. BPA proposes resolution to electricity oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its section of the grid for periodically reducing their output when necessary to keep the electricity supply from exceeding demand during high river flows. If BPA decides to...

  13. National Electric Transmission Congestion Studies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    congestion where it is significant enough to merit remediation. These are: 1), reduce electricity demand in the congested area through energy efficiency and demand management...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce...

  15. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  16. Micromachined electrical cauterizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Northrup, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    A micromachined electrical cauterizer is disclosed. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 {mu}m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures. 7 figs.

  17. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  18. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    between combustion engines and electric motors is thatsize of gasoline engine and electric motor. Using largerwhen the gasoline engine and electric motor are turned on

  19. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  20. Social Networking Reduces Peak Power Consumption in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    in buildings represents approximately 74% of the nation's electricity consumption [1]. However, electricity the peak power consumption of schedulable jobs of electrical appliances of users under de- lay requirements1 Social Networking Reduces Peak Power Consumption in Smart Grid Qiuyuan Huang, Xin Li, Jing Zhao

  1. Reduced /Conservation Tillage in South and Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Livingston, Stephen

    2003-03-19

    Reduced or conservation tillage can benefit sorghum crops and increase profit. This publication discusses the types of tilling systems and the conditions for using each in South and Central Texas....

  2. Benefits of Manure and Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of the potas- sium (K20) fed to dairy cattle are excreted in manure. Poultry litters and swine manures may haveBenefits of Manure and Effluent Livestock manures are often rich in plant nutrients. Studies have by all plants for normal growth and pro- duction. In addition,litter and manures contain smaller amounts

  3. Electric Boosting System for Light Truck/SUV Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Arnold, Craig Balis, Pierre Barthelet, Etienne Poix, Tariq Samad, Greg Hampson, S.M. Shahed

    2005-06-22

    Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems. One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-TurboTM designs do both. The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-TurboTM, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-TurboTM can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-TurboTM consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration in slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-TurboTM wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-TurboTM designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-TurboTM. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-TurboTM designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-TurboTM. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. e-TurboTM provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-TurboTM performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

  4. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Date: 26 June 2012 From: DON Benefits Officer To of the Navy systems are now ready to accept employee's Roth TSP transactions (regular and catch-up). The TSP available at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits/resources/Documents/Benefits%20Bulletin%2020 12

  5. Economic benefits of greenspace Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic benefits of greenspace Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Economic benefits of greenspace A critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits Forestry Commission: Edinburgh Vadim. ISBN 978-0-85538-865-2 Saraev, V. (2012) Economic benefits of greenspace: a critical assessment

  6. Update of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Ronald D.; Freeman, Roger; Petit, David; Rister, Ed; Sturdivant, Allan; Ribera, Luis; Zinn, Michele

    2006-01-01

    of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas Raymondville Drain Static and Stochastic Implications Prepared for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Galveston, Texas by Ronald D.... ii Executive Summary This report represents an update on the 2001 evaluation of benefits attributable to the South Main Drain in Willacy County. The results are limited to agricultural benefits due to reduced flood damages and improved drainage...

  7. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix K: The Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix K: The Smart Grid Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Components of the Smart Grid.............................................................................................................. 2 Benefits from the Smart grid

  8. A versatile technique to minimize electrical losses in distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyaruzi, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    This dissertation presents a method of minimizing electrical losses in radial distribution feeders by the use of shunt capacitors. The engineering benefits of reducing peak electrical power and energy losses are compared to the costs associated with the current engineering practice of buying, installing and servicing capacitor banks in the distribution feeders. The present analysis defines this cost-benefit problem and the formulation of the problem of nonuniform feeders with different wire gauges at various feeder sections. Standard utility capacitor bank sizes are used to give a more realistic model. An original computer solution methodology based on techniques developed for this study determines: (i) Whether it is economical to install compensating capacitor banks on a particular radial distribution feeder or not. (ii) The locations at which capacitor banks should be installed. (iii) The types and sizes of capacitor banks to be installed. (iv) The time setting of switched capacitor banks. The techniques have been applied to a typical radial distribution feeder in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The results and the engineering implications of this work are discussed and recommendations for the engineering community made.

  9. The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2011-01-01

    EG. 2010. Human and environmental impact assessment ofof the overall environmental impacts and benefits of theand reducing environmental impacts of CCS Roger Sathre and

  10. Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

    2001-09-17

    Dimming controls for electric lighting have been one of the mainstays of the effort to use daylighting to reduce annual lighting energy consumption. The coincidence of daylighting with electric utility peak demand makes daylighting controls an effective strategy for reducing commercial building peak electric loads. During times of energy shortage, there is a greatly increased need to reduce electricity use during peak periods, both to ease the burden on electricity providers and to control the operating costs of buildings. The paper presents a typical commercial building electric demand profile during summer, and shows how daylighting-linked lighting controls and load shedding techniques can reduce lighting at precisely those times when electricity is most expensive. We look at the importance of dimming for increasing the reliability of the electricity grid in California and other states, as well as examine the potential cost-effectiveness of widespread use of daylighting to save energy and reduce monthly electricity bills.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  12. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  13. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  14. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Line 888-320-2917 M - F, 7:30 a.m. ­ 7:30 p.m. ET TTY: 866-359-5277 Email: navybenefits@navy.mil http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Line 888-320-2917 M - F, 7:30 a.m. ­ 7:30 p.m. ET

  15. A Self-Consistent Method to Assess Air Quality Co-Benefits from US Climate Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saari, R.

    Air quality co-benefits can potentially reduce the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. However, while many studies of the cost of greenhouse gas mitigation model the full macroeconomic welfare impacts, most studies of air ...

  16. Project Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices | DepartmentProductManagementProject Benefits

  17. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  18. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  19. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01

    USA. CEC, 2012. Electricity Consumption by Planning Area [of customer gross electricity consumption, for three levelsresponse reduces electricity consumption, sometimes through

  20. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  1. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  2. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  3. Market Integration, Efficiency, and Interconnectors: The Irish Single Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepal, Rabindra; Jamasb, Tooraj

    integration between SEM and other European markets and thereby raising the possibility to benefit from increased electricity trade. As wholesale prices in SEM remain relatively high and volatile; a larger interconnector capacity can promote competition, close...

  4. The Economics and Feasibility of Electricity Generation using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    benefits of using biogas to generate electricity instead of coal are positive, implying that an otherwise efficient rate structure will err against biogas. The second consideration is that manure digester

  5. Development of sodium silicate adhesives for electrical steel bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Jordan (Jordan Christine)

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic adhesives have several benefits over traditional joining methods for joining electrical steels used in magnetic cores of numerous industrial applications. As insulators with very high melting temperatures, the ...

  6. Benefits Plan Reports & Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1Ben Allen HPC1 ISDACHomeBenefits

  7. Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C | NationalBenefits | National Nuclear

  8. Benefits and Limitations of Tapping into Stored Energy For Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    - icant impact on both its recurring electricity bill (Op-ex) and one-time construction costs (Cap-ex play a role in reducing Cap-ex costs by allowing tighter overbooking of power infrastructure compo- nents and we quantify the extent of such Cap-ex savings. To our knowledge, this is the first paper

  9. Benefit Value Studies and Benefit Trends 11-3-15 Final.pptx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investment Proprietary & Confidential | MTG DATE | 2015 Introduction to BIv1 8 Benefit Index Methodology Provide reasonable comparisons of different types of benefits within...

  10. electrical, engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    school of electrical, computer and energy engineering Annual Report 2012-2013 Breaking the final systems engineering Marco Santello, School Director enrollment 930 undergraduate 771 graduate 159 DEGREE PROGRAM biomedical engineering (Harrington Bioengineering program) school of computing, informatics

  11. Electrical, Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering 2009-2010 Annual Report #12;Organizational Structure for Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering Schools (Director) Lead These Engineering Undergraduate Degree Programs Coordinate Across Engineering for These Grand Challenge Areas... Biological & Health

  12. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  13. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  14. Definition of GPRA08 benefits metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Background information for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on the definitions of GPRA08 benefits metrics.

  15. Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-09-07

    For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major difference was that LBNL started working with the AEO 2004NEMS code and EIA was using AEO 2005 NEMS code. Unlike the High Price Scenario the Carbon Cap scenario gives a radically different forecast than the Reference Scenario. NEMS-LBNL proved that it can handle these alternative scenarios. However, results are price inelastic (for both oil and natural gas prices) within the price range evaluated. Perhaps even higher price paths would lead to a distinctly different forecast than the Reference Scenario. On the other hand, the Carbon Cap Scenario behaves more like an alternative future. The future in the Carbon Cap Scenario has higher electricity prices, reduced driving, more renewable capacity, and reduced energy consumption. The next step for this work is to evaluate the EE benefits under each of the three scenarios. Comparing those three sets of predicted benefits will indicate how much uncertainty is inherent within this sort of deterministic forecasting.

  16. Investigating Environmental Benefits of Biologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .47 kg kg kg kg kg kg m3 MJ Soil Emissions Water Emissions Air Emissions Nitrogen Dioxide Methane Carbon mixing Approximate as energy to heat ethanol Emissions from electricity kg0.196Carbon Dioxide MJ1.4Energy.00160Carbon Dioxide m30.0015Water Consumed kJ11.323Energy Consumed Cleaning of 1m2 of surface with fog ( )Area

  17. Committed regional electrical interconnection projects in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azzam, M.; Al-Said, A.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the well-known advantages of electrical interconnections and their consequent benefits, Jordan considers the interconnection of its electrical network with the neighboring electrical networks as one of its main corporate strategies. At present the electrical interconnection project of the networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey is progressing. To achieve this interconnection project, two feasibility studies were conducted: interconnection of the Egyptian and Jordanian electrical power systems; interconnection of the electrical networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey (EIJST interconnection). This presentation reviews these studies and their results.

  18. Quantifying the Operational Benefits of Conventional and Advanced Pumped Storage Hydro on Reliability and Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krad, I.; Ela, E.; Koritarov, V.

    2014-07-01

    Pumped storage hydro (PSH) plants have significant potential to provide reliability and efficiency benefits in future electric power systems with high penetrations of variable generation. New PSH technologies, such as adjustable-speed PSH, have been introduced that can also present further benefits. This paper demonstrates and quantifies some of the reliability and efficiency benefits afforded by PSH plants by utilizing the Flexible Energy Scheduling Tool for the Integration of Variable generation (FESTIV), an integrated power system operations tool that evaluates both reliability and production costs.

  19. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Bulletin 2010-2 DON Civilian Human Resources Web Site: Benefits Information The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Civilian Human Resources) launched a new Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr that provides Department of the Navy

  20. The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2012 Norman ­ Oklahoma City ­ Tulsa #12;2 The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide Norman - Oklahoma City - Tulsa Table of Contents Introduction NOTICE: The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma reserves the right to change any benefit plans

  1. The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2013 Norman ­ Oklahoma City ­ Tulsa #12;2 The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide Norman - Oklahoma City - Tulsa Table of Contents Introduction NOTICE: The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma reserves the right to change any benefit plans

  2. Electricity pricing for conservation and load shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orans, Ren; Woo, C.K.; Horii, Brian; Chait, Michele; DeBenedictis, Andrew

    2010-04-15

    The electricity industry is facing the challenge of increasing costs of reliably meeting demand growth and fully complying with legislative renewable portfolio standards and greenhouse gas reduction targets. However, an electric utility's existing tariffs often don't have rates that increase with consumption volume or vary by time of use, thus not fully exploiting the potential benefits from customer conservation and load shifting. (author)

  3. Why Pressure Reducing Valves (PVR's) are costing you money 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, A.

    2012-01-01

    saving hundreds of thousands of dollars on your electric bill and taking only a minimal hit in the available heat content? Why let steam down and get no benefit from it, when putting it through a low pressure steam turbine coupled to a generator would...

  4. Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Maxey, L Curt; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Beshears, David L; Ward, Christina D; Parks, James Edgar

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

  5. Costs and benefits of energy efficiency improvements in ceiling fans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Nihar; Sathaye, Nakul; Phadke, Amol; Letschert, Virginie

    2013-10-15

    Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, especially in developing countries with warm climates. The paper provides analysis of costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans to assess the global potential for electricity savings and green house gas (GHG) emission reductions. Ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terawatt hours per year could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize potential savings.

  6. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  7. Should We Consider the CoBenefits of Agricultural GHG Levan Elbakidze, Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    agricultural management strategies are utilized to offset or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions discussed case where a coal fired electrical powerplant, which is allocated fewer emission permits than

  8. Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15% 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gialanella, V.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further...

  9. Energy Department Releases Updated eGallon Prices as Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    market continues to grow, electric vehicles will play a key role in our effort to reduce air pollution and slow the effects of climate change." Plug-In Electric Vehicle Sales...

  10. Electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauvergne, J.

    1994-04-01

    EVs have insufficient energy sources for a climatic comfort system. The heat rejection of the drivetrain is dispersed in the vehicle (electric motor, batteries, electronic unit for power control). Its level is generally low (no more than 2-kW peaks) and variable according to the trip profile, with no heat rejection at rest and a maximum during regenerative braking. Nevertheless, it must be used for heating. It is not realistic to have the A/C compressor driven by the electric traction motor: the motor does not operate when the vehicle is at rest, precisely when maximum cooling power is required. The same is true for hybrid vehicles during electric operation. It is necessary to develop solutions that use stored onboard energy either from the traction batteries or specific storage source. In either case, it is necessary to design the climate control system to use the energy efficiently to maximize range and save weight. Heat loss through passenger compartment seals and the walls of the passenger compartment must be limited. Plastic body panes help to reduce heat transfer, and heat gain is minimized with insulating glazing. This article describes technical solutions to solve the problem of passenger thermal comfort. However, the heating and A/C systems of electrically operated vehicles may have marginal performance at extreme outside temperatures.

  11. Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrialchanges the time of electricity demand to off-peak hours.Load shedding curtails electricity demand during a DR event.

  12. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    forests provide more carbon sequestration benefits than let-the relative carbon sequestration benefits of let-growlife cycle carbon sequestration benefits, averaged over 120,

  13. California wins by collaborating with China on electric vehicle market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and strengthened policies. The motivation is clean air, as well as energy security and enhancing the domestic auto, renewable electricity and nuclear energy. #12;California can also benefit by learning from China's electric for climate policy. It is very likely the success of PEVs, along with renewable energy, played a role in China

  14. Boost Converters for Gas Electric and Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, JW

    2005-06-16

    Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are driven by at least two prime energy sources, such as an internal combustion engine (ICE) and propulsion battery. For a series HEV configuration, the ICE drives only a generator, which maintains the state-of-charge (SOC) of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. For a parallel HEV configuration, the ICE is mechanically connected to directly drive the wheels as well as the generator, which likewise maintains the SOC of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. Today the prime energy source is an ICE; tomorrow it will very likely be a fuel cell (FC). Use of the FC eliminates a direct drive capability accentuating the importance of the battery charge and discharge systems. In both systems, the electric traction motor may use the voltage directly from the batteries or from a boost converter that raises the voltage. If low battery voltage is used directly, some special control circuitry, such as dual mode inverter control (DMIC) which adds a small cost, is necessary to drive the electric motor above base speed. If high voltage is chosen for more efficient motor operation or for high speed operation, the propulsion battery voltage must be raised, which would require some type of two-quadrant bidirectional chopper with an additional cost. Two common direct current (dc)-to-dc converters are: (1) the transformer-based boost or buck converter, which inverts a dc voltage, feeds the resulting alternating current (ac) into a transformer to raise or lower the voltage, and rectifies it to complete the conversion; and (2) the inductor-based switch mode boost or buck converter [1]. The switch-mode boost and buck features are discussed in this report as they operate in a bi-directional chopper. A benefit of the transformer-based boost converter is that it isolates the high voltage from the low voltage. Usually the transformer is large, further increasing the cost. A useful feature of the switch mode boost converter is its simplicity. Its inductor must handle the entire current, which is responsible for its main cost. The new Z-source inverter technology [2,3] boosts voltage directly by actively using the zero state time to boost the voltage. In the traditional pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter, this time is used only to control the average voltage by disconnecting the supply voltage from the motor. The purpose of this study is to examine the Z-source's potential for reducing the cost and improving the reliability of HEVs.

  15. High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo of homes in Premier Gardens. As the housing market continues to evolve toward zero net-energy ready homes, Building America research has provided essential guidance for...

  16. System and methods for reducing harmonic distortion in electrical converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kajouke, Lateef A; Perisic, Milun; Ransom, Ray M

    2013-12-03

    Systems and methods are provided for delivering energy using an energy conversion module. An exemplary method for delivering energy from an input interface to an output interface using an energy converison module coupled between the input interface and the output interface comprises the steps of determining an input voltage reference for the input interface based on a desired output voltage and a measured voltage and the output interface, determining a duty cycle control value based on a ratio of the input voltage reference and the measured voltage, operating one or more switching elements of the energy conversion module to deliver energy from the input interface to the output interface to the output interface with a duty cycle influenced by the dute cycle control value.

  17. Arc Vault Significantly Reduces Electrical Hazards | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02 (CRACApril

  18. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,Department ofDepartment of Energy NewsEnergyWorth

  19. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,Department ofDepartment of Energy

  20. EV Everywhere: Reducing Pollution with Electric Vehicles | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy and thermodynamics(Revised)EVonEnergy

  1. Q-Sync Motors in Commercial Refrigeration. Preliminary Test Results and Projected Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R.

    2015-09-01

    This report provides background information on various fractional-horsepower electric motor technologies, summarizes initial data from a DOE-sponsored Q-Sync motor demonstration project, and extrapolates that data to project the potential economic and environmental benefits resulting from upgrading the current installed base of 9–12 W evaporator fan motors to Q-Sync motors.

  2. Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L. A.; Cory, K. S.; Swezey, B. G.

    2008-08-01

    This paper examines utility experiences when offering the fixed-price benefits of renewable energy in green pricing programs, including the methods utilized and the impact on program participation. It focuses primarily on utility green pricing programs in states that have not undergone electric industry restructuring.

  3. Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs. 36 pp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Cory, Karlynn S.; Swezey, Blair G.

    2008-08-01

    This paper examines utility experiences when offering the fixed-price benefits of renewable energy in green pricing programs, including the methods utilized and the impact on program participation. It focuses primarily on utility green pricing programs in states that have not undergone electric industry restructuring.

  4. Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

  5. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    regenerative braking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissionsconditions, the expected savings in fuel costs are notis whether the fuel cost savings over the lifetime of the

  6. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  7. Environmental Emissions Nonenergy Benefits Working Paper: ARRA Period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, David; Bausch, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Weatherization reduces energy usage by low-income households, and thereby reduces the environmental impacts of the production and consumption of energy and reduces the social costs associated with those environmental impacts. The nonenergy benefits study conducted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) evaluation focused on measuring the emissions reductions resulting from WAP program energy usage reductions and estimating the societal value of those emission reductions. While there are other environmental impacts associated with the WAP program, this study focused on emissions impacts because the 2010 National Research Council (NRC) report Hidden Costs of Energy: The Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use recommended that Congress focus on emissions costs because they have the highest documented social impact costs

  8. Chapter 1: FY 2007 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2007 Budget Request.

  9. DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS I Collaboration with leading companies I Creation Analysis Optimization Scalable Database Mining Auto-Mining Agents CUTTING-EDGE CAPABILITIES

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY...

  11. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Merit Review, May 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Review, August 2006 Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Eliminating High Risk Work at Hanford...

  12. Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

  13. Current shock: Competition in electricity service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuntz, L.G. [Van Ness Feldman, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Consumers may not have given much thought to who supplies their electricity, or how, but they should know that a tremendous battle is being waged behind their electrical sockets. Just as several long-distance telecommunication carriers (AT&T, Spring, MCI) now compete to serve each household, so too firms with currently unfamiliar names may one day - in the not-so-distant future - be competing to supply household electricity. Whether, when, and how this happens are questions at the center of a vigorous debate occurring in Washington, in state capitals, and in courtrooms around the United States. Many utilities, small consumer groups, and environmentalists argue that moving to wide-open competition in electricity markets will benefit only the largest customers. With enhanced competition, what becomes of the electric utilities` historic obligation to serve? Customers and society may not be prepared to assume the risk that some customers could become, quite literally, powerless.

  14. Fuel Savings from Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-03-01

    NREL's study shows that hybrid electric vehicles can significantly reduce oil imports for use in light-duty vehicles, particularly if drivers switch to smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles overall.

  15. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  16. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power Working PaperFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacityand Competitive Electricity Markets”, mimeo, IDEI, available

  17. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    and design of electricity capacity markets. Our work has twoMarkets for Electricity capacity markets, and so, when thesemain features of electricity capacity markets. We have used

  18. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

  19. Designing Electricity Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

    2004-01-01

    market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) “Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom,” The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

  20. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVtheEnergyPreparedElectricalNOT

  1. Costs to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-03-01

    Central to the resolution of the acid rain issue are debates about the costs and benefits of controlling man-made emissions of chemicals that may cause acid rain. In this briefing, the position of those who are calling for immediate action and implicating coal-fired powerplants as the cause of the problem is examined. The costs of controlling sulfur dioxide emissions using alternative control methods available today are presented. No attempt is made to calculate the benefits of reducing these emissions since insufficient information is available to provide even a rough estimate. Information is presented in two steps. First, costs are presented as obtained through straightforward calculations based upon simplifying but realistic assumptions. Next, the costs of sulfur dioxide control obtained through several large-scale analyses are presented, and these results are compared with those obtained through the first method.

  2. 2014 COACHE Survey Results: Facilities, Policies, Benefits and Salary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    2014 COACHE Survey Results: Facilities, Policies, Benefits and Salary resources, personal and family policies, health and retirement benefits and Salary

  3. A High-Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nitrogen gas often provides a reducing atmosphere for these processes. High-temperature fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in its fuel to electricity, with water,...

  4. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    gasoline engine, but will require more electricity, thus requiring a larger, heavier, and more expensive battery. Blending

  5. The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide 2014 Norman ­ Oklahoma City ­ Tulsa #12;2 The University of Oklahoma Benefits Guide Norman - Oklahoma City - Tulsa Table of Contents Introduction A IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma reserves the right to change any

  6. Medical research: assessing the benefits to society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    .5 Surveys and consultations 21 2.6 Discussion and conclusions 21 3 Economic approaches to evaluation 23 3.2.2 The use of economic evaluation by industry 24 3.3 Benefits to the economy from a healthy work force 24 3May 2006 Medical research: assessing the benefits to society A report by the UK Evaluation Forum

  7. Fuel Efficiency Benefits and Implementation Consideration for Cruise Altitude and Speed Optimization in the National Airspace System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Luke

    2014-07-29

    This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

  8. Full efficiency benefits and implementation considerations for cruise altitude and speed optimization in the National Airspace system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Luke L

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

  9. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  10. Electric trade in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

  11. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  13. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

  14. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  15. Green Move: a platform for highly configurable, heterogeneous electric vehicle sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cugola, Gianpaolo

    Green Move: a platform for highly configurable, heterogeneous electric vehicle sharing Andrea G the spreading of electric vehicles, in particular for what concerns the high upfront costs of the vehicles benefits. I. INTRODUCTION Electric vehicle sharing has the potential to provide a solution to many

  16. Variability of Behaviour in Electricity Load Profile Clustering; Who Does Things at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Variability of Behaviour in Electricity Load Profile Clustering; Who Does Things at the Same Time://ima.ac.uk/dent 2 The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, UK Abstract. UK electricity market changes provide opportunities to alter households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall elec- tricity

  17. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  19. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L. ); Duleep, K.G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  20. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Duleep, K.G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  1. Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scudiere, Matthew B; McKeever, John W

    2011-01-01

    As Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (EVs and HEVs) become more prevalent, there is a need to change the power source from gasoline on the vehicle to electricity from the grid in order to mitigate requirements for onboard energy storage (battery weight) as well as to reduce dependency on oil by increasing dependency on the grid (our coal, gas, and renewable energy instead of their oil). Traditional systems for trains and buses rely on physical contact to transfer electrical energy to vehicles in motion. Until recently, conventional magnetically coupled systems required a gap of less than a centimeter. This is not practical for vehicles of the future.

  2. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Value Proposition Study: Interim Report: Phase I Scenario Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, Karen R; Markel, Lawrence C; Hadley, Stanton W; Hinds, Shaun; DeVault, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) offer significant improvements in fuel economy, convenient low-cost recharging capabilities, potential environmental benefits, and decreased reliance on imported petroleum. However, the cost associated with new components (e.g., advanced batteries) to be introduced in these vehicles will likely result in a price premium to the consumer. This study aims to overcome this market barrier by identifying and evaluating value propositions that will increase the qualitative value and/or decrease the overall cost of ownership relative to the competing conventional vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) of 2030 During this initial phase of this study, business scenarios were developed based on economic advantages that either increase the consumer value or reduce the consumer cost of PHEVs to assure a sustainable market that can thrive without the aid of state and Federal incentives or subsidies. Once the characteristics of a thriving PHEV market have been defined for this timeframe, market introduction steps, such as supportive policies, regulations and temporary incentives, needed to reach this level of sustainability will be determined. PHEVs have gained interest over the past decade for several reasons, including their high fuel economy, convenient low-cost recharging capabilities, potential environmental benefits and reduced use of imported petroleum, potentially contributing to President Bush's goal of a 20% reduction in gasoline use in ten years, or 'Twenty in Ten'. PHEVs and energy storage from advanced batteries have also been suggested as enabling technologies to improve the reliability and efficiency of the electric power grid. However, PHEVs will likely cost significantly more to purchase than conventional or other hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), in large part because of the cost of batteries. Despite the potential long-term savings to consumers and value to stakeholders, the initial cost of PHEVs presents a major market barrier to their widespread commercialization. The purpose of this project is to identify and evaluate value-added propositions for PHEVs that will help overcome this market barrier. Candidate value propositions for the initial case study were chosen to enhance consumer acceptance of PHEVs and/or compatibility with the grid. Potential benefits of such grid-connected vehicles include the ability to supply peak load or emergency power requirements of the grid, enabling utilities to size their generation capacity and contingency resources at levels below peak. Different models for vehicle/battery ownership, leasing, financing and operation, as well as the grid, communications, and vehicle infrastructure needed to support the proposed value-added functions were explored during Phase 1. Rigorous power system, vehicle, financial and emissions modeling were utilized to help identify the most promising value propositions and market niches to focus PHEV deployment initiatives.

  3. The environmental benefits of cogeneration: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, K.E.; Wachtler, J.N.

    1995-09-01

    As a case study of the environmental feasibility of a major renovation to the University of Minnesota`s steam service facilities demonstrates, cogeneration is an efficient method of energy production and reduces area-wide air emissions by reducing the demand and production levels at less efficient facilities in the region. To acknowledge this benefit and encourage efficient production, {open_quotes}cogeneration credits{close_quotes} should be granted to energy producers as an offset to point-source emissions. This paper will identify the projected reduction in area-wide emissions for the University`s cogeneration project and alternatives and will demonstrate the method used for calculating those emissions. Although regulators have not yet fully accepted the validity of cogeneration credits, attitudes are starting to change, and we can only persuade regulators to encourage efficient production by discussing the issue now and by developing ways to make these ideas effective.

  4. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    THAT MIGHT REDUCE HYBRID IMPACT ON OIL CONSUMPTION AND GHGhave been reduced, oil consumption continues to create2010, United States VMT Oil consumption GHG 2010, California

  5. Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

    2001-01-01

    and California Electricity Crisis Rubinstein, Neils & Colak daylighting system is saving energy when it is most critical, because electricity costsCalifornia’s energy crisis and the consequent increases in electricity rates, is daylighting now a cost-California and then investigate the potential of daylight-linked controls to reduce peak demand and lower energy costs

  6. Fish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Fish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease, according to new evidence reports announced- ute to heart disease. The review also found other evidence indicating that fish oil can help lower in knowledge." Continued, page 2... Evidence Reports Confirm Benefits of Fish Oil Elizabeth Yetley, PhD Joins

  7. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Spinney, P. [and others

    1997-05-01

    The question of uncertainty and risk in electric utility resource planning has received considerable attention in recent years. During the 1980s, many utilities suffered financial losses because of unexpectedly high plant construction costs and low growth in electricity demand. In addition, the introduction of competition to the electric industry is creating new risks for power companies. No longer will utilities be able to count on regulatory protections and a base of captive consumers to provide a stable market and adequate return on their investments. Alternative risk management strategies will have to be considered instead. One approach to managing risk is for a utility company to invest in diverse power sources such as wind power plants. Since wind plants consume no fuel, can be built in relatively small increments with short construction lead times, and generate no pollutants, it is often said that they offer significant protection from risks associated with conventional fossil-fuel power plants. So far there have been few efforts to quantify these benefits, however. The study compares the costs and risks of two competing resource options, a gas-fired combined cycle plant and a wind plant, both utility-owned, through decision analysis. The case study utility is Texas Utilities Electric, a very large investor-owned company serving an area with substantial, high-quality wind resources. The authors chose a specific moment in the future - the year 2003 - when the utility currently plans to build a large fossil-fueled power plant, and examined the implications for the utility`s expected revenues, costs, and profits if a wind plant were to be built instead.

  8. 2015 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT INSURANCE PLAN CONTACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT INSURANCE PLAN CONTACTS Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield ......................................................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories for Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Landmark Healthcare www

  9. Chapter 3: FY 2005 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2005 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed—NEMS-GPRA05 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA05 for the long term.

  10. Chapter 3: FY 2006 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2006 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed–NEMS-GPRA06 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA06 for the long term.

  11. Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

    2002-01-01

    energy use over ten years by 15 billion kWh; 2) Reduce cumulative statewide electric peak demand over ten years by over 1200 MW; 3) Result in cooling cost savings of more than a billion dollars; and 4) Reduce cumulative statewide key air pollutants....

  12. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Halsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  13. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    coasting through regenerative braking. Second, by downsizingrecharge the battery. Regenerative braking and coasting Onehybrid that uses regenerative braking and some electric

  14. Strategic Industrial Energy Efficiency: Reduce Expenses, Build Revenues, and Control Risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some manufacturing companies successfully boost their financial performance through optimized energy use. This leads not only to reduced energy consumption and associated environmental benefits, but also to capacity improvements that generate...

  15. Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda Sarah Carter 2009 #12;Socio-economic Kairu, Bbale Marcellinus, Willie McGhee, Alexa Morrison and Pauline Nantongo. #12;Socio-economic

  16. Reducing Configuration Complexity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Pastams AG 2015 Reducing

  17. University of Strathclyde Dpt of Electric Electrical Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strathclyde Dpt of Electric Electrical Engineering Institute for Energy and Enviro Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Strathclyde, Dpt of Electric & Electrical...

  18. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by...

  19. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this...

  20. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  1. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A.

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market structures like the EIM. In addition to more efficient energy transactions in the WI, the EIM would reduce the amount of flexibility reserves needed to accommodate forecast errors associated with variable production from wind and solar energy resources. The modeling approach takes full advantage of variable resource diversity over the entire market footprint, but the projected reduction in flexibility reserves may be overly optimistic. While some reduction would undoubtedly occur, the EIM is only an energy market and would therefore not realize the same reduction in reserves as an ancillary services market. In our opinion the methodology does not adequately capture the impact of transmission constraints on the deployment of flexibility reserves. Estimates of flexibility reserves assume that forecast errors follow a normal distribution. Improved estimates could be obtained by using other probability distributions to estimate up and down reserves to capture the underlying uncertainty of these resources under specific operating conditions. Also, the use of a persistence forecast method for solar is questionable, because solar insolation follows a deterministic pattern dictated by the sun's path through the sky. We suggest a more rigorous method for forecasting solar insolation using the sun's relatively predictable daily pattern at specific locations. The EIM study considered only one scenario for hydropower resources. While this scenario is within the normal range over the WI footprint, it represents a severe drought condition in the Colorado River Basin from which Western schedules power. Given hydropower's prominent role in the WI, we recommend simulating a range of hydropower conditions since the relationship between water availability and WI dispatch costs is nonlinear. Also, the representation of specific operational constraints faced by hydropower operators in the WI needs improvements. The model used in the study cannot fully capture all of the EIM impacts and complexities of power system operations. In particular, a primary benefit of the EIM is a shorter dispa

  2. Electric trade in the United States, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

  3. On Benefits of Network Coding in Bidirected Networks and Hyper-networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zongpeng

    . It was shown that network coding helps increase the throughput and reduce the cost of data transmission to study the coding advantage in two types of parameterized networks, with richer modeling power. The firstOn Benefits of Network Coding in Bidirected Networks and Hyper-networks Xunrui Yin, Xin Wang, Jin

  4. On the Energy Benefit of Network Coding for Wireless Multiple Unicast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    On the Energy Benefit of Network Coding for Wireless Multiple Unicast Jasper Goseling, Ryutaroh--We consider energy savings offered by network cod- ing for multiple unicast in wireless networks. For d coding has the potential of reducing energy con- sumption in wireless networks by exploiting

  5. Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels Jason- out reducing food supplies. We use these criteria to evaluate, through life-cycle accounting, ethanol from corn grain and biodie- sel from soybeans. Ethanol yields 25% more energy than the energy invested

  6. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ­ Superconductivity for Electric Systems #12;3 Control Milestones and Status ControlSuperconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report

  7. LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue the concepts of field and potential are abstract and difficult to visualize, this laboratory uses a computer and electric potential at any point in space. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you

  8. The Benefits and Risks of Virtual Bidding in Multi-Settlement Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isemonger, Alan G.

    2006-11-15

    While it is possible that multi-settlement markets can exist without virtual trading, it is equally clear that virtual trading can provide many market benefits. The main one: In the absence of explicit virtual bidding (EVB), the price arbitrage trades that are benign in other commodity markets affect the reliability of the underlying electricity markets, resulting in a situation where EVB is most useful when it neutralizes the deleterious reliability effects of implicit virtual bidding and physical arbitrage. (author)

  9. Examination of Potential Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Clark, K.; King, J.; Kirby, B.; Guo, T.; Liu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In the Western Interconnection, there is significant interest in improving approaches to wide-area coordinated operations of the bulk electric power system, in part because of the increasing penetration of variable generation. One proposed solution is an energy imbalance market. This study focused on that approach alone, with the goal of identifying the potential benefits of an energy imbalance market in the year 2020.

  10. Technological and economic comparison of battery technologies for U.S.A electric grid stabilization applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Ted (Ted A.)

    2010-01-01

    Energy storage can provide many benefits to the electric grid of the United States of America. With recent pushes to stabilize renewable energy and implement a Smart Grid, battery technology can play a pivotal role in the ...

  11. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  12. Optimal routes for electric vehicles facing uncertainty, congestion, and energy constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Matthew William

    2013-01-01

    There are many benefits of owning a battery electric vehicle, including zero tailpipe emissions, potential independence from oil, lower fuel costs, and the option to recharge the battery at home. However, a significant ...

  13. An analysis of hybrid-electric vehicles as the car of the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Heejay

    2007-01-01

    This thesis will examine the validity of the benefits of the Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (HEV). With the recent focus on energy initiatives, reflected through Bush's state of the union, as well as President Hockfield's MIT ...

  14. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  15. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  16. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  17. Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1993-06-01

    A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

  18. Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

  19. Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban HeatIslandMitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2005-08-23

    Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

  20. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this paper, an analysis was performed...

  1. Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career Fair- Baltimore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career Fair- Baltimore, MD part of the 97th Annual American Legion National Convention Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career...

  2. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

  3. Summary and Presentations from "Estimating the Benefits and Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary and Presentations from "Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies" Workshop Now Available Summary and Presentations from "Estimating the Benefits...

  4. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop -...

  5. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and...

  6. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  7. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  8. Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercializati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of Ethanol Containing Diesel Fuels Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of...

  9. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT ENROLLMENT DEADLINES HRM/Benefits PH: 504-568-7780 FAX: 504-568-2212

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMPLOYEE BENEFIT ENROLLMENT DEADLINES HRM/Benefits PH: 504-568-7780 FAX: 504-568-2212 INSURANCE are received by HRM Benefits. Please contact us for more information: 504/568-7780. Acceptable Dependent

  10. Update on Energy Saving Opportunities in Industrial Electrical Power Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frasure, J. W.; Fredericks, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    application of capacitors to improve plant power factors will raise voltage levels and reduce'line currents, yielding a reduction in system losses. Also, by reducing var demand, capacitors can reduce or eliminate utility power-factor or demand charges..., force the industrial power user to continuously update and evaluate available means of saving electrical energy. This paper provides a survey of one company's experience with several methods of energy conservation in electrical distribution systems...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  12. California's electricity crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  13. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    West having a 1.1 percent decrease in electricity generation compared to last February. Electricity generation from coal increased in all regions of the country, with Florida...

  15. Random Walks and Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2008-01-30

    Feb 4, 2008 ... Electrical Network Calculations in Random Walks in. Random ... Markov Chains. 2. Electrical Networks and Reversible Markov Chains. 3.

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  18. ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, & ENERGY ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, & ENERGY ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDY GUIDE FALL 2014 ­ SPRING 2015 University of Colorado at Boulder Department of Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering Graduate Office Campus Box 425

  19. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 6, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

  20. Optimizing and Diversifying Electric Vehicle Driving Range for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Properly determining the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the sales and social benefits of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This study proposes a framework for optimizing the driving range by minimizing the sum of battery price, electricity cost, and range limitation cost referred to as the range-related cost as a measurement of range anxiety. The objective function is linked to policy-relevant parameters, including battery cost and price markup, battery utilization, charging infrastructure availability, vehicle efficiency, electricity and gasoline prices, household vehicle ownership, daily driving patterns, discount rate, and perceived vehicle lifetime. Qualitative discussion of the framework and its empirical application to a sample (N=36,664) representing new car drivers in the United States is included. The quantitative results strongly suggest that ranges of less than 100 miles are likely to be more popular in the BEV market for a long period of time. The average optimal range among U.S. drivers is found to be largely inelastic. Still, battery cost reduction significantly drives BEV demand toward longer ranges, whereas improvement in the charging infrastructure is found to significantly drive BEV demand toward shorter ranges. The bias of a single-range assumption and the effects of range optimization and diversification in reducing such biases are both found to be significant.

  1. Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a Vehicle Fuel BenefitsBenefits to

  3. Data Sync: End To End BenefitsData Sync: End To End Benefits MIT Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Data Sync: End To End BenefitsData Sync: End To End Benefits MIT Conference Created by Xavier Franco Director of Global Data Management Presented by Larry Dziedzic Information Management Data Importance Of Data Standards The Role Of Data Sync A Case For Item Data Sync Plans Moving Forward #12;3 J

  4. Performance of the Lead-Alloy Cooled Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Hejzlar; Cliff Davis

    2004-09-01

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners.

  5. Performance of the Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Davis, Cliff B. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

    2004-09-15

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners.

  6. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  7. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  8. Viability study of photo-voltaic systems added to terrestrial electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rippel, W.E.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the following computer study is to determine the set of necessary conditions under which the addition of photo-voltaic (PV) cells to electric vehicles provides a net utility or economic benefit. Economic benefits are given the primary focus and are evaluated in terms of a payback period.

  9. Reducing Penguin Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya; Alakabha Datta; David London

    2013-04-29

    The most common decay used for measuring 2beta_s, the phase of Bs-Bsbar mixing, is Bs -> J/psi phi. This decay is dominated by the colour-suppressed tree diagram, but there are other contributions due to gluonic and electroweak penguin diagrams. These are often referred to as "penguin pollution" (PP) because their inclusion in the amplitude leads to a theoretical error in the extraction of 2beta_s from the data. In the standard model (SM), it is estimated that the PP is negligible, but there is some uncertainty as to its exact size. Now, phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} (the measured value of 2beta_s) is small, in agreement with the SM, but still has significant experimental errors. When these are reduced, if one hopes to be able to see clear evidence of new physics (NP), it is crucial to have the theoretical error under control. In this paper, we show that, using a modification of the angular analysis currently used to measure phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} in Bs -> J/psi phi, one can reduce the theoretical error due to PP. Theoretical input is still required, but it is much more modest than entirely neglecting the PP. If phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} differs from the SM prediction, this points to NP in the mixing. There is also enough information to test for NP in the decay. This method can be applied to all Bs/Bsbar -> V1 V2 decays.

  10. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, OfficeLBNL-48258 Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Nance Matson, Craig Wray, Iain Walker, Max Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Performance of Buildings Group

  11. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs · Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

  12. Projected Benefits of EERE's Portfolio - FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-17

    This collection of data tables and charts shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  13. Quality health plans & benefits Healthier living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Quality health plans & benefits Healthier living Financial well-being Intelligent solutions Do the Math! 2015-2016 University of Virginia Student Health Insurance Plan www.aetnastudenthealth.com 15.03.491.1 #12;A Student Health Insurance Plan may be the best alternative and here's why: A student health

  14. Renewable Portfolio Standards: Costs and Benefits (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Weaver, S.; Flores, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes state-level RPS costs to date, and considers how those costs may evolve going forward given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states and discusses key methodological considerations.

  15. Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to what the system has exhibited in the past, and current information signals actually are not available Geographical Location 1 Production DELAY Headquarters Ordering Information Exchanging Decision Making DELAY1 Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments I. INTRODUCTION A feedback control system

  16. Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    delays arise Manufacturer Geographical Location 1 Production DELAY Headquarters Ordering Information1 Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments I. INTRODUCTION A feedback control system is composed of a process to be controlled, a set of sensors with access to information signals from the plant

  17. ARTICLE XIX SALARY AND OTHER FINANCIAL BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    107 ARTICLE XIX SALARY AND OTHER FINANCIAL BENEFITS Preamble and Conditions Precedent The cost to fully fund such cost items has been enacted in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws. A. Salary, 2012, who meets the eligibility criteria for satisfactory performance shall receive a salary rate

  18. Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-19

    To ensure that reimbursement of costs incurred by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors' pension and medical benefits are reasonable in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and contract requirements and reflect prudent business practices. This directive has been suspended as of June 19, 2006, for 1 year. For more information, see DOE N 251.66.

  19. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  20. Methodological Approaches for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Russell

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions against which a project would be compared. The report also suggests metrics suitable for describing principal characteristics of a modern Smart Grid to which a project can contribute. This first section of the report presents background information on the motivation for the report and its purpose. Section 2 introduces the methodological framework, focusing on the definition of benefits and a sequential, logical process for estimating them. Beginning with the Smart Grid technologies and functions of a project, it maps these functions to the benefits they produce. Section 3 provides a hypothetical example to illustrate the approach. Section 4 describes each of the 10 steps in the approach. Section 5 covers issues related to estimating benefits of the Smart Grid. Section 6 summarizes the next steps. The methods developed in this study will help improve future estimates - both retrospective and prospective - of the benefits of Smart Grid investments. These benefits, including those to consumers, society in general, and utilities, can then be weighed against the investments. Such methods would be useful in total resource cost tests and in societal versions of such tests. As such, the report will be of interest not only to electric utilities, but also to a broad constituency of stakeholders. Significant aspects of the methodology were used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop its methods for estimating the benefits and costs of its renewable and distributed systems integration demonstration projects as well as its Smart Grid Investment Grant projects and demonstration projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of this report, which was cofunded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, is to present a comprehensive set of methods for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects. By publishing this report, EPRI seeks to contribute to the development of methods that will establish the benefits associated with investments in Smart Grid technologies. EPRI does not endorse the contents of this report or make any representations as to the accuracy and appropriateness of its contents. The purpose of this report is to present a methodological framework that will provide a standardized approach for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid demonstration projects. The framework also has broader application to larger projects, such as those funded under the ARRA. Moreover, with additional development, it will provide the means for extrapolating the results of pilots and trials to at-scale investments in Smart Grid technologies. The framework was developed by a panel whose members provided a broad range of expertise.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

  4. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Electrical Engineering (EE) students must/programs/electrical_engineering) and minors are used to regulate technical electives. A student must complete four technical elective courses in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. At a minimum

  5. Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical & Computer Engineering 2014-2015AcademicYearHandbook Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical is for the internal use of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University only permission of the Department Head of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. #12;2 Table

  6. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Agile Sensing Systems: Analysis, Design and Implementation" by Prof. Jun (Jason) Zhang Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Denver Tuesday of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Denver. He was with the School of Electrical

  7. Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios 2009/11/30­12/01 István Maros Electricity Portfolio #12;Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Outline 1 Introduction 2 Computational Efficiency 3 Electricity Portfolio Approximate

  8. A Conceptual Framework for ERP Benefit Classification: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    A Conceptual Framework for ERP Benefit Classification: A Literature Review Silja Eckartz*, Maya resource planning (ERP) benefits, carried out according to the guidelines by Webster et al. (2002 in the identification, realization and assessment of ERP benefits. Special focus is put on benefits management in cross

  9. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  10. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  11. ECE 438 Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Catalog Description: History of electric traction. Introduction to electric and hybrid-electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECE 438 ­ Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Catalog Description: History of electric traction. Introduction to electric and hybrid-electric vehicle configurations. Vehicle mechanics. Energy sources and storage. Range prediction. Motor for HEVs. Electric drive components. Vehicle transmission system. Credits

  12. Characterization of the Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreutzer, Haley Maren

    2012-05-31

    A low-cost and efficient electrical energy storage system is needed to implement intermittent renewable energy sources such as solar and wind while maintaining grid reliability, and could also reduce the use of inefficient peak-load electrical...

  13. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  14. Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    residential electric customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation systems with specific types of energy efficient equipment. These rebates include efficient central air...

  15. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DuctAir sealing Building Insulation Other EE LED Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Baltimore Gas and Electric Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:...

  16. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    600 hp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer. Thehp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer. For allhp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer and is

  17. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  18. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for consumers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  19. Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama launches the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative that helps large companies reduce with fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels and conservation techniques into their operations. Charter partners include AT&T, FedEx, Pepsi-Co, UPS and Verizon.

  20. Post-Closure Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnershipSitePost-Closure Benefits Post-Closure

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digglaws-incentivesFuels and VehiclesBenefits to

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digglaws-incentivesFuelsPublicationsPlug-InBenefits to

  3. Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

    2007-10-31

    The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

  4. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    TK Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability oninclude both heat and electricity storage, and 3. to make anIn this case, electricity storage costs are reduced from 193

  5. DOES ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ENABLE THE UPTAKE OF SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES IN SOUTH AFRICA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 DOES ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY ENABLE THE UPTAKE OF SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES IN SOUTH AFRICA? G to electricity. The socio-political benefits of the national electrification programme are documented. Variation in electrification rates among households seems correlated with SMME uptake, but the nature

  6. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  7. New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities' Carbon Emissions and Fuel Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2), a follow-up to the initial WWSIS released in May 2010, which examined the viability, benefits, and challenges of integrating as much as 33% wind and solar power into the electricity grid of the western United States.

  8. Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

  9. The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

    2011-04-20

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

  10. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

  11. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    and timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number ofcontinually changing electricity demands by using a suite ofif local patterns of electricity demand change significantly

  12. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)to added vehicle electricity demand in the Mixed technology

  13. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of...

  14. Wider benefits of Space Science & Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    academia who build subsystems) · Platforms and platform systems, solar panels etc. · Propulsion ­ electric words ­ few systems that we can't provide nationally - at least in principle! #12;Example ­ Carbon Semi-autonomous UAVs Medical robots Manufacturing Novel batteries & generators Analysis Miniature

  15. Ecological benefits of dc power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutuzova, N. B.

    2011-05-15

    The environmental effects of dc overhead transmission lines are examined. The major effects of ac and dc transmission lines are compared. Dc lines have advantages compared to ac lines in terms of electrical safety for people under the lines, biological effects, corona losses, and clearance width.

  16. United States/Mexico electricity exchanges. [History, incentives, and constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    As a result of the agreement between the respective presidents, a joint study was undertaken to analyze the possibilities of increasing the international electricity exchange between the two countries. Responsibility for this undertaking was assigned to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and to the Direccion de Energia de Mexico (DEM) through the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Representatives from Mexico and the US were chosen from the regional utilities along the border between the two countries and made up working groups that particiated in the study. With the support of both governments, and a high degree of cooperation between the two countries, work on the study was completed within fourteen months The completion of the study has been a major step in broadening the base of bilateral energy relations. the study highlights the opportunities for increased electricity exchanges, which could increase cooperation along the common border. Expansion of electricity interchange could offer substantial economic benefit to both countries, both directly and indirectly. Direct benefits include increased reliability of electric power and cost savings through economies of scale and diversity of peak demand patterns. Indirect benefits include improved economic and employment opportunities, especially in the border areas of both countries. This report provides background on the history of past exchanges and the characteristics of the US and Mexico electric systems, a summary of opportunities and incentives, and suggestions for procedures to remove obstacles and constraints.

  17. Electric vehicles move closer to market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, L.

    1995-03-01

    This article reports that though battery technology is currently limiting the growth of EVs, the search for improvements is spurring innovative engineering developments. As battery makers, automakers, national laboratories, and others continue their search for a practical source of electric power that will make electric vehicles (EVs) more viable, engineers worldwide are making progress in other areas of EV development. Vector control, for example, enables better regulation of motor torque and speed; composite and aluminum parts reduce the vehicle`s weight, which in turn reduces the load on the motor and battery; and flywheel energy storage systems, supercapacitors, regenerative brake systems, and hybrid/electric drive trains increase range and acceleration. Despite efforts to develop an electric vehicle from the ground up, most of the early EVs to be sold in the United States will likely be converted from gasoline-powered vehicles. Chrysler Corp., for example, is expected to sell electric versions of its minivans and build them on the same assembly line as its gasoline-powered vehicles to reduce costs. The pace of engineering development in this field is fast and furious. Indeed, it is virtually impossible to monitor all emerging EV technology. To meet their quotas, the major automakers may even consider buying credits from smaller, innovative EV manufacturers. But whatever stopgap measures vehicle makers take, technology development will be the driving force behind long-term EV growth.

  18. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Megel, Olivier; Gomez, Tomás; Marnay, Chris; Beer, Sebastian; Lai, Judy; Battaglia, Vincent

    2010-08-25

    Connection of electric storage technologies to smartgrids or microgrids will have substantial implications for building energy systems. In addition to potentially supplying ancillary services directly to the traditional centralized grid (or macrogrid), local storage will enable demand response. As an economically attractive option, mobile storage devices such as plug-in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources and storage at the building. In general, it is assumed that they can improve the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of renewable and fossil based on-site generation (e.g. PV, fuel cells, or microturbines operating with or without combined heat and power). Also, mobile storage can directly contribute to tariff driven demand response in commercial buildings. In order to examine the impact of mobile storage on building energy costs and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a microgrid/distributed-energy-resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs applying CO2 taxes/CO2 pricing schemes. The problem is solved for a representative office building in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2020. By using employees' EVs for energy management, the office building can arbitrage its costs. But since the car battery lifetime is reduced, a business model that also reimburses car owners for the degradation will be required. In general, the link between a microgrid and an electric vehicle can create a win-win situation, wherein the microgrid can reduce utility costs by load shifting while the electric vehicle owner receives revenue that partially offsets his/her expensive mobile storage investment. For the California office building with EVs connected under a business model that distributes benefits, it is found that the economic impact is very limited relative to the costs of mobile storage for the site analyzed, i.e. cost reductions from electric vehicle connections are modest. Nonetheless, this example shows that some economic benefit is created because of avoided demand charges and on-peak energy. The strategy adopted by the office building is to avoid these high on-peak costs by using energy from the mobile storage in the business hours. CO2 emission reduction strategy results indicate that EVs' contribution at the selected office building are minor.

  19. Designing electricity transmission auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greve, Thomas; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2012-10-26

    The UK has ambitious plans for exploiting offshore wind for electricity production in order to meet its challenging target under the EU Renewable Energy Directive. This could involve investing up to 20bn in transmission assets to bring electricity...

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  4. Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ,500 for full battery electric vehicle (BEV) and $5,000 for plug- in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) · Financial 39 Tesla 39 BMW 26 Toyota 7 Honda 3 Cadillac 3 Mitsubishi 2 #12;Department of Public Utilities · DPU

  5. Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

    2008-11-01

    This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

  6. Plug-in electric vehicle introduction in the EU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisternes, Fernando J. de $q (Fernando José Sisternes Jiménez)

    2010-01-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) could significantly reduce gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU's transport sector. However, PEV well-towheel (WTW) emissions depend on improvements in vehicle ...

  7. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors and Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk-in Coolers and Freezers...

  8. British electricity policy in flux : paradigm ambivalence and technological tension 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emamian, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh

    2014-07-01

    Drastic changes have taken place in UK electricity policy over recent years as government has sought to address the challenges associated with energy security, affordability and commitments to reduce carbon emissions. ...

  9. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

  10. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  11. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  12. The Challenge Domestic solar panels produce electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    of lower electricity costs and reduced dependence on fossil fuels. The Collaboration Brooks Devlin University of Sheffield `Building for the Future' Innovation Awards, designed to give SMEs the opportunity to access research expertise and facilities. Projects were aimed at developing innovative products

  13. Electric Vehicle Lifecycle Cost Assessment for Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to residential solar photovoltaic (PV) power to reducing EV ownership costs. In this work, extensions are made substantially brings down the cost of EV ownership, even considering the capital expenditure for PV panelsElectric Vehicle Lifecycle Cost Assessment for Hawaii Dr. Makena Coffman Dr. Paul Bernstein

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    As nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs offer a sustainable transportation option, provide a cost-competitive alternative for drivers, reduce dependence on imported oil, and enable global economic leadership and job growth.

  15. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Webinars | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation Transmission Planning National Electric Transmission Congestion Study National Electric Transmission...

  16. Medium Duty Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Robin J. D.

    2015-05-31

    The Smith Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project (SDP) was integral to the Smith business plan to establish a manufacturing base in the United States (US) and produce a portfolio of All Electric Vehicles (AEV’s) for the medium duty commercial truck market. Smith focused on the commercial depot based logistics market, as it represented the market that was most ready for the early adoption of AEV technology. The SDP enabled Smith to accelerate its introduction of vehicles and increase the size of its US supply chain to support early market adoption of AEV’s that were cost competitive, fully met the needs of a diverse set of end users and were compliant with Federal safety and emissions requirements. The SDP accelerated the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems to substantially reduce petroleum consumption, reduce vehicular emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and increase US jobs.

  17. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-02-01

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  18. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

  19. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  20. The Case for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

  1. Direct participation of electrical loads in the California independent system operator markets during the Summer of 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Khavkin, Mark; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-04-01

    California's restructured electricity markets opened on 1 April 1998. The former investor-owned utilities were functionally divided into generation, transmission, and distribution activities, all of their gas-fired generating capacity was divested, and the retail market was opened to competition. To ensure that small customers shared in the expected benefit of lower prices, the enabling legislation mandated a 10% rate cut for all customers, which was implemented in a simplistic way that fossilized 1996 tariff structures. Rising fuel and environmental compliance costs, together with a reduced ability to import electricity, numerous plant outages, and exercise of market power by generators drove up wholesale electricity prices steeply in 2000, while retail tariffs remained unchanged. One of the distribution/supply companies entered bankruptcy in April 2001, and another was insolvent. During this period, two sets of interruptible load programs were in place, longstanding ones organized as special tariffs by the distribution/supply companies and hastily established ones run directly by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The distribution/supply company programs were effective at reducing load during the summer of 2000, but because of the high frequency of outages required by a system on the brink of failure, customer response declined and many left the tariff. The CAISO programs failed to attract enough participation to make a significant difference to the California supply demand imbalance. The poor performance of direct load participation in California's markets reinforces the argument for accurate pricing of electricity as a stimulus to energy efficiency investment and as a constraint on market volatility.

  2. The $2000 Electric Powertrain Option-1 Program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the tasks accomplished as part of Northrop Grumman's TRP $2000 Electric Powertrain Option-1 program. Northrop Grumman has strived to achieve technology advances and development considered as high priority to the success of future electric vehicles. Northrop Grumman has achieved the intent of the program by taking several steps toward reducing the cost of the electric vehicle powertrain, demonstrating technologies in the form of hardware and introducing enhancements into production that are consistent with the needs of the market.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

  4. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  5. Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical & Computer Engineering 2014-2015StudentHandbook For students entering the Masters of Science in Electrical & Computer Engineering: Pittsburgh, Silicon Valley, Rwanda, or Technology Enhanced, 2014 #12;This document is for the internal use of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  6. LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · apply the concept of circuit to any

  7. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "A Random Walk on Image Patches" by Prof. Francois Meyer Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering University of Colorado--Boulder Monday, April 2, 2012, 11:00 a a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from INRIA, France, in 1993. Meyer worked on the thermonuclear

  8. Electronics, Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science IS IN YOUR HANDS THE FUTURE #12;SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science2 CAREERS IN ELECTRONICS, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE This is an exciting time to join the School of EEECS at Queen's University

  9. BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ELECTRICITY MARKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFORMING BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ELECTRICITY MARKET: A WAY FORWARD DR. MARKJACCARD BRITISHCOLUMBIATASKFORCEON ELECTRICITYMARKETREFORM: FINALREPORT JANUARY1998 #12;BRITISH COLUMBIA TASK FORCE ON ELECTRICITY with the mandate to lead a Task Force to bring forward to government a package of electricity market reform

  10. LEDSGP/benefits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville,LEDSGP/activities < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation,LEDSGP/benefits

  11. Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29HaiWhy IsHealth Benefits | National

  12. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  13. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    Car problems Pollution from motor vehicles Crude oil,the pollution from any one new motor vehicle is slight,of hybrid vehicles will reduce oil use and pollution in the

  14. More electrification reduces total energy usage, aids economic growth, and fights inflation. [Conference paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, F.

    1980-01-01

    Many little-known benefits will accrue if more electricity is used and substituted for nonelectric energy. Assuming that electricity continues to increase its share by 75% of the total incremental need each year, its share will reach 51% by the year 2000. The growth in demand is due to the multiple primary sources which can generate power and the diverse end uses; its cost advantages; the degree of sophistication, innovation, and value it contributes to products and services; and energy savings. Since electricty has the capacity to reverse inflationary and declining productivity trends of recent years, a correlation can be found between increased use of electricity and manufacturing productivity. Attention should be drawn to these and other benefits during the continuing energy debate. 7 references, 4 tables. (DCK)

  15. Chapter 1: Estimating prospective benefits of EERE's portfolio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  16. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants October 1, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis To help...

  17. Benefits of battery-uItracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ian C., S.M. (Ian Charles). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the benefits of battery and battery-ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (ESSs) in pulsed-load applications. It investigates and quantifies the benefits of the hybrid ESS over its battery-only ...

  18. RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA September 29, 2015 - 10:43am Addthis...

  19. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants October 1, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis...

  20. Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures October 30, 2014 - 5:15pm Addthis As a major win...

  1. Appendix C: Biomass Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  2. The contracting benefits of accounting conservatism to lenders and borrowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jieying, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the ex post and ex ante benefits of conservatism to lenders and borrowers in the debt contracting process. First, I argue that conservatism benefits lenders ex post through a timely signal of default ...

  3. Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

  4. The Effect of Reduced Evaporator Air Flow on the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palani, M.; O'Neal, D.; Haberl, J.

    1992-01-01

    the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions such as reduced evaporator air flow. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of system...

  5. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    for coal, natural gas, oil, and waste-to-energy (WTE) firedcoal, natural gas, oil and waste-to-energy fired electricitytype (coal, oil, natural gas, or waste-to-energy, or WTE),

  6. Ownership Unbuilding in Electricity Markets - A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of the German TSO'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunekreeft, Gert

    available capacity, we regard these as indirect effects. Note that the competition effect would typically be beneficial; we deal with the cost-side of higher CAPEX associated with additional capacity (the flip side of the same coin) in section 3...

  7. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Hanford Woodwaste Steam Turbine, Cfb Fresno Petroleum Coke,Woodwaste MSW Steam Turbine, Cfb Riverside Corona Landfill

  8. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    impact assessment. In Life cycle assessment: Analysis by anRebitzer, G. (2004). Life cycle assessment Part 2: CurrentHealth Response in Life Cycle Assessment Using EDI0s and

  9. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Woodwaste Natural Gas Steam Turbine Cogen Sierra Tulare GasGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotNot Cogen Cogen Cogen Kern Steam Turbine Steam Turbne Lassen

  10. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    data for thermal and hydro power plants are based on CEA’smillion) per MW while small hydro power plants cost Rs 5.50comes from thermal and hydro power plants. We assume that

  11. The More Cooperation, the More Competition? A Cournot Analysis of the Benefits of Electric Market Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Rijkers, F. A. M.

    2006-03-14

    are fueled by gas, oil, coal, nuclear, and other, respectively: 23%, 16%, 7%, 37%, and 17%. For the central generation capacity of 14,000 MW in the Netherlands, the respective percentages are in- stead 56%, 24%, 1%, 3%, and 16%. Transmission between... , and the TSOs would retain the resulting economic rents from any day-ahead transfers between the countries. Some interconnector capacity might still be re- served for longer term contracts, but we do not consider this in our analysis below, where we in- stead...

  12. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    2004 Database of California Power Plants/' Located at:generation from California power plants. A-2a) Emissionthat includes all power plants in California that are one-

  13. Locational-based Coupling of Electricity Markets: Benefits from Coordinating Unit Commitment and Balancing Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    their own market areas, while attempting to maintain day-ahead schedules of international power exchange (Oggioni & Smeers 2009). If neighbouring operators could coordinate their balancing markets while respecting locational constraints, redispatch costs...

  14. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas Natural Gas a) Urban power plants (continued) PLANTNAMELandfill Gas Landfill Guadalupe Power Plant WatsonvilleGas Natural Gas b) rural power plants (continued) PLANTNAME

  15. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Tulare Gas Fueled Reciprocating Cogen Engine Gas TurbineGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotGas Kern Natural Gas/Eor Gas Turbine Kern Ag. & Woodwaste

  16. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Location: State/County Fuel Type: Coal, natural a oil WTELocation: State/County Fuel Type: Coal, natural gas, oil,Location: State/County Fuel Type: Coal, natural gas, oil,

  17. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    resources (DEER) Update Shldy (Energy Commission, 2001). Asfor Energy Efficiency Resources (DEER) Update Study" (Final

  18. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    location, whether or not cogeneration technologies are used,in rural regions use cogeneration technologies and thisof coal- powered cogeneration plants are not provided by the

  19. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine CogenEastridge Sunrise Ii Combined Cycle Expansion Midway-Sunset0.33-0.39 a CHP/cogen/ Combined cycle O.4 b c 0.58-0.84 d

  20. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    Thous. tons) Reduction in Fly Ash SPM Emissions (Thous.pollutants (SO 2 , NO x , and Fly Ash) that are noted in the