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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SMES benefit analysis using a product cost model for Puget Sound applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology that is expected to provide a means of storing electrical energy for use during peak demand periods. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has estimated benefits and costs associated with the use of SMES technology and has provided insight into the overall future potential of SMES in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and on systems that connect and exchange power with BPA.

Dagle, J.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Plug-in Hybrid Modeling and Application: Cost/Benefit Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents data from a simulation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle efficiency and cost, including baseline vehicle assumptions, powertrain technology scenarios, and component modeling.

Simpson, A.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Regulation, Unemployment, and Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf (“A stand-alone analysis of jobs is not included in aWachter, Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Usingnew jobs are rounding errors in cost-benefit analyses that

Posner, Eric; Masur, Jonathan S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Projected Benefits - GPRA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projected Benefits - GPRA Projected Benefits - GPRA Project Summary Full Title: Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs Project ID: 208 Principal Investigator: Michael Leifman Keywords: Energy efficiency; energy use; energy savings; renewable Purpose Assess the past and future contributions of the programs conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to DOE's goals of providing affordable, clean and reliable energy. The program benefits are reported in EERE's annual Congressional Budget Request. This analysis fulfills the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. Performer Principal Investigator: Michael Leifman Organization: U.S. Department of Energy Address: 1000 Independence Ave., SW

6

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 What Does the U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy R&D Mean to America's Energy and Economic Future? Methodology for Estimating Research & Development (R&D) Benefits The primary tool used to estimate future R&D benefits is the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) developed by the Energy Information Ad- ministration (EIA). Benefits are based on the differ- ence between certain parameters for NEMS runs made with and without the impacts of FE R&D. For cases with FE R&D, it is assumed that program R&D goals are met and funding is consistent with FY2004 appropriations and program plans. Multiple scenarios are used to examine the impact of se- lected regulatory and fuel energy price assump- tions. Other than inputs reflecting FE R&D goals

7

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis W. F. Feltz, D. D. Turner, R. O. Knuteson, and R. G. Dedecker Space Science and Engineering Center Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has funded the development of the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI). This has led to a hardened, autonomous system that measures downwelling infrared (IR) radiance at high-spectral resolution. Seven AERI systems have been deployed around the world as part of the ARM Program. The initial goal of these instruments was to characterize the clear-sky IR emission from the atmosphere,

8

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number...

9

Carbon Supply and Co-Benefits Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Co-Benefits Analysis Jump to: navigation, search TODO: find a link to a carbon supplyco-benefits analysis Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbonSupply...

10

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: CO2 Reduction Benefits Analysis for Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Reduction Benefits Analysis for Fuel Cell Applications CO2 Reduction Benefits Analysis for Fuel Cell Applications Project Summary Full Title: CO2 Reduction Benefits Analysis for Fuel Cell Applications Project ID: 263 Principal Investigator: Chip Friley Brief Description: This analysis used the 10-region U.S. MARKAL model to quantify the impact of changes in production, distribution and vehicle costs and carbon prices on fuel cell vehicle penetration and overall carbon dioxide emissions. Keywords: Carbon dioxide (CO2); Hydrogen; Fuel cells Purpose Perform analysis of topics of interest to the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies program related to projected carbon dioxide reduction benefits of fuel cell applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Chip Friley Organization: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Address: Mail Stop 475C

11

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Ratnesh Sharma, Gonçalo Mendes, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Olivier Mégel, and Afzal S. Siddiqui Conference Name 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Chicago, IL Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

12

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options » Options » Benefits Benefits Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Current Employees (CRYPTOCard access) Retirees Competitive pay, work-life balance options, comprehensive benefits package We attract and retain exceptional talent with our competitive pay packages that provide fair and equitable compensation. We recognize and reward outstanding contributions through our various employee award programs. We support and nurture a culture focused on a work/life balance for all of our employees. Our benefits package Employees are eligible for a variety of health and retirement benefits. Health & wellness

13

Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country...

14

Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

Weng, Yu-Chi, E-mail: clyde.weng@gmail.com [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fujiwara, Takeshi [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE SuperTruck Program Benefits Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the project's technical scope development, information collection, and analysis. He also served as the key technical contact point for the SuperTruck development...

16

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

17

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

18

DYNASTORE - A Computer Model for Quantifying Dynamic Energy Storage Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now in development, the DYNASTORE computer model is the first production cost model designed to accurately represent changes in the utility daily load. By quantifying the dynamic benefits of energy storage, it highlights the significant cost savings linked with this technology.

1987-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT OF USING FORECASTS Mohamed Zied Ch^atenay-Malabry Cedex, France Abstract: In this paper, we analyze forecast based inventory control policies for a non-stationary demand. We assume that forecasts and the associated uncertainties are given

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Michael Stadler1,2 , Chris Marnay1 to be presented at the 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Chicago, IL, Sept 6-9 2011 http, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement

22

Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applications v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applications spreadsheet provides estimates for the financial benefits of key Advanced Distribution Automation ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

23

Analysis of costs-benefits tradeoffs of complex security systems  

SciTech Connect

Essential to a systems approach to design of security systems is an analysis of the cost effectiveness of alternative designs. While the concept of analysis of costs and benefits is straightforward, implementation can be at the least tedious and, for complex designs and alternatives, can become nearly intractable without the help of structured analysis tools. PACAIT--Performance and Cost Analysis Integrated Tools--is a prototype tool. The performance side of the analysis collates and reduces data from ASSESS, and existing DOE PC-based security systems performance analysis tool. The costs side of the analysis uses ACE, an existing DOD PC-based costs analysis tool. Costs are reported over the full life-cycle of the system, that is, the costs to procure, operate, maintain and retire the system and all of its components. Results are collected in Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel workbooks and are readily available to analysts and decision makers in both tabular and graphical formats and at both the system and path-element levels.

Hicks, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits Connected to Smart Grids M. Stadler 1,2,a , C.Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Michael Stadler , Chris

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Finding Benefits by Modeling and Optimizing Steam and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site-wide steam modeling and optimization program (Visual MESA) was implemented at the INEOS Chocolate Bayou site. This program optimizes steam production, compressor turbine extraction, pump operation (turbine/motor) operation, as well as the monitoring of the entire steam system. This is used for both day-to-day site optimization as well as long-term site planning. In this presentation, we will discuss who the main users of the program are and how they and the plant derive benefits from its use.

Jones, B.; Nelson, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A practical method for incorporating Real Options analysis into US federal benefit-cost analysis procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research identifies how Real Options (RO) thinking might acceptably and effectively complement the current mandates for Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA) defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in Circular A-94. ...

Rivey, Darren

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Strategic cost-benefit analysis of energy policies: detailed projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward restructuring the energy system in order to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy forms. However, recent events have led to renewed concern over the direction of current energy policy. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. In the first, no additional programs or policies are initiated beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is directed toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third promotes increased domestic supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. Results indicate that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, involves substantial environmental costs and slows the rate of economic growth. These relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation are less than anticipated, or if the costs of synthetic fuels can be significantly lowered. Given these uncertainties, both conservation and RD and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy. However, between these policy alternatives, conservation appears to be the preferred strategy. The results of this study are presented in three reports (see also BNL--51105 and BNL--51128). 11 references, 3 figures, 61 tables.

Davitian, H.; Groncki, P.J.; Kleeman, P.; Lukachinski, J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Exploring nonprofit accountability in Thai grassroots organization : a cost-benefit analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A cost-benefit analysis was conducted in partnership with the Foundation for Older Persons' Development (FOPDEV), a grassroots organization in Chiang Mai, Thailand that supports older… (more)

O’Leary, Dervla Mary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 PowerPoint presentation by Joe Paladino from the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability before the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) on metrics and benefits analysis for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act smart grid programs including the Smart Grid Investment Grants and the Smart Grid Demonstration Program. Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs More Documents & Publications Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2012 - Tuesday,

34

EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 PowerPoint presentation by Joe Paladino from the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability before the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) on metrics and benefits analysis for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act smart grid programs including the Smart Grid Investment Grants and the Smart Grid Demonstration Program. Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs More Documents & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2012 - Tuesday, June 12, 2012 Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid

35

Assessing the maintainability benefits of design restructuring using dependency analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software developers and project managers often have to assess the quality of software design. A commonly adopted hypothesis is that a good design should cost less to maintain than a poor design. In this paper, we propose a model for quantifying the quality of a design from a maintainability perspective. Based on this model, we propose a novel strategy for predicting the “Return on Investment ” (ROI) for possible design restructurings using procedure-level dependency analysis. We demonstrate this approach with two exploratory Java case studies. Our results show that common low-level source code transformations change the system dependency structure in a beneficial way, allowing recovery of the initial refactoring investment over a number of maintenance activities. 1.

Robert Leitch; Eleni Stroulia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy and the environment cost-benefit analysis  

SciTech Connect

Papers were presented covering the following topics: energy resources and projection; nuclear fission reactors and the environment; fossil fuel and the environment, with emphasis on coal; fusion power and the environment; cost benefit scales; experience of utilities in financing nuclear power plant; and ecosystem tolerance limits of power plant effluents. Each article was abstracted and indexed separately. (PCS)

Karam, R.A.; Morgan, K.Z. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Review of the WECC EDT Phase 2 EIM Benefits Analysis and Results Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt River Project SWPA Southwestern Power Administration TEPPC Transmission Expansion Planning PolicyReview of the WECC EDT Phase 2 EIM Benefits Analysis and Results Report ANL/DIS-12-2 Decision and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. #12;Review of the WECC EDT Phase 2 EIM Benefits Analysis and Results

Kemner, Ken

39

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part Engineering Center of Columbia University investigated the waste management system of Montevideo, Uruguay

Columbia University

40

Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options September 19, 2012 Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH Topics Covered: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has begun an initiative to develop a methodology to perform cost-benefit analysis for some Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility applications as one potential input into nuclear safety decision-making processes. The scope, approach, precedence, and example of how it might be

42

FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program FY 2006. Benefits analysis : methodology and results - final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating benefits and the analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identification of technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in the activities planned for FY 06. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. These benefits estimates, along with market penetrations and other results, are then modeled as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY06 Budget Request.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

User's Guide to DYNASTORE: A Computer Model for Quantifying Dynamic Energy Storage Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DYNASTORE model's unique new capabilities enable it to quantify certain disaggregated benefits of energy storage technologies via a chronological production cost model. Because of this, it can provide a useful tool for proper evaluation and operation of such technologies, as well as knowledge of associated dynamic benefits.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cost-benefit analysis conducted for nutrition education in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the California Expanded Food are cost-effective and thatE, et al. 1999. Ap- plying cost-bene?t analysis to nutritionRH, Lambur M, Lewis E. 2002. Cost- bene?t analysis indicates

Block Joy, Amy; Goldman, George; Pradhan, Vijay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development, Demonstration,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE of Planning, Budget and Analysis Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S of Planning, Budget and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;ii

46

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop:Infrastructure: A Practitioner s Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop for Transportation, Policy, O i d L i iOperations, and Logistics George Mason University #12;The idea of benefit fas well as the nearer future) and a wide view (in the sense of allowing for sideeffects of many

47

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.netindex.php?id131 Equivalent URI:...

48

Health Monitoring System Technology Assessments---Cost Benefits Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of sensor-based structural health monitoring is very diverse and encompasses a wide range of activities including initiatives and innovations involving the development of advanced sensor, signal processing, data analysis, and actuation and ...

Kent Renee M.; Murphy Dennis A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

PESTICIDE BENEFITS PESTICIDE BENEFITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-vectoring mosquitoes) separate from the risks and benefits of other pesticides (such as those used on field crops. Similarly, analysis of other pesticides will focus on the impacts on other user groups and related effects to determine whether the pesticide will remain effective for at least five years. EPA also requires

51

Freedom car and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2007 benefits analysis, methodology and results -- final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in subsequent activities. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY07 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the FCVT program for internal project management purposes.

SIngh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be found at 1. In previous work, the Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) 2, 3. Its optimization techniques...

53

Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market structures like the EIM. In addition to more efficient energy transactions in the WI, the EIM would reduce the amount of flexibility reserves needed to accommodate forecast errors associated with variable production from wind and solar energy resources. The modeling approach takes full advantage of variable resource diversity over the entire market footprint, but the projected reduction in flexibility reserves may be overly optimistic. While some reduction would undoubtedly occur, the EIM is only an energy market and would therefore not realize the same reduction in reserves as an ancillary services market. In our opinion the methodology does not adequately capture the impact of transmission constraints on the deployment of flexibility reserves. Estimates of flexibility reserves assume that forecast errors follow a normal distribution. Improved estimates could be obtained by using other probability distributions to estimate up and down reserves to capture the underlying uncertainty of these resources under specific operating conditions. Also, the use of a persistence forecast method for solar is questionable, because solar insolation follows a deterministic pattern dictated by the sun's path through the sky. We suggest a more rigorous method for forecasting solar insolation using the sun's relatively predictable daily pattern at specific locations. The EIM study considered only one scenario for hydropower resources. While this scenario is within the normal range over the WI footprint, it represents a severe drought condition in the Colorado River Basin from which Western schedules power. Given hydropower's prominent role in the WI, we recommend simulating a range of hydropower conditions since the relationship between water availability and WI dispatch costs is nonlinear. Also, the representation of specific operational constraints faced by hydropower operators in the WI needs improvements. The model used in the study cannot fully capture all of the EIM impacts and complexities of power system operations. In particular, a primary benefit of the EIM is a shorter dispa

Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil EPRG Working Paper EPRG0905 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics... , and that privatisation can be structured with state involvement at several levels, aiming to maximise the public share of benefits. Keywords Privatisation, Cost-Benefit, Welfare, Oil and Gas, Norway JEL Classification D61, H43, L33, L71, Q48 Contact christian...

Wolf, C; Pollitt, Michael G.

59

Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/air/benmap/ Cost: Free Related Tools Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A Windows-based program that uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to

60

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cost-Benefit_Analysis_of_Smart_Grid_Technologies_Through_System_Simulations&oldid=514355"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country Slovakia Coordinates 48.669025°, 19.699024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.669025,"lon":19.699024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume I. Benefit--cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Section II follows a brief introduction and is entitled ''Benefit-Cost Analysis Framework.'' The analytical framework deals with two major steps involved in assessing the pros and cons of energy resource development (or any other type of development). The first is to identify and describe the overall tribal resource planning and decision process. The second is to develop a detailed methodological approach to the assessment of the benefits and costs of energy development alternatives within the context of the tribe's overall planning process. Sections III, IV, and V present the application of the benefit-cost analysis methodology to coal; oil and gas; and uranium, oil shale, and geothermal development, respectively. The methodology creates hypothetical examples that illustrate realistic development opportunities for the majority of tribes that have significant reserves of one or more of the resources that may be economic to develop.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute (www.vtpi.org)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis ­ Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute congestion is considered one of the most significant transportation problems. The capacity of a road depends, Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, 13th Edition, Institute of Transportation Studies, UBC (Berkeley; www

O'Donnell, Tom

64

A multi-project model of key factors affecting organizational benefits from enterprise systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a long-term, multi-project model of factors affecting organizational benefits from enterprise systems (ES), then reports a preliminary test of the model. In the shorter-term half of the model, it is hypothesized that once a system ... Keywords: IS implementation, IS project management, change management, enterprise system success, functional fit, improved access to information, integration, overcoming organizational inertia, packaged software, process optimization

Peter B. Seddon; Cheryl Calvert; Song Yang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market in the NWPP  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Pool (NWPP) Market Assessment Committee (MC) Initiative, which was officially launched on March 19, 2012, set out to explore a range of alternatives that could help the Balancing Authorities and scheduling utilities in the NWPP area address growing operational and commercial challenges affecting the regional power system. The MC formed an Analytical Team with technical representatives from each of the member Balancing Areas in the NWPP and with staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This Analytical Team was instructed to conduct extensive studies of intra-hour operation of the NWPP system in the year 2020 and of the NWPP region with 14,671 MW of wind penetration. The effort utilized a sub-hourly production cost model (the PLEXOS® computer model) that inputs data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)-wide Production Cost Model (PCM) to evaluate potential production cost savings. The Analytical Team was given two general options to evaluate: •Energy Imbalance Market (EIM): establishment of an automated, organized NWPP area market for economically supplying energy imbalance within the hour. •Enhanced Market-Operational Tools (EMT) that might augment or replace an EIM. The Analytical The Analytical Team built on the WECC-wide PCM data from prior work done in the WECC and carried forward the evolution of the original WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) 2020 PC0 data base. A large number of modifications and improvements were made to this case and the data were subjected to extensive review by the team members to improve the model representation of the Northwest (NW). MC meetings that were open to the public were held for interested parties to review and provide input to the study. Results for the test, base, and sensitivity case studies performed by the MC Initiative Analytical Team indicate that there are a wide range of benefits that could be obtained from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP depending on what assumptions are made. The instructions from the MC were to determine a "minimum high confidence" range of potential benefits. The results for the Base Case indicate that the EIM benefits ranged from approximately $40 million to $70 million in annual savings from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP footprint. A number of additional relevant sensitivity cases were performed, including low and high water conditions, low and high natural gas prices, and various flex reserve requirements, resource operations, and amounts of resource capability held back during the preschedule period. Along with the results for the Base Case, the results for these studies yielded EIM benefits that clustered within the range of $70 to $80 million dollars per year with potential benefits ranging from approximately $125 million to as little as $17 million per year. Because the design and operation of an EIM could enable participating Balancing Authorities (BAs) to collectively lower the quantity of resources they must carry to meet within-hour balancing needs, a sensitivity case was also performed to analyze the impact that such reductions might have on the benefits from an EIM. The results for this sensitivity case indicate that such reductions could increase the benefits from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP into the range of approximately $130 million to $160 million per year. Also, a sensitivity case for a WECC-wide EIM was performed with the results indicating that the potential benefits to the NWPP could increase into the range of $197 million to $233 million per year. While there may be potential reliability benefits from the coordinated dispatch process underlying the operation of an EIM, reliability benefits from an EIM were out of the scope of this study. The EIM benefit analyses that were performed by the Analytical Team are provided in this report.

Samaan, Nader A.; Bayless, Rich; Symonds, Mark; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Makarov, Yuri V.; Kannberg, Landis D.; Guo, Tao; Dennison-Leonard , Sarah; Goodenough, Mike; Schellberg, Ron; Conger, Sid; Harris, Kevin; Rarity, Matt; Wallace, Steven; Austin, Jamie; Noteboom, Rod; Van Blaricom , Tim; McRunnel, Kim; Apperson, John; Empey, Marshall; Etingov, Pavel V.; Warady, Debra; Brush, Ray; Newkirk, Joshua; Williams, Peter; Landauer, Marv; Owen, Hugh; Morter, Wayne; Haraguchi, Keli; Portouw, Jim; Downey, kathryn; Sorey, Steve; Williams, Stan; Gossa, Teyent; Kalich, Clint; Damiano, Patrick; Macarthur, Clay; Martin, Tom; Hoerner, Joe; Knudsen, Steve; Johnson, Anders; Link, Rick; Holcomb, Dennis

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2007 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Benefits Analysis, 7 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report ANL-08/06 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

67

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2008 Benefit Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Benefits Analysis, 8 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results- Final Report ANL-08/07 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

68

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Guidebook for Cost/Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a step-by-step process for estimating the costs and benefits associated with Smart Grid demonstration projects. In its entirety, the guidebook is meant to function as a standalone user’s manual for the analysis process, from the initial step of describing the project to the final step of communicating the results to all stakeholders. This revision of the Guidebook updates and supersedes the material in the original Volume 1, published in 2011, but goes further by adding ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Guidebook for Cost/Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a step-by-step process for estimating the costs and benefits associated with smart grid demonstration projects. The entire guidebook is meant to function as a stand-alone user’s manual for the analysis process, from the initial step of describing the project to the final step of communicating the results to all stakeholders. This version of the guidebook presents detailed instructions for describing the project objectives, the research plan, and the technologies deployed; ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modeling and Analysis Session: Market, Value, and Policy Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Primary objectives: to provide a broad range of analytical support to the Solar Program; and to anticipate and respond to the rapidly evolving analytical needs of the Solar Program. Three broad types of analysis are being carried out under this project including: (1) Market analysis: Developing a PV market penetration model--the SolarDS model--and other tools, in order to gain insight into the factors influencing market penetration of PV technology in U.S. markets. (2) Value analysis: Providing inputs to, support for, and review of the annual GPRA benefits analysis. Also developing methods and tools for improving the quantification of the benefits and cost of solar technologies. (3) Policy analysis: Defining and carrying out analysis that meets the needs of the Solar Energy Technologies Program in a timely fashion, for example evaluating the potential role of solar in the energy economy in the long-term.

Margolis, R. M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

BENEFIT HIGHLIGHTS BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No benefit payable under the Plan can be assigned, transferred or subject to any lien, garnishment, pledge

74

A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

Leiby, P.N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Using a scalable modeling and simulation framework to evaluate the benefits of intelligent transportation systems.  

SciTech Connect

A scalable, distributed modeling and simulation framework has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to study Intelligent Transportation Systems. The framework can run on a single-processor workstation, or run distributed on a multiprocessor computer or network of workstations. The framework is modular and supports plug-in models, hardware, and live data sources. The initial set of models currently includes road network and traffic flow, probe and smart vehicles, traffic management centers, communications between vehicles and centers, in-vehicle navigation systems, roadway traffic advisories. The modeling and simulation capability has been used to examine proposed ITS concepts. Results are presented from modeling scenarios from the Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) experimental program to demonstrate how the framework can be used to evaluate the benefits of ITS and to plan future ITS operational tests and deployment initiatives.

Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Application of a Tractive Energy Analysis to Quantify the Benefits of Advanced Efficiency Technologies Using Characteristic Drive Cycle Data  

SciTech Connect

Accurately predicting the fuel savings that can be achieved with the implementation of various technologies developed for fuel efficiency can be very challenging, particularly when considering combinations of technologies. Differences in the usage of highway vehicles can strongly influence the benefits realized with any given technology, which makes generalizations about fuel savings inappropriate for different vehicle applications. A model has been developed to estimate the potential for reducing fuel consumption when advanced efficiency technologies, or combinations of these technologies, are employed on highway vehicles, particularly medium- and heavy-duty trucks. The approach is based on a tractive energy analysis applied to drive cycles representative of the vehicle usage, and the analysis specifically accounts for individual energy loss factors that characterize the technologies of interest. This tractive energy evaluation is demonstrated by analyzing measured drive cycles from a long-haul trucking fleet and the results of an assessment of the fuel savings potential for combinations of technologies are presented. The results of this research will enable more reliable estimates of the fuel savings benefits that can be realized with particular technologies and technology combinations for individual trucking applications so that decision makers can make informed investment decisions for the implementation of advanced efficiency technologies.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

own starting numbers and inflation estimates for each of the fuels. Battery and Charger Efficiencies-To handle the various efficiencies of batteries and charger systems, the...

78

NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Technology Analysis Models...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration Energy Analysis Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal Technology Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools...

79

Simulation model and the dynamics of relative poverty rates in the presence of some social benefits in Romania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some simulations of the relative poverty rates values in the presence of some social benefits in the income of persons / households considered in the Household Budget Survey carried out by the National Institute of Statistics of Romania ... Keywords: dynamics, indicators, relative poverty, simulation model, social benefits

Cristina Stroe; Andreea Cambir; Cornelia Barti; Eva Militaru; Silvia Cojanu; Eliza Lungu; Codruta Dragoiu; Isadora Lazar

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessing the Benefits of Convection-Permitting Models by Neighborhood Verification: Examples from MAP D-PHASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) models produce more detailed precipitation structures but the real benefit is probably the more realistic statistics gained with the higher resolution and not the information on the specific grid ...

Tanja Weusthoff; Felix Ament; Marco Arpagaus; Mathias W. Rotach

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal exploration and resource assessment: R and D program benefit/cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Exploration and Resource and Reservoir Assessment (GERRA) Research and Development (R and D) Program of the Department of Energy was analyzed to evaluate its cost effectiveness and relevance to the needs of the geothermal exploration industry. This analysis was conducted in three phases. The first phase involved a review of the state-of-the-art and an identification of major R and D needs, followed by a quantitative assessment of the benefits expected from the achievement of some realistic targets for reducing the proportion of unsuccessful (non-productive) wells drilled in the course of exploration for a reservoir. In the second phase, questionnaires concerning the utility, effectiveness and need for improvement of certain commonly used exploration techniques were mailed to a set of 72 individuals active in geothermal exploration. The third phase consisted of in-person interviews with well recognized experts in geothermal exploration. The results of the quantitative analysis suggest that a benefit/cost ratio exceeding ten can be realized for the R and D expenditure by achieving a relatively modest target of improving the current weighted average exploratory drilling success ratio by 3 percentage points (i.e., from 0.24 to 0.27). The responses to the mailed questionnaires indicated that the emphasis of R and D should be on improving the data interpretation capability rather than the data collection (measurement) capability.Liquid geochemistry, seismic methods and thermal methods were identified as the techniques deserving most attention. The in-person interviews revealed that the industry is more concerned about finding buyers (utilities) for the discovered resources than about finding new resources in the near term.

Dhillon, H.; El-Sawy, A.; Goldstein, S.; Meidav, T.; Pfundstein, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment  

SciTech Connect

For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major difference was that LBNL started working with the AEO 2004NEMS code and EIA was using AEO 2005 NEMS code. Unlike the High Price Scenario the Carbon Cap scenario gives a radically different forecast than the Reference Scenario. NEMS-LBNL proved that it can handle these alternative scenarios. However, results are price inelastic (for both oil and natural gas prices) within the price range evaluated. Perhaps even higher price paths would lead to a distinctly different forecast than the Reference Scenario. On the other hand, the Carbon Cap Scenario behaves more like an alternative future. The future in the Carbon Cap Scenario has higher electricity prices, reduced driving, more renewable capacity, and reduced energy consumption. The next step for this work is to evaluate the EE benefits under each of the three scenarios. Comparing those three sets of predicted benefits will indicate how much uncertainty is inherent within this sort of deterministic forecasting.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of hydrogen to the natural gas feedstocks of midsize (30-150 MW) gas turbines was analyzed as a method of reducing nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and CO{sub 2} emissions. In particular, the costs of hydrogen addition were evaluated against the combined costs for other current NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions control technologies for both existing and new systems to determine its benefits and market feasibility. Markets for NO{sub x} emissions credits currently exist in California and the Northeast States and are expected to grow. Although regulations are not currently in place in the United States, several other countries have implemented carbon tax and carbon credit programs. The analysis thus assumes that the United States adopts future legislation similar to these programs. Therefore, potential sale of emissions credits for volunteer retrofits was also included in the study. It was found that hydrogen addition is a competitive alternative to traditional emissions abatement techniques under certain conditions. The existence of carbon credits shifts the system economics in favor of hydrogen addition.

Miller, J. (Energetics Inc., Washington, DC); Towns, B. (Energetics Inc., Washington, DC); Keller, Jay O.; Schefer, Robert W.; Skolnik, Edward G. (Energetics Inc., Washington, DC)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Environmental and petroleum resource conflicts: a simulation model to determine the benefits of petroleum production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), located on the Alaska North Slope, is believed to contain high petroleum production potential. This region also has outstanding wildlife and wilderness values. Currently ANWR is closed to oil and gas leasing. However, Congress is considering an Interior Department recommendation to open a portion of ANWR to oil and gas production. Environmentalists maintain that petroleum exploration and development will have severe environmental impacts. A draft study by the Interior Department reports values that are used to generate an expected present value of the net economic benefits of petroleum development in ANWR of $2.98 billion. Alternatively, using updated oil price projections and revised tax and financial assumptions, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Financial Analysis Simulation Model (AFAM) projects the expected present value of net economic benefits of oil production at between $0.32 and $1.39 billion. AFAM results indicate that, within most drilling cost scenarios, oil producers would earn an aftertax profit in 100% of the simulation trials. However, in a high-cost drilling scenario, AFAM projects aftertax losses to oil producers in 45% of the simulation trials. Although the Interior Department does not report a range of net economic benefits from oil development of ANWR, AFAM indicates that the distribution of net economic benefits across all scenarios is positively skewed. Net economic benefits from oil development range from $0 to $4.75 billion with a greater probability of benefits closer to the lower value. Decision makers considering whether or not to open ANWR to petroleum development can use these values to judge if the economic benefits outweigh the projected negative wilderness and wildlife impacts. 10 references, 9 figures, 6 tables.

Goerold, W.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The state of Iowa is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Models in Decision Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any statistical analysis or decision analysis contains numerical inputs of which we are unsure. Some of our uncertainty arises from physical randomness which we can model in various ways, ideally through probability. Some relates to judgmental estimates of qualities about which we may be unsure in many different respects. There are other uncertainties involved, however: some relates to ambiguity and imprecision of meaning; some relate to lack of clarity in the objectives which the analysis seeks to meet; some relate to the numerical accuracy of calculations. Suppose, for instance, that we need to consider the probability of a conservative government being returned at the next election. The probability, a subjective probability, itself is a number that the statistician or decision maker has to judge. In some ways it may be related to 'hard' data, but there will always be an element of judgement in setting its value. But one might also ask: what is meant by a 'conservative' government; ...

Simon French

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cost-benefit analysis of cosolvent flushing to treat groundwater contamination source areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the zone beneath the water table can be a virtually permanent source of groundwater contamination that cannot be remediated by currently available technologies. Cosolvent flushing is a new technology that has the potential to remediate these sites and could pose a solution to the problem of DNAPL source areas. A computer model was developed to determine the cost and time to remediate an aquifer using cosolvent flushing. Included in the model is a module to calculate the costs of recycling the alcohol that is used as the cosolvent. The model was validated using site conditions to a prior study. It was determined that recycling the cosolvent allows cosolvent flushing to be a cost effective alternative to surfactant flushing, another new technology being considered for DNAPL source remediation. Sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted by varying the saturation percentage of contaminant, percentage and type of alcohol used in the cosolvent mixture, site hydraulic conductivity, and the contaminant. Five alcohols were modeled: methanol, ethanol, 1-isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA). 1-Isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and TBA were always more expensive than methanol and ethanol.

Anason, S.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current modeling results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.

Lee, S.

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Analysis Department Weighing the Costs and Benefits of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department 3 State RPS Policies and Purchase Mandates: 21 States and D.C. WI: 10% by 2015 NV: 20% by 2015 TX Objectives · Background: State RPS policies have become major drivers of renewable energy additions, but the adoption of new state RPS policies hinges on expected costs and benefits · Objective: We review previous

96

Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Market analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Screenshot References: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model[1]

97

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis explains in detail all possible model descriptions to efficiently store piecewise linear functions starting with the Chua descriptions. Detailed explanation on how the model parameter can be obtained ...

Domine M. W. Leenaerts; Wim M. Van Bokhoven

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)/Home Area Network (HAN) Economic Benefits Analysis for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a framework for quantifying the benefits attributable to Home Area Network (HAN) technologies in the context of demand response. A HAN is a device designed to monitor energy use, distill user-consumption information (such as recent real-time energy usage), and perform appliance management functions within a home. The HAN central unit typically acts as a gateway between the in-home network (which controls appliances) and external entities such as the electric utility. Each piece of ho...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exploratory benefit-cost analysis of environmental controls on hydrothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the value of environmental benefits generated by environmental regulation of hydrothermal sites was initiated to compare these benefits with the estimated costs of regulation. Primary objectives were to 1) evaluate the environmental damages caused by unregulated hydrothermal resource development, 2) use existing environmental and economic data to estimate the dollar value of preventing expected environmental damages at two sites, and 3) compare the benefits and costs of preventing the damages. The sites chosen for analyses were in the Imperial Valley at Heber and Niland, California. Reasons for this choice were 1) there is a high level of commercial interest in developing the Heber known geothermal resource area (KGRA) and the Salton Sea KGRA; 2) the potential for environmental damage is high; 3) existing data bases for these two sites are more comprehensive than at other sites. The primary impacts analyzed were those related to hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions and those related to disposal of spent hydrothermal brine. (MHR)

Scott, M.J.; Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; King, M.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Benefit/cost analysis for research in geothermal log interpretation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well log interpretation, the process of inferring subsurface geology from geophysical measurements made in boreholes, is the most versatile and direct means available of assessing important physical and structural reservoir properties. Historically, well logging has been developed primarily for use in oil and gas wells, and its application in a different environment such as a geothermal reservoir creates complex problems. Present geothermal development is severely hindered by lack of data. Adaptation of well logging techniques holds the promise of reducing development costs, encouraging investment, and assisting regulatory permitting. Such benefits will translate directly into lower power costs and an increased domestic energy supply. A significant acceleration of geothermal power-on-line is possible plus cost reductions through reduction of drilling failure rate, reduction of average well cost, earlier recognition of bad wells, reduced flow testing, and savings due to provision of better data for regulatory decisions. Net undiscounted benefits in 1979 dollars from improving logging and interpretation in geothermal areas can exceed half a billion dollars in slightly more than a decade, about 300 million of this should be regarded as the potential benefit of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Log Interpretation Program or similar research.

Rigby, F.A.; Reardon, P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model for delivery system component costs and performance: Components Model Delivery scenario model for Urban and Rural Interstate markets and demand levels (Mkt....

104

NREL: Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rooms Credit union and banking benefits Flexible schedules Business casual dress Free RTD Eco Pass A Great Location Our main campus in Golden, Colorado, located in the foothills...

105

Preliminary benefit-cost analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) power addition  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this report is to conduct a preliminary benefit-cost study for the proposed power addition to FFTF to determine whether the project is cost-effective. If the project is authorized, construction will begin in 1986 and end in 1991. Full power operation is scheduled to begin in 1991 and a project life of 20 years is assumed. The undiscounted cost during the construction period of the FFTF power addition is estimated to be approximately $117 million over the construction period (1984 dollars). An additional $3 million is estimated as the opportunity cost - or value of these resources in their most favorable alternative use - of surplus FFTF equipment and unused CRBR equipment, including materials for steam generator fabrication. The annual operating and maintenance cost of the project is estimated to be about $2.1 million in 1984 dollars. 20 references.

Callaway, J.M.; Lezberg, A.J.; Scott, M.J.; Tawil, J.J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy storage benefits and market analysis handbook : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Guide describes a high level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric utility-related applications. In the United States use of electricity storage to support and optimize transmission and distribution (T&D) services has been limited due to high storage system cost and by limited experience with storage system design and operation. Recent improvement of energy storage and power electronics technologies, coupled with changes in the electricity marketplace, indicate an era of expanding opportunity for electricity storage as a cost-effective electric resource. Some recent developments (in no particular order) that drive the opportunity include: (1) states adoption of the renewables portfolio standard (RPS), which may increased use of renewable generation with intermittent output, (2) financial risk leading to limited investment in new transmission capacity, coupled with increasing congestion on some transmission lines, (3) regional peaking generation capacity constraints, and (4) increasing emphasis on locational marginal pricing (LMP).

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Corey, Garth P.; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE’s DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

A fresh look at cost estimation, process models and risk analysis”, EDSER-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable cost estimation is indispensable for industrial software development. A detailed analysis shows why the existing cost models are unreliable. Cost estimation should integrate software process modelling and risk analysis. A novel approach based on probability theory is proposed. A probabilistic cost model could provide a solid basis for cost-benefit analyses. 1

Frank Padberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Enterprise modeling and analysis: an enterprise modeling and analysis toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully integrated modeling and analysis toolkit, which facilitates multi-perspective knowledge capturing, sharing and reusing, is necessary for today's enterprises to meet the challenges of the ever more competitive global marketplace. In this paper ...

Dursun Delen; Perakath C. Benjamin

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Analysis of the Current Use, Benefit, and Value of the Open Science Grid  

SciTech Connect

The Open Science Grid usage has ramped up more than 25% in the past twelve months due to both the increase in throughput of the core stakeholders - US LHC, LIGO and Run II - and increase in usage by nonphysics communities. It is important to understand the value collaborative projects, such as the OSG, contribute to the scientific community. This needs to be cognizant of the environment of commercial cloud offerings, the evolving and maturing middleware for grid based distributed computing, and the evolution in science and research dependence on computation. We present a first categorization of OSG value and analysis across several different aspects of the Consortium's goals and activities. And lastly, we presents some of the upcoming challenges of LHC data analysis ramp up and our ongoing contributions to the World Wide LHC Computing Grid.

Pordes, R.; /Fermilab

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Benefit Analysis of Energy Storage: Case Study with Sacramento Municipal Utility District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage systems may support several electric utility use cases, including grid support, outage mitigation, capital deferral, and improved services to end users. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research in 2009 developed analytics and methods to quantify the locational value of electric energy storage options. The objectives of this project are to apply previously developed and generic energy storage dispatch models and evaluation methods to several cases and locations in the Sacramento Mu...

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Locational Analysis of Generation Benefits on Long Island, NewYork  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beginning in April of 2004, nine sites owned by Verizon began to participate in the Long Island Real Time Purchasing Pilot Project (LIRTP) as retail choice customers. LIRTP was designed to minimize electricity costs for retail customers who own on-site distributed generation (DG) units in the near-term, and to stabilize overall electricity costs in the long-term. The nine Verizon buildings have two types of DG units: gas turbines with an estimated generation cost of $156/MWh, and diesel units with an estimated cost of $120/MWh. Due to total site emission limits, the operable hours of the DG units are limited. To estimate the economic value of running on-site DG units, an analysis of the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) Locational Based Marginal Price (LBMP) data for Long Island was conducted, mainly covering the summer months from 2000 to 2004. Distributions of LBMP, relationship between LBMP and load, and estimates of profitable operating hours for the units were all analyzed. Since Long Island is a diverse and highly congested area, LBMP varies greatly. Looking at the data statistically offers a zone-wide viewpoint, while using spatial analysis shows the LBMP intrazonal differentiation. LBMP is currently used by NYISO for pricing in the 11 NY control zones. Because geographic information systems (GIS) visualize the distribution of a phenomenon over space, it clarifies where load and generation nodes are located, and where load reduction would be most valuable. This study is based on the assumption that the control zone areas do not fully represent the diversity of pricing, and that intrazonal pricing can be analyzed to determine where and when electricity conservation or injection into the network is most valuable.

Wang, Juan; Cohen, Jesse; Edwards, Jennifer; Marnay, Chris

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Analysis of the Benefits of Photovoltaic in High Rise Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficient glazing is necessary to reduce heat gains or losses that contribute to the high-energy use of buildings. However, high-rise commercial buildings that use energy efficient glazing are still consumptive. To reduce their energy use further, recent studies have integrated photovoltaic glazed window systems into the building shell. To understand the relationship between photovoltaic windows, energy use and human satisfaction, this paper presents a study of the effects of photovoltaic glazed windows on the energy use of large commercial buildings and includes an assessment of the overall human satisfaction of the workers within photovoltaic glazed office spaces. A prototypical building was used to develop the base case simulations for the DOE-2 energy simulation program and the PV F-Chart photovoltaic analysis program. By substituting the appropriate variables in the base case simulation for each site, the building was simulated to evaluate the impact of the PV glazing on the building's heat loss/gain as well as the amount of electricity that could be expected from the PV. To test for human satisfaction, a survey was performed to assess the overall preference of the subjects to the office spaces using the photovoltaic glazed windows. Finally, an overall assessment of the economic and non-economic impacts is also discussed.

Sylvester, K. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

120

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of energy analysis models, tools, and software ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most of these tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Energy Data for Decision Makers Crosscutting Analysis Models and Tools Technology Analysis Models...

122

Engineering Risk Benefit Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." Commission's White Paper, February 1999 * Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a...

123

Combustion instability modeling and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings realized by water conservation or efficiencythe benefits and costs of water conservation or efficiencycost savings from water conservation requires knowing the

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 California Water Rate Survey. 2006. Black & VeatchRegional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit5 Calculated Marginal Rates for

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis of the Performance Benefits of Short-Term Energy Storage in Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of prototype high penetration wind-diesel hybrid power systems have been implemented with different amounts of energy storage. They range from systems with no energy storage to those with many hours worth of energy storage. There has been little consensus among wind-diesel system developers as to the appropriate role and amount of energy storage in such systems. Some researchers advocate providing only enough storage capacity to supply power during the time it takes the diesel genset to start. Others install large battery banks to allow the diesel(s) to operate at full load and/or to time-shift the availability of wind-generated electricity to match the demand. Prior studies indicate that for high penetration wind-diesel systems, short-term energy storage provides the largest operational and economic benefit. This study uses data collected in Deering, Alaska, a small diesel-powered village, and the hybrid systems modeling software Hybrid2 to determine the optimum amount of short-term storage for a particular high penetration wind-diesel system. These findings were then generalized by determining how wind penetration, turbulence intensity, and load variability affect the value of short term energy storage as measured in terms of fuel savings, total diesel run time, and the number of diesel starts.

Shirazi, M.; Drouilhet, S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Modeling, Testing and Analysis to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by

128

NREL: Energy Analysis - Market Analysis Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Market Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools that are used for market...

129

Ventilation Model and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

V. Chipman

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

130

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure analysis model. Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) Determine which supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate the deployment of biofuels....

132

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: The Oil Security Metrics Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Full Title: The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Research and...

134

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research ...

135

A project to improve the capabilities of minorities in energy fields and a cost benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project being reported in this document had three components: (1) a research project to carry out cost-benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant at Tuskegee University, (2) seminars to improve the high-technology capabilities of minority persons, and (3) a class in energy management. The report provides a background on the three components listed above. The results from the research on the ethyl alcohol plant, are discussed, along with the seminars, and details of the energy management class.

Sara, T.S.; Jones, M. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume III: Energy Extraction and Utilization Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the benefit/cost relationship for 44 research and development (R and D) projects being funded by the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), Department of Energy (DOE) as a part of its Energy Extraction and Conversion Technology program. The benefits were computed in terms of the savings resulting from the reduction in the cost of electricity projected to be generated at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000, due to technological improvements brought about by successful R and D. The costs of various projects were estimated by referring to the actual expenditures already incurred and the projected future budgets for these projects. In certain cases, the expected future expenditures had to be estimated on the basis of the work which would need to be done to carry a project to the commercialization stage.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Pfundstein, Richard T.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE FY 2011 Advanced Combustion Technologies Annual Report. CLEERS is a research and development focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY 2011, more emphasis was placed on the SCR and LNT activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies. Objectives of this project are to lead and contribute to the Cross-Cut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulations (CLEERS) activities - (a) Provide project updates to the industry sub-team, solicit feedback, and adjust work scope accordingly; and (b) Lead technical discussions, invite distinguished speakers, and maintain an open dialogue on selective catalytic reduction (SCR), lean-NOx trap (LNT), and diesel particulate filter (DPF) modeling issues. Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Objectives are to: (1) Develop improved modeling capabilities for SCR and DPFs through fundamental experiments; and (2) Develop a fundamental understanding of SCR and LNT catalysts with primary focus on reaction mechanisms and material characterization. Some accomplishments are: (1) Participated in monthly CLEERS teleconferences and coordinated the calls focused on SCR, LNT and DPF technologies; (2) Updated PNNL's SCR model for the state-of-the-art commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst to extract kinetic parameters and to quantitatively describe the effects of hydrothermal aging; (3) Examined the effects of hydrothermal aging on the physicochemical properties and SCR reactions using the commercial Cu catalyst in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (4) Investigated the nature of Cu species and obtained kinetic parameters for small-pore zeolite-based Cu SCR catalyst. (5) Examined the effects of support materials for Ba-based LNT catalysts, and found magnesium aluminate may improve the oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) reduction performance at high temperatures; (6) Investigated soot oxidation mechanisms for relevant oxidants (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}) through reactor experiments and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) analysis; (7) Seven publications and 21 public presentations (eight invited) during the past FY; and (8) Co-organized sessions on emission control and modeling for the SAE World Congress and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Internal Combustion Engine Conference.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Strzelec, Andrea; Szanyi, Janos; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

NREL: Energy Analysis - Lynn Billman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas of expertise Benefits analysis for EERE programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy market research Analysis, modeling, and projection of capital requirements and...

139

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Cost: Paid Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Screenshot

140

The Common Information Model (CIM) Standard - An Analysis of Features and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract – In this paper an analysis of the Common Information Model (CIM) standard for object-oriented information specification in network and system management is given, including a short discussion of several important potential benefits and open issues, and a presentation of original extensions of the standard- solutions to some open issues.

Vladimir Tosic; Slobodanka Djordjevic-kajan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

142

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research institutions have ...

143

Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis (EIMA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis (EIMA) Division is focused on ensuring the reliability and resiliency of the U.S. electric grid through robust analytical, modeling, and assessment...

144

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study Biomass Direct Offshore Wind Concentrating Solar Powerwind resources with much greater specificity, and may model both offshore and

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

147

Bifurcation Analysis of Various Power System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifurcation Analysis of Various Power System Models William D. Rosehart Claudio A. Ca This paper presents the bifurcation analysis of a detailed power system model composed of an aggregated induction motor and impedance load supplied by an under-load tap-changer transformer and an equivalent

Cañizares, Claudio A.

148

SQLSAM: SQL for statistical analysis and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical modeling and analysis is extensively used in businesses for various purposes including graphic visualization of data, measurement of central tendencies and other statistics, and inferences on populations based on samples. Data is the fundamental ... Keywords: SQL, SQLSAM, business, business data processing, business decision making, continuous probability distributions, data visualisation, decision support systems, discrete probability distributions, graphic visualization, inferences, inferential statistics, organization databases, probability, query languages, regression analysis, standard database language, statistical analysis, statistical databases, statistical modeling, statistics

J. Choobineh; A. Kini

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Systems thinking benefits in supply change management: an illustration of the viable systems model in a Supply Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing product development models are solely an organisational matter. They do not take into consideration the whole Supply Chain (SC) and its different actors. In this article, we investigate how Supply Chain Management and Viable System Model ... Keywords: SCM, VSM, lead user, process industry, product development, supply chain management, viable system model

Diana Chroneer; Anita Mirijamdotter

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California studies. Biomass co-firing and direct combustionCalifornia studies. Biomass co-firing and direct combustionin the study is biomass co-firing. e - Study models fuel

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

significant significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its "Recovery through Retrofit" plan. 1 The residential PACE model 2 involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached

153

Assessing the Customer and Investor Benefits of Generation R&D Results in a Carbon Constrained Environment: An Exploratory Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a beginning investigation into the value of generating technology improvements as future power and carbon markets evolve. Two related studies one examining cost and performance improvements across a range of new technologies, and the other looking specifically at the value of Carbon Capture and Storage retrofit to existing coal generation are presented. The common thread linking these is an emphasis on power system modeling and on the future complex interactions among technologies a...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Transition Model ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report ArticleAbstract Title: VII.11 Development of HyTrans Model and Integrated Scenario Analysis Page number(s): 1307 Publisher: U.S. Department of Energy Author...

155

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: GREET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREET Model GREET Model Project Summary Full Title: Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Model Project ID: 84 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); emissions; greenhouse gases (GHG); fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose GREET supports Milestone 24 of the Systems Analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program: Complete baseline economic, energy efficiency, and environmental targets for fossil, nuclear and renewable hydrogen production and delivery technologies. GREET also supports the 3rd objective listed in the DOE Hydrogen Program's Systems Analysis Plan: Well-to-Wheels Analysis: Conduct on-going, integrated well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen pathways for introducing hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The analysis

156

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Survey review of models for use in market penetration analysis: utility sector focus  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate benefits of federal expenditures in research and development for new technologies are dependent upon the degree of acceptance of these technologies. Market penetration considerations are central to the problem of quantifying the potential benefits. These benefits are inputs to the selection process of projects competing for finite R and D funds. Market penetration is the gradual acceptance of a new commodity or technology. The Office of Coal utilization is concerned with the specialized area of market penetration of new electric power generation technologies for both replacement and new capacity. The common measure of market penetration is the fraction of the market serviced by the challenging technology for each time point considered. The methodologies for estimating market penetration are divided into three generic classes: integrated energy/economy modeling systems, utility capacity expansion models, and technology substitution models. In general, the integrated energy/economy modeling systems have three advantages: they provide internally consistent macro, energy-economy scenarios, they account for the effect of prices on demand by fuel form, and they explicitly capture the effects of population growth and the level and structure of economic activity on energy demand. A variety of deficiencies appear in most energy-economy systems models. All of the methodologies may be applied at some level to questions of market penetration of new technologies in the utility sector; choice of methods for a particular analysis must be conditioned by the scope of the analysis, data availability, and the relative cost of alternative analysis.

Groncki, P.J.; Kydes, A.S.; Lamontagne, J.; Marcuse, W.; Vinjamuri, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Analysis Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by modeling, testing, and analysis. This work complements the research on batteries, power electronics, and materials, helping researchers integrate these components and ensure the whole vehicle meets consumer and commercial needs. Modeling allows researchers to build "virtual vehicles" that simulate fuel economy, emissions and performance of a potential vehicle. The Office has supported the development of several software-based analytic tools that researchers can use or license. Integration and Validation allows researchers to test physical component and subsystem prototypes as if they are in a real vehicle. Laboratory and Fleet Testing provides data on PEVs through both dynamometer and on-the-road testing. Researchers use the data to benchmark current vehicles, as well as validate the accuracy of software models.

159

Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Building energy analysis is often time-intensive, error-prone, and non-reproducible. Entire energy analyses can be scripted end-to-end using the OpenStudio Ruby API. Common tasks within an analysis can be automated using OpenStudio Measures. Graphical user interfaces (GUI's) and component libraries reduce time, decrease errors, and improve repeatability in energy modeling.

Macumber, D.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Arabic texts analysis for topic modeling evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in information retrieval covering text semantic indexing and multilingual analysis. However, developments in Arabic information retrieval did not follow the extraordinary growth of Arabic usage in the Web during the ... Keywords: Arabic stemming, Classification, Linguistic analysis, Test collections, Topic model

Abderrezak Brahmi; Ahmed Ech-Cherif; Abdelkader Benyettou

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Wind Energy Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy provides many benefits, including economic and environmental. This two-sided fact sheet succinctly outlines the top ten wind energy benefits and is especially well suited for general audiences.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Speech Under Stress: Analysis, Modeling and Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter, we consider a range of issues associated with analysis, modeling, and recognition of speech under stress. We start by defining stress, what could be perceived as stress, and how it affects the speech production system. In the discussion ... Keywords: Lombard effect, Teager energy operator, hidden Markov models, pitch contours, robustness in speech recognition, speech technology, stress classification

John H. Hansen; Sanjay Patil

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Automated analysis of security-design models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have previously proposed SecureUML, an expressive UML-based language for constructing security-design models, which are models that combine design specifications for distributed systems with specifications of their security policies. Here, we show ... Keywords: Formal analysis, Metamodels, OCL, SecureUML, Security policies, UML

David Basin; Manuel Clavel; Jürgen Doser; Marina Egea

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling window optics for building energy analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses modeling the optics of windows for the purposes of simulating building energy requirements or daylighting availability. The theory for calculating the optical performance of conventional windows is reviewed. The simplifications that might commonly be made in creating computational models are analyzed. Some of the possibilities for more complex windows are analyzed, and the type of model and data that would be necessary to simulate such windows in a building energy analysis program are determined. It is shown that the optical performance of different window types can be simulated with models which require varying amounts of memory or computing time. It is recommended that a building energy analysis program have all models available and use the most efficient for any given window.

Walton, G.N.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Here » Benefits Working Here » Benefits Benefits Enjoy First Rate Federal Career Benefits As a DOE employee, you'll have access to exceptional Federal benefits with a variety of plan options that often exceed those offered in the private sector. In addition, you'll have competitive remuneration, continuous learning opportunities, and paid time off to help you construct an enjoyable work-life balance. You'll benefit from: Great salary Recruitment incentives Personal leave (vacation) Sick leave Student loan repayments Matching 401(k) retirement contribution Career development Possibility of opportunities to see the world Training Work-Life balance Flexible work schedules Retirement plan Health/Vision/Dental plans Flexible spending account Specifically, Federal career benefits for DOE employees include:

167

The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

505 505 The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs May 2006 David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Paul N. Leiby Senior Research Staff DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

168

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies - Energy ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of energy analysis models, tools, and software ...

169

Has the Decrease in the AFDC Benefit Reduction Rate Increased Work Effort? An Analysis of the California Work Pays Demonstration Project for 12/92 - 6/94  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HAS THE DECREASE IN THE AFDC BENEFIT REDUCTION RATEthe Demonstration Project? Are More AFDC Recipients Working?Are AFDC Recipients Earning More? Are AFDC Recipients

Sprague, Mary

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typicalinfluence consumer electricity bills. Some benefits thatconsumer’s monthly electricity bill. Figure presents

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection i...

Donald Greer Research; Donald Greer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

System Benefits Charge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New York's system benefits charge (SBC), established in 1996 by the New York Public Service Commission (PSC), supports energy efficiency, education and outreach, research and development, and low...

173

A Legacy of Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Over more than three decades, FE research and development has established a legacy of significant achievement and return of value and benefits for the public funds invested.

174

Event Model Interfaces for Heterogeneous System Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex embedded systems consist of hardware and software components from different domains, such as control and signal processing, many of them supplied by different IP vendors. The embedded system designer faces the challenge to integrate, optimize and verify the resulting heterogeneous systems. While formal verification is available for some subproblems, the analysis of the whole system is currently limited to simulation or emulation. In this paper, we tackle the analysis of global resource sharing, scheduling, and buffer sizing in heterogeneous embedded systems. For many practically used preemptive and non-preemptive hardware and software scheduling algorithms of processors and busses, semi-formal analysis techniques are known. However, they cannot be used in system level analysis due to incompatibilities of their underlying event models. This paper presents a technique to couple the analysis of local scheduling strategies via an event interface model. We derive transformation rules between the most important event models and provide proofs where necessary. We use expressive examples to illustrate their application.

Kai Richter; Rolf Ernst

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

176

Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for a Job Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media » Benefits With outstanding benefits, competitive pay, wellness programs and a stimulating and attractive work environment, Argonne is a tremendous place to pursue your career. Employee benefits are a key factor when evaluating a career opportunity. At Argonne, you'll find a comprehensive array of benefits to meet a variety of needs. In addition to medical, dental, life and disability coverage, you'll have access to paid time off, a retirement plan with a generous match and a number of other benefits, such as adoption assistance, an on-site child care center and auto and homeowners' insurance. Wellness plays an important role in life at Argonne. We offer a variety of

177

Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

178

Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash...

179

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of...

180

Alternative methods to determine headwater benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) began using a Flow Duration Analysis (FDA) methodology to assess headwater benefits in river basins where use of the Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) model may not result in significant improvements in modeling accuracy. The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy and appropriateness of the FDA method for determining energy gains in less complex basins. This report presents the results of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) validation of the FDA method. The validation is based on a comparison of energy gains using the FDA method with energy gains calculated using the MWBEG model. Comparisons of energy gains are made on a daily and monthly basis for a complex river basin (the Alabama River Basin) and a basin that is considered relatively simple hydrologically (the Stanislaus River Basin). In addition to validating the FDA method, ORNL was asked to suggest refinements and improvements to the FDA method. Refinements and improvements to the FDA method were carried out using the James River Basin as a test case.

Bao, Y.S.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The state of Michigan is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models and Tools Archive Models and Tools Archive Through the years, NREL has developed and supported several models and tools to assess, analyze, and optimize renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Some of these have been transferred to the private market. This page lists tools we have supported, but that are no longer active. See current models and tools here. ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. In 2003, ADVISOR was commercialized by AVL Powertrain Engineering, Inc. Hybrid2 Conduct detailed long-term performance and economic analysis on a wide variety of hybrid power systems. RET Finance Calculate the cost of energy of renewable electricity generation

183

Public Benefits Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Other Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission '''''Note: Currently, the four funds are not collecting revenue. The funds are transitioning toward a revolving loan and investment fund model in order to sustain their capital. ''''' Although Pennsylvania's December 1996 electricity restructuring law did not establish a clean-energy fund, four renewable and sustainable-energy

184

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Building energy modeling and analysis is currently a time-intensive, error-prone, and nonreproducible process. This paper describes the scripting platform of the OpenStudio tool suite (http://openstudio.nrel.gov) and demonstrates its use in several contexts. Two classes of scripts are described and demonstrated: measures and free-form scripts. Measures are small, single-purpose scripts that conform to a predefined interface. Because measures are fairly simple, they can be written or modified by inexperienced programmers.

Hale, E.; Macumber, D.; Benne, K.; Goldwasser, D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy technology R&D is a cornerstone of U.S. energy policy. Understanding the potential for energy technology R&D to solve the nation's energy problems is critical to formulating a successful R&D program. In light of this, the U.S. Congress requested the National Research Council (NRC) to undertake both retrospective and prospective assessments of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy Research programs (NRC, 2001; NRC, 2005). ("The Congress continued to express its interest in R&D benefits assessment by providing funds for the NRC to build on the retrospective methodology to develop a methodology for assessing prospective benefits." NRC, 2005, p. ES-2) In 2004, the NRC Committee on Prospective Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy R&D Programs published a report recommending a new framework and principles for prospective benefits assessment. The Committee explicitly deferred the issue of estimating security benefits to future work. Recognizing the need for a rigorous framework for assessing the energy security benefits of its R&D programs, the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) developed a framework and approach for defining energy security metrics for R&D programs to use in gauging the energy security benefits of their programs (Lee, 2005). This report describes methods for estimating the prospective oil security benefits of EERE's R&D programs that are consistent with the methodologies of the NRC (2005) Committee and that build on Lee's (2005) framework. Its objective is to define and implement a method that makes use of the NRC's typology of prospective benefits and methodological framework, satisfies the NRC's criteria for prospective benefits evaluation, and permits measurement of that portion of the prospective energy security benefits of EERE's R&D portfolio related to oil. While the Oil Security Metrics (OSM) methodology described in this report has been specifically developed to estimate the prospective oil security benefits of DOE's R&D programs, it is also applicable to other strategies and policies aimed at changing U.S. petroleum demand.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Benefits Solutions Service Center Health Insurance including: Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Services and Pension Plan, Savings and Investment Plan (SIP). Benefits Solutions Service Center 803.725.7772 (locally) or 800.368.7333 Benefit Related Customer Service Numbers 1.866.288.3257, website: www.ibenefitcenter.com Representatives M-F 9:00 - 5:00 EST System available 24 hours a day Monday - Saturday, and Sunday after 1 p.m. 1.800.325.6596 (Prime,Standard, Basic, Dental and Flexible Spending Accounts: Option 5 for COBRA and 3161 Benefits) M-F 8:30 - 4:30 1.800.868.-1032 (Mental Health and Substance Abuse Assistance) 1.800.521.3606, Vision Plan 1.800.581.4222, Westinghouse Corporate Pension 1.800.581.3366, Westinghouse Corporate Savings Plan

188

Improving the daylighting conditions of existing buildings : the benefits and limitations of integrating anidolic daylighting systems using the American classroom as a model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Awareness of the benefits of good daylighting has risen in recent years, and the designs of many new buildings take daylighting into consideration. However, the majority of our built environment is older than this recent ...

Kleindienst, Siân A. (Siân Alexandra)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bayesian Analysis of Errors-in-Variables Growth Curve Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixture Models. In Robust Bayesian Analysis. Lecture NotesA. (2004). Nonparametric Bayesian Data Analysis. Statistical95-110. West, M. (1990). Bayesian Kernel Density Estimation.

Huang, Hung-Jen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thermodynamic modeling of transcription: sensitivity analysis differentiates biological mechanism from mathematical model-induced effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Dresch et al. : Thermodynamic modeling of transcription:ARTICLE Open Access Thermodynamic modeling of transcription:on the analysis of thermodynamic models, which have been

Dresch, Jacqueline M; Liu, Xiaozhou; Arnosti, David N; Ay, Ahmet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sensitivity analysis of mobile home space conditioning energy requirements to selection of U-values in twelve climates and cost/benefit analysis of U-values proposed for the federal manufactured housing construction (FMHC) and safety standards (SS)  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the sensitivity of four suggested and existing building thermal performance standards to mobile home heating and cooling loads and to the seasonal energy consumption of the equipment meeting these loads. It also evaluates the net costs and benefits of an Office of Mobile Home Standards proposal to increase the level of stringency of the present regulation. Three mobile homes, each representing typical single - wide and double - wide homes, were selected to be simulated for 12 cities. The thermal resistance of the wall, roof, floor, door, and window components of the thermal envelope were chosen to reflect both common or potential construction methods and to obtain the overall U - value levels required by each standard level. The ''Hot House'' program was selected to determine seasonal energy consumption. Results indicate that seasonal loads decrease with decreasing U - values, although in some cases a decrease U - value resulted in a slight increase in the seasonal cooling load. The best standards for thermal performance and U - values are noted, as are sults of the cost - benefit analysis. Tables, eight references, and a ''Hot House'' program listing are included.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Adaptive time-frequency analysis based on autoregressive modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new adaptive method for discrete time-frequency analysis based on autoregressive (AR) modeling is introduced. The performance of AR modeling often depends upon a good selection of the model order. The predictive least squares (PLS) principle of Rissanen ... Keywords: Adaptive filters, Autoregressive modeling, Least squares methods, Model order, Time-frequency analysis

Antonio H. Costa; Stephan Hengstler

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Risk analysis of nuclear safeguards regulations. [Aggregated Systems Model (ASM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aggregated Systems Model (ASM), a probabilisitic risk analysis tool for nuclear safeguards, was applied to determine benefits and costs of proposed amendments to NRC regulations governing nuclear material control and accounting systems. The objective of the amendments was to improve the ability to detect insiders attempting to steal large quantities of special nuclear material (SNM). Insider threats range from likely events with minor consequences to unlikely events with catastrophic consequences. Moreover, establishing safeguards regulations is complicated by uncertainties in threats, safeguards performance, and consequences, and by the subjective judgments and difficult trade-offs between risks and safeguards costs. The ASM systematically incorporates these factors in a comprehensive, analytical framework. The ASM was used to evaluate the effectiveness of current safeguards and to quantify the risk of SNM theft. Various modifications designed to meet the objectives of the proposed amendments to reduce that risk were analyzed. Safeguards effectiveness was judged in terms of the probability of detecting and preventing theft, the expected time to detection, and the expected quantity of SNM diverted in a year. Data were gathered in tours and interviews at NRC-licensed facilities. The assessment at each facility was begun by carefully selecting scenarios representing the range of potential insider threats. A team of analysts and facility managers assigned probabilities for detection and prevention events in each scenario. Using the ASM we computed the measures of system effectiveness and identified cost-effective safeguards modifications that met the objectives of the proposed amendments.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Altman, W.D.; Judd, B.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Production Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Model Project Summary Full Title: H2A Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis Model Project ID: 219 Principal Investigator: Todd Ramsden Brief Description: The H2A Production...

195

AFDC Benefits and Nonmarital Births to Young Women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on recent work by Rosenzweig (1999), this paper re-examines the effect of AFDC benefits on early non-marital childbearing. Unlike most previous work in this area, Rosenzweig finds a statistically significant and quantitatively large positive effect of AFDC benefits. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we replicate Rosenzweig’s analysis and explore the reasons his findings differ from earlier research findings. We are able to reproduce his main finding that AFDC generosity influences non-marital childbearing when state and cohort fixed-effects are included. However, we find that model specification matters a great deal. An alternative specification of state fixed-effects yields no evidence of an AFDC effect, and when we focus on fertility only through age 19 (as in prior work), we also find no AFDC effect. This latter finding implies that the behavior of women in their early 20s may be far more sensitive to welfare In this paper, we replicate and extend recent research by Mark Rosenzweig (1999) on the relationship between AFDC benefits and non-marital childbearing by young women. Most previous work on the effects of AFDC benefit levels on a wide range of demographic behaviors, including non-marital childbearing, has found a relatively weak relationship. In some papers, benefits do have a statistically significant effect that is

Saul D. Hoffman; E. Michael Foster; David Neumark; Robert Moffitt; Rebecca Blank; Greg Duncan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

197

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: FLOW Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOW Model FLOW Model Project Summary Full Title: Chemical Engineering Process Simulation Platform - FLOW Project ID: 131 Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Brief Description: FLOW is a steady-state chemical process simulator. Modules have been developed for supply chain calculations, micro-economic calculations, and other calculations. Purpose Simulate steady-state chemical processes to support hydrogen infrastructure and transition analysis. Performer Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Address: Bethel Valley 1, Bldg 5700, N217 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 Telephone: 865-574-4998 Email: ferradajj@ornl.gov Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE Hydrogen Program Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov

198

Analysis of boiling experiment using inverse modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical predictions of geothermal reservoir behavior strongly depend on the assumed steam-water relative permeabilities, which are difficult and time-consuming to measure in the laboratory. This paper describes the esti- mation of the parameters of the relative per- meability and capillary pressure functions by automatically matching simulation results to data from a transient boiling experiment performed on a Berea sandstone. A sensitivity analysis reveals the strong dependence of the observed system behavior on effects such as heat transfer from the heater to the core, as well as heat losses through the insulation. Parameters of three conceptual models were estimated by inverse modeling. Each calibra- tion yields consistent effective steam perme- abilities, but the shape of the liquid relative permeability remains ambiguous.

Finsterle, S.; Guerrero, M.; Satik, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Eligibility for Retiree Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment for Retiree Benefits Age + years of service determines eligibility for retiree healthcare benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Healthcare insurance eligibility upon retirement To be eligible for retiree healthcare insurance, TCP1 and TCP2 employees must: be at least age 50 with at least 10 years of applicable service credits; or have at least 5 years of applicable service credits and meet the "Rule of 75" (age + service credits equal at least 75). LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees (pdf) - see additional eligiblity requirements Note: TCP1 and TCP2 employees with less than 20 years of service are subject to graduated eligibilty. Transitioning employees who were hired in a career position with UC before January 1, 1990 receive 100% of the LANS

200

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Forms Medical Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-340 Medical Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 -- Pharmacy Claim Form Caremark Prescription Drug Claim Processing Center, P.O. Box 52059, Phoenix, AZ 85072-2059 Dental Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-342 Dental Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 Life Insurance Return completed forms to: 5-171 Contributory Group Life Application and Deduction Authorization Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Benefits and Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Challenges Benefits and Challenges Benefits Photo: Fuel cell exhaust emits no harmful pollutants Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), that contribute to global climate change. Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) powered by pure hydrogen emit no GHGs from their tailpipe, only heat and water. Producing the hydrogen to power FCVs can generate GHGs, depending on the production method, but much less than that emitted by conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles. more... The chart below shows the GHGs generated by various vehicle types and considers all steps of the energy chain from fuel extraction or production to fuel use by the vehicle, not just tailpipe emissions. Even when accounting for the GHGs emitted during hydrogen production, conventional

202

MODELING ANALYSIS FOR GROUT HOPPER WASTE TANK  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout nuclear waste slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The primary objective of the work was to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet.

Lee, S.

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations Ignasi in forthcoming publications. Keywords-grounding analysis; earthing analysis, underground substations; I to a river (at substations next to hydroelectric dams), or the grounding system of a buried electrical

Colominas, Ignasi

204

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Choices Improving Reliability, Resilency, Survivability of an Aging Infrastructure Annual Benefit ( millions) Custom er Utility Society Annual Benefit of Achieved...

205

Kernel principal component analysis for stochastic input model generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media provides useful information only if realistic input models of the material property variations are used. These input models are often constructed from a set of experimental samples of the underlying random ... Keywords: Data-driven models, Flow in random porous media, Kernel principal component analysis, Non-linear model reduction, Stochastic partial differential equations

Xiang Ma; Nicholas Zabaras

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

207

Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

208

Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

209

A hierarchical analysis of terrestrial ecosystem model Biome-BGC: Equilibrium analysis and model calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing complexity of ecosystem models represents a major difficulty in tuning model parameters and analyzing simulated results. To address this problem, this study develops a hierarchical scheme that simplifies the Biome-BGC model into three functionally cascaded tiers and analyzes them sequentially. The first-tier model focuses on leaf-level ecophysiological processes; it simulates evapotranspiration and photosynthesis with prescribed leaf area index (LAI). The restriction on LAI is then lifted in the following two model tiers, which analyze how carbon and nitrogen is cycled at the whole-plant level (the second tier) and in all litter/soil pools (the third tier) to dynamically support the prescribed canopy. In particular, this study analyzes the steady state of these two model tiers by a set of equilibrium equations that are derived from Biome-BGC algorithms and are based on the principle of mass balance. Instead of spinning-up the model for thousands of climate years, these equations are able to estimate carbon/nitrogen stocks and fluxes of the target (steady-state) ecosystem directly from the results obtained by the first-tier model. The model hierarchy is examined with model experiments at four AmeriFlux sites. The results indicate that the proposed scheme can effectively calibrate Biome-BGC to simulate observed fluxes of evapotranspiration and photosynthesis; and the carbon/nitrogen stocks estimated by the equilibrium analysis approach are highly consistent with the results of model simulations. Therefore, the scheme developed in this study may serve as a practical guide to calibrate/analyze Biome-BGC; it also provides an efficient way to solve the problem of model spin-up, especially for applications over large regions. The same methodology may help analyze other similar ecosystem models as well.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Weile [ORNL; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) (Redirected from Policy Analysis Modeling System) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

212

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Purdue University Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/models/current.asp Cost: Free References: GTAP[1] Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste ICCT Roadmap Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model

213

Modular analysis and modelling of risk scenarios with dependencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The risk analysis of critical infrastructures such as the electric power supply or telecommunications is complicated by the fact that such infrastructures are mutually dependent. We propose a modular approach to the modelling and analysis of risk scenarios ... Keywords: Critical infrastructure, Dependency, Modular risk analysis, Risk scenario, Threat modelling

Gyrd Brændeland; Atle Refsdal; Ketil Stølen

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Bayesian models for DNA microarray data analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection of signi?cant genes via expression patterns is important in a microarray problem. Owing to small sample size and large number of variables (genes), the selection process can be unstable. This research proposes a hierarchical Bayesian model for gene (variable) selection. We employ latent variables in a regression setting and use a Bayesian mixture prior to perform the variable selection. Due to the binary nature of the data, the posterior distributions of the parameters are not in explicit form, and we need to use a combination of truncated sampling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based computation techniques to simulate the posterior distributions. The Bayesian model is ?exible enough to identify the signi?cant genes as well as to perform future predictions. The method is applied to cancer classi?cation via cDNA microarrays. In particular, the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with a hereditary disposition to breast cancer, and the method is used to identify the set of signi?cant genes to classify BRCA1 and others. Microarray data can also be applied to survival models. We address the issue of how to reduce the dimension in building model by selecting signi?cant genes as well as assessing the estimated survival curves. Additionally, we consider the wellknown Weibull regression and semiparametric proportional hazards (PH) models for survival analysis. With microarray data, we need to consider the case where the number of covariates p exceeds the number of samples n. Speci?cally, for a given vector of response values, which are times to event (death or censored times) and p gene expressions (covariates), we address the issue of how to reduce the dimension by selecting the responsible genes, which are controlling the survival time. This approach enables us to estimate the survival curve when n << p. In our approach, rather than ?xing the number of selected genes, we will assign a prior distribution to this number. The approach creates additional ?exibility by allowing the imposition of constraints, such as bounding the dimension via a prior, which in e?ect works as a penalty. To implement our methodology, we use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We demonstrate the use of the methodology with (a) di?use large B??cell lymphoma (DLBCL) complementary DNA (cDNA) data and (b) Breast Carcinoma data. Lastly, we propose a mixture of Dirichlet process models using discrete wavelet transform for a curve clustering. In order to characterize these time??course gene expresssions, we consider them as trajectory functions of time and gene??speci?c parameters and obtain their wavelet coe?cients by a discrete wavelet transform. We then build cluster curves using a mixture of Dirichlet process priors.

Lee, Kyeong Eun

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Modeling and Simulation - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and route airlift (CAMPS), and key components for the Department of Energy's National Energy Modeling System. We have designed and developed models for personal computers,...

216

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Discussion for Metrics and Benefits Data Collection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs Joe Paladino Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy OE Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting March 10, 2011 140 ARRA-Funded Smart Grid Projects 1 Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems SGIG/SGDP/RDSI Areas of Smart Grid Technology Deployment Customer Systems Advance Metering Infrastructure Electric Distribution Systems Electric Transmission Systems * Displays * Portals * Energy management * Direct load controls * Smart meters * Data management * Back office integration * Switches * Feeder optimization * Equipment monitoring * Energy Storage * Wide area monitoring and visualization * Synchrophasor Technology * Energy Storage Customer Systems Equipment Manufacturing

218

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership Hydrogen Delivery, Storage and Fuel Pathway Integration Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Energetics...

219

System Design, Analysis, Modeling, and Media Engineering Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modeling and simulations of * various storage systems configurations. Lead the storage system energy analysis and provide * results. Compile and obtain media engineering...

220

ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED BUILDING ENERGY AND CONTROL SYSTEMS Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: October 21, 2009 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy and Control Systems Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: August 10, 2009 -...

222

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting...

223

Analysis of Timescales of Response of a Simple Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis is made of various analytic solutions to a 0D climate model coupled to an upwelling diffusion ocean model. In particular, the responses to impulse, step-function, exponential, and linear forcings are addressed. The coupled ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Kimberly J. Schaudt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

TIPPtool: Compositional Specification and Analysis of Markovian Performance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this short paper we briefly describe a tool which is based on a Markovian stochastic process algebra. The tool offers both model specification and quantitative model analysis in a compositional fashion, wrapped in a userfriendly graphical front-end.

Holger Hermanns; Vassilis Mertsiotakis; Markus Siegle

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modeling and Hazard Analysis Using Stpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A joint research project between MIT and JAXA/JAMSS is investigating the application of a new hazard analysis to the system and software in the HTV. Traditional hazard analysis focuses on component failures but software ...

Ishimatsu, Takuto

226

A framework for formal modeling and analysis of organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, formal, role-based, framework for modeling and analyzing both real world and artificial organizations is introduced. It exploits static and dynamic properties of the organizational model and includes the (frequently ignored) environment. The transition ... Keywords: Analysis, Computational, Logic-based, Modeling, Organization model, Simulation, Verification

Catholijn M. Jonker; Alexei Sharpanskykh; Jan Treur; Pinar Yolum

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

228

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/29790 Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model ... further results The part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents human systems; a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model

229

Bayesian Analysis of MTD/BMTD Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chinese Restaurant Process . . . . . . . . . . . . 107107 Posteriors Chinese Restaurant Partition Rules . . . . .Model with DP Chinese Restaurant Representation ix Determine

Song, Huiming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

Hadley, S.W.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wind resource data in 13 developing countries. Contact Dan Getman for more information. Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) Determine optimal production and...

232

Genome Analysis and Systems Modeling Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Microbial Genomes) Pipeline, Comprehensive Genome Analysis Pipeline Genome Channel, Java applet for the comprehensive sequence-based view of genomes. Grail, a tool for the...

233

Bayesian Analysis of MTD/BMTD Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

105 Bayesian Analysis and Chinese RestaurantFunction . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.3 Bayesian Method and ItsPros . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 Bayesian Method with EM

Song, Huiming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

MARCIE: model checking and reachability analysis done efficiently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MARCIE is a tool for the analysis of generalized stochastic Petri nets which can be augmented by rewards. The supported analysis methods range from qualitative and quantitative standard properties to model checking of established temporal logics. MARCIE's ... Keywords: generalized stochastic petri nets, model checking, simulation

Monika Heiner, Christian Rohr, Martin Schwarick

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Benefits of Applying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... who have received the Award—note the following ... resource decisions, actions, results, analysis, and learning. ... of people around the country and the ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar Advisor Model; Session: Modeling and Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project supports the Solar America Initiative by: (1) providing a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, PV, solar heat systems, CSP, residential, commercial and utility markets; (2) developing and validating performance models to enable accurate calculation of levelized cost of energy (LCOE); (3) providing a consistent modeling platform for all TPP's; and (4) supporting implementation and usage of cost models.

Blair, N.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Linking Bayesian networks and PLS path modeling for causal analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Causal knowledge based on causal analysis can advance the quality of decision-making and thereby facilitate a process of transforming strategic objectives into effective actions. Several creditable studies have emphasized the usefulness of causal analysis ... Keywords: Bayesian network, Causal analysis, PLS path modeling

Wei Wen Wu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the research and development work done until now in earthing analysis is devoted to cases where the soil can be modelled in terms of an homogeneous and isotropic semi-infinite continuous medium, being the soil resistivity an order of magnitude ... Keywords: grounding analysis, earthing analysis, underground substations

Ignasi Colominas; Jose Paris; Xesus Nogueira; Fermin Navarrina; Manuel Casteleiro

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

240

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Sciences Technology Analysis Models...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of system flexibility. It can also evaluate the role of enabling technologies such as demand response and energy storage. It is an updated version of the PVFlex model described in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: VISION Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VISION Model VISION Model Project Summary Full Title: VISION Model Project ID: 77 Principal Investigator: Margaret Singh Brief Description: Estimates the potential energy use, oil use and carbon emission impacts of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicles and alternative fuels through 2050. Keywords: Alternative fueled vehicles (AFV); hybrid electric vehicles (HEV); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); emissions; greenhouse gases (GHG) Purpose The VISION model has been developed by US DOE to provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use and carbon emission impacts to 2050 of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicles and alternative fuels. It is an Excel spreadsheet model which is particularly useful in responding to quick-turnaround requests for such estimates. It is updated annually to be

242

Mathematical Models in Landscape Ecology: Stability Analysis and Numerical Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper a review of some mathematical models for the ecological evaluation of environmental systems is considered. Moreover a new model, capable to furnish more detailed information at the level of landscape units, is proposed. Numerical ... Keywords: 34D05, 92F05, Landscape ecology, Mathematical models, Stability analysis

Federica Gobattoni; Giuliana Lauro; Roberto Monaco; Raffaele Pelorosso

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

244

Global sensitivity analysis of stochastic computer models with joint metamodels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global sensitivity analysis method used to quantify the influence of uncertain input variables on the variability in numerical model responses has already been applied to deterministic computer codes; deterministic means here that the same set of ... Keywords: Computer experiment, Gaussian process, Generalized additive model, Joint modeling, Sobol indices, Uncertainty

Amandine Marrel; Bertrand Iooss; Sébastien Veiga; Mathieu Ribatet

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Analysis of Markov Reward Models using Zerosuppressed Multiterminal BDDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Performance variables (PV) enable the modeler to define complex per­ formance and dependabilityAnalysis of Markov Reward Models using Zero­suppressed Multi­terminal BDDs K. Lampka and M. Siegle of systems and quantitative measures of in­ terest. The underlying Markov reward models (MRMs) of­ ten

Lampka, Kai

246

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis We have played a major role in the design and analysis of most existing and past reactor types and of many

247

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building energy analysis using EnergyPlus. The benchmarkenergy savings benefits of integrated control using the medium office building benchmark

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2007 Budget Request (GPRA 2007)  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE's programs, as described in the FY 2007 Budget Request.

Sheehan, J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Trajectory Analysis and Semantic Region Modeling Using A Nonparametric Bayesian Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel nonparametric Bayesian model, Dual Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes (Dual-HDP), for trajectory analysis and semantic region modeling in surveillance settings, in an unsupervised way. In our approach, ...

Grimson, Eric

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

251

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

252

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations, may make renewable generation less economic than when renewable energy is presumed to compete with natural gas;natural gas and/or wholesale electric prices that have not been modeled in many of the studies; The potential for future carbon regulations,

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

ParaText : scalable text modeling and analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text (news documents, web content, journal articles, etc.) is a key task in many data analysis and decision making applications. As data sizes grow, scalability is essential for deep analysis. In many cases, documents are modeled as term or feature vectors and latent semantic analysis (LSA) is used to model latent, or hidden, relationships between documents and terms appearing in those documents. LSA supplies conceptual organization and analysis of document collections by modeling high-dimension feature vectors in many fewer dimensions. While past work on the scalability of LSA modeling has focused on the SVD, the goal of our work is to investigate the use of distributed memory architectures for the entire text analysis process, from data ingestion to semantic modeling and analysis. ParaText is a set of software components for distributed processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text. The ParaText source code is available under a BSD license, as an integral part of the Titan toolkit. ParaText components are chained-together into data-parallel pipelines that are replicated across processes on distributed-memory architectures. Individual components can be replaced or rewired to explore different computational strategies and implement new functionality. ParaText functionality can be embedded in applications on any platform using the native C++ API, Python, or Java. The ParaText MPI Process provides a 'generic' text analysis pipeline in a command-line executable that can be used for many serial and parallel analysis tasks. ParaText can also be deployed as a web service accessible via a RESTful (HTTP) API. In the web service configuration, any client can access the functionality provided by ParaText using commodity protocols ... from standard web browsers to custom clients written in any language.

Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Community Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Benefits Essential to the lab's sustainability efforts is helping sustain the community by supporting economic development and sharing knowledge and resources with the...

255

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila...

256

A Hybrid Model for Hydroturbine Generating Unit Trend Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the nonlinear and nonstationary characteristics of hydroelectricity systems, an hybrid prediction model based on wavelet transform and support vector machines is proposed in this paper for the trend analysis of hydroturbine generating unit ...

Min Zou; Jianzhong Zhou; Zhong Liu; Liangliang Zhan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Macro-System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macro-System Model Macro-System Model Project Summary Full Title: Macro-System Model (MSM) Project ID: 66 Principal Investigator: Mark Ruth Brief Description: Federated object model framework is used to link other models to perform rapid cross-cutting analysis. Keywords: Transition; well-to-wheels (WTW); renewable; hydrogen production; emissions; cost Purpose Perform rapid cross-cutting analysis by utilizing and linking other models. This work will also improve consistency between models. Analyses that require the MSM will be used to support decisions regarding programmatic investments and focus of funding and to estimate program outputs and outcomes. Performer Principal Investigator: Mark Ruth Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd.

259

Dynamic physical and economic modelling of riparian restoration options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic simulation framework is used to compare benefit-cost ratios of riparian restoration investment strategies to pursue ecosystem service benefits. The model is meant to be adaptable to generic restoration planning applications, with the Middle ... Keywords: Adaptive management, Benefit-cost analysis, Choice experiment, Dynamic simulation, Ecosystem service, Rio Grande, River restoration

Matthew A. Weber; Vincent C. Tidwell; Jennifer A. Thacher

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste The document describes the initial work on designing and developing requirements for a total system performance assessment (TSPA) model that can support preliminary safety assessments for a mined geologic repository for high-level waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in salt host rock at a generic site. A preliminary generic salt TSPA model for HLW/SNF disposal has been developed and tested for an isothermal repository in salt, for emplaced waste that is assumed to have no decay heat; for salt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comprehensive Evaluation of Rail Transit Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates rail transit benefits based on a comprehensive analysis of urban transportation system performance in major U.S. cities. It discusses best practices for evaluating transit benefits. It finds that cities with larger, well-established rail systems have significantly higher per capita transit ridership, lower average per capita vehicle ownership and mileage, less traffic congestion, lower traffic death rates and lower consumer transportation expenditures than otherwise comparable cities. This indicates that rail transit systems can provide a variety of economic, social and environmental benefits, and benefits tend to increase as a system expands and matures. This analysis indicates that rail investments can be a cost effective way to improve urban transport. Parking, vehicle and congestion cost savings from rail transit are estimated to exceed total U.S. public transit subsidies. It critiques Great Rail Disasters (O’Toole, 2004), a report which argued that rail transit systems fail to achieve their objectives and are not cost effective. It finds that many claims in Great Rail Disasters are inaccurate, based on

Todd Litman; Todd Alexander Litman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

On guided model-based analysis for ear biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ears are a new biometric with a major advantage in that they appear to maintain their structure with increasing age. Current approaches have exploited 2D and 3D images of the ear in human identification. Contending that the ear is mainly a planar shape ... Keywords: Biometrics, Ear biometrics, Ear embryology, Model-based analysis, Occlusion analysis

Banafshe Arbab-Zavar; Mark S. Nixon

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Gera, Dinesh (Fluent, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Benefit Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms Benefit Forms The employment and benefits forms that you will be asked to complete as part of this orientation program can be numerous. Each, however, serves an important purpose in ensuring proper recording of your employment and benefit elections. This online program is designed to make the task a little easier. Each set of forms that you will work with has been compiled to ensure that you are only completing the essential documentation for your individual employment circumstance. Also, each set begins with an Employee Information Form that, upon completion, will auto-populate applicable data throughout the entire package. All of the forms are in PDF format and require Acrobat Reader to view and fill-in. When you open the form "Packages," it will load in a separate

266

An Empirical Analysis of Bulk Cn2 Models over Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines some of the difficulties associated with the determination of C2n over water in a coastal region using a bulk model. The analysis shows the need to supplement bulk models with elements that do not belong to traditional Monin–...

Guy Potvin; Denis Dion; Jacques Claverie; Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; J. Luc Forand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee National Institute of Statistical Science James O. Berger Duke University Abstract Selection models are appropriate when a datum x enters it to be of some particular functional form. By introducing latent variables related to the selection mechanism

Berger, Jim

268

Sensitivity Analysis of H2-Vehicles' Market Prospects, Costs and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Greene (Primary Contact), Zhenhong Lin, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1310 Email: dlgreene@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Project Start Date: October, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market shares of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles * (FCVs) under varying market conditions using the Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) model.

269

Modeling Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Design and Analysis Moe A Khaleel BJ Koeppel, W Liu, K Lai, KP Recknagle, EM Ryan, EV Stephens, X Sun Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA July 27-29, 2009 1 PNNL SOFC Modeling Tools SOFC-MP Stack level model for fast analysis of co/counter-flow SOFC stack performance Detailed electrochemistry model Cell level model for the investigation of secondary reactions (degradation/contamination) mechanisms within the tri-layer Component-based design and performance modeling Contact material Interconnect Glass seal 2 SOFC-MP Stack Simulation Code Recent Accomplishments Major memory improvements of 3D model to accommodate 50-cell stacks on LINUX platform. Previously, developed a 2D (or stacked

270

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Policy Office Electricity Modeling System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Project Summary Full Title: Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Project ID: 93 Principal Investigator: Lessly Goudarzi Purpose Designed and built by OnLocation specifically to address electricity industry restructuring issues Performer Principal Investigator: Lessly Goudarzi Organization: OnLocation, Inc. Address: Suite 300, 501 Church Street Vienna, VA 22180 Telephone: 703-938-5151 Email: goudarzi@onlocationinc.com Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Energy Infrastructure Products/Deliverables Description: National Transmission Grid Study - Appendix A Publication Title: Policy Office Electricty Modeling System (POEMS) and Documentation for Transmission Analysis (PDF 461 KB) Download Adobe Reader.

271

MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations.

Eileen P. Poeter and Mary C. Hill

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

QuantUM: Quantitative Safety Analysis of UML Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When developing a safety-critical system it is essential to obtain an assessment of different design alternatives. In particular, an early safety assessment of the architectural design of a system is desirable. In spite of the plethora of available formal quantitative analysis methods it is still difficult for software and system architects to integrate these techniques into their every day work. This is mainly due to the lack of methods that can be directly applied to architecture level models, for instance given as UML diagrams. Also, it is necessary that the description methods used do not require a profound knowledge of formal methods. Our approach bridges this gap and improves the integration of quantitative safety analysis methods into the development process. All inputs of the analysis are specified at the level of a UML model. This model is then automatically translated into the analysis model, and the results of the analysis are consequently represented on the level of the UML model. Thus the analysi...

Leitner-Fischer, Florian; 10.4204/EPTCS.57.2

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modeling and analysis of energy conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to assess the need for and the feasibility of developing a computer code that could model thermodynamic systems and predict the performance of energy conversion systems. To assess the market need for this code, representatives of a few industrial organizations were contacted, including manufacturers, system and component designers, and research personnel. Researchers and small manufacturers, designers, and installers were very interested in the possibility of using the proposed code. However, large companies were satisfied with the existing codes that they have developed for their own use. Also, a survey was conduced of available codes that could be used or possibly modified for the desired purpose. The codes were evaluated with respect to a list of desirable features, which was prepared as a result of the survey. A few publicly available codes were found that might be suitable. The development, verification, and maintenance of such a code would require a substantial, ongoing effort. 21 refs.

Den Braven, K.R. (Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Stanger, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for Hydrogen Transition Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agent Agent Agent - - Based Modeling Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and Simulation (ABMS) for Hydrogen Transition for Hydrogen Transition Analysis Analysis Marianne Mintz Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop US Department of Energy January 26, 2006 Objectives and Scope for Phase 1 2 Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure development as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) approach Develop an ABMS model to simulate the evolution of that system, spanning the entire H2 supply chain from production to consumption Identify key factors that either promote or inhibit the growth of H2 infrastructure Apply ABMS to get new insights into transition, particularly early transition phase - Dynamic interplay between supply and demand

275

FIREMAN: a toolkit for FIREwall Modeling and ANalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security concerns are becoming increasingly critical in networked systems. Firewalls provide important defense for network security. However, misconfigurations in firewalls are very common and significantly weaken the desired security. This paper introduces FIREMAN, a static analysis toolkit for firewall modeling and analysis. By treating firewall configurations as specialized programs, FIREMAN applies static analysis techniques to check misconfigurations, such as policy violations, inconsistencies, and inefficiencies, in individual firewalls as well as among distributed firewalls. FIREMAN performs symbolic model checking of the firewall configurations for all possible IP packets and along all possible data paths. It is both sound and complete because of the finite state nature of firewall configurations. FIREMAN is implemented by modeling firewall rules using binary decision diagrams (BDDs), which have been used successfully in hardware verification and model checking. We have experimented with FIREMAN and used it to uncover several real misconfigurations in enterprise networks, some of which have been subsequently confirmed and corrected by the administrators of these networks. 1.

Lihua Yuan; Hao Chen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Benefits and Considerations Compressed and liquefied natural gas are clean, domestically produced alternative fuels. Using these fuels in natural gas vehicles increases

279

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Forecasting and Modeling Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Forecasting and Modeling Energy Forecasting and Modeling The following includes summary bios of staff expertise and interests in analysis relating to energy economics, energy system planning, risk and uncertainty modeling, and energy infrastructure planning. Team Lead: Nate Blair Administrative Support: Geraly Amador Clayton Barrows Greg Brinkman Brian W Bush Stuart Cohen Carolyn Davidson Paul Denholm Victor Diakov Aron Dobos Easan Drury Kelly Eurek Janine Freeman Marissa Hummon Jennie Jorganson Jordan Macknick Trieu Mai David Mulcahy David Palchak Ben Sigrin Daniel Steinberg Patrick Sullivan Aaron Townsend Laura Vimmerstedt Andrew Weekley Owen Zinaman Photo of Clayton Barrows. Clayton Barrows Postdoctoral Researcher Areas of expertise Power system modeling Primary research interests Power and energy systems

280

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swedish ESCO Experience”. Energy Efficiency, 3(3), 237-256.2001 Session. Chapter 219: Energy and Operational Efficiency2008. “NAESCO Analysis of Non-energy Benefits of Efficiency

Larsen, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Reliability U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 2007 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Joe Paladino October 29, 2007 Approach for Calculating OE Benefits Challenges * Established benefits methodologies (e.g., NEMS and MARKAL) do not address some of the major benefits that OE's program will provide (e.g. reliability). * Much of OE's program is about transforming the way the T&D infrastructure operates rather than replacing components: - Some technologies need a high penetration or must be deployed as an entire system to yield benefits (e.g. PMUs or Distribution Automation). - Some programs within OE are not developing "widgets" that can be easily counted. - OE is developing tools/methodologies or funding demonstrations that

283

Model documentation of the Short-Term Coal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term coal analysis system (SCOAL) is used by the Data Analysis and Forecasting Branch (DAFB) as an analytic aid to support preparation of short-term projections of bituminous coal and lignite production at the state level, and anthracite production, domestic imports of coal, and domestic and export demand for US coal at the national level. A description of SCOAL is presented which includes a general overview of the model and its analytical capabilities. (DMC)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Analysis of price diffusion in financial markets using PUCK model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the new type of random walk process called the Potentials of Unbalanced Complex Kinetics (PUCK) model, we theoretically show that the price diffusion in large scales is amplified 2/(2 + b) times, where b is the coefficient of quadratic term of the potential. In short time scales the price diffusion depends on the size M of the super moving average. Both numerical simulations and real data analysis of Yen-Dollar rates are consistent with theoretical analysis.

Mizuno, T; Takayasu, M; Mizuno, Takayuki; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Perez, Danielle [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Stochastic modelling of landfill leachate and biogas production incorporating waste heterogeneity. Model formulation and uncertainty analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model simulating the hydrological and biochemical processes occurring in landfilled waste is presented and demonstrated. The model combines biochemical and hydrological models into an integrated representation of the landfill environment. Waste decomposition is modelled using traditional biochemical waste decomposition pathways combined with a simplified methodology for representing the rate of decomposition. Water flow through the waste is represented using a statistical velocity model capable of representing the effects of waste heterogeneity on leachate flow through the waste. Given the limitations in data capture from landfill sites, significant emphasis is placed on improving parameter identification and reducing parameter requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed, highlighting the model's response to changes in input variables. A model test run is also presented, demonstrating the model capabilities. A parameter perturbation model sensitivity analysis was also performed. This has been able to show that although the model is sensitive to certain key parameters, its overall intuitive response provides a good basis for making reasonable predictions of the future state of the landfill system. Finally, due to the high uncertainty associated with landfill data, a tool for handling input data uncertainty is incorporated in the model's structure. It is concluded that the model can be used as a reasonable tool for modelling landfill processes and that further work should be undertaken to assess the model's performance.

Zacharof, A.I.; Butler, A.P

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

288

Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.  

SciTech Connect

Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

Bier, Asmeret Brooke

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Residential Duct Sealing Cost-Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential air duct leakage can account for as much as 15 percent of a utility bill. Research has shown that houses with supply leakage fractions of 10 percent or greater are viable candidates for air duct sealing or retrofit. This report details the development of a regional program designed to measure and improve residential heating system distribution efficiency via air duct sealing and retrofits. The program consolidates the efforts of several utilities and coordinates a region-wide assessment of th...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Construction, Field Testing, and Engineering Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project provides techniques to improve hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlays specifically through the use of special additives and innovative surfacing technologies with aggregates that are locally available in Illinois. The ultimate goal is to improve pavement performance through optimized materials while also controlling cost by efficiently using local materials. Therefore, the proposed new mixes use locally available aggregates when possible. The project also considered the use of alternative aggregates such as steel slag to increase the friction quality of the HMA and therefore improve pavement performance. To evaluate the newly developed wearing course mixtures and evaluate their performance under actual traffic loading, test pavements were

High Friction; Surface Layer; Imad L. Al-qadi; Songsu Son; Thomas Zehr; Imad L. Al-qadi; Songsu Son; Thomas Zehr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Essays on prescription drug benefits in Medicare managed care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I estimate a structural demand model for prescription drug benefits by Medicare beneficiaries using data from the Medicare HMO program. I then use the utility parameter estimates to explore other questions ...

Hall, Anne Elizabeth, 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Multi-State Load Models for Distribution System Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work in the field of distribution system analysis has shown that the traditional method of peak load analysis is not adequate for the analysis of emerging distribution system technologies. Voltage optimization, demand response, electric vehicle charging, and energy storage are examples of technologies with characteristics having daily, seasonal, and/or annual variations. In addition to the seasonal variations, emerging technologies such as demand response and plug in electric vehicle charging have the potential to send control signals to the end use loads which will affect how they consume energy. In order to support time-series analysis over different time frames and to incorporate potential control signal inputs it is necessary to develop detailed end use load models which accurately represent the load under various conditions, and not just during the peak load period. This paper will build on previous work on detail end use load modeling in order to outline the method of general multi-state load models for distribution system analysis.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

State space modelling and data analysis exercises in LISA Pathfinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionalities required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

M Nofrarias; F Antonucci; M Armano; H Audley; G Auger; M Benedetti; P Binetruy; J Bogenstahl; D Bortoluzzi; N Brandt; M Caleno; A Cavalleri; G Congedo; M Cruise; K Danzmann; F De Marchi; M Diaz-Aguilo; I Diepholz; G Dixon; R Dolesi; N Dunbar; J Fauste; L Ferraioli; V Ferroni W Fichter; E Fitzsimons; M Freschi; C García Marirrodriga; R Gerndt; L Gesa; F Gibert; D Giardini; C Grimani; A Grynagier; F Guzmán; I Harrison; G Heinzel; M Hewitson; D Hollington; D Hoyland; M Hueller; J Huesler; O Jennrich; P Jetzer; B Johlander; N Karnesis; N Korsakova; C Killow; X Llamas; I Lloro; A Lobo; R Maarschalkerweerd; S Madden; D Mance; I Mateos; P W McNamara; J Mendes; E Mitchell; D Nicolini; D Nicolodi; M Perreur-Lloyd; E Plagnol; P Prat; J Ramos-Castro; J Reiche; J A Romera Perez; D Robertson; H Rozemeijer; G Russano; A Schleicher; D Shaul; CF Sopuerta; T J Sumner; A Taylor; D Texier; C Trenkel; H-B Tu; S Vitale; G Wanner; H Ward; S Waschke; P Wass; D Wealthy; S Wen; W J Weber; T Ziegler; P Zweifel

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

SRS - Active Employee Benefits News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17/2013 17/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Active Employee Benefits News and Communications 01/16/13 NEW SIP IRS Determination Letter 06/09/11 Building Trades National Medical Screening Program 01/16/13 NEW Pension IRS Determination Letter 04/29/11 Pension Funding Letter & Notices 09/20/12 Income Levelling Communication 03/15/11 Potential Benefit Plan Considerations 05/14/12 2013 Benefits Changes 12/28/10 2011 FICA Reduction 05/02/12 EveMed Vision Insurance Introduces Paperless EOB's 12/15/10 Annual Notices: CHIP-ERRP-Life SARS 05/01/12 New Investment Options - SRNS Defined Contribution Plan 11/30/10 SMM - Life Insurance Revisions 04/10/12 Slides From 2012 Retiree Association Meetinq 11/04/10 Mental Health, Cadillac Plans, Grandfathered Plans

295

Infiltration modeling guidelines for commercial building energy analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology for modeling air infiltration in EnergyPlus to account for envelope air barrier characteristics. Based on a review of various infiltration modeling options available in EnergyPlus and sensitivity analysis, the linear wind velocity coefficient based on DOE-2 infiltration model is recommended. The methodology described in this report can be used to calculate the EnergyPlus infiltration input for any given building level infiltration rate specified at known pressure difference. The sensitivity analysis shows that EnergyPlus calculates the wind speed based on zone altitude, and the linear wind velocity coefficient represents the variation in infiltration heat loss consistent with building location and weather data.

Gowri, Krishnan; Winiarski, David W.; Jarnagin, Ronald E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

298

Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past six years, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has conducted extensive experimental research on radiant barrier systems (RBS). This paper presents recent research on the development of mathematical attic models. Two levels of modeling capability have been developed. A very simplified model based on ASHRAE procedures in used to study the sensitivity of RBS performance parameters, and a very detailed finite element model is used to study highly complex phenomena, including moisture adsorption and desorption in attics. The speed of the simple model allows a large range of attic parameters to be studies quickly, and the finite element model provides a detailed understanding of combined heat and moisture transport in attics. This paper concentrates on a parametric analysis of attic RBS using the simplified model. The development of the model is described, and results of the parametric analyses are presented and discussed. Preliminary results from the finite element model are also compared with measurements from a test attic to illustrate the effects of moisture adsorption and desorption in common attics.

Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NEET Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEET NEET Benefits NEET Benefits The R&D activities under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Program will address revolutionary improvements in safety, performance, reliability, economics, and proliferation risk reduction and promote creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges related to reactor and fuel cycle development. The activities undertaken in this program complement those within the Reactor Concepts Research Development & Demonstration and Fuel Cycle R&D programs. The knowledge generated through these activities will allow Nuclear Energy (NE) to address key challenges affecting nuclear reactor and fuel cycle deployment (e.g., capital cost, technology risks, and proliferation concerns). Further, these activities will enable nuclear power to continue

300

Integration of Facility Modeling Capabilities for Nuclear Nonproliferation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Humberto E. Garcia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Garcia, Humberto [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Coles, Garill A [ORNL; Edmunds, Thomas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garrett, Alfred [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Gorensek, Maximilian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Hamm, Luther [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Krebs, John [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kress, Reid L [ORNL; Lamberti, Vincent [Y-12 National Security Complex; Schoenwald, David [ORNL; Tzanos, Constantine P [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP): An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy system modeling can be intentionally or unintentionally misused by decision-makers. This report describes how both can be minimized through careful use of models and thorough understanding of their underlying approaches and assumptions. The analysis summarized here assesses the impact that model and data choices have on forecasting energy systems by comparing seven different electric-sector models. This analysis was coordinated by the Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP), a collaboration among governmental, academic, and nongovernmental participants.

Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K. R.; Venkatesh, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Title Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48258 Year of...

306

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

307

Benefits to the United States of Increasing Global Uptake of Clean Energy Technologies  

SciTech Connect

A previous report describes an opportunity for the United States to take leadership in efforts to transform the global energy system toward clean energy technologies (CET). An accompanying analysis to that report provides estimates of the economic benefits to the United States of such a global transformation on the order of several hundred billion dollars per year by 2050. This report describes the methods and assumptions used in developing those benefit estimates. It begins with a summary of the results of the analysis based on an updated and refined model completed since the publication of the previous report. The framework described can be used to estimate the economic benefits to the U.S. of coordinated global action to increase the uptake of CETs worldwide. Together with a Monte Carlo simulation engine, the framework can be used to develop plausible ranges for benefits, taking into account the large uncertainty in the driving variables and economic parameters. The resulting estimates illustrate that larger global clean energy markets offer significant opportunities to the United States economy.

Kline, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Vehicle Transient Air Conditioning Analysis: Model Development& System Optimization Investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a transient air conditioning (A/C) system model using SINDA/FLUINT analysis software. It captures all the relevant physics of transient A/C system performance, including two-phase flow effects in the evaporator and condenser, system mass effects, air side heat transfer on the condenser/evaporator, vehicle speed effects, temperature-dependent properties, and integration with a simplified cabin thermal model. It has demonstrated robust and powerful system design optimization capabilities. Single-variable and multiple variable design optimizations have been performed and are presented. Various system performance parameters can be optimized, including system COP, cabin cool-down time, and system heat load capacity. This work presents this new transient A/C system analysis and optimization tool and shows some high-level system design conclusions reached to date. The work focuses on R-134a A/C systems, but future efforts will modify the model to investigate the transient performance of alternative refrigerant systems such as carbon dioxide systems. NREL is integrating its transient air conditioning model into NRELs ADVISOR vehicle system analysis software, with the objective of simultaneously optimizing A/C system designs within the overall vehicle design optimization.

Hendricks, T. J.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Managerial Coaching Behavior and Employee Outcomes: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last two decades, managerial coaching has become increasingly popular in organizations. Despite its popularity, there is a paucity of empirical evidence in the study of managerial coaching outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived managerial coaching behavior and employee self-reported affective and performance-related outcomes based on perceptions of selected organization employees. Three theories, path-goal leadership, career motivation, and organization support, were used to frame the hypothesized conceptual model of managerial coaching outcomes for the current study. The systematic review of relevant literature identified satisfaction with work, role ambiguity, satisfaction with manager, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment for the potential outcomes of managerial coaching. A 36-item survey including seven existing instruments was utilized to collect data. An estimation of the readability level for the survey was Flesh-Kincaid Grade Level 7.1. The survey was sent electronically to all employees in the selected government organization. The sample included 431 respondents representing a population of 1,399 employees. Descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, Cronbach‘s alpha estimates for reliability, correlation analysis, two-step modeling techniques for structural equation modeling, and Sobel tests were the analysis methods used in the study. The results of the analyses indicated that the hypothesized conceptual model was adequately supported by the empirical data of the study sample (?2/df = 3.53; CFI = .91; IFI = .91; RMSEA = .08). The further investigations suggested that managerial coaching had a direct impact on employee satisfaction with work and role clarity and an indirect impact on satisfaction with work, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment. Role clarity, as a direct outcome of managerial coaching, influenced job performance—such mediation was consistent with the hypothesized model for the study. The hypothesized model had clear and comprehensive illustrations of how managerial coaching affects work and organization-related variables, satisfaction with work, role clarity, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment. This study provides empirical support to the proposed benefits of managerial coaching in organizations, and enhances the selected theories by offering additional empirical support to them.

Kim, Sewon

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), and many other agencies and organizations, have worked with Ralph Wurbs over the years to develop WRAP (the Water Rights Analysis Package). The WRAP model simulates management of the water resources of a river basin, or multiple-basin region, under a priority-based water allocation system. The model facilitates assessment of hydrologic and institutional water availability/reliability for existing and proposed requirements for water use and management. Basin-wide impacts of water resources development projects and management strategies may be evaluated. The software package is generalized for application to any river/reservoir/use system, with input files being developed for the particular river basin of concern. The model is documented by reference and users manuals that may be downloaded from this site along with the software. WRAP is incorporated in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System.

Wurbs, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Radiolysis Model Sensitivity Analysis for a Used Fuel Storage Canister  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M3 milestone (M3FT-13PN0810027) to report on a radiolysis computer model analysis that estimates the generation of radiolytic products for a storage canister. The analysis considers radiolysis outside storage canister walls and within the canister fill gas over a possible 300-year lifetime. Previous work relied on estimates based directly on a water radiolysis G-value. This work also includes that effect with the addition of coupled kinetics for 111 reactions for 40 gas species to account for radiolytic-induced chemistry, which includes water recombination and reactions with air.

Wittman, Richard S.

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy conserving Anisotropic Anhysteretic Magnetic Modelling for Finite Element Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To model ferromagnetic material in finite element analysis a correct description of the constitutive relationship (BH-law) must be found from measured data. This article proposes to use the energy density function as a centrepiece. Using this function, which turns out to be a convex function of the flux density, guarantees energy conservative modelling. The magnetic field strength can be seen as a derivative with respect to the flux density. Especially for anisotropic materials (from lamination and/or grain orientation) this method has advantages. Strictly speaking this method is only valid for anhysteretic and thermodynamically stable material.

Jens Krause

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Foam computer model helps in analysis of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new mechanistic model attempts to overcome many of the problems associated with existing foam flow analyses. The model calculates varying Fanning friction factors, rather than assumed constant factors, along the flow path. Foam generated by mixing gas and liquid for underbalanced drilling has unique rheological characteristics, making it very difficult to accurately predict the pressure profile. A user-friendly personal-computer program was developed to solve the mechanical energy balance equation for compressible foam flow. The program takes into account influxes of gas, liquid, and oil from formations. The pressure profile, foam quality, density, and cuttings transport are predicted by the model. A sensitivity analysis window allows the user to quickly optimize the hydraulics program by selecting the best combination of injection pressure, back pressure, and gas/liquid injection rates. This new model handles inclined and horizontal well bores and provides handy engineering and design tools for underbalanced drilling, well bore cleanout, and other foam operations. The paper describes rheological models, foam flow equations, equations of state, mechanical energy equations, pressure drop across nozzles, influx modeling, program operation, comparison to other models, to lab data, and to field data, and results.

Liu, G.; Medley, G.H. Jr. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modeling and analysis of unsymmetrical transformer banks serving unbalanced loads  

SciTech Connect

It is a common practice to serve combination three-phase and single-phase loads from an unsymmetrical three-phase transformer bank and a four-wire secondary. Depending upon the loads and company standards, nine different transformer connections can be considered along with either an open four wire or a quadraplex secondary. The selection of the proper connection and transformer ratings can be achieved by the correct modeling and analysis of a system consisting of an equivalent source, transformer bank, secondary, and loads. This paper develops the models for the nine transformer connections, the secondary, and the loads. A computer program has been written that allows the analysis of the system for loading and short-circuit studies. The paper includes several examples of different normal and abnormal operating conditions on some of the transformer connections.

Kersting, W.H. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Coll. of Engineering; Phillips, W.H. [WH Power Consultants, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Application of Bayesian Hierarchical Models in Genetic Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic data analysis has been capturing a lot of attentions for understanding the mechanism of the development and progressing of diseases like cancers, and is crucial in discovering genetic markers and treatment targets in medical research. This dissertation focuses on several important issues in genetic data analysis, graphical network modeling, feature selection, and covariance estimation. First, we develop a gene network modeling method for discrete gene expression data, produced by technologies such as serial analysis of gene expression and RNA sequencing experiment, which generate counts of mRNA transcripts in cell samples. We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution. We derive the gene network structures by selecting covariance matrices of the Gaussian distribution with a hyper-inverse Wishart prior. We incorporate prior network models based on Gene Ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. Next, we consider a variable selection problem, where the variables have natural grouping structures, with application to analysis of chromosomal copy number data. The chromosomal copy number data are produced by molecular inversion probes experiments which measure probe-specific copy number changes. We propose a novel Bayesian variable selection method, the hierarchical structured variable se- lection (HSVS) method, which accounts for the natural gene and probe-within-gene architecture to identify important genes and probes associated with clinically relevant outcomes. We propose the HSVS model for grouped variable selection, where simultaneous selection of both groups and within-group variables is of interest. The HSVS model utilizes a discrete mixture prior distribution for group selection and group-specific Bayesian lasso hierarchies for variable selection within groups. We further provide methods for accounting for serial correlations within groups that incorporate Bayesian fused lasso methods for within-group selection. Finally, we propose a Bayesian method of estimating high-dimensional covariance matrices that can be decomposed into a low rank and sparse component. This covariance structure has a wide range of applications including factor analytical model and random effects model. We model the covariance matrices with the decomposition structure by representing the covariance model in the form of a factor analytic model where the number of latent factors is unknown. We introduce binary indicators for estimating the rank of the low rank component combined with a Bayesian graphical lasso method for estimating the sparse component. We further extend our method to a graphical factor analytic model where the graphical model of the residuals is of interest. We achieve sparse estimation of the inverse covariance of the residuals in the graphical factor model by employing a hyper-inverse Wishart prior method for a decomposable graph and a Bayesian graphical lasso method for an unrestricted graph.

Zhang, Lin

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Back analysis of microplane model parameters using soft computing methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new procedure based on layered feed-forward neural networks for the microplane material model parameters identification is proposed in the present paper. Novelties are usage of the Latin Hypercube Sampling method for the generation of training sets, a systematic employment of stochastic sensitivity analysis and a genetic algorithm-based training of a neural network by an evolutionary algorithm. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach together with possible extensions are thoroughly discussed and analyzed.

Kucerova, A; Zeman, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Model Electric Restaurant: Volume 3: Analysis and Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Electric Restaurant Project was initiated in 1987 to study energy use in restaurants and other types of foodservice facilities. This report describes the second phase of the project, which ultimately involved testing a number of energy-efficient electric concepts in several restaurants in Los Angeles, California, as well as Phoenix and Mesa, Arizona. Field auditing, computer analysis, design, and testing activities revealed the best combination of electric equipment for minimizing site and sour...

1996-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2008 Budget Request  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE's programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs. Benefits for the FY 2008 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2008-2030) and long term (2030-2050).

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Security Analysis and Improvement Model for Web-based Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today the web has become a major conduit for information. As the World Wide Web?s popularity continues to increase, information security on the web has become an increasing concern. Web information security is related to availability, confidentiality, and data integrity. According to the reports from http://www.securityfocus.com in May 2006, operating systems account for 9% vulnerability, web-based software systems account for 61% vulnerability, and other applications account for 30% vulnerability. In this dissertation, I present a security analysis model using the Markov Process Model. Risk analysis is conducted using fuzzy logic method and information entropy theory. In a web-based application system, security risk is most related to the current states in software systems and hardware systems, and independent of web application system states in the past. Therefore, the web-based applications can be approximately modeled by the Markov Process Model. The web-based applications can be conceptually expressed in the discrete states of (web_client_good; web_server_good, web_server_vulnerable, web_server_attacked, web_server_security_failed; database_server_good, database_server_vulnerable, database_server_attacked, database_server_security_failed) as state space in the Markov Chain. The vulnerable behavior and system response in the web-based applications are analyzed in this dissertation. The analyses focus on functional availability-related aspects: the probability of reaching a particular security failed state and the mean time to the security failure of a system. Vulnerability risk index is classified in three levels as an indicator of the level of security (low level, high level, and failed level). An illustrative application example is provided. As the second objective of this dissertation, I propose a security improvement model for the web-based applications using the GeoIP services in the formal methods. In the security improvement model, web access is authenticated in role-based access control using user logins, remote IP addresses, and physical locations as subject credentials to combine with the requested objects and privilege modes. Access control algorithms are developed for subjects, objects, and access privileges. A secure implementation architecture is presented. In summary, the dissertation has developed security analysis and improvement model for the web-based application. Future work will address Markov Process Model validation when security data collection becomes easy. Security improvement model will be evaluated in performance aspect.

Wang, Yong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Title International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Christopher J., Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn K. Price, and Grace Wu Date Published 11/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords co-benefits, energy efficiency, ghg emissions, quantification Abstract Improving the efficiency of energy production and consumption and switching to lower carbon energy sources can significantly decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and reduce climate change impacts. A growing body of research has found that these measures can also directly mitigate many non-climate change related human health hazards and environmental damage. Positive impacts of policies and programs that occur in addition to the intended primary policy goal are called co-benefits. Policy analysis relies on forecasting and comparing the costs of policy and program implementation and the benefits that accrue to society from implementation. GHG reduction and energy efficiency policies and programs face political resistance in part because of the difficulty of quantifying their benefits. On the one hand, climate change mitigation policy benefits are often global, long-term, and subject to large uncertainties, and subsidized energy pricing can reduce the direct monetary benefits of energy efficiency policies to below their cost. On the other hand, the co-benefits that accrue from these efforts' resultant reductions in conventional air pollution (such as improved health, agricultural productivity, reduced damage to infrastructure, and local ecosystem improvements) are generally near term, local, and more certain than climate change mitigation benefits and larger than the monetary value of energy savings. The incorporation of co-benefits into energy efficiency and climate mitigation policy and program analysis therefore might significantly increase the uptake of these policies. Faster policy uptake is especially important in developing countries because ongoing development efforts that do not consider co-benefits may lock in suboptimal technologies and infrastructure and result in high costs in future years.

322

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Title Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2012 Authors Larsen, Peter H., Charles A. Goldman, Donald Gilligan, and Terry E. Singer Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 2012 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California Abstract This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry-a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances -- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Non- energy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100% of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings Agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

323

Bayesian analysis of inflation: Parameter estimation for single field models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future astrophysical data sets promise to strengthen constraints on models of inflation, and extracting these constraints requires methods and tools commensurate with the quality of the data. In this paper we describe ModeCode, a new, publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single-field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. ModeCode is easily extendable to additional models of inflation, and future updates will include Bayesian model comparison. Errors from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments. We constrain representative single-field models ({phi}{sup n} with n=2/3, 1, 2, and 4, natural inflation, and 'hilltop' inflation) using current data, and provide forecasts for Planck. From current data, we obtain weak but nontrivial limits on the post-inflationary physics, which is a significant source of uncertainty in the predictions of inflationary models, while we find that Planck will dramatically improve these constraints. In particular, Planck will link the inflationary dynamics with the post-inflationary growth of the horizon, and thus begin to probe the ''primordial dark ages'' between TeV and grand unified theory scale energies.

Mortonson, Michael J. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peiris, Hiranya V. [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Easther, Richard [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Parkinson, R.D. [Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States). Center for Technology

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Bayesian Analysis of Inflation: Parameter Estimation for Single Field Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future astrophysical datasets promise to strengthen constraints on models of inflation, and extracting these constraints requires methods and tools commensurate with the quality of the data. In this paper we describe ModeCode, a new, publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. ModeCode is easily extendable to additional models of inflation, and future updates will include Bayesian model comparison. Errors from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments. We constrain representative single field models (phi^n with n=2/3, 1, 2, and 4, natural inflation, and "hilltop" inflation) using current data, and provide forecasts for Planck. From current data, we obtain weak but nontrivial limits on the post-inflationary physics, which is a significant source of uncertainty in the predictions of inflationary models, while we find that Planck will dramatically improve these constraints. In particular, Planck will link the inflationary dynamics with the post-inflationary growth of the horizon, and thus begin to probe the "primordial dark ages" between TeV and GUT scale energies.

Michael J. Mortonson; Hiranya V. Peiris; Richard Easther

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

328

Environmental Benefits of Smart Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Today, consumers and utility companies can agree that smart meters provide benefits such as time-of-use billing, accurate measurement, and elimination of a meter reader's monthly visit. But do smart meters provide tangible benefits for the environment? Not all agree on this. This article discusses how a smart meter helps a utility to monitor energy usage. That monitoring data then allows the utility to work with consumers to reduce energy usage and integrate various sources of renewable energy. When that happens, the environment wins. A similar version of this article was published in Electronic Products on November 15, 2011. An Awakening "I don't understand the environmental benefits of the smart grid, " my cousin Chris said after I told him about my involvement in the smart grid effort at Maxim. "I think it is just a ploy by the utilities to raise rates, " he added. Ordinarily, I would have interrupted him with comments about intelligent management of energy and resources, but my cousin worked for the northern California utility for 15 years. He was not speaking from an uninformed standpoint, so I listened further. "Electricity flows like water, " he continued. "It flows from the source to all points of consumption. Installing a smart meter does not save energy, it just counts when you are consuming it. " These are all valid points. Here I was, convinced that smart meters were a good thing, something that could benefit both the economy and the environment, something that brought a better technical solution to an old problem. But in fact, I did not really know how the smart grid could

David Andeen; Segment Manager

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis...

330

Mathematical modelling, analysis and computation of some complex and nonlinear flow problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis consists of two parts: (I) modelling, analysis and computation of sweat transport in textile media; (II) unconditional convergence and optimal error analysis of… (more)

Li, Buyang (???)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design Considerations, Modeling and Analysis for the Multispectral Thermal Imager  

SciTech Connect

The design of remote sensing systems is driven by the need to provide cost-effective, substantive answers to questions posed by our customers. This is especially important for space-based systems, which tend to be expensive, and which generally cannot be changed after they are launched. We report here on the approach we employed in developing the desired attributes of a satellite mission, namely the Multispectral Thermal Imager. After an initial scoping study, we applied a procedure which we call: "End-to-end modeling and analysis (EEM)." We began with target attributes, translated to observable signatures and then propagated the signatures through the atmosphere to the sensor location. We modeled the sensor attributes to yield a simulated data stream, which was then analyzed to retrieve information about the original target. The retrieved signature was then compared to the original to obtain a figure of merit: hence the term "end-to-end modeling and analysis." We base the EEM in physics to ensure high fidelity and to permit scaling. As the actual design of the payload evolves, and as real hardware is tested, we can update the EEM to facilitate trade studies, and to judge, for example, whether components that deviate from specifications are acceptable.

Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Weber, P.G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development, Global Environment Facility, United Nations Development Programme Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.forestcarbonportal. Country Cambodia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References REDD Cambodia Case Study[1] Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Screenshot

334

Post-Closure Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits The Legacy Management Post-Closure Benefits (PCB) Program includes the development, implementation, and oversight of the Department's policy concerning the continuation of contractor pension and medical benefits after the closure of applicable DOE sites/facilities. This includes oversight of the administration and management of legacy contractor benefits in a fiscally responsible and effective manner. The primary program objective is to ensure a seamless transition of benefits administration after closure. The Benefit Continuity Team (BCT) within Legacy Management is responsible for this program. Legacy PCBs are benefits earned and accrued by contractor employees while in active employment at DOE facilities and are payable after their

335

Decline curve analysis in unconventional resource plays using logistic growth models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current models used to forecast production in unconventional oil and gas formations are often not producing valid results. When traditional decline curve analysis models are… (more)

Clark, Aaron James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Methodologies for Determining Persistence of Commissioning Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on the persistence of commissioning benefits to date have used a variety of methods to evaluate this persistence. This paper proposes a consistent framework for describing and evaluating the persistence of commissioning benefits. It begins by splitting commissioning benefits into two broad categories: 1) benefits that inherently persist; and 2) benefits that may not persist. The study of persistence then considers only the benefits that may not persist. These benefits are critical, since the top five reasons cited for performing commissioning in both new buildings and existing buildings are benefits that may not persist. These benefits are then further divided into benefits that may be quantified and benefits that are generally difficult to quantify. This paper proposes that benefits that may be quantified should generally be evaluated for persistence using approaches that are already widely accepted and used for other purposes, with adaptations where needed. Specifically, it proposes that energy and water savings be evaluated using methods consistent with the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (adapted with additional weather normalization), that comfort and indoor air quality improvements be evaluated using relevant standards, specifically ASHRAE Standard 55 and ASHRAE Standard 62, but goes further and proposes a methodology for economic quantification of these benefits as well. Finally, it is proposed that the persistence of measures whose benefit is difficult to quantify be evaluated simply by determining whether the measure is still in place or performing.

Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon The International Brachypodium Initiative* Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its

338

Modeling and Analysis of Time-Varying Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We live in a world increasingly dominated by networks -- communications, social, information, biological etc. A central attribute of many of these networks is that they are dynamic, that is, they exhibit structural changes over time. While the practice of dynamic networks has proliferated, we lag behind in the fundamental, mathematical understanding of network dynamism. Existing research on time-varying graphs ranges from preliminary algorithmic studies (e.g., Ferreira's work on evolving graphs) to analysis of specific properties such as flooding time in dynamic random graphs. A popular model for studying dynamic graphs is a sequence of graphs arranged by increasing snapshots of time. In this paper, we study the fundamental property of reachability in a time-varying graph over time and characterize the latency with respect to two metrics, namely store-or-advance latency and cut-through latency. Instead of expected value analysis, we concentrate on characterizing the exact probability distribution of routing l...

Basu, Prithwish; Ramanathan, Ram; Johnson, Matthew P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based...

340

Modeling and Analysis using SAINT: A combined discrete/continuous network simulation language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAINT, Systems Analysis of Integrated Networks of Tasks, is a network modeling and simulation technique developed to assist in the design and analysis of complex man-machine systems.* SAINT provides the concepts necessary to model systems that consist ...

David B. Wortman; Steven D. Duket; Deborah J. Seifert

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET

Seitzman, Jerry M.

342

Perfromance analysis of the Parallel Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient execution of parallel applications requires insight into how the parallel system features impact the performance of the application. Significant experimental analysis and the development of performance models enhance the understanding of such an impact. Deep understanding of an application’s major kernels and their design leads to a better understanding of the application’s performance, and hence, leads to development of better performance models. The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the latest in a series of global atmospheric models developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as a community tool for NCAR and the university research community. This work focuses on analyzing CAM and understanding the impact of different architectures on this application. In the analysis of CAM, kernel coupling, which quantifies the interaction between adjacent and chains of kernels in an application, is used. All experiments are conducted on four parallel platforms: NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center) Seaborg, SDSC (San Diego Supercomputer Center) DataStar P655, DataStar P690 and PSC (Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center) Lemieux. Experimental results indicate that kernel coupling gave an insight into many of the application characteristics. One important characteristic of CAM is that its performance is heavily dependent on a parallel platform memory hierarchy; different cache sizes and different cache policies had the major effect on CAM’s performance. Also, coupling values showed that although CAM’s kernels share many data structures, most of the coupling values are still destructive (i.e., interfering with each other so as to adversely affect performance). The kernel coupling results helps developers in pointing out the bottlenecks in memory usage in CAM. The results obtained from processor partitioning are significant in helping CAM users in choosing the right platform to run CAM.

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sherif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An efficient integrated approach for global sensitivity analysis of hydrological model parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient sensitivity analysis, particularly for the global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to identify the most important or sensitive parameters, is crucial for understanding complex hydrological models, e.g., distributed hydrological models. In this paper, ... Keywords: DTVGM, Global sensitivity analysis, RSMSobol' method, Response surface model, Statistical emulator

Che-Sheng Zhan; Xiao-Meng Song; Jun Xia; Charles Tong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Model and Seismic Analysis of Large-scale Wind Turbine Tower Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The working condition of wind turbine tower structure with a massive engine room and revolving wind wheels is very complex. The paper simplify the wind turbine tower model with finite element analysis software --ANSYS, completed modal analysis firstly, ... Keywords: wind turbine tower, model analysis, resonance, time-history analysis, dynamic

Xiang Liu; Jiangtao Kong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

346

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emergence of Hybrid Vehicles: Ending oil’s strangleholdthe benefits of hybrid vehicles Dr. Thomas Turrentine Dr.the benefits of hybrid vehicles Report prepared for CSAA Dr.

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Renewable Energy Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Benefits Renewable Energy Benefits October 16, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis Photo of a row of PV panels on the roof of a building surrounded by skyscrapers. The General...

348

CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano-LEDs'. ... Optical microscope image of “nano LEDs” emitting light. ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Financing smallholder agribusiness in Zambia: an economic analysis of the ZATAC model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates the case of a Zambian institution providing credit for smallholder agribusiness commercialization and compares this lender’s model with the major microfinance institutions, to identify specific mechanisms employed by the lender and how these have been adapted to suit seasonal agricultural production credit requirements. Econometric models are developed to examine the influence of key economic factors such as nominal and real interest rates, loan fees, and loan term on the supply of credit by the lender. Other important factors considered relevant in the lender’s market include availability of contract markets for financed production and the type of borrower (cooperative or investor-owned agribusinesses). The study uses loan-level and firm-level loan data aggregated from an electronic loan database of individual loan files kept by the lender. Cross sectional data over three years (2005 – 2007) are used in the study. The study finds that loan fees, loan term and availability of contract markets to borrowers are the key determinants of credit supply. In addition, the study finds that interest rates do not significantly influence the lender’s credit supply decisions, a finding that is consistent with literature on credit rationing in markets with asymmetric information. The study finds no evidence of economies of scale benefit to the lender being passed along to borrowers through lower loan fees. The study contributes to the literature and development needs of agricultural lenders and smallholder agribusinesses in Zambia through the analysis of different factors that influence the lender’s credit supply decisions.

Mwanamambo, Brian Namushi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Unified Technique for Dynamic Modeling and Stability Analysis of Microgrid Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents a unified method for dynamic modeling and stability analysis of microgrid power systems. Using the automated state-model generation algorithm, a state-space model… (more)

Johnson, Brian B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model: Version 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is the part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents the human systems. EPPA is a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

354

A Forward Looking Version of the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents a forward looking multi-regional general equilibrium model developed from the latest version of the recursive-dynamic MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. The model represents ...

Babiker, Mustafa M.H.

355

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of measured directional seas using a nonlinear model, named Directional Hybrid Wave Model (DHWM). The model has the capability of decomposing the directional wave field into its free wave components with different frequency, amplitude, direction and initial phase based on three or more time series of measured wave properties. With the information of free waves, the DHWM can predict wave properties accurately up to the second order in wave steepness. In this study, the DHWM is applied to the analyses of the data of Wave Crest Sensor Inter-comparison Study (WACSIS). The consistency between the measurements collected by different sensors in the WACSIS project was examined to ensure the data quality. The wave characteristics at the locations of selected sensors were predicted in time domain and were compared with those recorded at the same location. The degree of agreement between the predictions and the related measurements is an indicator of the consistency among different sensors. To analyze the directional seas in the presence of strong current, the original DHWM was extended to consider the Doppler effects of steady and uniform currents on the directional wave field. The advantage of extended DHWM originates from the use of the intrinsic frequency instead of the apparent frequency to determine the corresponding wavenumber and transfer functions relating wave pressure and velocities to elevation. Furthermore, a new approach is proposed to render the accurate and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross spectrum than a Directional Fourier Transfer (DFT) used in the conventional approach, the proposed approach is able to estimate the directional spreading parameters more accurately and consistently, which is confirmed by applying the proposed and conventional approach, respectively, to the time series generated by numerical simulation and recorded during the WACSIS project.

Zhang, Shaosong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Converting Boundary Representation Solid Models to Half-Space Representation Models for Monte Carlo Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Solid modeling computer software systems provide for the design of three-dimensional solid models used in the design and analysis of physical components. The current state-of-the-art in solid modeling representation uses a boundary representation format in which geometry and topology are used to form three-dimensional boundaries of the solid. The geometry representation used in these systems is cubic B-spline curves and surfaces--a network of cubic B-spline functions in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space. Many Monte Carlo codes, however, use a geometry representation in which geometry units are specified by intersections and unions of half-spaces. This paper describes an algorithm for converting from a boundary representation to a half-space representation.

Davis JE, Eddy MJ, Sutton TM, Altomari TJ

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Universal System Benefits Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Montana Public Service Commission Montana established the Universal System Benefits Program (USBP) in 1997 as part of its restructuring legislation. The USBP supports cost-effective energy conservation, low-income customer weatherization, renewable-energy projects and applications, research and development programs related to energy conservation and renewables, market transformation designed to encourage competitive markets for public purpose programs, and low-income

358

Societal Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Jersey's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation created a "societal benefits charge" (SBC) to support investments in energy efficiency and "Class I" renewable energy. The SBC funds New Jersey's Clean Energy Program (NJCEP), a statewide initiative administered by the

359

Iterated Function System Models in Data Analysis: Detection and Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the use of iterated function system (IFS) models for data analysis. An IFS is a discrete dynamical system in which each time step corresponds to the application of one of a finite collection of maps. The maps, which represent distinct dynamical regimes, may act in some pre-determined sequence or may be applied in random order. An algorithm is developed to detect the sequence of regime switches under the assumption of continuity. This method is tested on a simple IFS and applied to an experimental computer performance data set. This methodology has a wide range of potential uses: from change-point detection in time-series data to the field of digital communications.

Zachary Alexander; Elizabeth Bradley; Joshua Garland; James D. Meiss

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Hydrogen to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Delivery Pathways- V1.0 vs. V2.0 2 1 3 i delivery by a Loading, the plant Version 1.0 character zed components for 3 pathways with single mode. conditioning and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) Truck H2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH) Truck H2 Production 3 or 7 kpsi 100 or 1500 kg/d H2 Production Gaseous H2 Pipeline 100 or 1500 kg/d HDSAM V1.0 Estimates Delivery Cost for 3 Pathways 4 H2 H2 1 2 3 H2 Distribution and Ci I. Liquid H2 Distribution: HDSAM V2.0 Simulates Nine Pathways Production Production LH Terminal LH Terminal Production LH Terminal Transmission Transmission Distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MDM Project: Analysis of the Micromechanics Damage Model Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report extends a previous study of core algorithms and portability considerations associated with the Micromechanics Damage Model computer software developed by the AFRL Materials Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. 1 The MDM analysis suite is comprised of four fracture mechanics codes used to establish design criteria for newly developed composite materials, particularly for brittle, heat-resistant composites associated with the fabrication of turbine blades. The MDM codes are based on a semi-analytical approach in which single coated fibers and the surrounding composite material are represented as a nested set of concentric shells (Fig. 1). Stresses and displacements at prescribed points along the length of the cylinder are determined by evaluation of a polynomial function. Numerically challenging conditions arise during the construction of this function. The calculation of matrix exponentials in terms of the full spectrum of eigenvalues associated with the pri...

D. C. O' neal; R. Luczak; N. J. Pagano; H. W. Brown Iii; G. P. Tandon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

Hansen, L.F.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

363

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its potential as an important model system for developing new energy and food crops.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Health Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits > Health Benefits Health Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play

365

General system architecture for BIM: An integrated approach for design and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the significant benefits of Building Information Modeling (BIM) is the ability to effectively use analysis and evaluation programs during design, as feedback. However, the current dominant approach to analysis and evaluation of design proposals ... Keywords: Automated building analysis, BIM integration, Building Information Modeling, Conceptual building design, Model View Definition

Paola Sanguinetti; Sherif Abdelmohsen; JaeMin Lee; JinKook Lee; Hugo Sheward; Chuck Eastman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

367

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advances in the identification of electrochemical transfer function models using Prony analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of power system electromechanical oscillation models. These linear models are developed by analyzing power system ring-down data. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (KARMA) modeling, which has also been proposed for analysis of system oscillations. Under the conditions investigated, the Prony algorithm performed more accurate identification.

Trudnowski, D.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Donnelly, M.K. (Control Tech., Inc., Bozeman, MT (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY Benefits under the CHEIBA Trust Plan are available to Eligible Employees and Dependents of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to any lien, garnishment, pledge or bankruptcy. However, a Participant may assign benefits payable under

371

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collection and Reporting for Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Joe Paladino November 19, 2009 Investments Transformation Results * Equipment Manufacturing * Customer Systems * Advanced Metering Infrastructure * Electric Distribution Systems * Electric Transmission Systems * Integrated and/or Crosscutting Systems Customer Empowerment * Job Creation and Marketplace Innovation * Reduced Peak Load and Consumption * Operational Efficiency * Grid Reliability and Resilience * More Distributed and Renewable Energy * Lower Carbon Dioxide Emissions Advanced Grid Functionality An Opportunity for Transformation Primary Intent Is to Determine SGIG Program Impact Secondary Intent Is to Learn (to Address Uncertainty) Project-Based Cost/Benefit Analysis SGIG Program - Building the

373

Utility Benefits of SMES in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology expected to have wide-spread asset value in the electric utility industry. This project updates an earlier assessment of SMES benefits in the Pacific Northwest by estimating net present values of several system-specific application scenarios with the SMES cost model developed by EPRI.

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Bio-PEPA: A framework for the modelling and analysis of biological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present Bio-PEPA, a process algebra for the modelling and the analysis of biochemical networks. It is a modification of PEPA, originally defined for the performance analysis of computer systems, in order to handle some features of biological ... Keywords: Analysis, Biochemical networks, Modelling, Process algebras

Federica Ciocchetta; Jane Hillston

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Multidimensional Data Model Research for Data Mart Based Analysis System of Drilling Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the sake of complex analysis requirements of drilling fluid analysis system, this paper proposes a multidimensional data model and implement the solution of data mart due to the analyzing weaknesses of conventional information system. Since the database ... Keywords: drilling fluid, Data Mart, Multidimensional Data Model, Multi-Analysis, Fact Tables, Dimension Tables

Li Jian; Wang Bing; Xu Bihua; Liang Dachun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Non-markovian analysis for model driven engineering of real-time software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative evaluation of models with stochastic timings can decisively support schedulability analysis and performance engineering of real-time concurrent systems. These tasks require modeling formalisms and solution techniques that can encompass stochastic ... Keywords: model driven development, non-markovian stochastic analysis, real-time systems, software performance engineering

Laura Carnevali; Marco Paolieri; Alessandro Santoni; Enrico Vicario

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

TTP 289A Syllabus: Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis TTP 289A-002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTP 289A Syllabus: Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis 1 TTP 289A-002 (CRN81927) Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis Quarter: Winter 2014 When: T/Th: 2:10-4 pm and Policy, will also provide a portion of the lectures, specifically on modeling energy infrastructure

California at Davis, University of

378

Comparative analysis of models integrating synoptic forecast data into potato late blight risk estimate systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determinacy analysis, logistic regression, discriminant analysis and neural network models were compared for their accuracy in 5-day (120h) forecasts of daily potato late blight risk according to a modified-Wallin disease severity model. For 12 locations ... Keywords: Expert systems, Forecasting, Neural network models, Risk mitigation

Kathleen M. Baker; William W. Kirk

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advances in the identification of transfer function models using Prony analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of models. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) modeling. Special attention is given to system conditions often encountered with power system electromechanical dynamics.

Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41 Country Poland Eastern Europe References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41763.pdf This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Polish energy markets have recently been restructured, opening the door to new players with access to new products and instruments. In response to this changed environment, the Government of Poland and the Polish Power Grid Company were interested in analyzing the competitiveness of

382

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

383

Public Benefit Funds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefit Funds Public Benefit Funds Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Contents 1 Public Benefits Fund Incentives 2 References Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

384

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Title Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-45618 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Xiaomin Liu, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-45618 Date Published May 4 Abstract Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential water heater energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a water heater and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers are significant. At the efficiency level examined in this paper, 35% of households with electric water heaters experience LCC savings, with an average savings of $106, while 4% show LCC losses, with an average loss of $40 compared to a pre-standard LCC average of $2,565. The remainder of the population (61%) are largely unaffected.

385

Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Deparment of Environmental Quality. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Unit 4, operating alone under minimum and maximum loads will not cause or contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

386

Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Docket No. EO-05-01. Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Units 1 and 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Units 1 and 4, operating together under specific loads and during certain periods in a calendar day will not cause or contribut to excceedences of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together

387

Analysis of inverter models and harmonic propagation. Part III. Transient processes in inverter models  

SciTech Connect

Part III of a three part study presents the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of transient processes that arise in the photovoltaic power system during its normal commutational operations. A general description of the transient processes problem and the method of analysis is presented. The transient processes in the inverter model with an inductive filter are analyzed for both the discontinuous and the continuous currents on the dc side of the inverter, and the problem of transient processes due to the change in illumination level is discussed. Transient processes in the inverter model with capacitive filter are analyzed with special emphasis on the process that arises in the photovoltaic power system immediately after the first ignition of the thyristors. The influence of the operating point of the solar cell array on the transient process is discussed. A sequence for optimal operations is recommended. Part I of the study (SAND 7040/1) contains a detailed description of the microcomputer based simulator that represents the output characteristics of the five commercially available types of solar cell arrays under different environmental conditions, and Part II (SAND 7040/2) describes the harmonics in the photovoltaic power system.

Slonim, M.A.; Stanek, E.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dynamic social network analysis using latent space models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores two aspects of social network modeling. First, we generalize a successful static model of relationships into a dynamic model that accounts for friendships drifting over time. Second, we show how to make it tractable to learn such ...

Purnamrita Sarkar; Andrew W. Moore

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Office of Human Resources Services - Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BENEFITS BENEFITS Federal employees enjoy a very comprehensive benefits package and access to programs that encourage work life balance: Sick leave - up to 13 days earned annually Annual (vacation) leave Holidays - 10 days each year Flexible work schedules and telecommuting Family and medical leave for special circumstances Leave donation program Training and development opportunities Student loan repayment (as funds are available) Tuition assistance (as funds are available) Payment of professional credentials (as funds are available) Choice of several health benefit plans Supplemental dental and vision coverage Life insurance (including additional self and family options) Employee Assistance Program Flexible Spending Accounts Traditional pension plans and the Thrift Savings Plan (similar to a 401(k))

390

On the benefits and costs of microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the benefits that Microgrids can provide to a variety of stakeholders and considers their costs. A flexible framework is proposed in which… (more)

Weyrich Morris, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

392

UNLV HUMAN RESOURCES Benefit Provider Listing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 464-6832 TIAA-CREF (RPA & Supplemental 403B) www.tiaa-cref.org (800) 842-2776 SUPPLEMENTAL BENEFIT

Hemmers, Oliver

393

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Flats Benefits Center P.O Box 9735 Providence, RI 02940 (866) 296-5036 Medical and Life Insurance Administration Pension Administration Death Reporting Address Changes General...

394

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of costs and benefits of industrial energy efficiencyof the annual costs of an energy efficiency measure, therebyof cost- effectiveness of energy- efficiency improvement

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 99 5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring The restructuring of the natural gas ...

396

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Benefits and Perks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perks Bioscience Working at Sandia has its benefits From health and compensation to diversity programs, flexible career tracks, community outreach, and more, Sandians receive...

397

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory often work with Chinese colleagues...

398

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits Community College Internships (CCI) CCI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits...

399

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

PSCAD/EMTDC-Based Modeling and Analysis of a Microgrid with Renewable Energy Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgrid is a relatively new concept which has gained significant attention recently due to the increasing penetration of distributed energy sources. It brings many benefits to the traditional distribution system. Couples of microgrid testbeds in the forms of either hardware facilities or software simulation systems have been developed to study microgrid issues in many institutes throughout the world. In the work presented in this thesis, a microgrid system model in PSCAD/EMTDC was developed. The proposed microgrid system includes fundamental power system component models, two renewable energy source models (wind and solar) and one energy storage source model. Different case studies were conducted. The results from the simulation case studies showed that the proposed microgrid system in PSCAD had satisfactory performance under different scenarios with renewable energy sources. The proposed microgrid system model can be used for further research on microgrid issues.

Chu, Zhengguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy December 18, 2009 - 3:06pm Addthis Joshua DeLung When it comes to energy-efficient homes, Carol Bintz's Ohio house is a gleaming model of sustainability. She first was inspired by her own energy efficiency and renewable energy research done as part of her job to reduce operating costs at the Toledo Museum of Art. There she saw how quickly the savings could stack up. Carol took a leap toward her energy-efficiency goals for her new home by choosing a homebuilder with expertise in residential efficiency and renewable energy technologies and strategies, many of which were developed through the Energy Department's Building America program. Today, she's thrilled with her high-performance home, she says, and she's passionate

402

Sensitivity Analysis Using an Adjoint of the PSU-NCAR Mesoseale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adjoint of the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) Mesoscale Model has been developed for use in sensitivity analysis following Cacuci. Sensitivity analysis is defined as the determination of the ...

Ronald M. Errico; Tomislava Vukicevic

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Krebs, John [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kress, Reid L [ORNL; Lamberti, Vincent [Y-12 National Security Complex; Schoenwald, David [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Automotive System Cost Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project Summary Full Title: Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project ID: 118 Principal Investigator: Sujit Das Purpose Estimate current and...

405

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: MetaNET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of demands, resources, and market modules that has primarily been used for long term electricity market equilibrium modeling. METANET is a perfect foresight model and assumes...

406

Modeling and Analysis of CSP Systems (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The models can also help analysts assess the potential market penetration and economic impact of CSP under different policy and deployment scenarios. The Solar Advisor Model (SAM)...

407

Methodology for fault detection and diagnostics in an ocean turbine using vibration analysis and modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a methodology for mechanical fault detection and diagnostics in an ocean turbine using vibration analysis and modeling. This methodology relies on the… (more)

Mjit, Mustapha.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling and Analysis for Control of Reactant and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions due to the inclusion of compressibility, we employ the simplifying evaporation/condensation model

Stefanopoulou, Anna

409

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for agricultural production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper a multidimensional data model called CULTEH is built. In the model are defined the dimensions, the hierarchies and the facts. Based on this model an OLAP cube called CUBECTH is built. The OLAP cube accepts queries on several dimensions and ... Keywords: OLAP operations, agricultural production, data cube, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP)

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Adrian Turek Rahoveanu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Linear Stochastic Dynamical Model of ENSO. Part II: Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of a linear, intermediate model of ENSO is examined under stochastic forcing. The model was developed in a companion paper (Part I) and is derived from the Zebiak–Cane ENSO model. Four variants of the model are used ...

C. J. Thompson; D. S. Battisti

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

Wood, David O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Status Report on Modeling and Analysis of Small Modular Reactor Economics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed to generate the model for SMR economic analysis. The model is based on the G4-ECONS calculation tool developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF).

Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Hale, Richard Edward [ORNL; Moses, Rebecca J [ORNL

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Historical analysis of legal opinions with a sparse mixed-effects latent variable model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a latent variable model to enhance historical analysis of large corpora. This work extends prior work in topic modelling by incorporating metadata, and the interactions between the components in metadata, in a general way. To test this, we ...

William Yang Wang; Elijah Mayfield; Suresh Naidu; Jeremiah Dittmar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

417

Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

418

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect

Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for soil physical characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the construction of a multidimensional data model intended for the analysis of soil physical properties. The data from the model are provided by two agricultural soil/land databases. Based on the multidimensional data model we build ... Keywords: OLAP operations, data cube, land use, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP), soil physical properties

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Virgil Vlad; Dumitru Marian Motelica

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Empirical Models of End-User Network Behavior from NETI@home Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation of computer networks requires accurate models of user behavior. To this end, we present empirical models of end-user network traffic derived from the analysis of NETI@home (NETwork Intelligence at home) data. There are two forms of models ... Keywords: internet measurement, network traffic models, simulation

Charles R Simpson, Jr; Dheeraj Reddy; George F Riley

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Hampshire. ? State Tax Incentives and Renewable EnergyState tax No incentives/ system benefits charges for renewable energy

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Public Benefits Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefits Fund Public Benefits Fund Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

423

System Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Schools Utility Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire's 1996 electric-industry restructuring legislation authorized the creation of a system benefits charge (SBC) to support energy-efficiency programs and energy-assistance programs for low-income residents. The efficiency fund, which took effect in 2002, is funded by a non-bypassable surcharge of 1.8 mills per kilowatt-hour ($0.0018/kWh) on electric bills. A separate surcharge of 1.5 mills per kWh ($0.0015/kWh) supports low-income energy assistance programs. Approximately $19 million is collected annually to support the efficiency fund, although the annual sum collected has

424

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Drought Analysis Based on a Marked Cluster Poisson Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an operational definition of drought events based on an “excess over threshold” approach applied on rainfall series and develops a stochastic model for describing droughts defined in that way. The model consists of a Poisson ...

Ana C. Cebrián; Jesús Abaurrea

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An Error Analysis of Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Track Guidance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean track forecast errors over the 6-yr period 1983–88 are compared for four tropical cyclone-track forecast models in use at the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The model types represented are statistical, statistical-dynamical, barctropic-...

Mark Demaria; Miles B. Lawrence; James T. Kroll

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

An Interpretable Stroke Prediction Model using Rules and Bayesian Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to produce predictive models that are not only accurate, but are also interpretable to human experts. Our models are decision lists, which consist of a series of if...then... statements (for example, if high blood ...

Letham, Benjamin

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Optioned Portfolio Selection: Models and Analysis Jianfeng LIANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oldenkamp [8] proposed a linear programming model with a given level of guaranteed return. The so

Zhang, Shuzhong

431

Analysis and design of axisymmetric transonic flow with linearized three-dimensional flow prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this thesis is the application of the proven stream-surface based Newton method to analysis/design of an axisymmetric nacelle with the actuator disk modeling of a fan. And to further utilize the benefits ...

Ahn, Jon

432

Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Benefits of explosive cutting for nuclear-facility applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study discussed in this report was a cost/benefit analysis to determine: (1) whether explosive cutting is cost effective in comparison with alternative metal sectioning methods and (2) whether explosive cutting would reduce radiation exposure or provide other benefits. Two separate approaches were pursued. The first was to qualitatively assess cutting methods and factors involved in typical sectioning cases and then compare the results for the cutting methods. The second was to prepare estimates of work schedules and potential radiation exposures for candidate sectioning methods for two hypothetical, but typical, sectioning tasks. The analysis shows that explosive cutting would be cost effective and would also reduce radiation exposure when used for typical nuclear facility sectioning tasks. These results indicate that explosive cutting should be one of the principal cutting methods considered whenever steel or similar metal structures or equipment in a nuclear facility are to be sectioned for repair or decommissioning. 13 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.; Allen, R.P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction modification to improve energy efficiency.

Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

Ramsden, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analysis & Projections - Models & Documentation - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and...

437

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Replacement capital includes for some components H2A Delivery Component Economic Analysis * The economic results presented assume specific scenario - Scenario refers to...

438

Bayesian Analysis in Applications of Hierarchical Models: Issues and Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. S. Smith (Eds. ), Bayesian statistics 4 (pp. 336-338).Smith, A. F. (1993). Bayesian inference for generalizedat UCLA on May 23, 2011 Bayesian Analysis for Hierarchical

Michael Seltzer; Wing H. Wong; Anthony S. Bryk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Design of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam Jump to: navigation, search Name Design of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam Agency/Company /Organization UN-REDD Programme Sector Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.un-redd.org/Publica Country Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Design of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam[1] Design of a REDD-compliant Benefit Distribution System for Viet Nam Screenshot "Viet Nam is one of nine countries where the UN-REDD Programme is supporting the development of REDD+ readiness. In preparing for REDD+,

440

Enhanced oil recovery data base analysis by simplified predictive models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), has been developing computerized data bases and simplified predictive models to be used to predict enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential in the U.S. The development phase of this work is nearing completion whereupon the models and data bases will be made available to the public. This paper describes the overall development phase for the models and data bases with analyses of selected EOR projects using the predictive models. Examples of model outputs are discussed and brief descriptions of the predictive algorithms are given.

Ray, R.M.; Wesson, T.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "benefit analysis modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is shown that modeling and analysis provide information useful for setting a maintenance policy. 1 of the energy market, which has forced the producers to be more competitive by reacting promptly and reliablyEvaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,* , Michele

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

Original article: Overview of analytical models of permanent magnet electrical machines for analysis and design purposes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generally, accurate modelling of electrical machines requires the use of finite-element method. However, FE analysis is too time consuming, especially at firsts design stages, from the point of view of engineers working in R&D departments in the electrical ... Keywords: Analytical modelling, Electromagnetic analysis, Permanent magnet machines

Huguette Tiegna, Yacine Amara, Georges Barakat

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Upper bound limit analysis model for FRP-reinforced masonry curved structures. Part II: Structural analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A homogenized full 3D limit analysis model for the evaluation of collapse loads of FRP-reinforced masonry vaults is presented. Six-noded rigid infinitely resistant wedges are used to model masonry. Three-noded rigid infinitely resistant triangles are ... Keywords: FRP-reinforcement, Homogenization, Kinematic approach, Limit analysis, Masonry, Vaults

Gabriele Milani; Enrico Milani; Antonio Tralli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The diversity and molecular modelling analysis of B12-dependent and B12-independent glycerol dehydratases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To broaden our knowledge on the diversity of glycerol dehydratases, comprehensive sequence and molecular modelling analyses of these enzymes were performed. Our sequence analysis showed that B12-dependent and Bmodelling, sequence analysis, structure

Yuemin Liu; August A. Gallo; Rakesh K. Bajpai; Andrei Chistoserdov; Andrew T. Nelson; Leah N. Segura; Wu Xu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Macro-System Model for Hydrogen Energy Systems Analysis in Transportation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M. E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Computer analysis of the sensitivity of the integrated assessment model MERGE-5I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an application of a large-scale non-linear optimization model to the analysis of environmental problems. The authors present first results of the initial stage of the study, a sensitivity analysis of the model's input parameters. ...

Vyacheslav Maksimov; Leo Schrattenholzer; Yaroslav Minullin

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Fault Modeling and Analysis for Resistive Bridging Defects in a Synchronizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents fault modeling and analysis for bridging defects in a synchronizer that is implemented by two D flip-flops. Bridging defects are injected into any two nodes of the synchronizer, and HSPICE is used to perform circuit analysis. The ... Keywords: Bridging defect, Fault modeling, Synchronizer

Hyoung-Kook Kim; Wen-Ben Jone; Laung-Terng Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT): Model description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MODEL.................................................................................................................................7 I. Basic Methodology on Food............................................................................................. 7

Mark W. Rosegrant; Claudia Ringler; Siwa Msangi; Timothy B. Sulser; Tingju Zhu; Sarah A. Cline

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis and reduction of chemical models under uncertainty.  

SciTech Connect

While models of combustion processes have been successful in developing engines with improved fuel economy, more costly simulations are required to accurately model pollution chemistry. These simulations will also involve significant parametric uncertainties. Computational singular perturbation (CSP) and polynomial chaos-uncertainty quantification (PC-UQ) can be used to mitigate the additional computational cost of modeling combustion with uncertain parameters. PC-UQ was used to interrogate and analyze the Davis-Skodje model, where the deterministic parameter in the model was replaced with an uncertain parameter. In addition, PC-UQ was combined with CSP to explore how model reduction could be combined with uncertainty quantification to understand how reduced models are affected by parametric uncertainty.

Oxberry, Geoff; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 1 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Unit 1 operating alone under specific loads and during certain periods in a calendar day will not cause or contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

451

Stability Analysis of a Simplified Yet Complete Model for Chronic Myelegenous Leukemia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the asymptotic behavior of a partial differential equation (PDE) model for hematopoiesis. This PDE model is derived from the original agent-based model formulated by (Roeder et al., Nat. Med., 2006), and it describes the progression of blood cell development from the stem cell to the terminally differentiated state. To conduct our analysis, we start with the PDE model of (Kim et al, JTB, 2007), which coincides very well with the simulation results obtained by Roeder et al. We simplify the PDE model to make it amenable to analysis and justify our approximations using numerical simulations. An analysis of the simplified PDE model proves to exhibit very similar properties to those of the original agent-based model, even if for slightly different parameters. Hence, the simplified model is of value in understanding the dynamics of hematopoiesis and of chronic myelogenous leukemia, and it presents the advantage of having fewer parameters, which makes comparison with both experimental data and alternative...

Jauffret, Marie Doumic; Perthame, Benoît

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Evaluation of fluid-modeling techniques in the seismic analysis of LMFBR reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid modeling is of great importance in the seismic analysis of the LMFBR primary system. If the fluid model used in the analysis is too simplified, the results could be very uncertain. On the other hand, if the model is too detailed, considerable difficulty might be encountered in the analysis. The objectives of this study are to examine the validity of the two commonly used fluid modeling techniques. i.e. simplified added mass method and lumped mass method and to provide some useful information on the treatment of fluid in seismic analysis. The validity of these two methods of analysis is examined by comparing the calculated seismic responses of a fluid-structure system based on these two methods with that calculated from a coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis in which the fluid is treated by continuum fluid elements.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453