National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for benchmark models version

  1. Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.

    2009-09-08

    This document describes an energy benchmarking framework for hospitals. The document is organized as follows. The introduction provides a brief primer on benchmarking and its application to hospitals. The next two sections discuss special considerations including the identification of normalizing factors. The presentation of metrics is preceded by a description of the overall framework and the rationale for the grouping of metrics. Following the presentation of metrics, a high-level protocol is provided. The next section presents draft benchmarks for some metrics; benchmarks are not available for many metrics owing to a lack of data. This document ends with a list of research needs for further development.

  2. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models

  3. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, James T.; Hoffman, Forrest; Norby, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models

  4. Introduction to benchmark dose methods and U.S. EPA's benchmark dose software (BMDS) version 2.1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J. Allen; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Zhao, Q. Jay

    2011-07-15

    Traditionally, the No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) approach has been used to determine the point of departure (POD) from animal toxicology data for use in human health risk assessments. However, this approach is subject to substantial limitations that have been well defined, such as strict dependence on the dose selection, dose spacing, and sample size of the study from which the critical effect has been identified. Also, the NOAEL approach fails to take into consideration the shape of the dose-response curve and other related information. The benchmark dose (BMD) method, originally proposed as an alternative to the NOAEL methodology in the 1980s, addresses many of the limitations of the NOAEL method. It is less dependent on dose selection and spacing, and it takes into account the shape of the dose-response curve. In addition, the estimation of a BMD 95% lower bound confidence limit (BMDL) results in a POD that appropriately accounts for study quality (i.e., sample size). With the recent advent of user-friendly BMD software programs, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS), BMD has become the method of choice for many health organizations world-wide. This paper discusses the BMD methods and corresponding software (i.e., BMDS version 2.1.1) that have been developed by the U.S. EPA, and includes a comparison with recently released European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) BMD guidance.

  5. pMSSM Benchmark Models for Snowmass 2013 (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: pMSSM Benchmark Models for Snowmass 2013 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: pMSSM Benchmark Models for Snowmass 2013 Authors: Cahill-Rowley, Matthew W. ; ...

  6. Benchmarking the LAHET fission models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prael, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    There has been considerable interest in improving the fission models in the LAHET Monte Carlo code for the transport and interaction of nucleons, pions, muons, fight ions, and antinucleons. Although subactinide fission contributes little to neutron production in lead or tungsten targets, it can be significant for simulation of target activation and fission product contamination. The availability of new data permits new comparisons to be made between experiment and calculation.

  7. Benchmarks used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benchmarks were run, all at a concurrency of 1024 processes. They are all written in Fortran. NAS PARALLEL MPI BENCHMARKS - VERSION 3.3.1 Benchmark Full Name Description Level BT...

  8. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojević, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; Hargrove, Paul; Jin, Haoqiang; Fuerlinger, Karl; Koniges, Alice; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemoreĀ Ā» programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.Ā«Ā less

  9. Text-Alternative Version of TAP Webinar: Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the June TAP webinar, Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example.

  10. International land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Package v002.00

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Collier, Nathaniel; Hoffman, Forrest M. [Climage Modeling.org; Mu, Mingquan [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Riley, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2016-05-09

    As a contribution to International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Project, we are providing new analysis approaches, benchmarking tools, and science leadership. The goal of ILAMB is to assess and improve the performance of land models through international cooperation and to inform the design of new measurement campaigns and field studies to reduce uncertainties associated with key biogeochemical processes and feedbacks. ILAMB is expected to be a primary analysis tool for CMIP6 and future model-data intercomparison experiments. This team has developed initial prototype benchmarking systems for ILAMB, which will be improved and extended to include ocean model metrics and diagnostics.

  11. International land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Package v001.00

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mu, Mingquan [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Riley, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Hoffman, Forrest M. [Climage Modeling.org; Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2016-05-02

    As a contribution to International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Project, we are providing new analysis approaches, benchmarking tools, and science leadership. The goal of ILAMB is to assess and improve the performance of land models through international cooperation and to inform the design of new measurement campaigns and field studies to reduce uncertainties associated with key biogeochemical processes and feedbacks. ILAMB is expected to be a primary analysis tool for CMIP6 and future model-data intercomparison experiments. This team has developed initial prototype benchmarking systems for ILAMB, which will be improved and extended to include ocean model metrics and diagnostics.

  12. Glass Furnace Model Version 2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-06

    GFM2.0 is a derivative of the GFM code with substantially altered and enhanced capabilities. Like its predecessor, it is a fully three-dimensional, furnace simulation model that provides a more accurate representation of the entire furnace, and specifically, the glass melting process, by coupling the combustion space directly to the glass batch and glass melt via rigorous radiation heat transport models for both the combustion space and the glass melt. No assumptions are made with regardmoreĀ Ā» to interfacial parameters of heat, flux, temperature distribution, and batch coverage as must be done using other applicable codes available. These critical parameters are calculated. GFM2.0 contains a processor structured to facilitate use of the code, including the entry of teh furnace geometry and operating conditions, the execution of the program, and display of the computational results. Furnace simulations can therefore be created in a straightforward manner.Ā«Ā less

  13. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon

  14. Benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.J.; Faillace, E.R.; Gnanapragasam, E.K.

    1995-11-01

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models-RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)-represent analytically based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. A list of physical/chemical/biological processes related to multimedia-based exposure and risk assessment is first presented as a basis for comparing the overall capabilities of RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS. Model design, formulation, and function are then examined by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems. Major components of the models (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) are evaluated separately and then studied as part of an integrated system for the assessment of a multimedia release scenario to determine effects due to linking components of the models. Seven modeling scenarios are used in the conduct of this benchmarking study: (1) direct biosphere exposure, (2) direct release to the air, (3) direct release to the vadose zone, (4) direct release to the saturated zone, (5) direct release to surface water, (6) surface water hydrology, and (7) multimedia release. Study results show that the models differ with respect to (1) environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and (2) the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions (i.e., parameterization).

  15. Model Analysis ToolKit (MATK), Version 0

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Version 0 MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. June 19, 2015 software MATK provides basic functionality to...

  16. The integrated Earth System Model Version 1: formulation and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The integrated Earth System Model Version 1: formulation and functionality The integrated Earth System Model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for pro- jecting the ...

  17. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document

  18. Benchmark specifications and data requirements for initial modeling of the China experimental fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanning, T. H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-06-04

    A specification is proposed for an initial transient benchmark analysis of the China Experimental Fast Reactor design based on the analysis capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code. For the initial benchmark, a single-channel protected transient overpower accident is defined. Reactivity feedback coefficients will not be required and simplified material properties are recommended. This report also describes the data required for developing the modeling input. This data includes assembly geometry, reactor power distributions, kinetics and decay heat data, and material properties. Comparisons of benchmark results will take place at a future SAS4A/SASSYS-1 training meeting planned to occur at Argonne National Laboratory. Future benchmark specifications will be planned to expand upon this initial model to include more complex reactivity feedback models, material properties, additional assembly geometry, and primary and intermediate coolant systems.

  19. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  20. A regular version of Smilansky model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR, 25068 ?ež near Prague

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a modification of Smilansky model in which a singular potential “channel” is replaced by a regular, below unbounded potential which shrinks as it becomes deeper. We demonstrate that, similarly to the original model, such a system exhibits a spectral transition with respect to the coupling constant, and determine the critical value above which a new spectral branch opens. The result is generalized to situations with multiple potential “channels.”.

  1. Results of the 2013 UT modeling benchmark obtained with models implemented in CIVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toullelan, Gwénaėl; Raillon, Raphaėle; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonne, Sébastien

    2014-02-18

    The 2013 Ultrasonic Testing (UT) modeling benchmark concerns direct echoes from side drilled holes (SDH), flat bottom holes (FBH) and corner echoes from backwall breaking artificial notches inspected with a matrix phased array probe. This communication presents the results obtained with the models implemented in the CIVA software: the pencilmodel is used to compute the field radiated by the probe, the Kirchhoff approximation is applied to predict the response of FBH and notches and the SOV (Separation Of Variables) model is used for the SDH responses. The comparison between simulated and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  3. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James Mark; Carr, Dorthe B.

    2015-02-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris V1.1 2/2015 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Iteration I2 Review Comments M. Harris

  4. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  5. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitz, Cecilia M.; Shell, K. M.; Gent, P. R.; Bailey, D. A.; Danabasoglu, G.; Armour, K. C.; Holland, M. M.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2012-05-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20Ā°C for 1Ā° horizontal resolution in each component. This is about a half degree Celsius higher than in the previous version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1Ā° resolution is 1.72Ā°C, which is about 0.2Ā°C higher than in CCSM3. These higher climate sensitivities in CCSM4 cannot be explained by the change to a preindustrial baseline climate. We use the radiative kernel technique to show that from CCSM3 to CCSM4, the global mean lapse-rate feedback declines in magnitude, and the shortwave cloud feedback increases. These two warming effects are partially canceled by cooling due to slight decreases in the global mean water-vapor feedback and longwave cloud feedback from CCSM3 to CCSM4. A new formulation of the mixed-layer, slab ocean model in CCSM4 attempts to reproduce the SST and sea ice climatology from an integration with a full-depth ocean, and it is integrated with a dynamic sea ice model. These new features allow an isolation of the influence of ocean dynamical changes on the climate response when comparing integrations with the slab ocean and full-depth ocean. The transient climate response of the full-depth ocean version is 0.54 of the equilibrium climate sensitivity when estimated with the new slab ocean model version for both CCSM3 and CCSM4. We argue the ratio is the same in both versions because they have about the same zonal mean pattern of change in ocean surface heat flux, which broadly resembles the zonal mean pattern of net feedback strength.

  6. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bitz, Cecilia M.; Shell, K. M.; Gent, P. R.; Bailey, D. A.; Danabasoglu, G.; Armour, K. C.; Holland, M. M.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2012-05-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20Ā°C for 1Ā° horizontal resolution in each component. This is about a half degree Celsius higher than in the previous version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1Ā° resolution is 1.72Ā°C, which is about 0.2Ā°C higher than in CCSM3. These higher climate sensitivities in CCSM4 cannot be explained by the change to a preindustrial baseline climate. We use the radiative kernel technique to show that from CCSM3 to CCSM4, the global mean lapse-rate feedback declines in magnitude, and the shortwave cloud feedback increases. These twomoreĀ Ā» warming effects are partially canceled by cooling due to slight decreases in the global mean water-vapor feedback and longwave cloud feedback from CCSM3 to CCSM4. A new formulation of the mixed-layer, slab ocean model in CCSM4 attempts to reproduce the SST and sea ice climatology from an integration with a full-depth ocean, and it is integrated with a dynamic sea ice model. These new features allow an isolation of the influence of ocean dynamical changes on the climate response when comparing integrations with the slab ocean and full-depth ocean. The transient climate response of the full-depth ocean version is 0.54 of the equilibrium climate sensitivity when estimated with the new slab ocean model version for both CCSM3 and CCSM4. We argue the ratio is the same in both versions because they have about the same zonal mean pattern of change in ocean surface heat flux, which broadly resembles the zonal mean pattern of net feedback strength.Ā«Ā less

  7. Benchmarks used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison. The compilers are also compared against one another on the benchmarks. NERSC6 Benchmarks We used these benchmarks from the NERSC6 procurement: Nersc 6 procurement mpi benchmarks Benchmark Science Area Algorithms Concurrency Languages GTC Fusion PIC, finite difference 2048 (weak scaling) f90 IMPACT-T Accelerator Physics PIC, FFT 1024 (strong scaling) f90

  8. Development of a HEX-Z Partially Homogenized Benchmark Model for the FFTF Isothermal Physics Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2012-05-01

    A series of isothermal physics measurements were performed as part of an acceptance testing program for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). A HEX-Z partially-homogenized benchmark model of the FFTF fully-loaded core configuration was developed for evaluation of these measurements. Evaluated measurements include the critical eigenvalue of the fully-loaded core, two neutron spectra, 32 reactivity effects measurements, an isothermal temperature coefficient, and low-energy gamma and electron spectra. Dominant uncertainties in the critical configuration include the placement of radial shielding around the core, reactor core assembly pitch, composition of the stainless steel components, plutonium content in the fuel pellets, and boron content in the absorber pellets. Calculations of criticality, reactivity effects measurements, and the isothermal temperature coefficient using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections with the benchmark model are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment measurements. There is only some correlation between calculated and measured spectral measurements; homogenization of many of the core components may have impacted computational assessment of these measurements. This benchmark evaluation has been added to the IRPhEP Handbook.

  9. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  10. MPI Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPI Benchmarks MPI Benchmarks The APEX RFP calls out several MPI related requirements that can be categorized as two-sided or one-sided and the respective measures of message rate, bandwidth and latency for each. In addition, collective operations are called out. The general philosophy for MPI benchmarking is to use publicly available micro-benchmarks were appropriate and to develop new micro-benchmarks where there are gaps in the public benchmark suites. Unless a benchmark is explicitly called

  11. H2A Production Model, Version 2 User Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Ramsden, T.; Zuboy, J.

    2008-09-01

    The H2A Production Model analyzes the technical and economic aspects of central and forecourt hydrogen production technologies. Using a standard discounted cash flow rate of return methodology, it determines the minimum hydrogen selling price, including a specified after-tax internal rate of return from the production technology. Users have the option of accepting default technology input values--such as capital costs, operating costs, and capacity factor--from established H2A production technology cases or entering custom values. Users can also modify the model's financial inputs. This new version of the H2A Production Model features enhanced usability and functionality. Input fields are consolidated and simplified. New capabilities include performing sensitivity analyses and scaling analyses to various plant sizes. This User Guide helps users already familiar with the basic tenets of H2A hydrogen production cost analysis get started using the new version of the model. It introduces the basic elements of the model then describes the function and use of each of its worksheets.

  12. NERSC-5 Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Benchmarks NERSC-5 Benchmarks The NERSC-5 application benchmarks were used in the acquisition process that resulted in the NERSC Cray XT4 system ("Franklin"). CAM: CCSM Community Climate Model GAMESS: Computational Chemistry GTC: 3D Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code MADBench: Microwave Anisotropy Dataset Computational Analysis Benchmark MILC: MIMD Lattice Computation PARATEC: Parallel Total Energy Code PMEMD: Particle Mesh Ewald Molecular Dynamics Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:58

  13. Text-Alternative Version: Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires" webcast, held November 15, 2011.

  14. CASL - Initial Validation and Benchmark Study of new 3D CRUD Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial Validation and Benchmark Study of new 3D CRUD Model A new 3D CRUD model, known as "MAMBA" (for "MPO Advanced Model for Boron Analysis"), is being developed by the Crud Group within the MPO focus area of CASL. The 3D MAMBA v2.0 computer code was released to CASL on Feb. 28, 2012 and is capable of being run in "stand-alone" mode or in coupled mode with a thermal hydraulics computational fluid dynamics model (e.g., STAR-CCM+) and/or a neutron transport

  15. Benchmarking & Workload Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAM: CCSM Community Climate Model GAMESS: Computational Chemistry GTC: 3D Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code MADBench: Microwave Anisotropy Dataset Computational Analysis Benchmark MILC: ...

  16. NERSC-5 Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAM: CCSM Community Climate Model GAMESS: Computational Chemistry GTC: 3D Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code MADBench: Microwave Anisotropy Dataset Computational Analysis Benchmark MILC: ...

  17. Reference aquaplanet climate in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Brian; Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2016-03-18

    In this study, fundamental characteristics of the aquaplanet climate simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5.3 (CAM5.3) are presented. The assumptions and simplifications of the configuration are described. A 16 year long, perpetual equinox integration with prescribed SST using the modelā€™s standard 18 grid spacing is presented as a reference simulation. Statistical analysis is presented that shows similar aquaplanet configurations can be run for about 2 years to obtain robust climatological structures, including global and zonal means, eddy statistics, and precipitation distributions. Such a simulation can be compared to the reference simulation to discern differences in the climate, includingmoreĀ Ā» an assessment of confidence in the differences. To aid such comparisons, the reference simulation has been made available via earthsystemgrid.org. Examples are shown comparing the reference simulation with simulations from the CAM5 series that make different microphysical assumptions and use a different dynamical core.Ā«Ā less

  18. The integrated Earth System Model Version 1: formulation and functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, William D.; Craig, Anthony P.; Truesdale, John E.; Di Vittorio, Alan; Jones, Andrew D.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Patel, Pralit L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Chini, Louise M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth System Model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for pro- jecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) and an Earth System Model (ESM) into a common modeling in- frastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the humanā€“Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species, land use and land cover change, and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. The iESM project integrates the economic and human dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a sin- gle simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore- omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific under- standing of the humanā€“Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper de- scribes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.

  19. The integrated Earth system model version 1: formulation and functionality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, W. D.; Craig, A. P.; Truesdale, J. E.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Jones, A. D.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J. A.; Kim, S. H.; Thomson, A. M.; et al

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth system model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an integrated assessment model (IAM) and an Earth system model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the humanā€“Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species (SLS), land use and land cover change (LULCC), and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. ThemoreĀ Ā» iESM project integrates the economic and human-dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the humanā€“Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper describes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.Ā«Ā less

  20. Benchmark models and experimental data for a U(20) polyethylene-moderated critical system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Larry; Busch, Robert D.; Bowen, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    This work involves the analysis of recent experiments performed on the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN)-201M (AGN) polyethylene-moderated research reactor at the University of New Mexico (UNM). The experiments include 36 delayed critical (DC) configurations and 11 positive-period and rod-drop measurements (transient sequences). The Even Parity Neutron Transport (EVENT) radiation transport code was chosen to analyze these steady state and time-dependent experimental configurations. The UNM AGN specifications provided in a benchmark calculation report (2007) were used to initiate AGN EVENT model development and to test the EVENT AGN calculation methodology. The results of the EVENT DC experimental analyses compared well with the experimental data; the average AGN EVENT calculation bias in the keff is ā€“0.0048% for the Legrendre Flux Expansion Order of 11 (P11) cases and +0.0119% for the P13 cases. The EVENT transient analysis also compared well with the AGN experimental data with respect to predicting the reactor period and control rod worth values. This paper discusses the benchmark models used, the recent experimental configurations, and the EVENT experimental analysis.

  1. UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Fayer

    2000-06-12

    The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

  2. Vadose Zone Contaminant Migration Multi-Layer Model Software (Version 4.0)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-12

    The Version 4.0 model is designed to improve functionality and addresses a greater range of unsaturated zone scenarios than previous versions. The additional flexibility is accomplished in the model by including user-defined hydraulic layer functions and hydraulic parameters.

  3. Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

    2008-06-05

    An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

  4. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  5. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Renyu; Seager, Sara; Bains, William

    2012-12-20

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all types of terrestrial planet atmospheres, ranging from oxidizing through reducing, which makes the code suitable for applications for the wide range of anticipated terrestrial exoplanet compositions. The one-dimensional chemical transport model treats up to 800 chemical reactions, photochemical processes, dry and wet deposition, surface emission, and thermal escape of O, H, C, N, and S bearing species, as well as formation and deposition of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid aerosols. We validate the model by computing the atmospheric composition of current Earth and Mars and find agreement with observations of major trace gases in Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. We simulate several plausible atmospheric scenarios of terrestrial exoplanets and choose three benchmark cases for atmospheres from reducing to oxidizing. The most interesting finding is that atomic hydrogen is always a more abundant reactive radical than the hydroxyl radical in anoxic atmospheres. Whether atomic hydrogen is the most important removal path for a molecule of interest also depends on the relevant reaction rates. We also find that volcanic carbon compounds (i.e., CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) are chemically long-lived and tend to be well mixed in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and their dry deposition velocities to the surface control the atmospheric oxidation states. Furthermore, we revisit whether photochemically produced oxygen can cause false positives for detecting oxygenic photosynthesis, and find that in 1 bar CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres oxygen and ozone may build up to levels that have conventionally been accepted as signatures of life, if there is no surface emission of reducing gases. The atmospheric scenarios presented in this paper can serve as the benchmark

  6. Estimating Parameters for the PVsyst Version 6 Photovoltaic Module Performance Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Clifford

    2015-10-01

    We present an algorithm to determine parameters for the photovoltaic module perf ormance model encoded in the software package PVsyst(TM) version 6. Our method operates on current - voltage (I - V) measured over a range of irradiance and temperature conditions. We describe the method and illustrate its steps using data for a 36 cell crystalli ne silicon module. We qualitatively compare our method with one other technique for estimating parameters for the PVsyst(TM) version 6 model .

  7. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. J.

    2012-04-15

    Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

  8. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Models Guide summarizes the IBS use of several computer models for predicting the results of emergency situations. These include models for predicting dispersion/doses of airborne contaminants, traffic evacuation, explosion effects, heat radiation from a fire, and siren sound transmission. The guide references additional technical documentation on the models when such documentation is available from other sources. The audience for this manual is chiefly emergency management planners and analysts, but also data managers and system managers.

  9. Integrated Baseline Bystem (IBS) Version 1.03: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System)(IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planning and analysis. This document is the models guide for the IBS and explains how to use the emergency related computer models. This document provides information for the experienced system user, and is the primary reference for the computer modeling software supplied with the system. It is designed for emergency managers and planners, and others familiar with the concepts of computer modeling. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other IBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary.

  10. Benchmarking the RELAP5/MOD2. 5 r-. Theta. model of an SRS (Savannah River Site) reactor to the 1989 L-Reactor tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.S. ); Davis, C.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Benchmarking calculations utilizing RELAP5/MOD2.5 with a detailed multi-dimensional r-{theta} model of the SRS L-Reactor will be presented. This benchmarking effort has provided much insight into the two-component two-phase behavior of the reactor under isothermal conditions with large quantities of air ingested from the moderator tank to the external loops. Initial benchmarking results have illuminated several model weaknesses which will be discussed in conjunction with proposed modeling changes. The benchmarking work is being performed to provide a fully qualified RELAP5 model for use in computing the system response to a double ended large break LOCA. 5 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Macro System Model (MSM) User Guide, Version 1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.

    2011-09-01

    This user guide describes the macro system model (MSM). The MSM has been designed to allow users to analyze the financial, environmental, transitional, geographical, and R&D issues associated with the transition to a hydrogen economy. Basic end users can use the MSM to answer cross-cutting questions that were previously difficult to answer in a consistent and timely manner due to various assumptions and methodologies among different models.

  12. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  13. Concrete Model Descriptions and Summary of Benchmark Studies for Blast Effects Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C; Kokko, E; Darnell, I; Dunn, T; Hagler, L; Leininger, L

    2005-07-21

    Concrete is perhaps one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. Engineers use it to build massive concrete dams, concrete waterways, highways, bridges, and even nuclear reactors. The advantages of using concrete is that it can be cast into any desired shape, it is durable, and very economical compared to structural steel. The disadvantages are its low tensile strength, low ductility, and low strength-to-weight ratio. Concrete is a composite material that consists of a coarse granular material, or aggregate, embedded in a hard matrix of material, or cement, which fills the gaps between the aggregates and binds them together. Concrete properties, however, vary widely. The properties depend on the choice of materials used and the proportions for a particular application, as well as differences in fabrication techniques. Table 1 provides a listing of typical engineering properties for structural concrete. Properties also depend on the level of concrete confinement, or hydrostatic pressure, the material is being subjected to. In general, concrete is rarely subjected to a single axial stress. The material may experience a combination of stresses all acting simultaneously. The behavior of concrete under these combined stresses are, however, extremely difficult to characterize. In addition to the type of loading, one must also consider the stress history of the material. Failure is determined not only by the ultimate stresses, but also by the rate of loading and the order in which these stresses were applied. The concrete model described herein accounts for this complex behavior of concrete. It was developed by Javier Malvar, Jim Wesevich, and John Crawford of Karagozian and Case, and Don Simon of Logicon RDA in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's programs. The model is an enhanced version of the Concrete/Geological Material Model 16 in the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D. The modifications that were made to the original model

  14. Models and Results Database (MAR-D), Version 4. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branham-Haar, K.A.; Dinneen, R.A.; Russell, K.D.; Skinner, N.L. )

    1992-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC-RES) is presently funding the development of the Models and Results Database (MAR-D) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. MAR-D's primary function is to create a data repository for NUREG-1150 and other permanent data by providing input, conversion, and output capabilities for data used by IRRAS, SARA, SETS, and FRANTIC personal computer (PC) codes. As probabilistic risk assessments and individual plant examinations are submitted to the NRC for review, MAR-D can be used to convert the models and results from the study for use with IRRAS and SARA. Then, these data can be easily accessed by future studies and will be in a form that will enhance the analysis process. This reference manual provides an overview of the function available within MAR-D and step-by-step operating instructions.

  15. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  16. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

  17. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOMĀ’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are criticalmoreĀ Ā» to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated

  18. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF VERSION 3.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, Don; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W. M.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Pisso, I.; Bukhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for cal- culating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need from the modeler community has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteoro- logical model. Simple procedures on how to run FLEXPART-WRF are presented along with special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. In addition, test case data, the source code and visualization tools are provided to the reader as supplementary material.

  19. Comparison of practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods to a Fort Polk data/model benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    The results of five practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing programs are compared against a detailed simulation model that has been calibrated to monitored data taken from one military family housing unit at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The calibration of the detailed model to data is described in a companion paper. The assertion that the data/detailed model is a useful benchmark for practical sizing methods is based on this calibration. The results from the comparisons demonstrate the current level of agreement between vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods in common use. It is recommended that the calibration and comparison exercise be repeated with data sets from additional sites in order to build confidence in the practical sizing methods.

  20. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate high

  1. Building Energy Use Benchmarking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Use Benchmarking Building Energy Use Benchmarking Benchmarking is the practice of comparing the measured performance of a device, process, facility, or organization to itself, its peers, or established norms, with the goal of informing and motivating performance improvement. When applied to building energy use, benchmarking serves as a mechanism to measure energy performance of a single building over time, relative to other similar buildings, or to modeled simulations of a

  2. Introduction to Benchmarking: Starting a Benchmarking Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Introduction to Benchmarking: Starting a Benchmarking Plan webinar, presented on February 21, 2013 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program (TAP).

  3. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity

  4. The NERSC GTC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GTC The NERSC GTC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:04:18...

  5. The NERSC MADBench Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MADBench The NERSC MADBench Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:10:14...

  6. The NERSC GAMESS Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GAMESS The NERSC GAMESS Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 14:48:10...

  7. The NERSC CAM Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAM The NERSC CAM Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 14:32:44...

  8. The NERSC PMEMD Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PMEMD The NERSC PMEMD Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:55:50...

  9. The NERSC PARATEC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARATEC The NERSC PARATEC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:16:06...

  10. The NERSC MILC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MILC The NERSC MILC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:12:32...

  11. The NERSC CAM Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAM The NERSC CAM Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 14:32:44

  12. The NERSC GAMESS Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GAMESS The NERSC GAMESS Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:09

  13. The NERSC GTC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GTC The NERSC GTC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:23

  14. The NERSC MADBench Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MADBench The NERSC MADBench Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:18

  15. The NERSC MILC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MILC The NERSC MILC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2015-01-06 15:12:32

  16. The NERSC PARATEC Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARATEC The NERSC PARATEC Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:25

  17. The NERSC PMEMD Benchmark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PMEMD The NERSC PMEMD Benchmark Complete Readme Overview Building and Optimization Running and Timing Performance Data Download Benchmark Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:01

  18. Aerosol specification in single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lebassi-Habtezion, B.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-03-27

    Single-column model (SCM) capability is an important tool for general circulation model development. In this study, the SCM mode of version 5 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is shown to handle aerosol initialization and advection improperly, resulting in aerosol, cloud-droplet, and ice crystal concentrations which are typically much lower than observed or simulated by CAM5 in global mode. This deficiency has a major impact on stratiform cloud simulations but has little impact on convective case studies because aerosol is currently not used by CAM5 convective schemes and convective cases are typically longer in duration (so initialization is less important).moreĀ Ā» By imposing fixed aerosol or cloud-droplet and crystal number concentrations, the aerosol issues described above can be avoided. Sensitivity studies using these idealizations suggest that the Meyers et al. (1992) ice nucleation scheme prevents mixed-phase cloud from existing by producing too many ice crystals. Microphysics is shown to strongly deplete cloud water in stratiform cases, indicating problems with sequential splitting in CAM5 and the need for careful interpretation of output from sequentially split climate models. Droplet concentration in the general circulation model (GCM) version of CAM5 is also shown to be far too low (~ 25 cmāˆ’3) at the southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site.Ā«Ā less

  19. Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

  20. Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Summary of Changes from v1.1_3.1 to v1.2_4.0, October 30, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This file contains the changes to the new construction building benchmark files from version 1.0_3.0 to version 1.1_3.1.

  1. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  2. NERSC-8 Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Benchmarks NERSC-8 Benchmarks The NERSC-8 micro- and application benchmarks that were used in the acquisition process that will be the NERSC Cray XC40 ("Cori") system. All of the benchmarks used for this procurement may be found here Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:31

  3. Verification and validation benchmarks. (Technical Report) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Benchmarking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling, Testing, Data & Results Ā» Vehicle Technologies Office: Benchmarking Vehicle Technologies Office: Benchmarking Research funded by the Vehicle Technologies Office produces a great deal of valuable data, but it is important to compare those research results with both baseline data and similar work done elsewhere in the world. Through laboratory testing to develop points of reference (known as benchmarking), researchers can compare vehicles and components to validate models, support

  5. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; JimƩnez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; et al

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification ofmoreĀ Ā» uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.Ā«Ā less

  6. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; JimĆ©nez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan -Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokofā€™ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo -Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  7. Benchmarking Data Cleansing: A Rite of Passage Along the Benchmarking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Cleansing: A Rite of Passage Along the Benchmarking Journey Benchmarking Data Cleansing: A Rite of Passage Along the Benchmarking Journey Hosted by the Technical Assistance ...

  8. NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benchmarks NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks These benchmark programs are for use as part of the joint NERSC / ACES NERSC-8/Trinity system procurement. There are two basic kinds of benchmarks: MiniApplications: miniFE, miniGhost, AMG, UMT, GTC, MILC, SNAP, and miniDFT MicroBenchmarks: Pynamic, STREAM, OMB, SMB, ZiaTest, IOR, Metabench, PSNAP, FSTest, mpimemu, and UPC_FT The SSP is an aggregate measure based on selected runs of the MiniApplications. The benchmark run rules are available here (PDF,

  9. CBEI - Improving Benchmarking Data Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Benchmarking Data Quality 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Scott ... Analysis of 2013 Philadelphia benchmarking data; Evaluation of Proficiency in Benchmarking ...

  10. Chemical structures of low-pressure premixed methylcyclohexane flames as benchmarks for the development of a predictive combustion chemistry model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Yang, Bin; Jasper, Ahren W.; Pitz, William J.; Hansen, Nils

    2011-11-14

    The chemical compositions of three low-pressure premixed flames of methylcyclohexane (MCH) are investigated with the emphasis on the chemistry of MCH decomposition and the formation of aromatic species, including benzene and toluene. The flames are stabilized on a flat-flame (McKenna type) burner at equivalence ratios of Ļ† = 1.0, 1.75, and 1.9 and at low pressures between 15 Torr (= 20 mbar) and 30 Torr (= 40 mbar). The complex chemistry of MCH consumption is illustrated in the experimental identification of several C7H12, C7H10, C6H12, and C6H10 isomers sampled from the flames as a function of distance from the burner.moreĀ Ā» Three initiation steps for MCH consumption are discussed: ring-opening to heptenes and methyl-hexenes (isomerization), methyl radical loss yielding the cyclohexyl radical (dissociation), and H abstraction from MCH. Mole fraction profiles as a function of distance from the burner for the C7 species supplemented by theoretical calculations are presented, indicating that flame structures resulting in steeper temperature gradients and/or greater peak temperatures can lead to a relative increase in MCH consumption through the dissociation and isomerization channels. Trends observed among the stable C6 species as well as 1,3-pentadiene and isoprene also support this conclusion. Relatively large amounts of toluene and benzene are observed in the experiments, illustrating the importance of sequential H-abstraction steps from MCH to toluene and from cyclohexyl to benzene. Furthermore, modeled results using the detailed chemical model of Pitz et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst.2007, 31, 267ā€“275) are also provided to illustrate the use of these data as a benchmark for the improvement or future development of a MCH mechanism.Ā«Ā less

  11. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), Investment & Planing Version 3.10.5.m

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Version 3.10.5 is a multi-year Decision Support tool for Distributed Generation (DG). DER-CAM was initially created as an exclusively economic energy model, able to find the cost minimizing combination and operation profile of a set of DER technologies that meet heat and electric loads of a single building or microgrid for a typical test year. Now, version 3.10.5.m solves for a multiple-year horizon the technology choice question, the appropriate capacity for each selected technology asmore »well as the operational and investment schedule. Optimized investment decisions are based on techno-economic criteria, along with site information such as energy loads, economic forecast, and technology characterization. Version 3.10.5 contains: 1. a PV and battery degradation model and 2. variable performance for technologies. Efficiency, investment costs, etc. can vary over time and model technology breakthroughs and advancements.« less

  12. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), Investment & Planing Version 3.10.5.m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Version 3.10.5 is a multi-year Decision Support tool for Distributed Generation (DG). DER-CAM was initially created as an exclusively economic energy model, able to find the cost minimizing combination and operation profile of a set of DER technologies that meet heat and electric loads of a single building or microgrid for a typical test year. Now, version 3.10.5.m solves for a multiple-year horizon the technology choice question, the appropriate capacity for each selected technology as well as the operational and investment schedule. Optimized investment decisions are based on techno-economic criteria, along with site information such as energy loads, economic forecast, and technology characterization. Version 3.10.5 contains: 1. a PV and battery degradation model and 2. variable performance for technologies. Efficiency, investment costs, etc. can vary over time and model technology breakthroughs and advancements.

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), Investment & Planing Version 3.10.5.m

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Version 3.10.5 is a multi-year Decision Support tool for Distributed Generation (DG). DER-CAM was initially created as an exclusively economic energy model, able to find the cost minimizing combination and operation profile of a set of DER technologies that meet heat and electric loads of a single building or microgrid for a typical test year. Now, version 3.10.5.m solves for a multiple-year horizon the technology choice question, the appropriate capacity for each selected technology asmoreĀ Ā» well as the operational and investment schedule. Optimized investment decisions are based on techno-economic criteria, along with site information such as energy loads, economic forecast, and technology characterization. Version 3.10.5 contains: 1. a PV and battery degradation model and 2. variable performance for technologies. Efficiency, investment costs, etc. can vary over time and model technology breakthroughs and advancements.Ā«Ā less

  14. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  15. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2011-09-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  16. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  17. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNLā€™s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  18. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model (Version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  19. Boreal winter MJO teleconnection in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 with the Unified Convection parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Changhyun; Park, Sungsu; Kim, Daehyun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hye-Mi

    2015-10-15

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the dominant mode of tropical intraseasonal variability, influences weather and climate in the extratropics through atmospheric teleconnection. In this study, two simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) - one with the default shallow and deep convection schemes and the other with the Unified Convection scheme (UNICON) - are employed to examine the impacts of cumulus parameterizations on the simulation of the boreal wintertime MJO teleconnection in the Northern Hemisphere. We demonstrate that the UNICON substantially improves the MJO teleconnection. When the UNICON is employed, the simulated circulation anomalies associated with the MJO better resemble the observed counterpart, compared to the simulation with the default convection schemes. Quantitatively, the pattern correlation for the 300-hPa geopotential height anomalies between the simulations and observation increases from 0.07 for the default schemes to 0.54 for the UNICON. These circulation anomalies associated with the MJO further help to enhance the surface air temperature and precipitation anomalies over North America, although room for improvement is still evident. Initial value calculations suggest that the realistic MJO teleconnection with the UNICON is not attributed to the changes in the background wind, but primarily to the improved tropical convective heating associated with the MJO.

  20. Benchmarking Database - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ā©bobpaz.com0121.JPG Benchmarking Database Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  1. Benchmarks & Workflows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Ā» R & D Ā» APEX Ā» Benchmarks & Workflows Benchmarks & Workflows For the Crossroads/NERSC-9 procurement: NERSC conducted a workload analysis on the Hopper and Edison systems analyzing algorithmic diversity, MPI and OpenMP concurrency, memory utilization, and I/O and storage needs. Benchmarks will be used to measure the sustained performance of proposed systems. Example workflows are being provided to give prospective offerors a better understanding of the current I/O usage

  2. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional Residential Program Benchmarking, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 23, 2014.

  3. PyMPI Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-02-16

    Pynamic is a benchmark designed to test a system's ability to handle the Dynamic Linking and Loading (DLL) requirements of Python-based scientific applications. This benchmark is developed to add a workload to our testing environment, a workload that represents a newly emerging class of DLL behaviors. Pynamic buildins on pyMPI, and MPI extension to Python C-extension dummy codes and a glue layer that facilitates linking and loading of the generated dynamic modules into the resultingmoreĀ Ā» pyMPI. Pynamic is configurable, enabling modeling the static properties of a specific code as described in section 5. It does not, however, model any significant computationss of the target and hence, it is not subjected to the same level of control as the target code. In fact, HPC computer vendors and tool developers will be encouraged to add it to their tesitn suite once the code release is completed. an ability to produce and run this benchmark is an effective test for valifating the capability of a compiler and linker/loader as well as an OS kernel and other runtime system of HPC computer vendors. In addition, the benchmark is designed as a test case for stressing code development tools. Though Python has recently gained popularity in the HPC community, it heavy DLL operations have hindered certain HPC code development tools, notably parallel debuggers, from performing optimally.Ā«Ā less

  4. Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning caches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning ...

  5. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  6. Collection of Neutronic VVER Reactor Benchmarks.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-30

    Version 00 A system of computational neutronic benchmarks has been developed. In this CD-ROM report, the data generated in the course of the project are reproduced in their integrity with minor corrections. The editing that was performed on the various documents comprising this report was primarily meant to facilitate the production of the CD-ROM and to enable electronic retrieval of the information. The files are electronically navigable.

  7. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    267 September 2009 Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2 T. Ramsden and D. Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Zuboy Independent Contractor National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for

  8. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D ā€œringā€ model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  9. NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computation. NPB UPC-FT This is the NAS Parallel Benchmark FFT program written in the UPC language. Pynamic Pynamic tests dynamic loading subsystem design and the ability to handle...

  10. Energy Benchmarking and Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy benchmarking and disclosure is a market-based policy tool used to increase building energy performance awareness and transparency among key stakeholders and create demand for energy efficiency improvements.

  11. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology ...

  12. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detailmoreĀ Ā» in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D ā€œringā€ model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this ā€œblockā€ model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained

  14. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detail in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D ā€œringā€ model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this ā€œblockā€ model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained in the

  15. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model and Source Model (version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  16. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J.

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU

  17. Designing a Benchmarking Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) Solution Center document about how state and local governments, Indian tribes, and overseas U.S. territories can design a plan to benchmark the energy consumption in public buildings.

  18. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy ...

  19. NERSC-6/7 Benchmarks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/7 Benchmarks NERSC-6/7 Benchmarks The NERSC-6/7 application benchmarks were used in the acquisition process that resulted in the NERSC Cray XE6 ("Hopper") system and the follow on Cray XC30 system ("Edison") . A technical report describing the benchmark programs used in the NERSC-6 acquisition and the science drivers behind them is available here. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:40

  20. Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rules Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules Applications and micro-benchmarks for the Crossroads/NERSC-9 procurement. You can find more information by clicking on the header for each of the topics listed below. Change Log Change and update notes for the benchmark suite. Application Benchmarks The following applications will be used by the Sustained System Improvement metric in measuring the performance improvement of proposed systems relative to NERSC's Edison platform. General Run Rules

  1. A system analysis computer model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIRSYS Version 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sozer, M.C.

    1992-04-01

    A system transient analysis computer model (HFIRSYS) has been developed for analysis of small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and operational transients. The computer model is based on the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) that produces the FORTRAN code automatically and that provides integration routines such as the Gear`s stiff algorithm as well as enabling users with numerous practical tools for generating Eigen values, and providing debug outputs and graphics capabilities, etc. The HFIRSYS computer code is structured in the form of the Modular Modeling System (MMS) code. Component modules from MMS and in-house developed modules were both used to configure HFIRSYS. A description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, theoretical bases for the modeled components of the system, and the verification and validation efforts are reported. The computer model performs satisfactorily including cases in which effects of structural elasticity on the system pressure is significant; however, its capabilities are limited to single phase flow. Because of the modular structure, the new component models from the Modular Modeling System can easily be added to HFIRSYS for analyzing their effects on system`s behavior. The computer model is a versatile tool for studying various system transients. The intent of this report is not to be a users manual, but to provide theoretical bases and basic information about the computer model and the reactor.

  2. Hydrogen Macro System Model User Guide, Version 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.; Genung, K.; Hoseley, R.; Smith, A.; Yuzugullu, E.

    2009-07-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  3. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8)moreĀ Ā» with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.Ā«Ā less

  4. OECD NEA Benchmark Database of Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions for World Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, Ian C; Sly, Nicholas C; Michel-Sendis, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on the isotopic concentrations in irradiated nuclear fuel represent one of the primary methods for validating computational methods and nuclear data used for reactor and spent fuel depletion simulations that support nuclear fuel cycle safety and safeguards programs. Measurement data have previously not been available to users in a centralized or searchable format, and the majority of accessible information has been, for the most part, limited to light-water-reactor designs. This paper describes a recent initiative to compile spent fuel benchmark data for additional reactor designs used throughout the world that can be used to validate computer model simulations that support nuclear energy and nuclear safeguards missions. Experimental benchmark data have been expanded to include VVER-440, VVER-1000, RBMK, graphite moderated MAGNOX, gas cooled AGR, and several heavy-water moderated CANDU reactor designs. Additional experimental data for pressurized light water and boiling water reactor fuels has also been compiled for modern assembly designs and more extensive isotopic measurements. These data are being compiled and uploaded to a recently revised structured and searchable database, SFCOMPO, to provide the nuclear analysis community with a centrally-accessible resource of spent fuel compositions that can be used to benchmark computer codes, models, and nuclear data. The current version of SFCOMPO contains data for eight reactor designs, 20 fuel assembly designs, more than 550 spent fuel samples, and measured isotopic data for about 80 nuclides.

  5. Spent Fuel Criticality Benchmark Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2001-07-23

    Characteristics between commercial spent fuel waste packages (WP), Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs), and commercial reactor critical (CRC) evaluations are compared in this work. Emphasis is placed upon comparisons of CRC benchmark results and the relative neutron flux spectra in each system. Benchmark evaluations were performed for four different pressurized water reactors using four different sets of isotopes. As expected, as the number of fission products used to represent the burned fuel inventory approached reality, the closer to unity k{sub eff} became. Examination of material and geometry characteristics indicate several fundamental similarities between the WP and CRC systems. In addition, spectral evaluations were performed on a representative pressurized water reactor CRC, a 21-assembly area of the core modeled in a potential WP configuration, and three LCEs considered applicable benchmarks for storage packages. Fission and absorption reaction spectra as well as relative neutron flux spectra are generated and compared for each system. The energy dependent reaction rates are the product of the neutron flux spectrum and the energy dependent total macroscopic cross section. With constant source distribution functions, and the total macroscopic cross sections for the fuel region in the CRCs and WP being composed of nearly the same isotopics, the resulting relative flux spectra in the CRCs and WP are very nearly the same. Differences in the relative neutron flux spectra between WPs and CRCs are evident in the thermal energy range as expected. However, the relative energy distribution of the absorption, fission, and scattering reaction rates in both the CRCs and the WP are essentially the same.

  6. MPI Multicore Linktest Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-25

    The MPI Multicore Linktest (LinkTest) measures the aggregate bandwidth from/to a multicore node in a parallel system. It allows the user to specify a variety of different node layout and communication routine variations and reports the maximal observed bandwidth across all specified options. In particular, this benchmark is able to vary the number of tasks on the root node and thereby allows users to study the impact of multicore architectures on MPI communication performance.

  7. Commercial and Multifamily Building Benchmarking and Disclosure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Multifamily Building Benchmarking and Disclosure Commercial and Multifamily Building Benchmarking and Disclosure Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: ...

  8. House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation ...

  9. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  10. Benchmarking the New RESRAD-OFFSITE Source Term Model with DUST-MS and GoldSim - 13377

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Yu, C.

    2013-07-01

    RESRAD-OFFSITE is a computer code developed by Argonne National Laboratory under the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It is designed on the basis of RESRAD (onsite) code, a computer code designated by DOE and NRC for evaluating soil-contaminated sites for compliance with human health protection requirements pertaining to license termination or environmental remediation. RESRAD-OFFSITE has enhanced capabilities of modeling radionuclide transport to offsite locations and calculating potential radiation exposure to offsite receptors. Recently, a new source term model was incorporated into RESRAD-OFFSITE to enhance its capability further. This new source term model allows simulation of radionuclide releases from different waste forms, in addition to the soil sources originally considered in RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes. With this new source term model, a variety of applications can be achieved by using RESRAD-OFFSITE, including but not limited to, assessing the performance of radioactive waste disposal facilities. This paper presents the comparison of radionuclide release rates calculated by the new source term model of RESRAD-OFFSITE versus those calculated by DUST-MS and GoldSim, respectively. The focus of comparison is on the release rates of radionuclides from the bottom of the contaminated zone that was assumed to contain radioactive source materials buried in soil. The transport of released contaminants outside of the primary contaminated zone is beyond the scope of this paper. Overall, the agreement between the RESRAD-OFFSITE results and the DUST-MS and GoldSim results is fairly good, with all three codes predicting identical or similar radionuclide release profiles over time. Numerical dispersion in the DUST-MS and GoldSim results was identified as potentially contributing to the disagreement in the release rates. In general, greater discrepancy in the release rates was found for short

  11. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  12. A strict test of stellar evolution models: The absolute dimensions of the massive benchmark eclipsing binary V578 Mon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pavlovski, K.; Hensberge, H.; Chew, Y. Gómez Maqueo; Claret, A.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P = 2.40848 days) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of 5.41 ± 0.04 R{sub ?} and 4.29 ± 0.05 R{sub ?}, and temperatures of 30,000 ± 500 K and 25,750 ± 435 K, respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well with previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of 14.54 ± 0.08 M{sub ?} and 10.29 ± 0.06 M{sub ?} are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of the Granada group. We find that all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within the uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrones. However, there are some apparent age discrepancies for the corresponding mass-radius isochrones. Models with larger convective overshoot, >0.35, worked best. Combined with our previously determined apsidal motion of 0.07089{sub ?0.00013}{sup +0.00021} deg cycle{sup –1}, we compute the internal structure constants (tidal Love number) for the Newtonian and general relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion as log k {sub 2} = –1.975 ± 0.017 and log k {sub 2} = –3.412 ± 0.018, respectively. We find the relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion to be small, <4%. We find that the prediction of log k {sub 2,theo} = –2.005 ± 0.025 of the Granada models fully agrees with our observed log k {sub 2}.

  13. Moment-Based Probability Modeling and Extreme Response Estimation, The FITS Routine Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANUEL,LANCE; KASHEF,TINA; WINTERSTEIN,STEVEN R.

    1999-11-01

    This report documents the use of the FITS routine, which provides automated fits of various analytical, commonly used probability models from input data. It is intended to complement the previously distributed FITTING routine documented in RMS Report 14 (Winterstein et al., 1994), which implements relatively complex four-moment distribution models whose parameters are fit with numerical optimization routines. Although these four-moment fits can be quite useful and faithful to the observed data, their complexity can make them difficult to automate within standard fitting algorithms. In contrast, FITS provides more robust (lower moment) fits of simpler, more conventional distribution forms. For each database of interest, the routine estimates the distribution of annual maximum response based on the data values and the duration, T, over which they were recorded. To focus on the upper tails of interest, the user can also supply an arbitrary lower-bound threshold, {chi}{sub low}, above which a shifted distribution model--exponential or Weibull--is fit.

  14. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  15. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  16. Solergy (Beta Version 1)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-30

    SOLERGY simulates the operation and power output of a user-defined solar central receiver power plant for a time period of up to one year. SOLERGY utilizes recorded or simulated weather data and plant component performance models to calculate the power flowing through each part of the solar plant. A plant control subroutine monitors these powers and determines when to operate the various plant subsystems. The original version of the code was released in May 1987,moreĀ Ā» within SAND86-8060 and was widely distributed. The Beta Version 1 to be released in 2009, includes some relatively small modifications to the original code.Ā«Ā less

  17. Offshore Wind Guidance Document: Oceanography and Sediment Stability (Version 1) Development of a Conceptual Site Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-06-01

    This guidance document provide s the reader with an overview of the key environmental considerations for a typical offshore wind coastal location and the tools to help guide the reader through a thoro ugh planning process. It will enable readers to identify the key coastal processes relevant to their offshore wind site and perform pertinent analysis to guide siting and layout design, with the goal of minimizing costs associated with planning, permitting , and long - ter m maintenance. The document highlight s site characterization and assessment techniques for evaluating spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in the vicinity of a wind farm under typical, extreme, and storm conditions. Finally, the document des cribe s the assimilation of all of this information into the conceptual site model (CSM) to aid the decision - making processes.

  18. Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Ganguly, Srirupa; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in data centers. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing data centers - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, data center designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior data center benchmarking studies supported by the California Energy Commission. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the LBNL data center benchmarking database that was developed from these studies. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including facility designers and energy managers. This guide also builds on recent research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Energy Now program.

  19. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5

  20. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumpsmoreĀ Ā» and an anisotropy in one part.Ā«Ā less

  1. Sensitivity of precipitation to parameter values in the community atmosphere model version 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, Gardar; Lucas, Donald; Qian, Yun; Swiler, Laura Painton; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-03-01

    One objective of the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) program is to develop the capability to thoroughly test and understand the uncertainties in the overall climate model and its components as they are being developed. The focus on uncertainties involves sensitivity analysis: the capability to determine which input parameters have a major influence on the output responses of interest. This report presents some initial sensitivity analysis results performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LNNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the 2011-2012 timeframe, these laboratories worked in collaboration to perform sensitivity analyses of a set of CAM5, 2Ā° runs, where the response metrics of interest were precipitation metrics. The three labs performed their sensitivity analysis (SA) studies separately and then compared results. Overall, the results were quite consistent with each other although the methods used were different. This exercise provided a robustness check of the global sensitivity analysis metrics and identified some strongly influential parameters.

  2. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

  3. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  4. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  5. EIA model documentation: World oil refining logistics demand model,``WORLD`` reference manual. Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-11

    This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts. Broadly, the manual covers WORLD model features in progressively increasing detail. Section 2 provides an overview of the WORLD model, how it has evolved, what its design goals are, what it produces, and where it can be taken with further enhancements. Section 3 reviews model management covering data sources, managing over-optimization, calibration and seasonality, check-points for case construction and common errors. Section 4 describes in detail the WORLD system, including: data and program systems in overview; details of mainframe and PC program control and files;model generation, size management, debugging and error analysis; use with different optimizers; and reporting and results analysis. Section 5 provides a detailed description of every WORLD model data table, covering model controls, case and technology data. Section 6 goes into the details of WORLD matrix structure. It provides an overview, describes how regional definitions are controlled and defines the naming conventions for-all model rows, columns, right-hand sides, and bounds. It also includes a discussion of the formulation of product blending and specifications in WORLD. Several Appendices supplement the main sections.

  6. Healthcare Project Performance Benchmarks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Healthcare Project Performance Benchmarks Healthcare Project Performance Benchmarks Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service company projects within the healthcare industry, disaggregated and reported by major retrofit strategy. Author: U.S. Department of Energy healthcareprojectperformancebenchmarks.pdf (1.76 MB) More Documents & Publications Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

  7. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³?U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3? uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3?) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4?. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3? of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Kƶberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the Ā²Ā³āµU enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermoreĀ Ā» than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3Ļƒ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3Ļƒ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4Ļƒ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3Ļƒ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.Ā«Ā less

  9. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Sandia has released version 1.3 of PVLib, its widely used Matlab toolbox for modeling photovoltaic (PV) power ...

  11. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the streammoreĀ Ā» of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.Ā«Ā less

  12. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl Anderson, Steve Plimpton

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the stream of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.

  13. A proposed benchmark for simulation in radiographic testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaenisch, G.-R.; Deresch, A.; Bellon, C.; Schumm, A.; Guerin, P.

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of this benchmark study is to compare simulation results predicted by various models of radiographic testing, in particular those that are capable of separately predicting primary and scatter radiation for specimens of arbitrary geometry.

  14. Performance of Multi-chaotic PSO on a shifted benchmark functions set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluhacek, Michal; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2015-03-10

    In this paper the performance of Multi-chaotic PSO algorithm is investigated using two shifted benchmark functions. The purpose of shifted benchmark functions is to simulate the time-variant real-world problems. The results of chaotic PSO are compared with canonical version of the algorithm. It is concluded that using the multi-chaotic approach can lead to better results in optimization of shifted functions.

  15. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will provide a valuable body of best practices that can be incorporated into an EGS ... Stim") - Injection below S hmin per benchmarking LANL model - Max. injection rate ...

  16. Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example ...

  17. Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems Figure 1: Features of a sample CBERD energy information system ...

  18. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as ...

  19. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and

  20. Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service company projects within public housing, disaggregated and reported by major retrofit strategy. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  1. Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as ... ESCOs in a similar climate zone (based on ASHRAE climate zones) or market segment (e.g., ...

  2. Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service company projects within the federal government, disaggregated and reported by major retrofit strategy. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  3. Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service company projects within post secondary education facilities, disaggregated and reported by major retrofit strategy. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  4. PVWatts Version 5 Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobos, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    The NREL PVWatts calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes includes several built-in parameters that are hidden from the user. This technical reference describes the sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimate. This reference is applicable to the significantly revised version of PVWatts released by NREL in 2014.

  5. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  6. Benchmarking Help Center Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Center Guide Benchmarking Help Center Guide This guide provides recommendations for establishing a benchmarking help center based on experiences and lessons learned in New York City and Seattle. Benchmarking Help Center Guide (884.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Energy Disclosure and Leasing Standards: Best Practices Benchmarking Outreach and Data Collection Techniques for External Portfolios Energy Performance Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies for Public and Commercial

  7. Issues in benchmarking human reliability analysis methods : a literature review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lois, Erasmia; Forester, John Alan; Tran, Tuan Q.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Boring, Ronald L.

    2008-04-01

    There is a diversity of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods available for use in assessing human performance within probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Due to the significant differences in the methods, including the scope, approach, and underlying models, there is a need for an empirical comparison investigating the validity and reliability of the methods. To accomplish this empirical comparison, a benchmarking study is currently underway that compares HRA methods with each other and against operator performance in simulator studies. In order to account for as many effects as possible in the construction of this benchmarking study, a literature review was conducted, reviewing past benchmarking studies in the areas of psychology and risk assessment. A number of lessons learned through these studies are presented in order to aid in the design of future HRA benchmarking endeavors.

  8. Benchmark analysis of high temperature engineering test reactor core using McCARD code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Jo, Chang Keun; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man

    2013-07-01

    A benchmark calculation has been performed for a startup core physics test of Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The calculation is carried out by the McCARD code, which adopts the Monte Carlo method. The cross section library is ENDF-B/VII.0. The fuel cell is modeled by the reactivity-equivalent physical transform (RPT) method. Effective multiplication factors with different numbers of fuel columns have been analyzed. The calculation shows that the HTTR becomes critical with 19 fuel columns with an excess reactivity of 0.84% Ī”k/k. The discrepancies between the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations are 2.2 and 1.4 % Ī”k/k for 24 and 30 columns, respectively. The reasons for the discrepancy are thought to be the current version of cross section library and the impurity in the graphite which is represented by the boron concentration. In the future, the depletion results will be proposed for further benchmark calculations. (authors)

  9. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  11. WIPP Benchmark calculations with the large strain SPECTROM codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, G.D.; DeVries, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides calculational results from the updated Lagrangian structural finite-element programs SPECTROM-32 and SPECTROM-333 for the purpose of qualifying these codes to perform analyses of structural situations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results are presented for the Second WIPP Benchmark (Benchmark II) Problems and for a simplified heated room problem used in a parallel design calculation study. The Benchmark II problems consist of an isothermal room problem and a heated room problem. The stratigraphy involves 27 distinct geologic layers including ten clay seams of which four are modeled as frictionless sliding interfaces. The analyses of the Benchmark II problems consider a 10-year simulation period. The evaluation of nine structural codes used in the Benchmark II problems shows that inclusion of finite-strain effects is not as significant as observed for the simplified heated room problem, and a variety of finite-strain and small-strain formulations produced similar results. The simplified heated room problem provides stratigraphic complexity equivalent to the Benchmark II problems but neglects sliding along the clay seams. The simplified heated problem does, however, provide a calculational check case where the small strain-formulation produced room closures about 20 percent greater than those obtained using finite-strain formulations. A discussion is given of each of the solved problems, and the computational results are compared with available published results. In general, the results of the two SPECTROM large strain codes compare favorably with results from other codes used to solve the problems.

  12. STONIX, Version 0.x

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Version 0.x STONIX, Version 0.x STONIX is a program for configuring UNIX and Linux computer operating systems. May 14, 2015 software STONIX is a program for configuring UNIX and...

  13. Solar Webinar Text Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on solar renewable energy.

  14. Sophia Library Version 12

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Library Version 12 is the source code shared by all the executables related to the Sophia package.

  15. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  16. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  17. Processor Emulator with Benchmark Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-11-13

    A processor emulator and a suite of benchmark applications have been developed to assist in characterizing the performance of data-centric workloads on current and future computer architectures. Some of the applications have been collected from other open source projects. For more details on the emulator and an example of its usage, see reference [1].

  18. K-12 Schools Project Performance Benchmarks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K-12 Schools Project Performance Benchmarks K-12 Schools Project Performance Benchmarks Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service ...

  19. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  20. Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks, a webinar from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings program.

  1. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

  2. Commercial and Multifamily Building Benchmarking and Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Commercial and Multifamily Building Benchmarking and Disclosure, Call Slides, July 25, 2013.

  3. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  4. Benchmarking of Competitive Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape006_burress_2011_o.pdf (733.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Benchmarking of Competitive Technologies Benchmarking of Competitive Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Benchmarking EV and HEV Technologies

  5. GENII Version 2 Usersā€™ Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2004-03-08

    The GENII Version 2 computer code was developed for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the radiological risk estimating procedures of Federal Guidance Report 13 into updated versions of existing environmental pathway analysis models. The resulting environmental dosimetry computer codes are compiled in the GENII Environmental Dosimetry System. The GENII system was developed to provide a state-of-the-art, technically peer-reviewed, documented set of programs for calculating radiation dose and risk from radionuclides released to the environment. The codes were designed with the flexibility to accommodate input parameters for a wide variety of generic sites. Operation of a new version of the codes, GENII Version 2, is described in this report. Two versions of the GENII Version 2 code system are available, a full-featured version and a version specifically designed for demonstrating compliance with the dose limits specified in 40 CFR 61.93(a), the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) for radionuclides. The only differences lie in the limitation of the capabilities of the user to change specific parameters in the NESHAPS version. This report describes the data entry, accomplished via interactive, menu-driven user interfaces. Default exposure and consumption parameters are provided for both the average (population) and maximum individual; however, these may be modified by the user. Source term information may be entered as radionuclide release quantities for transport scenarios, or as basic radionuclide concentrations in environmental media (air, water, soil). For input of basic or derived concentrations, decay of parent radionuclides and ingrowth of radioactive decay products prior to the start of the exposure scenario may be considered. A single code run can

  6. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  7. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY PROGRAM TO OBTAIN BENCHMARK DATA ON THE FLOW PHENOMENA IN A SCALED MODEL OF A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR LOWER PLENUM FOR THE VALIDATION OF CFD CODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a typical prismatic gas-cooled (GCR) reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A detailed description of the model, scaling, the experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that are presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic GCR design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet flow is also presented.

  8. MPI Multicore Torus Communication Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-05

    The MPI Multicore Torus Communications Benchmark (TorusTest) measues the aggegate bandwidth across all six links from/to any multicore node in a logical torus. It can run in wo modi: using a static or a random mapping of tasks to torus locations. The former can be used to achieve optimal mappings and aggregate bandwidths that can be achieved with varying node mappings.

  9. Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) continued > We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that employs performance contracting as a core part of its energy efficiency services business. 1 For projects with electricity savings, we assume site energy conversion (1 kWh = 3,412 Btu). We did not estimate avoided Btus from gallons of water conserved. In general, we followed the analytical approach

  10. Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that employs performance contracting as a core part of its energy efficiency services business. 1 For projects with electricity savings, we assume site energy conversion (1 kWh = 3,412 Btu). We did not estimate avoided Btus from gallons of water conserved. In general, we followed the analytical approach documented in Hopper et

  11. Pre-equilibrium, Statistical Nuclear-Model Code System for Calculation Cross Sections and Emission Spectra, Version gn9cp8.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-02-02

    Version 00 GNASH provides a flexible method by which reaction and level cross sections, isomer ratios, and emission spectra (neutron, gamma-ray, and charged-particle) resulting from particle- and photon-induced reactions can be calculated. The September 1991 release of GNASH incorporated an additional option for calculating gamma-ray strength functions and transmission coefficients by including the Kopecky-Uhl model. In addition, improvements were made to the output routines, particularly regarding gamma-ray strength function information. Major improvements in the 1995moreĀ Ā» FKK-GNASH release include added capabilities: to read in externally calculated preequilibrium spectrum from, e.g., Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin theory, to do multiple preequilibrium calculations, to calculate appropriate spin distributions for nuclear states formed in preequilibrium reactions, and to do incident-photon calculations. In the 1998 release improvements were made in the accuracy of the exciton model and other calculations, and provision was made for including energy-dependent renormalization of the reaction cross section and energy-dependent exciton model parameterization (for data evaluation purposes). The sample problems provided here are the same as those that were given in the 1998 release; however, the calculations were run using the current version of GNASH (gn9cp8). The major differences between this version and the previous one released in 1998 are as follows: 1. A serious buffering error that affected stored state populations resulting when multiple reactions lead to the same compound nucleus is corrected. This error only affects cases with INPOPT=-1, normally used for high-energy calculations. It is the reason that the present outputs for the p + Zr90 test case (described below) are significantly different from the 1998 results for the same p + Zr90 test case. 2. Minor errors were corrected in estimating preequilibrium contributions to discrete states; interpolating the spin

  12. Femaxi-6 Version 1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    FEMAXI-6(Updated) predicts the thermal and mechanical behaviour of a light water reactor fuel rod during normal and transient (not accident) conditions. It can analyse the integral behaviour of a whole fuel rod throughout its life as well as the localised behaviour of a small part of fuel rod. Temperature distribution, radial and axial deformations, fission gas release, and inner gas pressure are calculated as a function of irradiation time and axial position. Stresses and strainsmoreĀ Ā» in the pellet and cladding are calculated and PCMI analysis is performed. Also, thermal conductivity degradation of pellet and cladding waterside oxidation are modeled. Its analytical capabilities also cover the boiling transient anticipated in BWR. RODBURN calculates the power generation density profile in the radial and axial directions and fast neutron flux, and concentrations of fission product isotopes and fissile materials of a single rod irradiated in PWR, BWR and Halden BWR. RODBURN gives an output file which can be read by FEMAXI-6. NEA-1080/10: This version differs from the previous one in the following: a few formulae were updated in the manual and the source code. the input options were expanded in the following points: Thermal expansion modelling; Pellet swelling option; Pellet plasticity model; Cladding surface heat transfer model All changes are marked in red in the reference report.Ā«Ā less

  13. Sophia Daemon Version 12

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Daemon Version 12 contains the code that is exclusively used by the Ā‘sophiadĀ’ application. It runs as a service on a Linux host and analyzes network traffic obtained from libpcap and produces a network fingerprint based on hosts and channels. Sophia Daemon Version 12 can, if desired by the user, produce alerts when its fingerprint changes. Sophia Daemon Version 12 can receive data from another Sophia Daemon or raw packet data. It can outputmoreĀ Ā» data to another Sophia Daemon Version 12, OglNet Version 12 or MySQL. Sophia Daemon Version 12 runs in a passive real-time manner that allows it to be used on a SCADA network. Its network fingerprint is designed to be applicable to SCADA networks rather than general IT networks.Ā«Ā less

  14. APEX user`s guide - (Argonne production, expansion, and exchange model for electrical systems), version 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Veselka, T.D.; Guziel, K.A.; Blodgett, D.W.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Koritarov, V.S.; North, M.J.; Novickas, A.A.; Paprockas, K.R.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes operating procedures and background documentation for the Argonne Production, Expansion, and Exchange Model for Electrical Systems (APEX). This modeling system was developed to provide the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Electricity with in-house capabilities for addressing policy options that affect electrical utilities. To meet this objective, Argonne National Laboratory developed a menu-driven programming package that enables the user to develop and conduct simulations of production costs, system reliability, spot market network flows, and optimal system capacity expansion. The APEX system consists of three basic simulation components, supported by various databases and data management software. The components include (1) the investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems (ICARUS) model, (2) the Spot Market Network (SMN) model, and (3) the Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model. The ICARUS model provides generating-unit-level production-cost and reliability simulations with explicit recognition of planned and unplanned outages. The SMN model addresses optimal network flows with recognition of marginal costs, wheeling charges, and transmission constraints. The PACE model determines long-term (e.g., longer than 10 years) capacity expansion schedules on the basis of candidate expansion technologies and load growth estimates. In addition, the Automated Data Assembly Package (ADAP) and case management features simplify user-input requirements. The ADAP, ICARUS, and SMN modules are described in detail. The PACE module is expected to be addressed in a future publication.

  15. A Multi-Year Plan for Enhancing Turbulence Modeling in Hydra-TH Revised and Updated Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Thomas M.; Berndt, Markus; Baglietto, Emilio; Magolan, Ben

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a multi-year plan for enhancing turbulence modeling in Hydra-TH for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) program. Hydra-TH is being developed to the meet the high- fidelity, high-Reynolds number CFD based thermal hydraulic simulation needs of the program. This work is being conducted within the thermal hydraulics methods (THM) focus area. This report is an extension of THM CASL milestone L3:THM.CFD.P10.02 [33] (March, 2015) and picks up where it left off. It will also serve to meet the requirements of CASL THM level three milestone, L3:THM.CFD.P11.04, scheduled for completion September 30, 2015. The objectives of this plan will be met by: maturation of recently added turbulence models, strategic design/development of new models and systematic and rigorous testing of existing and new models and model extensions. While multi-phase turbulent flow simulations are important to the program, only single-phase modeling will be considered in this report. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also an important modeling methodology. However, at least in the first year, the focus is on steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence modeling.

  16. TMACS version description document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    1999-05-13

    This document updates the Version Description Document with the changes incorporated in the Revision 11.0 software installation on the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS).

  17. MDF Overview (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Demonstration Facilities (MDF) overview video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  18. IES version 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    IES version 2013 Tax Deduction Qualified Software calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  19. CalTOX (registered trademark), A multimedia total exposure model spreadsheet user's guide. Version 4.0(Beta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, T.E.; Enoch, K.G.

    2002-08-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a set of spreadsheet models and spreadsheet data sets to assist in assessing human exposures from continuous releases to multiple environmental media, i.e. air, soil, and water. It has also been used for waste classification and for setting soil clean-up levels at uncontrolled hazardous wastes sites. The modeling components of CalTOX include a multimedia transport and transformation model, multi-pathway exposure scenario models, and add-ins to quantify and evaluate uncertainty and variability. All parameter values used as inputs to CalTOX are distributions, described in terms of mean values and a coefficient of variation, rather than as point estimates or plausible upper values such as most other models employ. This probabilistic approach allows both sensitivity and uncertainty analyses to be directly incorporated into the model operation. This manual provides CalTOX users with a brief overview of the CalTOX spreadsheet model and provides instructions for using the spreadsheet to make deterministic and probabilistic calculations of source-dose-risk relationships.

  20. Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, Jim; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-07-23

    Here, cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single-column version of NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3). For comparison, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Poolā€“International Cloud Experiment by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) contents are similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and ice water content extends 2 km further downward, which is in better agreement with observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction on temperature from the new scheme is also in better agreement with available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is, in general, larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice crystal effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the calculations of TOA OLR, in addition to cloud water path. Numerical experiments show that cloud properties in the new scheme can respond reasonably to changes in the concentration of aerosols and emphasize the importance of correctly simulating aerosol effects in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions. Further evaluation, especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data, is needed.

  1. Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, Jim; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-07-23

    Here, cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single-column version of NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3). For comparison, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Poolā€“International Cloud Experiment by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within themoreĀ Ā» mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) contents are similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and ice water content extends 2 km further downward, which is in better agreement with observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction on temperature from the new scheme is also in better agreement with available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is, in general, larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice crystal effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the calculations of TOA OLR, in addition to cloud water path. Numerical experiments show that cloud properties in the new scheme can respond reasonably to changes in the concentration of aerosols and emphasize the importance of correctly simulating aerosol effects in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions. Further evaluation, especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data, is needed.Ā«Ā less

  2. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  3. Text-Alternative Version: Webcast of the Renewable Energy Competency Model: An Aid to Build a Renewable Energy Skilled Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the Webcast of Renewable Energy and Competency model. Led by Linda Silverman an economist at Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Pam Frugoli Department of Labor. This webcast was on...

  4. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  5. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in themoreĀ Ā» experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.Ā«Ā less

  6. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSORā€™06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  7. Versioning Complex Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macduff, Matt C.; Lee, Benno; Beus, Sherman J.

    2014-06-29

    Using the history of ARM data files, we designed and demonstrated a data versioning paradigm that is feasible. Assigning versions to sets of files that are modified with some special assumptions and domain specific rules was effective in the case of ARM data, which has more than 5000 datastreams and 500TB of data.

  8. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil,Benny Manuel; Ballance, Robert; Haskell, Karen

    2012-08-09

    Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

  9. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  10. Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specifically, a recent measurement made in support of national security at the Nevada Test ... BENCHMARKS; NATIONAL SECURITY; NEVADA TEST SITE; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIATIONS; ...

  11. Method and system for benchmarking computers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gustafson, John L.

    1993-09-14

    A testing system and method for benchmarking computer systems. The system includes a store containing a scalable set of tasks to be performed to produce a solution in ever-increasing degrees of resolution as a larger number of the tasks are performed. A timing and control module allots to each computer a fixed benchmarking interval in which to perform the stored tasks. Means are provided for determining, after completion of the benchmarking interval, the degree of progress through the scalable set of tasks and for producing a benchmarking rating relating to the degree of progress for each computer.

  12. Micro Kernel Benchmark for Evaluating Computer Performance

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-06

    Crystal_mk is a micro benchmark that LLNL will use to evaluate vendor's software(e.g. compiler) and hardware(e.g. processor speed, memory design).

  13. Comparing Apples to Apples: Benchmarking Electrocatalysts for...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Comparing Apples to Apples: Benchmarking Electrocatalysts for Solar Water-Splitting Devices Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights ...

  14. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts...

  15. CBEI Localized Benchmarking: Users and Analytics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Real Estate Life Cycle Data, metrics, and content: * Benchmarking * DOE SEED * DOE BPD * ... Budget History CBEI BP3 (past) 212013 - 4302014 CBEI BP4 (current) 512014 - 430...

  16. Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  17. Greenland and Antarctic mass balances for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} from the GENESIS version-2 global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Pollard, D.

    1997-05-01

    As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in these mass balances have received considerable attention in the glaciological literature, but until recently relatively few general circulation modeling (GCM) studies have focused on the problem. However, there are two significant problems in using GCMs to predict mass balance distributions on ice sheets: (i) the relatively coarse GCM horizontal resolution truncates the topography of the ice-sheet flanks and smaller ice sheets such as Greenland, and (ii) the snow and ice physics in most GCMs does not include ice-sheet-specific processes such as the refreezing of meltwater. Two techniques are described that attack these problems, involving (i) an elevation-based correction to the surface meteorology and (ii) a simple a posteriori correction for the refreezing of meltwater following Pfeiffer et al. Using these techniques in a new version 2 of the Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems global climate model, the authors present global climate and ice-sheet mass-balance results from two equilibrated runs for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This GCM is well suited for ice-sheet mass-balance studies because (a) the surface can be represented at a finer resolution (2{degrees} lat x 2{degrees} long) than the atmospheric GCM, (b) the two correction techniques are included as part of the model, and the model`s mass balances for present-day Greenland and Antarctica are realistic. 131 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCFADDEN, J.G.

    1999-07-19

    Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G{sub eff} values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically.

  19. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  20. Parameterized Micro-benchmarking: An Auto-tuning Approach for Complex Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Wenjing; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Gagan

    2012-05-15

    Auto-tuning has emerged as an important practical method for creating highly optimized implementations of key computational kernels and applications. However, the growing complexity of architectures and applications is creating new challenges for auto-tuning. Complex applications can involve a prohibitively large search space that precludes empirical auto-tuning. Similarly, architectures are becoming increasingly complicated, making it hard to model performance. In this paper, we focus on the challenge to auto-tuning presented by applications with a large number of kernels and kernel instantiations. While these kernels may share a somewhat similar pattern, they differ considerably in problem sizes and the exact computation performed. We propose and evaluate a new approach to auto-tuning which we refer to as parameterized micro-benchmarking. It is an alternative to the two existing classes of approaches to auto-tuning: analytical model-based and empirical search-based. Particularly, we argue that the former may not be able to capture all the architectural features that impact performance, whereas the latter might be too expensive for an application that has several different kernels. In our approach, different expressions in the application, different possible implementations of each expression, and the key architectural features, are used to derive a simple micro-benchmark and a small parameter space. This allows us to learn the most significant features of the architecture that can impact the choice of implementation for each kernel. We have evaluated our approach in the context of GPU implementations of tensor contraction expressions encountered in excited state calculations in quantum chemistry. We have focused on two aspects of GPUs that affect tensor contraction execution: memory access patterns and kernel consolidation. Using our parameterized micro-benchmarking approach, we obtain a speedup of up to 2 over the version that used default optimizations, but no

  1. Sophia Support Version 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Support Version 12 is the assemblage of scripts and files that turn the Sophia tool suite source code into the Sophia Debian installation package that is used by Ubuntu 10.04 LTS.

  2. Sophia Client Version 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  3. Underwire Version 12 (SOPHIA)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Underwire Version 12 is code that provides generic functionality that is common between several projects of these authors. This functionality provides a common API for such things as logging and signal handling that speed up development of new applications.

  4. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Program Progress with Examples Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Better Buildings Residential Network: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples (544.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Optional Residential

  5. HPC Analytics Support. Requirements for Uncertainty Quantification Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Purohit, Sumit; Rodriguez, Luke R.

    2015-05-01

    This report outlines techniques for extending benchmark generation products so they support uncertainty quantification by benchmarked systems. We describe how uncertainty quantification requirements can be presented to candidate analytical tools supporting SPARQL. We describe benchmark data sets for evaluating uncertainty quantification, as well as an approach for using our benchmark generator to produce data sets for generating benchmark data sets.

  6. Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning caches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Gara, Alan; O& #x27; Brien, Kathryn M.; Ohmacht, Martin; Zhuang, Xiaotong

    2013-03-12

    Mechanisms are provided for controlling version pressure on a speculative versioning cache. Raw version pressure data is collected based on one or more threads accessing cache lines of the speculative versioning cache. One or more statistical measures of version pressure are generated based on the collected raw version pressure data. A determination is made as to whether one or more modifications to an operation of a data processing system are to be performed based on the one or more statistical measures of version pressure, the one or more modifications affecting version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache. An operation of the data processing system is modified based on the one or more determined modifications, in response to a determination that one or more modifications to the operation of the data processing system are to be performed, to affect the version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache.

  7. SHMTools, Version 0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHMTools, Version 0.1 SHMTools, Version 0.1 SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM) processes. September 24, 2013...

  8. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, “Report on Inspection 1”, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

  9. UMTmk Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-21

    UMTmk is a micro benchmark that LLNL will use to evaluate vendor's software (e.g. compiler) and hardware (e.g. processor speed, memory design).

  10. Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation This tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving...

  11. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as part of the DOE Better Buildings Program. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress (1.27 MB) More Documents & Publications Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Optional Residential Program Benchmarking Guide to Benchmarking Residential

  12. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tisseur, D. Costin, M. Rattoni, B. Vienne, C. Vabre, A. Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  13. Version No.: 2002.001

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,,,,,"OMB No. 1905-0175" ,,,..."Expiration Date: 12312017" ,,,..."Version No.: 2015.01" "MONTHLY REPORT OF ...

  14. Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress - CALL FOR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... BBNP Peer Group Benchmarking Examples Step 7 Recommended Benchmarking Metrics ... should review and approve of the methodology used by contractors to estimate ...

  15. Energy Performance Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies for Public...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings Energy Performance Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings ...

  16. Benchmarking and Disclosure: State and Local Policy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benchmarking and Disclosure: State and Local Policy Design Guide and Sample Policy Language State and local policy design guide. Benchmarking and Disclosure: State and Local Policy ...

  17. Energy Benchmarking, Rating, and Disclosure for Local Governments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Local Governments Energy Benchmarking, Rating, and Disclosure for Local Governments Existing Commercial Buildings Working Group fact sheet about energy benchmarking. Energy ...

  18. Federal Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance, August 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance, August 2014 Update Federal Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance, August 2014 Update Guidance describes the Energy Independence and Security ...

  19. Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: industrial-energy.lbl.govnode100 Cost: Free Language: English References: Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool 1 Logo: Benchmarking and...

  20. Energy Benchmarking, Rating, and Disclosure for State Governments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Existing Commercial Buildings Working Group

    2012-05-23

    Provides information on how energy use data access can help state governments lead by example through benchmarking and disclosing results and implement benchmarking policies for the private sector.

  1. POLICY FLASH 2014-15 Determination of Benchmark Compensation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain Executives and Employees POLICY FLASH 2014-15 Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain Executives and...

  2. POLICY FLASH 2014-15 Determination of Benchmark Compensation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain Executives and Employees (Update) POLICY FLASH 2014-15 Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain...

  3. Transcript of March 28, 2013, TAP webinar titled Internal Benchmarking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TAP webinar titled Internal Benchmarking Outreach and Data Collection Techniques Transcript of March 28, 2013, TAP webinar titled Internal Benchmarking Outreach and Data ...

  4. Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for ...

  5. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples (544.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress ...

  6. DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness May 21,...

  7. Developing integrated benchmarks for DOE performance measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, Jr. H.C.

    1992-09-30

    The objectives of this task were to describe and evaluate selected existing sources of information on occupational safety and health with emphasis on hazard and exposure assessment, abatement, training, reporting, and control identifying for exposure and outcome in preparation for developing DOE performance benchmarks. Existing resources and methodologies were assessed for their potential use as practical performance benchmarks. Strengths and limitations of current data resources were identified. Guidelines were outlined for developing new or improved performance factors, which then could become the basis for selecting performance benchmarks. Data bases for non-DOE comparison populations were identified so that DOE performance could be assessed relative to non-DOE occupational and industrial groups. Systems approaches were described which can be used to link hazards and exposure, event occurrence, and adverse outcome factors, as needed to generate valid, reliable, and predictive performance benchmarks. Data bases were identified which contain information relevant to one or more performance assessment categories . A list of 72 potential performance benchmarks was prepared to illustrate the kinds of information that can be produced through a benchmark development program. Current information resources which may be used to develop potential performance benchmarks are limited. There is need to develop an occupational safety and health information and data system in DOE, which is capable of incorporating demonstrated and documented performance benchmarks prior to, or concurrent with the development of hardware and software. A key to the success of this systems approach is rigorous development and demonstration of performance benchmark equivalents to users of such data before system hardware and software commitments are institutionalized.

  8. Transport Version 3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-05-16

    The Transport version 3 (T3) system uses the Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) to move data from sources to a Data Reporisoty (DR). Interested recipients subscribe to newsgroups to retrieve data. Data in transport is protected by AES-256 and RSA cryptographic services provided by the external OpenSSL cryptographic libraries.

  9. N Reactor RELAP5 model benchmark comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Bolander, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    This report documents work performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in support of Westinghouse Hanford Company safety analyses for the N Reactor. The portion of the work reported here includes comparisons of RELAP5/MOD2-calculated data with measured plant data for: (1) a plant trip reactor transient from full power operation; and (2) a hot dump test performed prior to plant startup. These qualitative comparisons are valuable because they provide an indication of the capabilities of the RELAP5/MOD2 code to simulate operational and blowdonw transients in the N Reactor. 9 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Internal Benchmarking Outreach and Data Collection Techniques

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) presentation at a TAP webinar held on April 11, 2013 and dealing with internal benchmarking outreach and data collection techniques.