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1

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

2

BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bench-Scale Testing of the Micronized Magnetite Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis of the Department of Energy's (DOE's), Coal Preparation Program has been the development of high-efficiency technologies that offer near-term, low-cost improvements in the ability of coal preparation plants to address problems associated with coal fines. In 1992, three cost-shared contracts were awarded to industry, under the first High-Efficiency Preparation (HEP I) solicitation. All three projects involved bench-scale testing of various emerging technologies, at the Federal Energy Technology Center*s (FETC*s), Process Research Facility (PRF). The first HEP I project, completed in mid-1993, was conducted by Process Technology, Inc., with the objective of developing a computerized, on-line system for monitoring and controlling the operation of a column flotation circuit. The second HEP I project, completed in mid-1994, was conducted by a team led by Virginia Polytechnic Institute to test the Mozely Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with the Microcel Flotation Column, for improved removal of mineral matter and pyritic sulfur from fine coal. The last HEP I project, of which the findings are contained in this report, was conducted by Custom Coals Corporation to evaluate and advance a micronized-magnetite-based, fine-coal cycloning technology. The micronized-magnetite coal cleaning technology, also know as the Micro-Mag process, is based on widely used conventional dense-medium cyclone applications, in that it utilizes a finely ground magnetite/water suspension as a separating medium for cleaning fine coal, by density, in a cyclone. However, the micronized-magnetite cleaning technology differs from conventional systems in several ways: ! It utilizes significantly finer magnetite (about 5 to 10 micron mean particle size), as compared to normal mean particle sizes of 20 microns. ! It can effectively beneficiate coal particles down to 500M in size, as compared to the most advanced, existing conventional systems that are limited to a particle bottom size of about 28M - 100 M. ! Smaller diameter cyclones, 4 to 10 inches, are used to provide the higher G-force required to separate the finer feed coal. ! Cyclone feed pressures up to 10 times greater than those used in conventional cleaning systems are employed to enhance the separating forces.

Edward R. Torak; Peter J. Suardini

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

bench scale dev | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL®EvaluationBench-Scale

5

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant exhaust gases using conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) is significantly Act list of sources of hazardous air pollutants. Both the reversal and the CAMR were vacated by the UMercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot

Li, Ying

6

Report on Recommendations for Lab and Bench-Scale Tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on Recommendations for Lab and Bench-Scale Tasks Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In order to make this report more understandable thermodynamic efficiency of 100%. A recent EPRI study indicates that carbon fuel cells have the potential

7

Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

BANNING DL

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(incineration) or as a filler for asphalt. Incineration has been employed in an attempt to harness the high calorific value of scrap tires. However, disposal via incineration may not maximize the potential economic recovery of energy and chemical materials... into liquid fuels and forms of solid carbon such as carbon black and activated carbon. Previous work in this area utilizes pyrolysis. ' There are several commercial, pilot, and bench-scale tire 2-4, 6-8 pyrolysis systems in use today. Many of these employ...

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Design of Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goal of the project is to design and optimize a bench-scale process for novel silicone CO{sub 2}-capture solvents and establish scalability and potential for commercialization of post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. This system should be capable of 90% capture efficiency and demonstrate that less than 35% increase in the cost of energy services can be achieved upon scale-up. Experiments were conducted to obtain data required for design of the major unit operations. The bench-scale system design has been completed, including sizing of major unit operations and the development of a detailed Process and Instrument Diagram (P&ID). The system has been designed to be able to operate over a wide range of process conditions so that the effect of various process variables on performance can be determined. To facilitate flexibility in operation, the absorption column has been designed in a modular manner, so that the height of the column can be varied. The desorber has also been designed to allow for a range of residence times, temperatures, and pressures. The system will be fabricated at Techniserv Inc.

Wood, Benjamin

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

Hulburt, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bench-scale testing of fluidized-bed sorbents -- ZT-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. Specific objectives of this study are the following: {sm_bullet} Investigating various manufacturing methods to produce fluidizable zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents in a particle size range of 50 to 400 {mu}m; Characterizating and screening the formulations for chemical reactivity, attrition resistance, and structural properties; Testing selected formulations in an HTHP bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor to obtain an unbiased ranking of the promising sorbents; Investigating the effect of various process variables, such as temperature, nature of coal gas, gas velocity, and chemical composition of the sorbent, on the performance of the sorbent; Life-cycle testing of the superior zinc ferrite and zinc titanate formulations under HTHP conditions to determine their long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength; Addressing various reactor design issues; Generating a database on sorbent properties and performance (e.g., rates of reaction, attrition rate) to be used in the design and scaleup of future commercial hot-gas desulfurization systems; Transferring sorbent manufacturing technology to the private sector; Producing large batches (in tonnage quantities) of the sorbent to demonstrate commercial feasibility of the preparation method; and Coordinate testing of superior formulations in pilot plants with real and/or simulated coal gas.

Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Multicomponent aerosol dynamic of the Pb-O[sub 2] system in a bench scale flame incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article gives results of a study to understand the formation and growth of lead particles in a flame incinerator. A bench scale flame incinerator was used to perform controlled experiments with lead acetate as a test compound. A dilution probe (in conjunction with real-time aerosol instruments) was used to measure the evolution of the particle size distribution at different locations in the flame region. A multicomponent lognormal aerosol model was developed accounting for the chemistry of the lead-oxygen system, and for such aerosol dynamic phenomena as nucleation, coagulation, and condensation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the predictions of the model using appropriate kinetic parameters and the experimental results.

Lin, W.Y.; Sethi, V.; Biswas, P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations and process engineering. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to investigate thermochemical water splitting has been under way at General Atomic Company (GA) since October 1972. This document is an annual progress report of Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored process development work on the GA sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. The work consisted of laboratory bench-scale investigations, demonstration of the process in a closed-loop cycle demonstrator, and process engineering design studies. A bench-scale system, consisting of three subunits, has been designed to study the cycle under continuous flow conditions. The designs of subunit I, which models the main solution reaction and product separation, and subunit II, which models the concentration and decomposition of sulfuric acid, were presented in an earlier annual report. The design of subunit III, which models the purification and decomposition of hydrogen iodide, is given in this report. Progress on the installation and operation of subunits I and II is described. A closed-loop cycle demonstrator was installed and operated based on a DOE request. Operation of the GA sulfur-iodine cycle was demonstrated in this system under recycle conditions. The process engineering addresses the flowsheet design of a large-scale production process consisting of four chemical sections (I through IV) and one helium heat supply section (V). The completed designs for sections I through V are presented. The thermal efficiency of the process calculated from the present flowsheet is 47%.

Caprioglio, G.; McCorkle, K.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Rode, J.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). At a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F), the CCS energy penalty for amino-silicone solvent is only 30.4% which compares to a 35.9% energy penalty for MEA. The increase in COE for the amino-silicone solvent relative to the non-capture case is between 98% and 103% (depending on the solvent cost) which compares to an ~109% COE cost increase for MEA. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with Tri-Ethylene Glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. The report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). Models were developed for both processes and used to calculate mass and energy balances. Capital costs and energy penalty were calculated for both systems, as well as the increase in cost of electricity. The amino-silicone solvent based system demonstrates significant advantages compared to the MEA system.

Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Bench-Scale Synthetic Optimization of 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane (APO-Link) Used in the Production of APO-BMI Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diamine reagent 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane is no longer commercially available but still required for the synthesis of the bismaleimide resin, APO-BMI, used in syntactic foams. In this work, we examined the hydrolysis of benzothiazole followed the by reaction with dichloroethane or dibromoethane. We also studied the deprotonation of 2-aminothiophenol followed by the reaction with dibromoethane. We optimized the latter for scale-up by scrutinizing all aspects of the reaction conditions, work-up and recrystallization. On bench-scale, our optimized procedure consistently produced a 75-80% overall yield of finely divided, high purity product (>95%).

Hilary Wheeler; Crystal Densmore

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily demonstrated. In addition to the experimental studies, the technical challenges pertinent to fouling of slurry-handling equipment and the design of the crystallizer and stripper were addressed through consultation with vendors and engineering analyses. A process flow diagram of the Hot-CAP was then developed and a TEA was performed to compare the energy use and cost performance of a nominal 550-MWe subcritical pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plant without CO{sub 2} capture (DOE/NETL Case 9) with the benchmark MEA-based post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC; DOE/NETL Case 10) and the Hot-CAP-based PCC. The results revealed that the net power produced in the PC + Hot-CAP is 609 MWe, greater than the PC + MEA (550 MWe). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the PC + Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} transportation and storage, is 120.3 mills/kWh, a 60% increase over the base PC plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The LCOE increase for the Hot-CAP is 29% lower than that for MEA. TEA results demonstrated that the Hot-CAP is energy-efficient and cost-effective compared with the benchmark MEA process.

Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O'Brien, Kevin

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

32

Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of a bench-scale, inert-gas, oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heating rates and maximum temperatures on the redistribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium into the shale oil, retort water, and offgas of a 6-kg bench-scale retort. A Green River shale (western) from Colorado and a New Albany shale (eastern) from Kentucky were heated at 1-2{degree}C/min to a maximum temperature of 500{degree}C. The eastern and western shales were also heated at 2{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C and at 10{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C. Real-time monitoring of the offgas stream for mercury was accomplished with Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy or a microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy. Microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy was also used to monitor for arsenic in the offgas during retorting; little or no arsenic was observed in the offgas. Mass balance calculations for arsenic and selenium accounted for essentially 100% of those elements in the spent shale, shale oil, and retort water. The mass balance calculations suggest little offgas component for arsenic and selenium. This agrees with the results of the MPD monitoring of the offgas. These results indicate the potential pathway for mercury to enter the environment is from the offgas. Arsenic and selenium preferential redistribution into the shale oil may present problems during the upgrading process.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Fruchter, J.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents which can reduce the sulfur in coal gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. This report summarizes the highlights and accomplishments of the October slipstream test run of the Zinc Titanate Fluid Bed Desulfurization/Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (ZTFBD/DSRP) Mobile Laboratory at the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Although the run had to be shortened due to mechanical problems with METC`s gasifier, there was sufficient on-stream time to demonstrate highly successful operation of both the zinc titanate fluid bed desulfurization and the DSRP with actual coal gas.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.4 -- Hot-gas cleaning. Topical report (includes semiannual report for January--June 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments of three subtasks completed in support of the current and future hot-gas cleanup activities at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The overall objective of the EERC hot-gas cleanup task is to develop reliable methods to remove particulate matter from high-temperature, high-pressure gas streams produced from coal combustion and/or gasification. Near-term task objectives include (1) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure bench-scale filter vessel; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure sampling train; and (3) the preliminary design of a pilot-scale high-temperature, high-pressure filter vessel and support systems. Bench-scale hot-gas filter research will be performed with the pressurized fluid-bed reactor (PFBR) or the continuous fluid-bed reactor (CFBR) and a hot-gas filter vessel. The objectives of future work with the bench-scale system will be to determine particulate and vapor-phase alkali degradation of candidate ceramic filter structures as well as filter performance relative to particulate collection efficiency, differential pressure, and filter cleanability. Construction of the high-temperature, high-pressure sampling system was intended to support bench- and pilot-scale activities with respect to conventional particulate sampling (total mass and particle-size distribution) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) sampling. Finally, pilot-scale tests will be performed to evaluate filter performance and determine alkali corrosion of ceramic materials with a hot-gas filter vessel attached to the EERC Transport Reactor Development Unit (TRDU).

Weber, G.F.; Swanson, M.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B3.6 Sitingconstructionoperationdecommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot...

37

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, MeHg levels decreased on the time scale of days to weeks. • Capping materials should sequester MeHg produced and not contribute to the production of MeHg.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

39

CX-008860: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protection-Richland Operations Office Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposes to conduct 1) bench-scale research projects, 2) conventional laboratory operations, 3)...

40

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture. Manufacturing Plan for Aminosilicone-based CO{sub 2} Absorption Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially cost effective manufacturing plan was developed for GAP-1m, the aminosilicone-based part of the CO{sub 2} capture solvent described in DE-FE0007502, and the small-scale synthesis of GAP-1m was confirmed. The plan utilizes a current intermediate at SiVance LLC to supply the 2013-2015 needs for GE Global Research. Material from this process was supplied to GE Global Research for evaluation and creation of specifications. GE Global Research has since ordered larger quantities (60 liters) for the larger scale evaluations that start in first quarter, 2013. For GE’s much larger future commercial needs, an improved, more economical pathway to make the product was developed after significant laboratory and literature research. Suppliers were identified for all raw materials.

Vogt, Kirkland

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE BENCH-SCALE CALORIMETRY REVISITED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective heat of combustion, thé mass loss rate, thé time to ignition12 . The standard Cône Calorimeter has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF

48

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF8

49

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF89

50

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF892

51

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0

52

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07

53

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF

54

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF0

55

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF01

56

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07

57

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072 ACRF

58

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072 ACRF3

59

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072

60

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725 ACRF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725

62

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07257

63

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072578

64

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725789

65

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07257896

66

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072578967

67

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark

68

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8

69

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark81

70

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF

71

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0 A

72

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0

73

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811

74

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8114 The

75

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8114 The DR

76

Bench Scale Project - Final Report - 063014  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite JC-118794ArgonneAnalysing the EffectEnergyNovel

77

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 Belowground

78

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-0707

79

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-07071

80

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-070712

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919

82

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and

83

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and2

84

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and28

85

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science

86

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science2

87

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science23

88

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science234

89

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science2345

90

CX-011846: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bench-Scale Research Projects & Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/26/2014 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Princeton Site Office

91

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bench Scale Integration Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergy Victor Der,ResourcesServicesBench

93

Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory (Fact Sheet), National Bioenergy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economic Comparison of Different Fermentation Configurations to Convert Corn Stover to Ethanol Using Z. mobilis and Saccharomyces." Biotechnol. Prog. (26); pp. 64-72. Hodge,...

94

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, HELD AT THE 2003 NEW ENGLAND FUEL INSTITUTE CONVENTION AND 30TH NORTH AMERICAN HEATING AND ENERGY EXPOSITION, HYNES CONVENTION CENTER, PRUDENTIAL CENTER, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, JUNE 9 - 10, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This meeting is the sixteenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the third since the National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Fuel Flexibility Program under the United States Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability Program (DEER). The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Status of health and environmental research relative to coal gasification 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health and environmental research relative to coal gasification conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE sponsorship is summarized. The studies have focused on the chemical and toxicological characterization of materials from a range of process streams in five bench-scale, pilot-plant and industrial gasifiers. They also address ecological effects, industrial hygiene, environmental control technology performance, and risk assessment. Following an overview of coal gasification technology and related environmental concerns, integrated summaries of the studies and results in each area are presented and conclusions are drawn. Needed health and environmental research relative to coal gasification is identified.

Wilzbach, K.E.; Reilly, C.A. Jr. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

2014 Annual AFN Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AFN Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. In addition to the memorable keynote speeches, the expert panels and special reports, the Convention features several evenings of cultural performances known as Quyana Alaska.

97

AFN Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

98

NCAI Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the California tribes will host the organization’s 69th Annual Convention & Marketplace in Sacramento, California this October. The national...

99

Base program on energy related research. Quaterly report, February 1, 1997--April 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in four major research areas is summarized in this report. In the area of oil and gas, subtasks reported on are miscible-immiscible gas injection processes, development of a portable data acquisition system and coalbed methane simulator, tank bottom waste processing using the TaBoRR Process, and bench-scale testing and verification of pyrolysis concept for remediation of tank bottoms. Advanced systems applications research includes design, assembly, and testing of a bench-scale fuel preparation and delivery system for pressurized application using coal fines. Five subtasks are reported on for the environmental technologies research area: (1) conditioning and hydration reactions associated with clean coal technology ash disposal/utilization, (2) remediation of contaminated soils, (3) the Syn-Ag Process: coal combustion ash management option, (4) the Maxi-Acid Process: in-situ amelioration of acid mine drainage, and (5) PEAC value-added project. Under applied energy science, heavy oil/plastics co-processing activities and fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas are described. Information supplied for each subtask includes an account status report, which includes budget and schedule data, and a brief project summary consisting of research objectives, accomplishments, and activities scheduled for the next quarter. 2 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Experimental Stability of SDMs AES 124th Convention, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2008 May 17­20 Page 2 of 15­20 Amsterdam, The Netherlands The papers at this Convention have been selected on the basis of a submitted

Reiss, Josh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ConventionConventionConventionConvention InformaInformaInformaInformation Guidetion Guidetion Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternatio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and Solids 13131313----17 June 2005, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA #12;Information Guide International Convention

Reuter, Martin

102

ATNI Mid-year Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

103

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drops [3], on objects. It consists of conventional eyeglasses linked to a comfortable-to-carry palmtop

Ferri, Massimo

104

NCAI 71st Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Save the date for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) 71st Annual Convention at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta.

105

Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

106

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

109

ITCN 49th Annual Convention  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. will be hosting its 49th Annual Convention, themed "Making a Difference for Nevada Tribes," December 8-11, 2014 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget in Sparks, Nevada.

110

NAIHC Convention and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC) most longstanding Annual Event, the 39th Annual NAIHC Convention and Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about tribal housing, attend...

111

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mark L. Ullery, Bruce E. Logan Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 212 Sackett Building limited energy recovery (McCarty et al., 2011). Microbial electrochemical technologies (METs

114

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION Treatability of Complex Effluents in High-Throughput and Bench Scale Microbial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The efficiency was calculated using only recovered hydrogen and combined hydrogen and methane, using the heat of combustion to calculate the energy contained in the gas. Figure S13. Open circuit gas production and COD

115

Bench scale testing - Phase I, Task 4. Topical progress report, September 1994--January 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8114 The

117

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

118

CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Date: 06022010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on...

119

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for C02 Capture Location: Georgia Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and...

122

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

Laughlin, Robert B.

123

Cotton Insect Pests and Natural Enemies in Conventional and Conservation Tillage Systems at AG-CARES, Lamesa, TX, 2003.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: Cotton Insect Pests and Natural Enemies in Conventional and Conservation Tillage Systems Research Scientist, Research Associate, Graduate Research Assistants (TAES). INTRODUCTION: Cotton aided to sustainable cotton production in Texas. Adoption of the minimum tillage (conservation tillage

Mukhtar, Saqib

124

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

125

On the SPA Convention and Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconstruction of the fundamental supersymmetric theory and its breaking mechanism will require high-precision tools. Here a brief introduction to SPA, the Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis (SPA) Convention and Project, is presented which is based on a consistent set of conventions and input parameters.

Jan Kalinowski

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

RESEARCH ARTICLE Generalist predators in organically and conventionally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Chicago, IL, USA Keywords Araneae; Carabidae; DOK trial; farming system; intraguild interactions; natural activ- ity density, effects of the farming system on species diversity are less predictable. Both Department of Animal Ecology, University of Technology Darmstadt, Schnittspahnstrasse, Darmstadt, Germany 2

Illinois at Chicago, University of

127

Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND

128

Research and development of CWM technology toward clean coal use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this chapter, three subjects were presented from among our technical efforts to develop clean coal applications to improve environmental quality. The three subjects are briefly summarized as follows: development of technology aimed at producing and utilizing exclusively low ash CWM; development of technology to produce CWM from various pond coals; development of technology to upgrade LRC and utilize CWM for both a boiler fuel and a gasification feedstock. We are fully convinced that the first and second of the above technologies have reached the level of practical use through demonstration tests. As to the third, we have almost finished a 10 kg/h coal slurry bench-scale test and have a plan to construct an upgrading pilot plant of 350 kg/h which will be completed in the fall 1994. We will hopefully establish upgrading technology through pilot-scale demonstration testing in 1995. With this technology, not just utilization of LRCs will be expanded, but also highly efficient use of coal will be accelerated. Thus, C0{sub 2} emission will also be strongly reduced. In ending, we would like to stress our efforts on research and development of environmentally friendly technologies as well as COM and CWM technologies based on bituminous and steaming coals.

Shibata, Kazuhiro

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fabrication of masters for microfluidic devices using conventional printed circuit technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in microfluidic technology. In this research, we use inexpensive photosensitized copper clad circuit board substrates to produce master molds using conventional printed circuit technology. The techniques provide the benefits of parallel fabrication associated...

Sudarsan, Arjun Penubolu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

131

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are hosting their 59th Annual Fall Convention in Pendleton, Oregon. The DOE Office of Indian Energy is sponsoring a workshop for tribal leaders and...

132

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

133

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

134

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Law as Economy: Convention, Corporation, Currency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1015 Law as Economy: Convention, Corporation, Currency Ritu Birla* I. Law as Economy: Nomos. Law Inside/Outside Economy of an orthodox faith in economy as universal law, that is, in the free market as the law of the universe

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

136

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities...

137

Analysis of differences in productivity, profitability and soil fertility between organic and conventional cropping systems in the (sub)tropics   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This research tries to fill this gap by making an analysis of the differences between organic and conventional agriculture in this region based on an extensive literature research including 88 papers (with 458 data pairs). This comparison is focussed around...

te Pas, Caroline M.

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if conventional oil production was no longer able to satisfy demand? Fuels from non-conventional oil resources would then become the backstop fuel. These resources involve higher CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced than conventional oil as they require... ?EMUC ? GDPgrowth ?POPgrowth? ? (13) r is the consumption discount rate (% per year) EMUC is the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption (no unit) ptp is the pure time preference rate (% per year) GDPgrowth is the growth of GDP (% per year...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

139

October 1st Hamilton Convention Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 1st & 2nd , 2010 Hamilton Convention Centre 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton ON ANGELA SILLA, EventMaster University, Hamilton Brian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC Professor Division of Hematology & Thromboembolsim Department of Medicine McMaster University, Hamilton Peter Powers, MD, FRCPC Associate Professor Division of Hematology

Hitchcock, Adam P.

140

Convention on Cybercrime Budapest, 23.XI.2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-operation in criminal matters; Convinced that the present Convention is necessary to deter action directed against, a common criminal policy aimed at the protection of society against cybercrime, inter alia, by adopting by the risk that computer networks and electronic information may also be used for committing criminal

Shamos, Michael I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Policy message A narrow focus on conventional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often prevents improvement of sanitation in poor settlements. n Simple, affordable, effective techPolicy message n A narrow focus on conventional sanitation technologies and top- down planning studies featured here were conducted in: Lao PDR, Tanzania, and Nepal Local solutions for sanitation Urban

Richner, Heinz

142

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants into the atmosphere. Amongst the various air pollution control techniques available, biological provides a new and inexpensive tool for comparative studies in biotrickling filtration for air pollution: biofilters and biotrickling filters. In biofilters, humidified polluted air is passed through a packed bed

143

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention...

145

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

146

Challenging Conventional Wisdom: A Clean and Highly Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Challenging Conventional Wisdom: A Clean and Highly Efficient Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Engine Challenging Conventional Wisdom: A Clean and Highly Efficient Opposed-Piston...

147

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

methods Associated research and development Support industry opportunities and new markets emerging in the traditional energy sector This is one in a series of Office of...

149

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Woody  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conventional woody feedstock design has been developed that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying woody biomass as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints and consideration of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move woody biomass from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the use of the slash stream since it is a more conservative analysis and represents the material actually used in the experimental part of the project.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Herbaceous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conventional bale feedstock design has been established that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying herbaceous feedstocks as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move herbaceous biomass feedstock from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the uses of field-dried corn stover or switchgrass as a feedstock to annually supply an 800,000 DM ton conversion facility.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

Hasan, M.Z. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Foo, M.L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Cava, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

DECONTAMINATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the five plus years this Cooperative Agreement existed, more than 45 different projects were funded. Most projects were funded for a one year period but there were some, deemed of such quality and importance, funded for multiple years. Approximately 22 external agencies, businesses, and other entities have cooperated with or been funded through the WVU Cooperative Agreement over the five plus years. These external entities received 33% of the funding by this Agreement. The scope of this Agreement encompassed all forms of hazardous waste remediation including radioactive, organic, and inorganic contaminants. All matrices were of interest; generally soil, water, and contaminated structures. Economic, health, and regulatory aspects of technologies were also within the scope of the agreement. The highest priority was given to small businesses funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and Department of Energy (DOE) involved in research and development of innovative remediation processes. These projects were to assist in the removal of barriers to development and commercialization of these new technologies. Studies of existing, underdeveloped technologies, were preferred to fundamental research into remediation technologies. Sound development of completely new technologies was preferred to minor improvements in existing methods. Solid technological improvements in existing technologies or significant cost reduction through innovative redesign were the preferred projects. Development, evaluation, and bench scale testing projects were preferred for the WVU research component. In the effort to fill gaps in current remediation technologies, the worth of the WVU Cooperative Agreement was proven. Two great technologies came out of the program. The Prefabricated Vertical Drain Technology for enhancing soil flushing was developed over the 6-year period and is presently being demonstrated on a 0.10 acre Trichloroethylene contaminated site in Ohio. The SpinTek Centrifugal Membrane System was a unique separation process introduced through the Agreement that is now being used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on the cost to the USDOE for both technologies and considering their usefulness in cleaning up contaminated sites, no other technologies developed through USDOE provide or have the propensity to provide as great a return on investment and impact on environmental remediation. These technologies alone make the $10.3 million USDOE investment in the WVU Cooperative Agreement a tremendous investment.

Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., PE.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, May, 1996--July 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. In many instances, a potential JSR cosponsor has been identified but additional laboratory or bench-scale data are necessary to assess the utility of the technology prior to cosponsor investment. Both peer and management review are employed prior to proposing Base projects to the US DOE. The goals of the Base Research Program are in support of those of the JSR program, which are designed to: increase the production of United States and western energy resources, particularly low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; reduce the nations`s dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the US and regional economies; minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. The goals of the JSR and Base Programs are accomplished by focusing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization in three major technology areas: Energy Programs emphasize the increased production and utilization of domestic energy resources and include enhanced oil recovery, coal bonification and upgrading, coalbed methane recovery, and renewable energy resources; Environmental Programs minimize the impact of energy production and utilization by providing technology to clean underground oily wastes, mitigate acid mine drainage, and demonstrate uses for Clean Coal Technology and pressurized fluidized bed combustion waste solids; Technology Enhancement activities encompass resource characterization studies, the development of improved environmental monitors and sensors, and improved techniques and models for predicting the dispersion of hazardous gas releases.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

157

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

158

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

159

NCAI 71st Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NCAI 71st Annual Convention NCAI 71st Annual Convention October 26, 2014 12:00PM EDT to October 31, 2014 9:00PM EDT Atlanta, Georgia http:www.ncai.orgconferences-events...

160

Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2000.

Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

great organization. From electing new leaders to voting on resolutions that set the foundation of AMVETS, the National Convention sets the stage for the coming year. Contact...

167

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act...

168

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

169

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

170

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

171

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- - - - 64.7 64.7 - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

172

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and...

173

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCCCapture Division FY14-15 1012013 - 9302015 Steve Mascaro Research Triangle Park, Durham, NC Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for...

174

CX-004955: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

support laboratory and bench scale research and development on a flywheel energy storage module that will provide 4 times the stored energy at 118 the cost-per-energy of Beacon's...

175

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

exclusion for bench scale research. 1 1 9-b- Hazardous waste: because of the presence of carbon tetrachloride as a site pollutant, any waste liquid 1 generated at the site will be...

176

I  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

e s x NO- Some bench-scale research activities may emit low levels of hazardous air pollutants or criteria pollutants such as hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide as defined by the...

177

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

e s X NO- Some bench-scale research activities may emit low levels of hazardous air pollutants or criteria pollutants but are considered an insignificant activity under the...

178

Unconventional digital reactor control without conventional programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in simulation technology have resulted in the capability to design, test, and implement advanced control algorithms without the need for the labor-intensive effort of writing and debugging of computer programs. This technology has been adopted for a program of experimental development of power reactor control, which is jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Electric Power Research Institute. The experimental reactor control test bed utilizes the General Atomic Mark III TRIGA reactor at the Penn State Breazeale reactor facility. Control experiments are conducted within the movable experiment technical specifications of the TRIGA. A digital controller with an experimental control algorithm is interfaced to a secondary control rod (SCR). The new technology presented in this paper utilizes a UNIX network-compatible microprocessor-based controller operating under the Wind River Systems VxWorks real-time operating system. The controller interfaces with the Math-works MATLAB/SIMULINK development environment and Real-Time Innovations 8 monitoring software remotely operated on a SPARC workstation.

Edwards, R.M.; Johns, R.M.; Kenney, S.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

Turetsky, Merritt

180

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast Studies on Physiology Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 #12;Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production in several ethanol production plants, which nevertheless had a high efficiency in one of the monitored

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CONVENTIONALLY REINFORCED CONCRETE COUPLING BEAMS A Thesis by AJAY SESHADRI SHASTRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams Copyright 2010...

Shastri, Ajay Seshadri

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Specific Energy and Energy Density Analysis of Conventional and NonConventional Flywheels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flywheels are widely used as a means of energy storage throughout different applications such as hybrid electric vehicles, spacecraft, and electrical grids. The research presented here investigates various steel flywheel constructions. The purpose...

Reyna, Ruben

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Determination of plate efficiencies for conventional distillation columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COIUMNS A Thesis By Thomas Raymond Harris Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub)ect t Chemical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COLUMNS A Thesis Thomas Raymond Harris Approred as to style and content bye Chairman of ommittee Head...

Harris, Thomas Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report 2005 Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Emission Inventories Denmark's National Inventory's National Inventory Report 2005 - Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

187

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

National Ignition Facility system design requirements conventional facilities SDR001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This System Design Requirements (SDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the minimum design requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) site infrastructure and conventional facilities. These consist of the physical site and buildings necessary to house the laser, target chamber, target preparation areas, optics support and ancillary functions.

Hands, J.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the addition of water/lixiviant is generally collected by air pollution control mechanisms, which return as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines

190

Nov/Dec 2006 2006 CSBA Convention Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 2006 CSBA Convention Once, again, we cheated winter and had only a little rain water on the highway the opening ceremonies and committee reports, Keynote Speaker, Dr. Jamie Ellis, from the University of Florida be reused by forcefully washing off the slime and letting the combs dry out. Probably, the portion of t

Ferrara, Katherine W.

191

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

192

A Foundation for Conventional and Temporal Query Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substantially from built-in temporal support in the DBMS. To achieve this, temporal query representation DBMS architectures and ones where the temporal support is obtained via a layer on top of a conventional DBMS. This foundation captures duplicates and ordering for all queries, as well as coalescing

Snodgrass, Richard T.

193

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Comparative Analysis of Conventional Oil and Gas and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Analysis of Conventional Oil and Gas and Wind Project Decommissioning Regulations Generation Energy, a non-profit renewable investment firm focusing on extending capital from private School and on the board of the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation, which manages ``Efficiency Vermont

Jaramillo, Paulina

195

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the Transition Years Fabián Menalled weed management tool is located between your ears www.forages.oregonsate.edu #12;Today, we'll talk more about principles than specific practices #12;Outline for Today's Presentation Transitioning to organic

Maxwell, Bruce D.

196

Increasing Desalination by Mitigating Anolyte pH Imbalance Using Catholyte Effluent Addition in a Multi-Anode Bench Scale Microbial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as electrodialysis, thermal desalination, and reverse osmosis have many environ- mental concerns and high energy costs.4,5 Even with state of the art advances in reverse osmosis technology bringing its energy

197

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

Lu, Yongqi

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALJ,SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMEN...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct small-scale research and development projects, conventional laboratory operations,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Segmented vs conventional numerals: legibility and long term retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental chamber. Sub jects The subjects were thirty male students between the ages of 1g and 27 from the Industrial Engineering department at Texas A&M University. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10. Procedure Exposure time and number... December 1971 Ma]or Subject: Industrial Engineering SEGMENTED VS CONVENTIONAL NUMERALS: LEGIBILITY AND LONG TERM RETENTION A Thesis STEVE EDGAR HILL Approved as to style and content by: Elias Chairman of Committee) r. A. W. ortham (Head...

Hill, Steve Edgar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

BEBR Sponsored Research Projects The Bureau of Economic and Business Research conducts sponsored research as a part of its overall mission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEBR Sponsored Research Projects The Bureau of Economic and Business Research conducts sponsored Festival Surveys Sundance Institute Economic Impact of Spending by Convention Attendees Salt Lake Convention & Visitors Bureau Economic Impact of Utah's Oil and Gas Industry State of Utah, Public Lands

Provancher, William

204

Generalized Ginzburg-Landau models for non-conventional superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some recent extensions of the Ginzburg-Landau model able to describe several properties of non-conventional superconductors. In the first extension, s-wave superconductors endowed with two different critical temperatures are considered, their main thermodynamical and magnetic properties being calculated and discussed. Instead in the second extension we describe spin-triplet superconductivity (with a single critical temperature), studying in detail the main predicted physical properties. A thorough discussion of the peculiar predictions of our models and their physical consequences is as well performed.

S. Esposito; G. Salesi

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Rulemaking | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarter OverallDepartment ofConvention on

206

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarter OverallDepartment ofConvention

207

Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2Administrative Operations ContactsStatement ofConvention(Fact

208

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Nevada through Directed Research and Public Outreach Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey...

210

aapg annual convention: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: NEOGENE HISTORY OF COLLISION IN THE HALMAHERA REGION, INDONESIA Robert Hall SE Asia Research Group no trace. INTRODUCTION Eastern Indonesia includes...

211

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Programs, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2002. The Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Project is designed to rapidly increase numbers of salmon in stocks that are in imminent danger of extirpation. Parr are captured in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River and reared to adulthood in captivity. Upon maturation, they are spawned (within stocks) and their progeny reared to smoltification before being released into the natal stream of their parents. This program is co-managed by ODFW, National Marine Fisheries Service, the Nez Perce Tribe and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pushing towards the ET sensitivity using 'conventional' technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, the design study `Einstein gravitational wave Telescope' (ET) has been funded within the European FP7 framework. The ambitious goal of this project is to provide a conceptual design of a detector with a hundred times better sensitivity than currently operating instruments. It is expected that this will require the development and implementation of new technologies, which go beyond the concepts employed for the first and second detector generations. However, it is a very interesting and educational exercise to imagine a Michelson interferometer in which conventional technologies have been pushed to - or maybe beyond - their limits to reach the envisaged sensitivity for the Einstein Telescope. In this document we present a first sketchy analysis of what modifications and improvements are necessary to go, step-by-step, from second generation gravitational wave detectors to the Einstein Telescope.

Stefan Hild; Simon Chelkowski; Andreas Freise

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Essays on Choice and Demand Analysis of Organic and Conventional Milk in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation has four interrelated studies, namely (1) the characterization of milk purchase choices which included the purchase of organic milk, both organic and conventional milk and conventional milk only; (2) the estimation of a single...

Alviola IV, Pedro A.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rhetoric and heresthetic in the Mississippi Freedom Party controversy at the 1964 Democratic Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Democratic Convention. Specifically, the focus is on the rhetorical discourse presented by the members of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Fannie Lou Hamer in particular, at the Credentials Committee two days before the onset of the actual Convention...

Battaglia, Adria

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San José McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. However, for reactivity-controlled compression ignition, the mean surface temperature increased with changes in boost suggesting that equivalence ratio affects steady-state heat transfer.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL; Hendricks, Terry Lee [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Ghandhi, Jaal B [University of Wisconsin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepcin, Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Global #12;Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Subjects;Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Main sources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Non-conventional passive sensors for monitoring tritium on surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe development of small passive, solid-state detectors for in-situ measurements of tritium, or other weak beta-emitting radionuclides, on surfaces. One form of detector operates on the principle of thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE), the other by discharge of an electret ion chamber (EIC). There are currently two specific types of commercially available detector systems that lend themselves to making surface measurements. One is the thin-film BeO on a graphite disc, and the other is the Teflon EIC. Two other types of TSEE dosimeters (ceramic BeO and carbon doped alumina) are described but lack either a suitable commercially available reader or standardized methods of fabrication. The small size of these detectors allows deployment in locations difficult to access with conventional windowless gas-flow proportional counters. Preliminary testing shows that quantitative measurements are realized with exposure times of 1--10 hours for the TSEE dosimeters (at the DOE release guideline of 5,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for fixed beta contamination). The EIC detectors exhibit an MDA of 26,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for a 24 hour exposure. Both types of integrating device are inexpensive and reusable. Measurements can, therefore, be made that are faster, cheaper, safer, and better than those possible with baseline monitoring technology.

Gammage, R.B.; Brock, J.L.; Meyer, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps.

Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Upgrading of low-rank coals for conventional and advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-rank coals, subbituminous, lignitic, and brown coals, have a ubiquitous presence in the world, being found in all continents. Close to half of the world`s estimated coal resources are low- rank coals. Many countries have no alternative economic source of energy. In the lower 48 states of the United States, there are 220 billion tons of economically recoverable reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal. Add to this quantity 5 trillion tons of predominantly subbituminous coal in Alaska, and the combined amount represents the largest supply of the lowest-cost fuels available for generating electric power in the United States. However, to use these coals cost-effectively and in an environmentally acceptable way, it is imperative that their properties and combustion/gasification behavior be well understood. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) takes a cradle-to-grave approach (i.e., mining, precleaning, combustion/gasification, postcleaning, and reuse and disposal of residues) for all aspects of coal processing and utilization. The environmental impact of these activities must be matched with the appropriate technologies. Experience over many years has shown that variations in coal and ash properties have a critical impact on design, reliability and efficiency of operation, and environmental compliance when low-rank coals are burned in conventional systems. This chapter reviews the significant technical issues of beneficiation, which includes reduction in moisture as well as ash (including sulfur), in relation to low-rank coal properties and their impact on conventional and advanced power systems. Finally, the development and utilization of low-rank coal resources are briefly discussed in view of policy, economic, and strategic issues.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.; Jones, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Directions in automotive engine research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of high fuel costs and automotive fuel economy and emission regulations has cast doubt on the economic superiority and even the technical feasibility of conventional spark ignition and diesel engines, and has opened the field to other concepts. The emission regulations and their effect on the design and efficiency of conventional engines are reviewed, the research and development effort to improve the performance of conventional engines and to develop advanced engines is discussed, and the current status of these engines is presented.

Samuels, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

227

In-Cylinder Imaging of Conventional and Advanced, Low-Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vessels, which have been extensively modified for optical access. * Newly-developed laserimaging techniques in these facilities have provided new insight into conventional...

228

Air exchange effectiveness of conventional and task ventilation for offices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air quality and comfort complaints within large buildings are often attributed to air distribution problems. We define three air exchange effectiveness parameters related to air distribution. The first two indicate the indoor air flow pattern (i.e., the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement flow) for an entire building or region. The third parameter is most useful for assessments of the spatial variability of ventilation. We also define the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern within specific rooms or sections of buildings. The results of measurements of these parameters in US office buildings by the authors and other researchers are reviewed. Almost all measurements indicate very limited short circuiting or displacement flow between locations of air supply and removal. However, a moderate degree of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. The results of laboratory-based measurements by the authors are consistent with the field data. Our measurements in office buildings do indicate that ventilation rates can vary substantially between indoor locations, probably due to variation in air supply rates between locations rather than variation in the indoor air flow patterns. One possible method of improving air distribution is to employ task ventilation with air supplied closer to the occupant`s breathing zone. We have evaluated two task ventilation systems in a laboratory setting. During most operating conditions, these systems did not provide a region of substantially increased ventilation where occupants breath. However, both systems are capable of providing substantially enhanced ventilation at the breathing zone under some operating conditions. Therefore, task ventilation is a potential option for using ventilation air more effectively.

Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.; Prill, R.J.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Air exchange effectiveness of conventional and task ventilation for offices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air quality and comfort complaints within large buildings are often attributed to air distribution problems. We define three air exchange effectiveness parameters related to air distribution. The first two indicate the indoor air flow pattern (i.e., the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement flow) for an entire building or region. The third parameter is most useful for assessments of the spatial variability of ventilation. We also define the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern within specific rooms or sections of buildings. The results of measurements of these parameters in US office buildings by the authors and other researchers are reviewed. Almost all measurements indicate very limited short circuiting or displacement flow between locations of air supply and removal. However, a moderate degree of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. The results of laboratory-based measurements by the authors are consistent with the field data. Our measurements in office buildings do indicate that ventilation rates can vary substantially between indoor locations, probably due to variation in air supply rates between locations rather than variation in the indoor air flow patterns. One possible method of improving air distribution is to employ task ventilation with air supplied closer to the occupant's breathing zone. We have evaluated two task ventilation systems in a laboratory setting. During most operating conditions, these systems did not provide a region of substantially increased ventilation where occupants breath. However, both systems are capable of providing substantially enhanced ventilation at the breathing zone under some operating conditions. Therefore, task ventilation is a potential option for using ventilation air more effectively.

Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.; Prill, R.J.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs aircraft such as those that serve regional routes. We thus explore the optimal aerodynamic shape of both a blended wing-body and conventional tube-and-wing regional aircraft through high-fidelity aerodynamic shape

Zingg, David W.

231

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

232

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

Grill-Spector, Kalanit

233

Evaluation of air toxic emissions from advanced and conventional coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the air toxics measurements at three advanced power systems and a base case conventional fossil fuel power plant. The four plants tested include a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, integrated gasification combined cycle, circulating fluidized bed combustor, and a conventional coal-fired plant.

Chu, P.; Epstein, M. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Gould, L. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Botros, P. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

Laughlin, Robert B.

235

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report 2006 Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention Research Institute Ministry of the Environment Emission Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report, Landscape and Planning #12;Data sheet Title: Denmark's National Inventory Report 2006 - Submitted under

236

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Emission Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Mikkelsen #12;Data sheet Title: Denmark's National Inventory Report ­ Submitted under the United Nations

237

2 www.trnmag.com Technology Research News February 23/March 2, 2005 Process yields semiconductor foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wayne State University have made crystalline aerogels -- new semiconductor materials that are very porous, giving them very high surface areas. Unlike conventional aerogels, the researchers' materials

Ruina, Andy L.

238

Research Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

240

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H. (Carpenter Technol. Corp.)

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

A comparative study of conventionally sintered and microwave sintered nickel zinc ferrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the present work, nickel zinc ferrite having compositional formula Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by conventional solid state method and sintered in conventional and microwave furnaces. Pellets were sintered with very short soaking time of 10 min at 1150 °C in microwave furnace whereas 4 hrs of soaking time was selected for conventional sintering at 1200 °C. Phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis technique. Scanning electron micrographs were taken for microstructural study. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of temperature. To study magnetic behavior, M-H hysteresis loops were recorded for both samples. It is observed that microwave sintered sample could obtain comparable properties to the conventionally sintered one in lesser soaking time at lower sintering temperature.

Rani, Rekha [Electroceramics Research Lab, GVM Girls College, Sonepat-131001, India and School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Juneja, J. K. [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonepat-131001 (India); Raina, K. K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Kotnala, R. K. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi -110012 (India); Prakash, Chandra, E-mail: cprakash2014@gmail.com [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Timarpur, Delhi - 110054 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Making Translation Work BIOTECHNOLOGY'S LARGEST GLOBAL EVENT, THE BIO INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION, CONVENES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Translation Work BIOTECHNOLOGY'S LARGEST GLOBAL EVENT, THE BIO INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION- tunities and discussing industry trends, investments, and policies meant to better the world.The gathering reasonable protection of commercial interests within strictly defined domains of joint activity, while

Mullins, Dyche

245

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

246

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

87.4 86.9 78.3 68.5 W 70.8 See footnotes at end of table. 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 16 Energy Information Administration ...

247

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

88.4 87.8 80.1 70.0 NA 72.6 See footnotes at end of table. 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 16 Energy Information Administration ...

248

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.7 5.9 3.9 12.7 W 16.6 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

249

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

250

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional septic tanks have been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of septic tank/drain field systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

2014-02-06 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Conventional Cooking Products; Request for Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information and notice of document availability regarding energy conservation standards for residential conventional cooking products, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 6, 2014.

252

Biofiltration vs. conventional activated sludge plants: what about priority and emerging1 pollutants removal?2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performances of two complete wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) for all priority19 substances listed solids elimination and possible coagulant impact on soluble compounds. For biological27 treatments; biofiltration; conventional activated sludge; physico-chemical lamellar settling;42 wastewater treatment plant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in conventional deposits. The longer- term problem of climate change arises from the fuller and longer-term use of coal, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” (Grubb, 2001) As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport... , it is not mobile at reservoir conditions, (Cupcic, 2003): density Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock rich in organic matter, (USGS, 2005): oil shales contain kerogen, which is a solid, insoluble organic material...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

254

Comparison of conventional freezing and vitrification for cryopreservation of equine embryos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL FREEZING AND VITRIFICATION FOR CRYOPRESERVATION OF EQUINE EMBRYOS A Thesis by JASON EDWARD BRUEMMER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL FREEZING AND VITRIFICATION FOR CRYOPRESERVATION OF EQUINE EMBRYOS A Thesis by JASON EDWARD BRUEMMER Approved as to style and content by: J...

Bruemmer, Jason Edward

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effects of conventional feeds vs. table food waste on the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1984 Major Subject: Animal Science EFFECTS OF CONVENTIONAL FEEDS VS. TABLE FOOD WASTE ON THE QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PORK A Thesis by DARRELL CHESTER MOHR Approved... as to style and content by: n o Commrttee) ( o-c o Comm ttee) ( ea De artment) ( mber) m er) May, 1984 ABSTRACT Effects of Conventional Feeds vs. Table Food Waste on the Quantitative and Qualitative Characteristics of Pork. (May, 1984). Darrell...

Mohr, Darrell Chester

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE the welding wire and the bypass torch. To control the base metal current at the desired level, a group. Introduction Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is a major process for metals joining. Conventional GMAW is normally

Zhang, YuMing

257

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

258

CX-010922: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, Other: Bench Scale Laboratory Research Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

259

Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Haynes, H.W. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cost comparison of solar detoxification with conventional alternatives for the destruction of trichloroethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to compare the cost of solar waste detoxification processes with conventional alternatives for the treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air. The solar processes that were evaluated are high flux photothermal oxidation (PHOTOX), high flux thermal catalytic reforming (SOLTOX), and low flux photocatalytic oxidation (PHOCAT). The high flux processes, PHOTOX and SOLTOX, were based on dish concentrator technology. The low flux photocatalytic process was based on parabolic trough concentrating technology. The conventional alternatives are thermal oxidation, thermal catalytic oxidation, off-site carbon regeneration, and on-site solvent recovery. Analysis of the seven processes showed PHOCAT to be the most economical treatment method. PHOTOX showed slightly better economics relative to SOLTOX. Both were competitive, with the best conventional destruction process, thermal oxidation. Off-site carbon regeneration was the most expensive treatment method. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Glatzmaier, G.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NV Energy Solar Integration Study: Cycling and Movements of Conventional Generators for Balancing Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an increasing penetration level of solar power in the southern Nevada system, the impact of solar on system operations needs to be carefully studied from various perspectives. Qualitatively, it is expected that the balancing requirements to compensate for solar power variability will be larger in magnitude; meanwhile, generators providing load following and regulation services will be moved up or down more frequently. One of the most important tasks is to quantitatively evaluate the cycling and movements of conventional generators with solar power at different penetration levels. This study is focused on developing effective methodologies for this goal and providing a basis for evaluating the wear and tear of the conventional generators

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Research Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community...

265

Crosscutting Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to, and encourage, greater synergy among disciplines and across each of the Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) core technology areas. Its mission space is bound by...

266

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preface Vice Rector for Research The research strategy of the TU Vienna for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable and low emission mobility 11 Climate neutral, renewable and conventional energy supply systems 12 and to improve our international appearance, as well as build- ing cooperation at all levels. We would like organisations and with the economic and private sectors. The research focus point "Energy and Environ- ment

Szmolyan, Peter

268

Life cycle analysis of lubricants from rape seed oil in comparison to conventional lubricants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction and procedure Comparing with biomass-derived lubricants, in many cases conventional lubricants turn out to have disadvantages for their environmental impact, especially where losses occur during regular operation (e.g. in chainsaws) or where a leakage leads to immediate emissions into the environment as for agricultural machinery. Bio lubricants are supposed to be environmentally friendly, among other

G. A. Reinhardt; R. Herbener; S. O. Gärtner

269

Nuclear forward scattering vs. conventional Mossbauer studies of atomically tailored Eu-based materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the decrease in size of devices, rapid characterization of nano-devices is an inevitable necessity. It is shown that Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation from the advanced photon source provides such a tool of investigation. Results are presented and compared for conventional Moessbauer and Nuclear Forward Scattering for {sup 151}Eu-doped magnesium sulfide as an example, especially at low concentrations.

Konjhodzic, A.; Adamczyk, A.; Hasan, Z.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Carroll, J. J.; Vagizov, F.; Univ. of Philadelphia; Youngstown State Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EXTRACTING INFORMATION FROM CONVENTIONAL AE FEATURES FOR ONSET DAMAGE DETECTION IN CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXTRACTING INFORMATION FROM CONVENTIONAL AE FEATURES FOR ONSET DAMAGE DETECTION IN CARBON FIBER and preprocessing methods on Acoustic Emission measurements of prosthetic feets made of carbon fiber reinforced in carbon fiber composistes #12;When microstructural changes occur in composites, energy is released

271

SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typing method for application in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (specifically source rock) reservoirs using conventional well logs and core data. Source rock reservoirs are known to be highly heterogeneous and often, petrophysical description of source rock reservoirs with well logs has been focused to quantifying rock

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

272

CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS**, Dr. VASILIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS, antoniadis@dpem.tuc.gr Abstract: Twist drills are geometrically complex tools, which are used in industry and experimental approaches for drilling simulation. The present paper is based on the ground that the increasing

Aristomenis, Antoniadis

273

Compiling functional pipe/stream abstractions into conventional programs: Software Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compiling functional pipe/stream abstractions into conventional programs: Software Pipelines with these technques and aware of the implementation of infinite stream/pipe abstractions in Lisp, Scheme the stream/pipe abstraction may be used, in principle, even by those who allege that all practical programs

Fateman, Richard J.

274

Compiling functional pipe/stream abstractions into conventional programs: Software Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compiling functional pipe/stream abstractions into conventional programs: Software Pipelines as a silly functional programming trick. We show how the stream/pipe abstraction can sometimes be converted to many students is streams (in the language of Abelson/Sussman [1]) or pipes (in the language of Norvig

Fateman, Richard J.

275

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.

276

WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE of tools for quantitative policy analysis. As policy analysts have turned to the consideration of climate and other problems of global change, they have found it natural to employ such now standard tools as utility

Risbey, James S.

277

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy. Wind's variability does increase the day-to-day and minute-to- minute operating costs of a utility system because the wind variations do affect the operation of other plants. But investigations by utility

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

278

Query Plans for Conventional and Temporal Queries Involving Duplicates and Ordering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substantially from built- in temporal support in the DBMS. To achieve this, temporal query representation for providing temporal support both via a stand-alone temporal DBMS and via a layer on top of a conventional DBMS. By capturing duplicate removal and retention and order preservation for all queries, as well

Snodgrass, Richard T.

279

Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives? A Systematic Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irradiation or chemical food additives and are not grown from genetically modified organisms (6, 8Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives? A Systematic Review Crystal of organic foods are unclear. Purpose: To review evidence comparing the health effects of or- ganic

Wang, Changlu

280

Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

training. B~AW i ht. T hl 4 h th tth h dy lght rth h did t change as a result of either training regimen, While in the conventional treatment, the horses consumed 2% of their mean body weight per day which resulted in a mean digestible energy intake...

Haney, Elizabeth anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat horizon in each core. Substantially older radiocarbon ages from organic-rich gytjja (mineral peat- lands throughout the WSL, for a total of 29,350 measurements digitized. (ii) Our own field data

Gillespie, Rosemary

282

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional turbine load statistics for design. There are not many published studies that have addressed the issue of such optimal space-time resolution. This study in- vestigates turbine extreme and fatigue load statistics

Manuel, Lance

283

A comparative risk assessment of genetically engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production systems Robert K.D. Peterson* & Leslie M. Shama Agricultural and Biological Risk Assessment engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems. Replacement of traditional herbicides with different wheat production systems in the US and Canada using the risk assessment paradigm. Specifically, we

Peterson, Robert K. D.

284

Conventional Facilities Chapter 3: Architecture 3-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ADAAG) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) 2.2 LEED for Labs 3.2 Architecture 3Conventional Facilities Chapter 3: Architecture 3-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 3 ARCHITECTURE 3.1 Design Criteria 3.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards, orders

Ohta, Shigemi

285

Ultramicroscopy 103 (2005) 6781 Conventional and back-side focused ion beam milling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prepared using the more conventional `trench' FIB geometry. The use of carbon coating to remove specimen is used, then the local intensity and spacing of the interference fringes that form in the overlap region as it provides direct access to the electrostatic potential in the specimen (projected in the electron beam

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

286

Chapter 13: Conventional Facilities 13-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and operation Sustainable design Section of the Ring Building available for accelerator installation by July-II Conceptual Design Report Brookhaven National Laboratory Table 13.1.1 NSLS-II Gross Area. Building Component: Conventional Facilities 13-5 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 13.2 SITE ANALYSIS 13.2.1 Building Site

Ohta, Shigemi

287

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis ...........................................................................2-1 H2A Hydrogen Delivery Models 2.1.5.2 ......................................................................2-10 Refueling Station Compressor 2.1.5.3 ............................2-11 Refueling Station Liquid

288

Calibration and data reduction algorithms for non-conventional multi-hole pressure probes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Moreover, they eliminate the need to separate the measurement domain of a probe to "low-angle" and "high-angle" regimes, typical in conventional 5- and 7-hole-probe algorithms that require two different sets of pressure coefficient definitions...

Ramakrishnan, Vijay

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented fabrication will soon transition from 300 to 450 mm at a time when excitation frequencies for capacitively of processing. The increase in diameter to 450 mm is likely to exacerbate these effects, perhaps requiring

Kushner, Mark

290

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

worldwide, there has been an increase in the support of renewable energy. Latin America has not beenTechnological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System Juan D- Renewable energy has had a steady growth in power systems worldwide. The high uncertainty about what type

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

291

Energy efficient residence: research results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report on the design, construction, and monitoring of an energy efficient residence and a conventional comparison home by the National Association of Home Builders Research Foundation, Inc. The report describes the two homes in considerable detail, summarizes the results of the energy and other measurements, and evaluates many of the energy conservation techniques used. Finally, these results are synthesized with the foundation's other energy conservation experience into two lists of energy saving design tips for homes in both colder and warmer climates. Most of the design tips are accompanied by brief comments intended to aid in their interpretation and use.

Johnson, R.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Research Help  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelp Research

293

AR Researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles with an emphasis in cooperative unmanned vehicle research and intelligent remote sensing. Cal Christensen, M.S., P.E., P.M.P Cal...

294

IR Researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers Eric D. Larsen Eric D. Larsen is a mechanical engineer at the Idaho National Laboratorywith 19 years of experience in design and integration of electro-mechanical and...

295

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLVâ??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average homeâ??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nationâ??s energy consumption â?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Georgia Newspaper Coverage Discovering Conventional Practices of the 'Cherokee Question': Prelude to the Removal, 1828-1832.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis analyzes the specific journalistic conventional practices of newspapers in Georgia as they focused on the “Cherokee Question” in 1828-1832, the critical period during… (more)

Hobgood, Jr., James Hollister

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Outline of an on-site inspection regime for conventional arms control in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complexity of the negotiations on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) was emphasized recently by General John R. Galvin, SACEUR, when he stated, {open_quotes}The difficulties of comparing the relative strengths of strategic or intermediate-range nuclear arsenals pale in comparison with the problems of assessing the relative capabilities of opposing conventional forces.{open_quotes} Throughout this process, intensive and rigorous verification measures must be developed and enforced to ensure an acceptable degree of reliability. The eventual agreement will require a complex verification monitoring process covering a vast geographical area. The long-term success of the agreement to a large extent will depend on the level of confidence achieved by the verification process and the effective deployment of technological means will be essential to that process.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

2014-11-24 Issuance: Test Procedures for Conventional Cooking Products; Supplementary Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register Supplementary Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding test procedures for conventional cooking products, as issued by the Deputy Asisstant Secretary for Energy Efficiency. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

299

Gasoline-fueled hybrid vs. conventional vehicle emissions and fuel economy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the relative fuel economy and emissions behavior, both measured and modeled, of technically comparable, contemporary hybrid and conventional vehicles fueled by gasoline, in terms of different driving cycles. Criteria pollutants (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides) are discussed, and the potential emissions benefits of designing hybrids for grid connection are briefly considered. In 1997, Toyota estimated that their grid-independent hybrid vehicle would obtain twice the fuel economy of a comparable conventional vehicle on the Japan 10/15 mode driving cycle. This initial result, as well as the fuel economy level (66 mpg), made its way into the U.S. press. Criteria emissions amounting to one-tenth of Japanese standards were cited, and some have interpreted these results to suggest that the grid-independent hybrid can reduce criteria emissions in the U.S. more sharply than can a conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper shows that the potential of contemporary grid-independent hybrid vehicle technology for reducing emissions and fuel consumption under U.S. driving conditions is less than some have inferred. The importance (and difficulty) of doing test and model assessments with comparable driving cycles, comparable emissions control technology, and comparable performance capabilities is emphasized. Compared with comparable-technology conventional vehicles, grid-independent hybrids appear to have no clear criteria pollutant benefits (or disbenefits). (Such benefits are clearly possible with grid-connectable hybrids operating in zero emissions mode.) However, significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (i.e., fuel consumption) are possible with hybrid vehicles when they are used to best advantage.

Anderson, J.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.; Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a method, at the pilot scale, for the economical production of hydrogen from peanut shells. During the project period a pilot scale process, based on the bench scale process developed at NREL (National Renewable Energy Lab), was developed and successfully operated to produce hydrogen from peanut shells. The technoeconomic analysis of the process suggests that the production of hydrogen via this method is cost-competitive with conventional means of hydrogen production.

Boone, William

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alleviate atmospheric pollution in colla- boration with DMU (the National En- vironmental Research Institute Countries is also part of this department. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department (Formerly

305

Cooperative Mmonitoring Center Occasional Paper/5: Propspects of Conventional Arms Control in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intensely adversarial relationship between India and Pakistan is marked by military rivalry, mutual distrust, and suspicion. The most dividing disagreement has been over the Kashmir region. An inability to discuss the Kashmir issue has prevented discussion on other important issues. Since there is little prospect of detente, at least in the near-term, the question is whether this rivalry can be contained by other means, such as arms control approaches. Conventional arms control has been applied flexibly and successfully in some regions to reduce threat-perceptions and achieve reassuring military stability. Some lessons from other international models might be applied to the India/Pakistan context. This paper discusses the status of conventional arms control in South Asia, the dominant Indian and Pakistani perceptions about arms control, the benefits that could be derived from arms control, as well as the problems and prospects of arms control. It also discusses existing conventional arms control agreements at the regional and global levels as well as the potential role of cooperative monitoring technology.

Gupta, Amit; Kamal, Nazir

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Research Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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308

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelp

309

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelpA New

310

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelpA

311

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelpAA Novel

312

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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313

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelpAAFilling

314

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearch Facilities

315

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearch FacilitiesThe Two

316

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearch FacilitiesThe

317

Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearch

318

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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319

Research Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANL Research

320

Research | JCESR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form Research FormURTests

322

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form Research

323

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form ResearchImproved

324

Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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325

Research | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANLSoftwareCenterResearch

326

An investigation of wind loads on conventional and nonconventional highway signs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) With the flanged connection at the base of the tubular support the sign could be rotated. in 22. 5-degree increments allowing for a semi-controlled environment. (d) The wind loads on a sign with a single tubular support are believed to be of the same order...AN INVESTIGATION OF WIND LOADS ON CONVENTIONAL AND NONCONVENTIONAL HIGHWAY SIGNS A Thesis By Hayes Ellis Ross, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Ross, Hayes Ellis

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Johnson-Clarendon Convention, 1869: the anatomy of a diplomatic failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE JOHNSON-CLARENDON CONTENTION, 1869; THE ANATOMY OF A DIPLOMATIC FAILURE A Thesis by JOANN FRANCES VAN PARYS PAPPAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS August 1979 Maj or Subj ect; American History THE JOHNSON-CLARENDON CONVENTION, 1869: THE ANATOMY OF A DIPLOMATIC FAILURE A Thesis by JOANN FRANCES VAN PARYS PAPPAS Approved as to style and content by: C airman o Committee !r...

Pappas, Joann Frances Van Parys

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Workover well control. Part 3. Conventional rigs, snubbing units handle a variety of workover jobs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional rig, the most widely used rig for workovers, performs several common functions: tripping in and out of the hole, rotating the work string, and circulating fluid. Its primary component groups are the derrick, hoisting systems, rotary tools, circulating systems, and tubular goods. Rig sizing depends on the job requirements; the typical workover rig is a small-capacity, single unit used for concentric work. A workover rig's most important feature is its portability; compartmentalizing the rig permits transporting it offshore in packages smaller than 8000 lb and allows small cranes to replace derrick barges for loading operations.

Adams, N.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Protein folding and non-conventional drug design: a primer for nuclear structure physicists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the paradigms emerging from the study of the phenomena of phase transitions in finite many-body systems, like e.g. the atomic nucleus can be used at profit to solve the protein folding problem within the framework of simple (although not oversimplified) models. From this solution a paradigm emerges for the design of non-conventional drugs, which inhibit enzymatic action without inducing resistance (mutations). The application of these concepts to the design of an inhibitor to the HIV-protease central in the life cycle of the HIV virus is discussed.

Broglia, R.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Tiana, G.; Provasi, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuelAnnualSanConventional,

331

Research and Development with Full Scale Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings...

Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The potential for clean energy production using oxy-fuel combustion and integrated pollutant removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective remediation of flue gas produced by an oxy-fuel coal combustion process has been proven at bench scale in the course of cooperative research between USDOE’s Albany Research Center (ARC) and Jupiter Oxygen Corporation. All combustion gas pollutants were captured, including CO2 which was compressed to a liquefied state suitable for sequestration. Current laboratory-scale research and the future of combined oxy-fuel/IPR systems are discussed.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Weber, Thomas (Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, Schiller Park, IL 60176).; Summers, Cathy A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual transportation convention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, University of Minnesota Collection: Engineering 2 Updated June 2011 Curriculum Vitae Summary: Bunching." 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board,...

334

acsm-asprs annual convention: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: NEOGENE HISTORY OF COLLISION IN THE HALMAHERA REGION, INDONESIA Robert Hall SE Asia Research Group no trace. INTRODUCTION Eastern Indonesia includes...

335

Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 27 September 1993, President Clinton proposed {open_quotes}... a multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards.{close_quotes} The UN General Assembly subsequently adopted a resolution recommending negotiation of a non-discriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty (hereinafter referred to as {open_quotes}the Cutoff Convention{close_quotes}) banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The matter is now on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament, although not yet under negotiation. This accord would, in effect, place all fissile material (defined as highly enriched uranium and plutonium) produced after entry into force (EIF) of the accord under international safeguards. {open_quotes}Production{close_quotes} would mean separation of the material in question from radioactive fission products, as in spent fuel reprocessing, or enrichment of uranium above the 20% level, which defines highly enriched uranium (HEU). Facilities where such production could occur would be safeguarded to verify that either such production is not occurring or that all material produced at these facilities is maintained under safeguards.

Dougherty, D.; Fainberg, A.; Sanborn, J.; Allentuck, J.; Sun, C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

338

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

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339

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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340

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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342

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAre Increases

343

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAre IncreasesEvaluation

344

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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345

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAreQuantifying the

346

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAreQuantifying

347

Research Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A B C D E F G H I J KAustin » Research

348

PNNL: Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to the Pacific Northwest National LaboratoryResearch

349

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User Facilities

350

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User

351

Research Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANL

352

Research Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANLSoftware & Tools

353

Research | NREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas OurLANLSoftwareCenter

354

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form

355

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral Formulation

356

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral FormulationAn

357

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral

358

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneralIntegrated

359

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch

360

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations atARM

362

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations

363

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud

364

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloudObservational

365

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloudObservationalA

366

Research Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aware that conventional irreversible digi- tal logic technology, which dissipates the entire energy progress in the energy efficiency of digital technologies will Dr. Frank is employed by Florida StateResearch Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for Adiabatic Charging with Various Driving

Frank, Michael P.

367

WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44 ABSTRACT. Consumable double- electrode gas metal arc welding (DE- GMAW) is an innovative welding process that can significantly increase the deposi- tion rate arc welding(GMAW)gunandconstantcurrent (CC) power supply to a conventional GMAW setup -- Fig. 1

Zhang, YuMing

368

A review of "The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern 'Convents of Pleasure'" by Nicky Hallett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of religious paradoxes: there is unity in diversity. Nicky Hallett. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern “Convents of Pleasure.” Farnham, Surrey, England: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. xii+249. $109.95. Review by elena levy...

Levy-Navarro, Elena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effects of conservation tillage and conventional tillage on selected physical and chemical properties of a Blackland Praire soil in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE AND CONVENTIONAL TILLAGE ON SELECTED PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF A BLACKLAND PRAIRIE SOIL IN TEXAS A Thesis By WELHELMUS ISAK IMANUEL MELLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Agronomy EFFECTS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE AND CONVENTIONAL TILLAGE ON SELECTED PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF A BLACKLAND PRAIRIE...

Mella, Welhelmus Isak Imanuel

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Dynamics and control of a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation column: Conventional control approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, bifurcation analysis and dynamic simulation were used to investigate the optimum conventional control strategy of an isopropyl alcohol (IPA), cyclohexane (CyH), and water (H{sub 2}O) heterogeneous azeotropic column. Steady-state process analysis shows that the optimal operation point should be located at a critical reflux, a transition point at which the distillation path switches from a route that passes through the IPA + H{sub 2}O azeotrope to one that passes through the IPA + CyH azeotrope. A good control strategy must be able to maintain a steady column temperature profile that shows a plateau near 70 C to ensure passage around the IPA + CyH azeotrope. An inverse double-loop control strategy is proposed based on principal component analysis. This scheme is capable of maintaining the desired column temperature profile given all kinds of feed disturbances, thus keeping the product IPA purity at the desired level.

Chien, I.L. [National Taiwan Univ. of Science and Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Wang, C.J.; Wong, D.S.H. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Effects of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends on Conventional Vehicle Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted in 2008 on 16 late-model conventional vehicles (1999-2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing because it more accurately represents real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.

Knoll, K.; West, B.; Huff, S.; Thomas, J.; Orban, J.; Cooper, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

Heisler, Ismael A., E-mail: i.heisler@uea.ac.uk; Moca, Roberta; Meech, Stephen R., E-mail: s.meech@uea.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Camargo, Franco V. A. [School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasília - DF 70040-020 (Brazil)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Experimental Study of Waveguide Coupled Microwave Heating with Conventional Multicusp Negative Ion Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negative ion production with conventional multicusp plasma chambers utilizing 2.45 GHz microwave heating is demonstrated. The experimental results were obtained with the multicusp plasma chambers and extraction systems of the RFdriven RADIS ion source and the filament driven arc discharge ion source LIISA. A waveguide microwave coupling system, which is almost similar to the one used with the SILHI ion source, was used. The results demonstrate that at least one third of negative ion beam obtained with inductive RF-coupling (RADIS) or arc discharge (LIISA) can be achieved with 1 kW of 2.45 GHz microwave power in CW mode without any modification of the plasma chamber. The co-extracted electron to H^- ratio and the optimum pressure range were observed to be similar for both heating methods. The behaviour of the plasma implies that the energy transfer from the microwaves to the plasma electrons is mainly an off-resonance process.

Komppula, J; Koivisto, H; Laulainen, J; Tarvainen, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Experiments and analysis for large conventional fast reactors in ZPPR-18/19  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments in ZPPR 18 and 19 provided physics data for large (1100 MWe) conventional LMRs. Measurements focused on the spatial distributions of fission rates and control worths. Experimental results were obtained for the fundamental to first-harmonic eigenvalue separation. In the outer core of ZPPR-18, fuel was arranged in sectors with uranium about the y axis and plutonium about the x axis. In ZPPR-19, the fuel was rearranged to give a uniform outer core distribution. Fission rate C/E values were essentially invariant with radius through the plutonium zones. The control worth C/E values were influences by their proximity to the uranium sectors. 10 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.; Grasseschi, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Grain growth in a conventional titanium alloy during rapid, continuous heat treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present work was to analyze the kinetics of beta grain growth during rapid, continuous heating of a conventional alpha-beta titanium alloy. The analysis was based on approximate, closed-form theoretical expressions derived by Bourell and Kaysser and Soper and Semiatin as well as a fully numerical, computer-based approach. The problem and approach discussed here differs from previous investigations of grain growth during continuous heating and cooling, most of which have been for austenite grain growth in the heat-affected zone during welding of steels. In this regard, the main features of the present work are the very high heating rates involved, the avoidance of the application of complex numerical integration schemes, and the avoidance of using isothermal grain growth kinetic data to fit continuous heating results.

Semiatin, S.L. (Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)); Soper, J.C. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States)); Sukonnik, I.M. (Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comparison of reliability performance of group connected and conventional HVDC transmission systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A group connected HVDC transmission scheme is a variant of the unit connection where instead of a single generator, a group of generators are directly connected to the converter. Studies conducted in the past indicated that significant cost reduction can be achieved using this scheme. This is mainly due to the elimination of many components which results in considerable capital and operating cost savings to the utility. Concerns regarding the reliability performance of unit connected schemes were raised, however, there has not been a detailed reliability study conducted. This paper addresses the reliability evaluation aspect of a group connected scheme and compares the reliability performance of the group connected scheme with that of the conventional common collector system. Reliability models for both schemes were developed using a hypothetical system model based on the Nelson River system. Practical system component outage data was used to examine the reliability performance of both schemes.

Kuruganty, S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The LBNO long-baseline oscillation sensitivities with two conventional neutrino beams at different baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Observatory (LBNO) initially consists of $\\sim 20$ kton liquid double phase TPC complemented by a magnetised iron calorimeter, to be installed at the Pyh\\"asalmi mine, at a distance of 2300 km from CERN. The conventional neutrino beam is produced by 400 GeV protons accelerated at the SPS accelerator delivering 700 kW of power. The long baseline provides a unique opportunity to study neutrino flavour oscillations over their 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima exploring the $L/E$ behaviour, and distinguishing effects arising from $\\delta_{CP}$ and matter. In this paper we show how this comprehensive physics case can be further enhanced and complemented if a neutrino beam produced at the Protvino IHEP accelerator complex, at a distance of 1160 km, and with modest power of 450 kW is aimed towards the same far detectors. We show that the coupling of two independent sub-MW conventional neutrino and antineutrino beams at different baselines from CERN and Protvino will allow to measure CP violation in the leptonic sector at a confidence level of at least $3\\sigma$ for 50\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ with a 20 kton detector. With a far detector of 70 kton, the combination allows a $3\\sigma$ sensitivity for 75\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ after 10 years of running. Running two independent neutrino beams, each at a power below 1 MW, is more within today's state of the art than the long-term operation of a new single high-energy multi-MW facility, which has several technical challenges and will likely require a learning curve.

LAGUNA-LBNO Collaboration; :; S. K. Agarwalla; L. Agostino; M. Aittola; A. Alekou; B. Andrieu; F. Antoniou; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; A. Balik; P. Ballett; I. Bandac; D. Banerjee; W. Bartmann; F. Bay; B. Biskup; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; E. Borriello; I. Brancus; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Calviani; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; G. Cata-Danil; S. Chakraborty; N. Charitonidis; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; F. Chipesiu; P. Crivelli; J. Dawson; I. De Bonis; Y. Declais; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; A. Eliseev; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; K. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; A. N. Erykalov; T. Esanu; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; G. Gavrilov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; S. Gilardoni; B. Goddard; C. M. Gomoiu; Y. A. Gornushkin; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; K. Huitu; A. Izmaylov; A. Jipa; K. Kainulainen; Y. Karadzhov; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; A. N. Kopylov; A. Korzenev; S. Kosyanenko; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; C. Lazaridis; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin-Mari; V. Matveev; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; A. Mirizzi; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; S. Narita; D. A. Nesterenko; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; E. Noah; Yu. Novikov; A. Oprima; J. Osborne; T. Ovsyannikova; Y. Papaphilippou; S. Pascoli; T. Patzak; M. Pectu; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; F. Resnati; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Rummukainen; A. Saftoiu; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez-Galan; J. Sarkamo; N. Saviano; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; E. Shaposhnikova; M. Slupecki; D. Smargianaki; D. Stanca; R. Steerenberg; A. R. Sterian; P. Sterian; S. Stoica; C. Strabel; J. Suhonen; V. Suvorov; G. Toma; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; K. Tuominen; M. Valram; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; F. Velotti; P. Velten; V. Venturi; T. Viant; S. Vihonen; H. Vincke; A. Vorobyev; A. Weber; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

379

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

380

On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In-Use and Vehicle Dynamometer Evaluation and Comparison of Class 7 Hybrid Electric and Conventional Diesel Delivery Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compared fuel economy and emissions between heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and equivalent conventional diesel vehicles. In-use field data were collected from daily fleet operations carried out at a FedEx facility in California on six HEV and six conventional 2010 Freightliner M2-106 straight box trucks. Field data collection primarily focused on route assessment and vehicle fuel consumption over a six-month period. Chassis dynamometer testing was also carried out on one conventional vehicle and one HEV to determine differences in fuel consumption and emissions. Route data from the field study was analyzed to determine the selection of dynamometer test cycles. From this analysis, the New York Composite (NYComp), Hybrid Truck Users Forum Class 6 (HTUF 6), and California Air Resource Board (CARB) Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) drive cycles were chosen. The HEV showed 31% better fuel economy on the NYComp cycle, 25% better on the HTUF 6 cycle and 4% worse on the CARB HHDDT cycle when compared to the conventional vehicle. The in-use field data indicates that the HEVs had around 16% better fuel economy than the conventional vehicles. Dynamometer testing also showed that the HEV generally emitted higher levels of nitric oxides than the conventional vehicle over the drive cycles, up to 77% higher on the NYComp cycle (though this may at least in part be attributed to the different engine certification levels in the vehicles tested). The conventional vehicle was found to accelerate up to freeway speeds over ten seconds faster than the HEV.

Burton, J.; Walkowicz, K.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research and Commercialization Grants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Research and Commercialization Technology provides grants for renewable resource research and development projects, among other types, to be conducted at research and commercialization...

383

Research Library Discontinues OPPIE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Library Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Find more information below. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email The Research Library is...

384

How Modern Displays Push Conventional Colorimetry to its Limit Abhijit Sarkar1,2, Laurent Blond1, Patrick Le Callet2, Florent Autrusseau2, Jrgen Stauder1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 How Modern Displays Push Conventional Colorimetry to its Limit Abhijit Sarkar1,2, Laurent Blondé1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

TO THE 1979 CONVENTION ON LONG-RANGE TRANSBOUNDARY AIR POLLUTION ON HEAVY METALS The Parties,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determined to implement the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution, Concerned that emissions of certain heavy metals are transported across national boundaries and may cause damage to ecosystems of environmental and economic importance and may have harmful effects on human health, Considering that combustion and industrial processes are the predominant anthropogenic sources of emissions of heavy metals into the atmosphere, Acknowledging that heavy metals are natural constituents of the Earth's crust and that many heavy metals in certain forms and appropriate concentrations are essential to life, Taking into consideration existing scientific and technical data on the emissions, geochemical processes, atmospheric transport and effects on human health and the environment of heavy metals, as well as on abatement techniques and costs, Aware that techniques and management practices are available to reduce air pollution caused by the emissions of heavy metals, Recognizing that countries in the region of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) have different economic conditions, and that in certain countries the economies are in transition,

unknown authors

386

Investigation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally designed refrigerator-freezers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally-designed, domestic refrigerator freezers (RFs) were incorporated into two 1990 production RF cabinets and refrigeration systems. The baseline performance of the original units and unit components were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model which could simulate cycling behavior was used to evaluate the daily energy use impacts for each modification, and modeled versus experimental results are compared. The model was shown to track measured RF performance improvement sufficiently well that it was used with some confidence to investigate additional options that could not be experimentally investigated. Substantial improvements in RF efficiency were demonstrated with relatively minor changes in system components and refrigeration circuit design. However, each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. For RF sizes typically sold in the United States (18-22 ft{sup 3} [510--620 1]), alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration cycles may be required to achieve the program goal (1.00 Kilowatt-hour per day for a 560 l, top mount RF.

Sand, J.R.; Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H. [Consulting Engineer, Cedar Rapids, IA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Challenges and Potential Solutions for Reducing Climate Control Loads in Conventional and Hybrid Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, is collaborating with U.S. automotive manufacturers to develop innovative techniques to reduce national fuel consumption and vehicle tailpipe emissions by reducing vehicle climate control loads. A new U.S. emissions test, the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), will soon begin measuring tailpipe emissions with the air conditioning system operating. Modeled results show that emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) more than double during the air conditioning part of the SFTP. Reducing the transmittance of the glazing can have a greater impact on the cabin soak temperature than ventilating the vehicle during a hot soak. Reducing the amount of outside air can decrease cooling and heating loads but requires that the recirculated air be cleaned. We discuss a photocatalytic oxidation air-cleaning process for removing volatile organic compounds and bioareosols. We conclude with an example of modeling the thermal comfort of the occupants. An auxiliary load increase of only 400 Watts (W) results in a 0.4 km/L (1 mpg) decrease for a conventional 11.9-L/100-km (28-mpg) vehicle. If every vehicle in the United States were to save only 0.4 km/L (1 mpg), $4 billion (U.S. dollars) would be saved annually in gasoline and oil costs. Further information can be found at http://www.ctts.nrel.gov/auxload.html.

Farrington, R.B., Anderson, R., Blake, D.M., Burch, S.D.; Cuddy, M.R., Keyser, M.A., Rugh, J.P.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Controlling the Performance of a Three-Terminal Molecular Transistor: Conformational versus Conventional Gating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, United States Shashi P. Karna* U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The effect of conformational changes in the gate arm of a three of the gate field. The current modulation is found to reach its maximum only under exclusive effect of voltage

Pandey, Ravi

389

A Prospective Phase III Randomized Trial of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. Results: The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}8, or T {>=}2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF.

Arcangeli, Giorgio, E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.i [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

POC-scale testing of a dry triboelectrostatic separator for fine coal cleaning. First quarterly technical progress report, September 27, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) developed a triboelectrostatic separation (TES) process which is capable of removing mineral matter from coal without using water. A distinct advantage of this dry coal cleaning process is that it does not entail costly steps of dewatering which is a common problem associated with conventional fine coal cleaning processes. It is the objective of this project to conduct a series of proof-of-concept (POC) scale tests at a throughput of 200--250 kg/hr and obtain scale- up information. Prior to the POC testing, bench-scale test work will be conducted with the objective of increasing the separation efficiency and throughput, for which changes in the basic designs for the charger and the separator may be necessary. The bench- and POC- scale test work will be carried out to evaluate various operating parameters and establish a reliable scale-up procedure. The scale-up data will be used to analyze the economic merits of the TES process. During the past quarter, a number of project tasks have been initiated. All documents required for project startup (i.e., work plans, management plans, etc.) have been submitted to DOE for approval. A bench-scale TES unit and an apparatus for studying tribocharging mechanisms have been designed and are currently being fabricated. One of the three coal samples to be used for bench-scale testing has been acquired.

Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Liquid balance monitoring inside conventional, Retrofit, and bio-reactor landfill cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg{sup ?1} (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste). • The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg{sup ?1} from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells. • The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. • Measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from accumulated liquid by balance. • The in-place saturated hydraulic conductivity of the MSW was calculated to be in the range of 10{sup ?8} to 10{sup ?7} m s{sup ?1}. - Abstract: The Outer Loop landfill bioreactor (OLLB) in Louisville, KY, USA has been the site of a study to evaluate long-term bioreactor performance at a full-scale operational landfill. Three types of landfill units were studied including a conventional landfill (Control cell), a new landfill area that had an air addition and recirculation piping network installed as waste was being placed (As-Built cell), and a conventional landfill that was modified to allow for liquids recirculation (Retrofit cell). During the monitoring period, the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg{sup ?1} (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste), respectively. The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg{sup ?1} from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells, respectively. The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. In the Control and As-Built cells, leachate head on liner decreased once waste placement stopped. The measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from the estimate of accumulated liquid by the liquid balance. Additionally, measurements on excavated solid waste samples revealed large spatial variability in waste moisture content. The degree of saturation in the Control cells decreased from 85% to 75%. The degree of saturation increased from 82% to 83% due to liquids addition in the Retrofit cells and decreased back to 80% once liquid addition stopped. In the As-Built cells, the degree of saturation increased from 87% to 97% during filling activities and then started to decrease soon after filling activities stopped to reach 92% at the end of the monitoring period. The measured leachate generation rates were used to estimate an in-place saturated hydraulic conductivity of the MSW in the range of 10{sup ?8} to 10{sup ?7} m s{sup ?1} which is lower than previous reports. In the Control and Retrofit cells, the net loss in liquids, 43 and 12 L Mg{sup ?1}, respectively, was similar to the measured settlement of 15% and 5–8% strain, respectively (Abichou et al., 2013). The increase in net liquid volume in the As-Built cells indicates that the 37% (average) measured settlement strain in these cells cannot be due to consolidation as the waste mass did not lose any moisture but rather suggests that settlement was attributable to lubrication of waste particle contacts, softening of flexible porous materials, and additional biological degradation.

Abichou, Tarek, E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Green, Roger; Hater, Gary [Waste Management Inc., Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Frontier Research Centers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Energy Frontier Research Centers SHARE Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials research...

393

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Noble Metal Catalysts for Mercury Oxidation in Utility Flue Gas: Gold, Palladium and Platinum Formulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of noble metals as catalysts for mercury oxidation in flue gas remains an area of active study. To date, field studies have focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot scale. In this article, we introduce bench-scale experimental results for gold, palladium and platinum catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Our initial results reveal some intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research into this potentially important process.

Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Noble metal catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of precious metals and platinum group metals as catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas is an active area of study. To date, field studies have recently focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot-scale. In this work, we introduce bench-scale results for gold, platinum, and palladium catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Initial results reveal intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research.

Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 16, July--September, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. 28 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

Shields, G.L.; Moro, N.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Conventional wisdom has long held that innovation is the strength of the West and that what gets developed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is completing his PhD in social media and innovation at Penn State University. He is a Royal Thai GovernmentConventional wisdom has long held that innovation is the strength of the West and that what gets not support this assump- tion. In point of fact, we're seeing a rise in the number of innovations coming from

398

2012 IEEE 27-th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel An Analysis of The Steam Community Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electrical Engineering Tel Aviv University Email: shavitt,noa@eng.tau.ac.il Abstract--The Steam community2012 IEEE 27-th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel An Analysis of The Steam Community Network Evolution Roi Becker, Yifat Chernihov, Yuval Shavitt and Noa Zilberman School

Shavitt, Yuval

399

he stable-hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H or 2H/1H, conventionally expressed as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he stable-hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H or 2H/1H, conventionally expressed as D) in bird feathers; Bowen et al. 2005; Votier et al. 2009). Because hydrogen in consumer tissues can ultimately be traced feathers (showing stable-hydrogen isotope characteristics typical of Siberia) and first-winter feathers

Green, Andy J.

400

A review of "Nuns’ Chronicles and Convent Culture in Renaissance and Counter-Reformation Italy." by K. J. P. Lowe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press, 2003. xvi + 437 pp. + 42 illus. $90.00. Review by THOMAS WORCESTER, COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS. Vernacular chronicles of three convents form the basis of this study: Santa Maria delle Vergini (Venice), known as Le Vergini; Santa Maria...

Thomas Worcester

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

In conventional accelerators, energy from RF electro-magnetic waves in vacuum is transformed into kinetic energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In conventional accelerators, energy from RF electro- magnetic waves in vacuum is transformed for accelerating and storing countercirculating beams of 7-TeV protons, has a stored beam energy exceeding 300 MJ. Accelerator-based light sources rely on the fact that when beams of GeV electrons interact with magnetic

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

402

Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory Alessandra F. A. Vilela, Ricardo Gargano a Patr´icia R.P. Barreto b a Instituto de from calculation of the rate constant using con- ventional Transition State Theory (TST

403

Abstract --The growth of non-conventional renewable energies involves a new challenge for optimal network expansion. A better  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implementation of policies to develop Non-Conventional Renewable Energies (NCRE), they can be seen as a mechanism for the harmonious development of the expansion network. From the economic viewpoint, NCREs usually are considered development or equipment repowering within a coordinated network expansion investment plan, both in AC

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

404

ENI Renewable and Non-conventional Energy Prize 2012 High-efficiency solar cells based on nanophotonic design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new solar cell designs that enable both a higher photovoltaic conversion efficiency and reduced) Photonic design principles for ultrahigh-efficiency photovoltaics, A. Polman and H.A. Atwater, Nature MaterENI Renewable and Non-conventional Energy Prize 2012 High-efficiency solar cells based

Polman, Albert

405

Transport of Bose-Einstein Condensates with Optical Tweezers Conventional condensate production techniques severely limit optical and mechanical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport of Bose-Einstein Condensates with Optical Tweezers Conventional condensate production to manipulate and study condensates has been a major restriction to previous experiments. So far, most experiments were carried out within a few millimeters of where the condensate was created. What is highly

406

CONVENTIONAL COTTON RESPONSE TO LOW RATES OF GLYPHOSATE J.W. Keeling and L.L. Lyon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONVENTIONAL COTTON RESPONSE TO LOW RATES OF GLYPHOSATE J.W. Keeling and L.L. Lyon Texas acres of upland cotton planted in the United States were Roundup Ready varieties. Because non-Roundup Ready cotton is often planted adjacent to Roundup Ready cotton, the potential for herbicide drift

Mukhtar, Saqib

407

Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, and mineral composition is an integral part of unconventional shale reservoir formation evaluation. Porosity requirement for economically viable flow of gas in very-low permeability shales. Brittle shales are favorable

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

408

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Student Research Fellowships Scientists of Tomorrow #12 medical Provides medical Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research

Bushman, Frederic

409

Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Furnace designers and refractory engineers recognize that optimized furnace superstructure design and refractory selection are needed as glass production furnaces are continually striving toward greater output and efficiencies. Harsher operating conditions test refractories to the limit, while changing production technology (such as the conversion to oxy-fuel from traditional air-fuel firing) can alter the way the materials perform. Refractories for both oxy- and air-fuel fired furnace superstructures are subjected to high temperatures during service that may cause them to excessively creep or subside if the refractory material is not creep resistant, or if it is subjected to high stress, or both. Furnace designers can ensure that superstructure structural integrity is maintained if the creep behavior of the refractory material is well understood and well represented by appropriate engineering creep models. Several issues limit the abilities of furnace designers to (1) choose the optimum refractory for their applications, (2) optimize the engineering design, or (3) predict the service mechanical integrity of their furnace superstructures. Published engineering creep data are essentially non-existent for almost all commercially available refractories used for glass furnace superstructures. The limited data that do exist are supplied by the various refractory suppliers. Unfortunately, these suppliers generally have different ways of conducting their mechanical testing and they also interpret and report their data differently; this makes it hard for furnace designers to draw fair comparisons between competing grades of candidate refractories. Furthermore, the refractory supplier's data are often not available in a form that can be readily used for furnace design and for the prediction and design of long-term structural integrity of furnace superstructures. With the aim of providing such comparable data, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technology and its Advanced Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Project summary. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This eight-volume report presents guidelines for performing verification and validation (V&V) on Artificial Intelligence (Al) systems with nuclear applications. The guidelines have much broader application than just expert systems; they are also applicable to object-oriented programming systems, rule-based systems, frame-based systems, model-based systems, neural nets, genetic algorithms, and conventional software systems. This is because many of the components of AI systems are implemented in conventional procedural programming languages, so there is no real distinction. The report examines the state of the art in verifying and validating expert systems. V&V methods traditionally applied to conventional software systems are evaluated for their applicability to expert systems. One hundred fifty-three conventional techniques are identified and evaluated. These methods are found to be useful for at least some of the components of expert systems, frame-based systems, and object-oriented systems. A taxonomy of 52 defect types and their delectability by the 153 methods is presented. With specific regard to expert systems, conventional V&V methods were found to apply well to all the components of the expert system with the exception of the knowledge base. The knowledge base requires extension of the existing methods. Several innovative static verification and validation methods for expert systems have been identified and are described here, including a method for checking the knowledge base {open_quotes}semantics{close_quotes} and a method for generating validation scenarios. Evaluation of some of these methods was performed both analytically and experimentally. A V&V methodology for expert systems is presented based on three factors: (1) a system`s judged need for V&V (based in turn on its complexity and degree of required integrity); (2) the life-cycle phase; and (3) the system component being tested.

Mirsky, S.M.; Hayes, J.E.; Miller, L.A. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ renewable/ November 2010 Sonoma County RESCO A Local Level Approach to Renewable Energy Portfolios. The Issue To address energy usage that contributes to climate change, California has enacted legislation to guide

412

External Research Funding Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 External Research Funding Agreements University Policy No: RH8200 Classification: Research and university employees under Research Funding Agreements. DEFINITIONS 2.00 Research Funding Agreement means funding provided through an agreement with the university to be used for research purposes, whether

Victoria, University of

413

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

414

Transforming Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Health Research the first two years National Institute for Health Research Progress For Information R OCR R ef: 0 Gateway R ef: 9298 Title Transforming Health Research the first two years. Health Institute for Health Research Progress Report i Transforming Health Research the first two years National

Diggle, Peter J.

415

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). Accomplishments during the quarter are described on the following tasks and subtasks: Development of near-term applications (engineering development and dewatering studies); Engineering development of selective agglomeration (bench-scale testing and process scale-up); PDU and advanced column flotation module (coal selection and procurement and advanced flotation topical report); Selective agglomeration module (module operation and clean coal production with Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana 7 coals); Disposition of the PDU; and Project final report. Plans for next quarter are discussed and agglomeration results of the three tested coals are presented.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process: Laboratory scale studies modelling and technical assessment. Final report, [October 1, 1988--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous and bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. AC22-88PCB8818 during the period October 1, 1988 to June 30, 1993. The work described in this report is primarily concerned with tests on a Laboratory Scale primarily using microautoclaves. Experiments were conducted evaluating coal, solvents, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatments, C0{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects. Other microautoclave tests are included in the companion topical reports for this contract, DE-88818-TOP-01 & 02 on Sub-Bituminous and Bituminous Bench-Scale and PDU activities. In addition to the Laboratory Scale Studies, kinetic data and modelling results from Bench-Scale and Microautoclave tests are interpreted and presented along with some economic updates and sensitivity studies.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Health effects of coal technologies: research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2004­MARCH 2005 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate Pacific Research Center Design by: Susan Yamamoto Printed by: Hagadone Printing Company Photo: Waikiki

Wang, Yuqing

419

RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES Roadmap 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR FRANCE Roadmap 2008 #12;INTRODUCTION European research infrastructures and development, benefiting to Europe's economy and competitiveness. This roadmap for the research infrastructures....................................................................................................6 3. The roadmap: existing and already decided RIs and others at the planning stage

Horn, David

420

BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy Research Collaboration As a partner of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC among agricultural researchers and stakeholders around the world. MSU's work with the GLBRC is organized

Liu, Taosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Penetrator reliability investigation and design exploration : from conventional design processes to innovative uncertainty-capturing algorithms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on research and algorithmic development in optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problems driven by earth penetrator (EP) designs. While taking into account uncertainty, we addressed three challenges in current simulation-based engineering design and analysis processes. The first challenge required leveraging small local samples, already constructed by optimization algorithms, to build effective surrogate models. We used Gaussian Process (GP) models to construct these surrogates. We developed two OUU algorithms using 'local' GPs (OUU-LGP) and one OUU algorithm using 'global' GPs (OUU-GGP) that appear competitive or better than current methods. The second challenge was to develop a methodical design process based on multi-resolution, multi-fidelity models. We developed a Multi-Fidelity Bayesian Auto-regressive process (MF-BAP). The third challenge involved the development of tools that are computational feasible and accessible. We created MATLAB{reg_sign} and initial DAKOTA implementations of our algorithms.

Martinez-Canales, Monica L.; Heaphy, Robert (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Gramacy, Robert B. (University of Cambridge); Taddy, Matt (University of California, Santa Cruz, CA); Chiesa, Michael L.; Thomas, Stephen W. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Swiler, Laura Painton (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hough, Patricia Diane; Lee, Herbert K. H. (University of California, Santa Cruz, CA); Trucano, Timothy Guy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Gray, Genetha Anne

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Research News TEMPLATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(DOE) Methane Hydrates R&D Program is addressing myriad questions NETL researcher Kelly Rose evaluates a natural gas hydrate research core from India's NGHP-01 natural...

423

Operations Research Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent in this position will serve as an Operations Research Analyst in the Generation Scheduling (PGS). The Operations Research Analyst is responsible for analytical work that involves...

424

Current Testbed Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

425

A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Attalah, Said [University of Arizona; Agrawal, Shweta [University of Arizona; Waller, Peter [University of Arizona; Ryan, Randy [University of Arizona.edu; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kyndt, John [University of Arizona; Kacira, Murat [University of Arizona; Ogden, Kim L. [University of Arizona; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electric Vehicle Performance at McMurdo Station (Antarctica) and Comparison with McMurdo Station Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of two electric vehicles (EVs) at McMurdo, Antarctica (McMurdo). The study examined the performance of two e-ride Industries EVs initially delivered to McMurdo on February 16, 2011, and compared their performance and fuel use with that of conventional vehicles that have a duty cycle similar to that of the EVs used at McMurdo.

Sears, T.; Lammert, M.; Colby, K.; Walter, R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences,...

428

Research at Research Development Services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· $400M ongoing upgrade · FEL Light Source (~14kW) CEBAF #12;Alternative Energy ·Algal Biodiesel Research

429

Jahresbericht der Research Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jahresbericht der Research Academy Leipzig 2008 #12;Inhalt Die Research Academy Leipzig 3 Vorwort Research Academy Leipzig im Aufwind 3 Die Arbeit der RAL-Doktorandenvertretung 2008 4 Fächerübergreifendes Qualifikationsprogramm Die Veranstaltungen der Research Academy Leipzig 2008 5 Seminar ,,Junge Wissenschaft und Praxis" 6

Schüler, Axel

430

Ultracomputer Research Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents significant accomplishments made on the Ultracomputer Research Project during CY92.

Gottlieb, A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Research Councils UK Transforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research is helping to accelerate the use of green energy technologies. RCUK has played a key role to help combat climate change, accelerate the deployment of green energy technologies and create newResearch Councils UK Transforming our energy future #12;Research funded by the Research Councils

Berzins, M.

432

Research Roadmap Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Roadmap Presentation: euCognition Meeting, Munich 12 Jan 2007 http://www.eucognition.org/six_monthly_meeting_2.htm What's a Research Roadmap For? Why do we need one? How can we produce one? Aaron Sloman ( http.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/cosy/papers/#pr0701 See also the euCognition Research Roadmap project: http://www.eucognition.org/wiki/index.php?title=Research_Roadmap

Sloman, Aaron

433

Nonlinear power flow control applications to conventional generator swing equations subject to variable generation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the swing equations for renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generator system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. In particular, this approach extends the work done by developing a formulation which applies to a larger set of Hamiltonian Systems that has Nearly Hamiltonian Systems as a subset. The results of this research include the determination of the required performance of a proposed Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS)/storage device to enable the maximum power output of a wind turbine while meeting the power system constraints on frequency and phase. The FACTS/storage device is required to operate as both a generator and load (energy storage) on the power system in this design. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is applied to the power flow equations to determine the stability boundaries (limit cycles) of the renewable generator system and enable design of feedback controllers that meet stability requirements while maximizing the power generation and flow to the load. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of renewable generators systems are determined based on the concepts of Hamiltonian systems, power flow, exergy (the maximum work that can be extracted from an energy flow) rate, and entropy rate.

Robinett, Rush D., III; Wilson, David Gerald

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

US researchers make tiny radio from 11:05AM Tuesday January 29, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

," Rogers said. After they have made the arrays of tubes, he said the rest of the process is very similar to making electronics using conventional silicon chips. The researchers teamed up with radio frequency ©2008, APN Holdings NZ Limited Served by: Laurel Instance: static | 04 Feb 2008 05:36:27 | 1,877 Page 2

Rogers, John A.

435

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparative Effectiveness of Analgesic Sedation as Primary Sedation in Medical ICU Patients vs. Conventional Sedation and Analgesia Regimens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more than one therapy Table 2. Outcomes of Analgosedation in the Rozendaal, FW et al Study16 Ventilator Outcomes Conventional Sedation & Analgesia n = 109 Remifentanil n = 96 P Value Duration of MV(mean days) + (95% CI) 5.1 (3....7, 95% CI = (0.47, 1.18). This was confirm after adjusting for patient socio-demographic and clinical characteristics HR= 0.99, 95% CI = (0.6, 1.63). The ICU length of stay was significantly different between the two treatment groups in both...

Taylor, Scott M.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

A compilation of automatic differentiation tools presented at the 1995 international convention on industrial and applied mathematics, Hamburg.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was compiled for the minisymposium on automatic differentiation tools presented at the 1995 International Convention on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Hamburg. The document was compiled by Chris Bischof and Fred Dilley of Argonne National Laboratory with contributions by Mike Bartholomew-Biggs, Stephen Brown, Alan Carle, Bruce Christianson, David Cowey, Frederic Eyssette, David M. Gay, Ralf Giering, Andreas Griewank, Jim Horwedel, Peyvand Khademi, K. Kubota, Andrew Mauer, Michael B. Monagan, John Pryce, John Reid, Andreas Rhodin, Nicole Rostaing-Schmidt, and Jean Utke.

Bischof, C.; Dilley, F.; Mathematics and Computer Science

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development Best Practices in Indian Country  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergy Contractor&3-1 ChapterCONVENTIONAL

439

Research Network E-Mobility Research Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Mobility Research Network Energy Storage Drive Train Vehicle System Technology (Electrics & Electronics) Materials Chair: ELECTRICAL DRIVES 1. Energy Efficient Electric Drives Improvement of low load efficiency School of Process Science School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science School of Mechanical

Berlin,Technische Universität

440

Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

442

University Research Summaries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries. 

443

Xu Zhang's Homepage - Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Interests. Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations; Finite Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods; Immersed Finite Element Methods

444

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

445

Researchers Edition 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the thematic priorities "Translational biomedical research and medical techno- logy" and "Renewable Energy of Geneva (UNIGE). UNIGE's researchers annually obtain more than 130 million Swiss Francs, earmarked for research, from sources such as: the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the European Union (EU

Genève, Université de

446

The Research Building Blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Research Building Blocks For Teaching Children to Read Third Edition Put Reading First Kindergarten Through Grade 3 Third Edition #12;#12;The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read Centers Program, PR/Award Number R305R70004, as administered by the Office of Educational Research

Rau, Don C.

447

Graduate Research Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Research Council of Canada Master's scholarships (17,5K, one year, non- renewable) Doctoral Research of Canada Master's scholarships (17,5K for one year, non- renewable) Doctoral scholarships (30k scholarships (20K per year, first nine semesters) Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

448

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER Annual Report April 2006 ­ March 2007 School of Ocean Research Center 1 2 The Year's Highlights 3 Research Accomplishments Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on inter- annual

Wang, Yuqing

449

RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;"Our new Biomedical Research Building-intensive medical schools. Perkins+Will has designed a building that will be superbly functional and have great a magnificent 12-story Biomedical Research Building to address this priority. The new 600,000 square foot

Engman, David M.

450

The transboundary EIA convention in the context of private sector operations co-financed by an International Financial Institution: two case studies from Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents two case studies involving private sector, offshore, oil field developments in the Caspian Sea. Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) of these operations indicated that major and unmitigated oil spills could potentially result in transboundary impacts. Both projects were co-financed by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), an International Financial Institution (IFI). Project review and financing decision by the EBRD occurred when neither country hosting the projects was a Party to the 1991 Convention on EIA in a Transboundary Context (Espoo Convention). Discussions with government agencies during project review highlighted their limited institutional capacity to pursue transboundary notification and consultation activities. However, without being formal Parties or having clearly defined roles under the Convention, the combined presence of the EBRD, the private sector developer and its project needing financing became important drivers to promote the Espoo Convention. Surveying for similar IFI-project combinations in developing and transition economies could provide a 'bottom up' input to further optimise the Convention Secretariat's awareness raising, intervention design, and alliance-building strategies. The knowledge management model and user-friendly Web site of the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity highlight approaches that may also prove effective for the Espoo Convention.

Nazari, Mehrdad M

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Retort abandonment: issues and research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper has identified key issues in retort abandonment and has addressed research needs. Retort abandonment for vertical modified in-situ (VMIS) shale oil recovery is an environmentally sensitive research area that has received recognition only within the past five years. Thus, experimental data and information are, in general, limited. In addition, there is presently a wide spectrum of unresolved issues that range from basic problem definition to technical details of potential control technologies. This situation is compounded by the scale of the problem and the absence of a commercial industry. The problems involve large numbers and will require engineering on a gigantic scale. Abandoned retorts are large - up to 700 feet deep and several hundred feet in cross section. They will exist in huge blocks, several square miles in area, which are inaccessible at several thousand feet below the surface. The processes that will ultimately be used to extract the oil are undefined. The technology is in transition, and representative samples of materials have not been available for research. Research efforts in this area have concentrated on basic studies on the nature and magnitude of environmental problems resulting from VMIS oil extraction. These investigations have used laboratory reactors to generate spent shales and modeling studies to predict water quality and hydrologic impacts. The technology for retort abandonment is just now being developed, using engineering analyses to identify promising environmental control options and laboratory and modeling studies to determine feasibility. We expect that, as the environmental problems are better defined and understood, conventional control technologies will prove to be adaptable to a majority of the problems associated with this new process and that laboratory and modeling research on the problem definition will be refocused on technology development and field experiments.

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Wagner, P.; Peterson, E.J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Research Affiliates | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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453

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAreQuantifyingResearch

454

Research Form | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form Research Form

455

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 1: technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume I contains the major results, a discussion of the conceptual framework of the study, and summaries of the vehicle, utility, fuel production, and manufacturing analyses. It also contains summaries of comments provided by external peer reviewers and brief responses to these comments.

Cuenca, R.; Formento, J.; Gaines, L.; Marr, B.; Santini, D.; Wang, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Adelman, S.; Kline, D.; Mark, J.; Ohi, J.; Rau, N. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Freeman, S.; Humphreys, K.; Placet, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50?nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30?nm–40?nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22?nm (k?=?2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

Attota, Ravikiran, E-mail: Ravikiran.attota@nist.gov; Dixson, Ronald G. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generator, Separator) is carried out with numerical simulations and tests. Through these thermal and information in nuclear power plants. In addition, research on structural changes induced by high-energy ion subjects. W02 W52 Thermal-Hydraulics of Nuclear Reactors Optimization of thermal-hydraulic performance

Kaji, Hajime

458

18 Research Activities 2012 Research Frontiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the changing process of people's lives under globalization and examine its links with the current socio that understanding India will shed light upon a path towards a diversity-enhancing globalization. INDAS is keen undertakes research on Islamic law and economics, including the recently developed Islamic economy

Takada, Shoji

459

The enhanced value of combining conventional and 'omics' analyses in early assessment of drug-induced hepatobiliary injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The InnoMed PredTox consortium was formed to evaluate whether conventional preclinical safety assessment can be significantly enhanced by incorporation of molecular profiling ('omics') technologies. In short-term toxicological studies in rats, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics data were collected and analyzed in relation to routine clinical chemistry and histopathology. Four of the sixteen hepato- and/or nephrotoxicants given to rats for 1, 3, or 14 days at two dose levels induced similar histopathological effects. These were characterized by bile duct necrosis and hyperplasia and/or increased bilirubin and cholestasis, in addition to hepatocyte necrosis and regeneration, hepatocyte hypertrophy, and hepatic inflammation. Combined analysis of liver transcriptomics data from these studies revealed common gene expression changes which allowed the development of a potential sequence of events on a mechanistic level in accordance with classical endpoint observations. This included genes implicated in early stress responses, regenerative processes, inflammation with inflammatory cell immigration, fibrotic processes, and cholestasis encompassing deregulation of certain membrane transporters. Furthermore, a preliminary classification analysis using transcriptomics data suggested that prediction of cholestasis may be possible based on gene expression changes seen at earlier time-points. Targeted bile acid analysis, based on LC-MS metabonomics data demonstrating increased levels of conjugated or unconjugated bile acids in response to individual compounds, did not provide earlier detection of toxicity as compared to conventional parameters, but may allow distinction of different types of hepatobiliary toxicity. Overall, liver transcriptomics data delivered mechanistic and molecular details in addition to the classical endpoint observations which were further enhanced by targeted bile acid analysis using LC/MS metabonomics.

Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun, E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Wuppertal (Germany); Adler, Melanie [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Amberg, Alexander [Sanofi aventis R and D, Disposition, Safety and Animal Research, Frankfurt (Germany); Brandenburg, Arnd [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Callanan, John J. [UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science and School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Connor, Susan [MetaPro (United Kingdom); Fountoulakis, Michael [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland); Gmuender, Hans [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Gruhler, Albrecht [Novo Nordisk A/S, Maaloev (Denmark); Hewitt, Philip [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Hodson, Mark [MetaPro (United Kingdom); Matheis, Katja A. [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach (Germany); McCarthy, Diane [Bio-Rad, Laboratories, Hercules, CA (United States); Raschke, Marian; Riefke, Bjoern [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Schmitt, Christina S. [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Sieber, Max [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sposny, Alexandra [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Suter, Laura [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sweatman, Brian [MetaPro (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Traditional (Conventional) Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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462

Conventional Medical Screening Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician.

463

Stocks of Conventional Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael Schaal Director, Oil and10:InformationSteam Coal Import8,717

464

Analysis of Nitro-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Conventional Diesel and Fischer--Tropsch Diesel Fuel Emissions Using Electron Monochromator-Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) in diesel fuel emissions has been studied for a number of years predominantly because of their contribution to the overall health and environmental risks associated with these emissions. Electron monochromator-mass spectrometry (EM-MS) is a highly selective and sensitive method for detection of NPAHs in complex matrixes, such as diesel emissions. Here, EM-MS was used to compare the levels of NPAHs in fuel emissions from conventional (petroleum) diesel, ultra-low sulfur/low-aromatic content diesel, Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel/synthetic diesel blend. The largest quantities of NPAHs were detected in the conventional diesel fuel emissions, while the ultra-low sulfur diesel and synthetic diesel fuel demonstrated a more than 50% reduction of NPAH quantities when compared to the conventional diesel fuel emissions. The emissions from the blend of conventional diesel with 30% synthetic diesel fuel also demonstrated a more than 30% reduction of the NPAH content when compared to the conventional diesel fuel emissions. In addition, a correlation was made between the aromatic content of the different fuel types and NPAH quantities and between the nitrogen oxides emissions from the different fuel types and NPAH quantities. The EM-MS system demonstrated high selectivity and sensitivity for detection of the NPAHs in the emissions with minimal sample cleanup required.

Havey, C. D.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Dane, A. J.; Voorhees, K. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench scale demonstration results have been analyzed. Power and control circuit interface designs have been carried out.

Lembit Salasoo

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Research News November 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

They also toured several of NETL's laboratories, including the Fuel Cells Lab, Chemical Looping Reactor, and the Supercomputer and Visualization Center. There, NETL's researchers...

467

ORISE: Research and Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations create effective health communication programs that are built on solid research and evaluation. This information helps...

468

INL Research Library Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and licensed subscriptions to provide the scientific and technical resources needed by INL researchers. Because of license restrictions, many of our subscriptions cannot be...

469

Jonathan Montaño: Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Travel Grant 2014-2015, Colombian Student Association at Purdue, May 2014. Graduate School Summer Research Grant, Purdue University, Summer 2012.

470

Photocatalysis Currently, the research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, various surfaces are coated with thin transparent titanium dioxide layers which degrade adhering fatty is a major focus of this research area. Filtration, extraction, chromatography and membrane adsorption

Vollmer, Heribert

471

research 1..8  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Accounts of Chemical Research virtual special issue "2D Nanomaterials beyond 3 Graphene". 4 Michael Naguib and Yury Gogotsi* , 5 Materials Science and Technology...

472

Environmental Research Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

473

National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

474

Case studies in magnetics and ground penetrating radar, Shreveport Convention Center, Shreveport, LA and Yankee Boy Rock Glacier, Ouray, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of geophysical tools such as magnetics and ground penetrating radar are becoming more prevalent in site characterization studies and other geologic research. Two case studies which illustrate this are described here. The first case study...

Pierce, Carl J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (? 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ? 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ? 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ? 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ? 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97% CO2 product purity was achieved throughout the test. Membrane contactor modules have been scaled from bench scale 2-inch diameter by 12-inch long (20 ft2 membrane surface area) modules to 4-inch diameter by 60-inch long pilot scale modules (165 ft2 membrane surface area). Pilot scale modules were tested in an integrated absorption/regeneration system for CO2 capture field tests at a coal-fired power plant (Midwest Generation’s Will County Station located in Romeoville, IL). Absorption and regeneration contactors were constructed utilizing high performance super-hydrophobic, nano-porous PEEK membranes with CO2 gas permeance of 2,000 GPU and a 1,000 GPU, respectively. Field tests using aMDEA solvent achieved greater than 90% CO2 removal in a single stage. The absorption mass transfer coefficient was 1.2 (sec)-1, exceeding the initial target of 1.0 (sec)-1. This mass transfer coefficient is over one order of magnitude greater than that of conventional gas/liquid contacting equipment. The economic evaluation based on field tests data indicates that the CO2 capture cost associated with membrane contactor technology is $54.69 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured when using aMDEA as a solvent. It is projected that the DOE’s 2025 cost goal of $40 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured can be met by decreasing membrane module cost and by utilizing advanced CO2 capture solvents. In the second stage of the field test, an advanced solvent, Hitachi’s H3-1 was utilized. The use of H3-1 solvent increased mass transfer coefficient by 17% as compared to aMDEA solvent. The high mass transfer coefficient of H3-1 solvent combined with much more favorable solvent regeneration requirements, indicate that the projected savings achievable with membrane contactor process can be further improved. H3-1 solvent will be used in the next pilot-scale development phase. The integrated absorption/regeneration process design and high performance membrane contactors developed in the current bench-scale program will be used as the base technology for future pilot-scale development.

Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of fireside performance indices - task 8. Topical report, March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Fireside Performance Indices (FPI) research project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was to develop a series of indices to reliably predict the fireside performance of subbituminous coals in utility boilers. Individual utilities must respond quickly and effectively to changing fuel markets because of competition within the U.S. coal-fired power industry. Spot-market purchases of coal have become commonplace. The economics associated with sulfur emissions control have caused many utilities to use Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coals. The PRB coals usually provide a lower-cost, medium-heating-value, low-sulfur fuel option. Although these coals possess similar overall or bulk compositional properties, their fireside performance characteristics vary considerably within a given boiler. Consequently, bulk compositional parameters and, hence, conventional indices such as the base-to-acid ratio, stagging factor, and fouling factor are inappropriate for predicting the fireside performance of PRB coals. The development of the computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and chemical fractionation methods, however, has enabled a more thorough characterization of the inorganic constituents of PRB, coals that contribute to the following adverse operational effects: stagging, fouling, opacity, erosion and poor grindability, slag tapping, and sootblower performance. Eight predictive indices have been developed based primarily on CCSEM and chemical fractionation analysis parameters to predict the propensity of a given coal or coal blend to cause operational problems. The indices were formulated using bench-, pilot-, and full-scale combustion testing data from previous research projects combined with bench-scale data from this project to identify the primary coal inorganic properties that cause ash-related problems in utility boilers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Research Integrity A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that all members of the HKU research family are well versed in research integrity. This booklet is intendedResearch Integrity A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students at The University of Hong Kong A publication of the Graduate School #12;Research Integrity: A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students

Tam, Vincent W. L.

478

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation, including SENSE Research School December 2007 #12; QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Quality,byphotocopy- ingorbyanyothermeanswiththepermissionofQANUifthesourceismentioned. #12;3QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Table of contents

Utrecht, Universiteit

479

Photoionization-photoelectron research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photoionization research program is aimed at understanding the basic processes of interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light with atoms and molecules. This research provides valuable information on both thermochemistry and dynamics. Recent studies include atoms, clusters, hydrides, sulfides and an important fluoride.

Berkowitz, J.; Ruscic, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Soil Testing and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

International Pacific Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Pacific Research Center APRIL 2007­MARCH 2008 REPORT School of Ocean and Earth Center i Foreword ii iv Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 1 Regional-Ocean Influences 13 Asian by the following broad research themes and goals of the IPRC Science Plan. Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate

Wang, Yuqing

482

Neuroscience Research Funding Contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizational units Volume 24 November 2014 #12;NIH Awards Initial $46 Million for BRAIN Initiative Research Projects lay the groundwork for visualizing the brain in action On September 14, 2014, the National to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotech- nologies (BRAIN

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

483

ENERGY EFFICIENCY RESEARCH POWERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ENERGY EFFICIENCY RESEARCH POWERS THE FUTUREPIER CONTRIBUTES TO JOB GROWTH AND PRIVATE INVESTMENT.Partofthecreditforthese achievementsgoestoCalifornia'suniquePublicInterest EnergyResearch(PIER)Program. Overthepast40years,Californiansincreasedthesizeof their homes and added scores of new energy-using de- vices,fromlargerefrigerators,dishwashers,audioequip- ment

484

Honorary Edition Potato Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002 Volume 34 Honorary Edition Michigan Potato Research Report Only a few persons have the wisdom single person has done so much for the potato industry. His vision and attention to detail have helped gratitude once more. I am pleased to dedicate the 2002 Michigan Potato Industry Commission Research Report

Douches, David S.

485

RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

486

EPRI's Photovoltaic Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Smart inverters 7© 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. · Storage #12 Executive Planning Workshop for a New Northeast Solar Energy Research Center January 11-12, 2011 #12;About sector on behalf of its members energ stakeholders and societ Chauncey Starr · The Electric Power

Homes, Christopher C.

487

COMMENTS ON "A NEW LOOK AT LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR REACTION RESEARCH"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

Shanahan, K.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

489

Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a reinforced concrete slab bolted to a reaction structure. Both the slab thickness and soil media were varied in the test series. The wealth of data obtained from these tests along with the variations in experimental setups provide ample opportunity to assess the robustness of the Zapotec CEL methodology.

Bessette, Gregory Carl

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Three-dimensional, Time-Resolved, Intrafraction Motion Monitoring Throughout Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy on a Conventional Linear Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) internal motion throughout stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver using standard x-ray imagers of a conventional linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with implanted gold markers received 11 treatment courses of 3-fraction SBRT in a stereotactic body-frame on a conventional linear accelerator. Two pretreatment and 1 posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired during each fraction. The CBCT projection images were used to estimate the internal 3D marker motion during CBCT acquisition with 11-Hz resolution by a monoscopic probability-based method. Throughout the treatment delivery by conformal or volumetric modulated arc fields, simultaneous MV portal imaging (8 Hz) and orthogonal kV imaging (5 Hz) were applied to determine the 3D marker motion using either MV/kV triangulation or the monoscopic method when marker segmentation was unachievable in either MV or kV images. The accuracy of monoscopic motion estimation was quantified by also applying monoscopic estimation as a test for all treatments during which MV/kV triangulation was possible. Results: Root-mean-square deviations between monoscopic estimations and triangulations were less than 1.0 mm. The mean 3D intrafraction and intrafield motion ranges during liver SBRT were 17.6 mm (range, 5.6-39.5 mm) and 11.3 mm (2.1-35.5mm), respectively. The risk of large intrafraction baseline shifts correlated with intrafield respiratory motion range. The mean 3D intrafractional marker displacement relative to the first CBCT was 3.4 mm (range, 0.7-14.5 mm). The 3D displacements exceeded 8.8 mm 10% of the time. Conclusions: Highly detailed time-resolved internal 3D motion was determined throughout liver SBRT using standard imaging equipment. Considerable intrafraction motion was observed. The demonstrated methods provide a widely available approach for motion monitoring that, combined with motion-adaptive treatment techniques, has the potential to improve the accuracy of radiation therapy for moving targets.

Worm, Esben S., E-mail: esbeworm@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University (Denmark); Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walter [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Poulsen, Per R. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark) [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University (Denmark)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

2012 PLANT CELL WALLS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, AUGUST 4-10, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-theme of this year’s meeting, ‘Cell Wall Research in a Post-Genome World’, will be a consideration of the dramatic technological changes that have occurred in the three years since the previous cell wall Gordon Conference in the area of DNA sequencing. New technologies are providing additional perspectives of plant cell wall biology across a rapidly growing number of species, highlighting a myriad of architectures, compositions, and functions in both "conventional" and specialized cell walls. This meeting will focus on addressing the knowledge gaps and technical challenges raised by such diversity, as well as our need to understand the underlying processes for critical applications such as crop improvement and bioenergy resource development.

Rose, Jocelyn

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

493

Research Highlights | JCESR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearchResearch

494

Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental impacts associated with energy production and utilization. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the JSR Program.

Western Research Institute

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Scott Hackel, Graduate Research Assistant; Gregory Nellis, Professor; Sanford Klein,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Scott Hackel, Graduate Research Assistant, Madison, WI, United States Abstract: Hybrid ground-coupled heat pump systems (HyGCHPs) couple conventional ground- coupled heat pump (GCHP) equipment with supplemental heat rejection or extraction systems

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

496

Concentrating Solar Power Hybrid System Study: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this PTS is to collaboratively leverage the collective resources at General Electric Global Research (GEGRC) and National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in the areas of concentrating solar power hybrid systems to advance state-of-the-art concentrating solar and conventional power generation system integration.

Turchi, C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Comparative Analysis of a Novel Approach to Economical Wind Energy Verterbi School of Engineering Research & Innovation Fund Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparative Analysis of a Novel Approach to Economical Wind Energy Verterbi School of the research project: Conventional wind energy generation is obtained from "wind farms" that are in high-wind infrastructures. It was expected that the proposed approach would reduce the cost of wind energy generation

Zhou, Chongwu

498

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

499

Research Affiliate Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL

500

Research Teams - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A B C D E F G H I J KAustinResearch