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1

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

2

Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory (Fact Sheet), National Bioenergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory Bench-scale process development capabilities for the conversion of biomass to sugars, fuels, and chemicals NREL is a national laboratory of the...

3

NETL: IEP - Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone solvent to capture CO2 with a continuous bench-scale system. The project will utilize both computational and experimental methods. Previously measured experimental data from a continuous laboratory-scale CO2 capture system will be used to design this bench-scale system. Data from the bench-scale system, such as kinetics and mass transfer information, will be used to determine scale-up effects and needed design parameters to develop a scale-up strategy, update cost of electricity (COE) calculations and perform a technical and economic feasibility study. A manufacturing plan for the aminosilicone solvent and a price model will be used for optimization. The final objective of the program is to demonstrate, at the bench-scale, a process that achieves 90 percent CO2 capture efficiency with less than a 35 percent increase in the COE. Development of this scalable bench-scale process combined with a rigorous process model and thorough manufacturability analysis for the solvent, will enable a practical technology path to later development at larger scales and commercialization. The technology will eventually be retrofittable to coal-based power plants.

4

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Bench Scale Kinetics of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors When research into the measurement and control of Hg emissions from coal-fired power plants began in earnest in the early 1990s, it was observed that oxidized mercury can be scrubbed at high efficiency in wet FGD systems, while elemental mercury can not. In many cases, elemental mercury concentrations were observed to increase slightly across wet FGD systems, but this was typically regarded as within the variability of the measurement methods. However, later measurements have shown substantial re-emissions from some FGD systems. The goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the aqueous chemistry of mercury (Hg) absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing liquors. Specifically, the project will determine the chemical reactions that oxidized mercury undergoes once absorbed, the byproducts of those reactions, and reaction kinetics.

5

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant exhaust gases using conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) is significantly Act list of sources of hazardous air pollutants. Both the reversal and the CAMR were vacated by the UMercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot

Li, Ying

6

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2008, DOE/SC-ARM/P-08-007 iii Contents 1. Data Availability ................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts ......................................... 2 3. Safety ....................................................................................................................................................

7

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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4 4 Comparison of Meteorological Measurements from Sparse and Dense Surface Observation Networks in the U.S. Southern Great Plains February 2008 J.W. Monroe Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma M.T. Ritsche, M. Franklin Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory, K.E. Kehoe Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

8

NETL: Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007514 GE Global Research is developing high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project will optimize the novel membranes at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel phosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project will also define the processes for coating the fiber support to manufacture ultrathin, defect-free composite hollow fiber membranes. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components will be evaluated using exposure and performance tests. Membrane fouling and cleanability studies will define long term performance. Technical and economic feasibility analyses will be conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE). Membranes based on coupling this novel selective material (phosphazene-based polymer) with an engineered hollow fiber support have the potential to meet DOE cost and performance goals.

9

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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ARM-0707 ARM-0707 Report on the ARM Climate Research Facility EXPANSION WORKSHOP October 31 - November 1, 2007 Reston, Virginia Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE AC05 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/SC-ARM-0707 iii Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to provide the infrastructure needed to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere. Designated as a national user facility the ACRF

10

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report M. Jensen, Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson, Brookhaven National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

11

Mercury capture in bench-scale absorbers  

SciTech Connect

This paper gives,a brief overview of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the capture of mercury by both dry sorbents and wet scrubbers. The emphasis in the research is on development of a better understanding of the key factors that control the capture of mercury. Future work is expected to utilize that information for the development of new or modified process concepts featuring enhanced mercury capture capabilities. The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne -research on dry sorbents can be summarized as follows: lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are `not effective in removing mercury; mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon; mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas; and chemical pretreatment (e.g., with sulfur or (CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon. Preliminary results from the wet scrubbing research include: no removal of elemental mercury is obtained under normal scrubber operating conditions; mercury removal is improved by the addition of packing or production of smaller gas bubbles to increase the gas-liquid contact area; polysulfide solutions do not appear promising for enhancing mercury removal in typical FGC systems; stainless steel packing appears to have beneficial properties for mercury removal and should be investigated further; and other chemical additives may offer greatly enhanced removals.

Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report C. Flynn, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory A.S. Koontz, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

13

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future December 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored b y the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em ployees, makes any warranty, express or i mplied, or assu mes

14

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 RACORO Science and Operations Plan December 2008 Dr. Andrew M. Vogelmann, Principal Investigator* RACORO Steering Committee (RSC): Andrew Vogelmann - Brookhaven National Laboratory Greg McFarquhar - University of Illinois John Ogren and Graham Feingold - NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory Dave Turner - University of Wisconsin-Madison Jennifer Comstock and Chuck Long - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) Technical Operations Office Beat Schmid and Jason Tomlinson - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Haf Jonsson - Naval Postgraduate School *Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg 490-D Upton, NY 11973 Tel: (631)-344-4421, Fax: (631) 344-2060

15

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Second Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report M. Jensen/Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson/Brookhaven National Laboratory J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University March 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

16

CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

18

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.1 6.1 Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1 W.F. Feltz D.D. Turner H.B. Howell W.L. Smith R.O. Knuteson H.M. Woolf J. Comstock C. Sivaraman R. Mahon T.Halter April 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

19

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

20

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ISDAC Flight Planning Document S.J. Ghan G. McFarquhar A. Korolev P. Liu W. Strapp H. Verlinde M. Wolde April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

22

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report September 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie, James Boyle, and Stephen A. Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Liu et al., September 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-012 Summary Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing,

23

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

24

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008 November 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

25

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

26

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

27

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model First Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

28

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Third Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University C. Flynn/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

29

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA P. Gotseff/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO E.G. Dutton/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

30

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long S. McFarlane D. Turner S. Xie October 1, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

31

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November - December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

32

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

33

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September - October 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

34

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report S.A. McFarlane/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Y. Shi/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory April 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

35

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

36

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Project No.: DE-FE0013118 Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is developing and evaluating a hybrid membrane-absorption CO2 capture system. This work builds on prior DOE-funded work and combines MTR's Polaris(tm) membrane, in a low-pressure-drop, large area, plate-and-frame module, with UT Austin's piperazine (PZ) solvent and advanced, high-temperature and pressure regeneration technology. Preliminary estimates indicate that this hybrid system could lower the regeneration energy by 30 percent compared to that required with 30 weight percent monoethanolamine (MEA). MTR is evaluating two variations of the hybrid design consisting of the cross-flow Polaris membrane, which enriches flue gas to approximately 20 percent CO2, and an advanced 5 molal PZ advanced flash stripper with cold-rich bypass. The flash stripper will be optimized to take advantage of the higher CO2 concentration. In the first variation, the two systems are operated in series; in the second, the flue gas flow is split and treated by each system in parallel. The first phase of this project will include an examination of both hybrid configurations, using an integrated process model and a preliminary techno-economic assessment. In the second phase, MTR will manufacture and test a low pressure drop, large-area membrane module and UT Austin will modify their 0.1 MWe pilot plant and operate it under simulated series and parallel configurations. Based on the model and test results, the most promising configuration will be identified. In the final stage of the project, the membrane module will be integrated into the pilot plant where the fully integrated hybrid system, in its most promising cost optimized configuration, will be tested on simulated flue gas.

37

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

NETL: Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0013687 GE global is constructing and operating a continuous, bench-scale CO2 capture system that employs a phase-changing silicone solvent . Experimental data obtained at the laboratory scale in a previous ARPA-E funded project, including mass transfer and kinetic information, is being used to determine process scalability and perform a techno-economic assessment of the commercial scale process. The manufacturability of the solvent is being examined to obtain the material needed for bench-scale testing. Data obtained from the bench-scale system will include mass transfer parameters, kinetic parameters, heat transfer parameters, solvent stability, effects of flue gas contaminants, and recommended operating conditions. Other data such as absorption/desorption isotherms and solvent regeneration energy will be determined in laboratory testing. The solvent manufacturing cost, the bench-scale engineering data, and the laboratory property data will be used to complete the techno-economic assessment and to develop a scale-up strategy for commercialization.

39

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Project No.: DE-FE0007948 InnoSepra, LLC is demonstrating the effectiveness of an innovative adsorption-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology utilizing a combination of novel microporous materials and process cycles. The process utilizes physical sorbents with much lower heats of adsorption compared to competing processes. Lab scale testing has produced greater than 99 percent CO2 purity and greater than 90 percent CO2 recovery from synthetic flue gas. Projections based on detailed engineering evaluations show that at commercial scale, the technology can reduce the power consumption for CO2 capture by more than 40 percent and the capital cost for the CO2 capture equipment by more than 60 percent, resulting in a more than a 40 percent reduction in the CO2 capture cost compared to alternate technologies such as amines and chilled ammonia.

42

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

BANNING DL

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(incineration) or as a filler for asphalt. Incineration has been employed in an attempt to harness the high calorific value of scrap tires. However, disposal via incineration may not maximize the potential economic recovery of energy and chemical materials... into liquid fuels and forms of solid carbon such as carbon black and activated carbon. Previous work in this area utilizes pyrolysis. ' There are several commercial, pilot, and bench-scale tire 2-4, 6-8 pyrolysis systems in use today. Many of these employ...

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Design of Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of the project is to design and optimize a bench-scale process for novel silicone CO{sub 2}-capture solvents and establish scalability and potential for commercialization of post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. This system should be capable of 90% capture efficiency and demonstrate that less than 35% increase in the cost of energy services can be achieved upon scale-up. Experiments were conducted to obtain data required for design of the major unit operations. The bench-scale system design has been completed, including sizing of major unit operations and the development of a detailed Process and Instrument Diagram (P&ID). The system has been designed to be able to operate over a wide range of process conditions so that the effect of various process variables on performance can be determined. To facilitate flexibility in operation, the absorption column has been designed in a modular manner, so that the height of the column can be varied. The desorber has also been designed to allow for a range of residence times, temperatures, and pressures. The system will be fabricated at Techniserv Inc.

Wood, Benjamin

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel Bench-Scale Experiment Results  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex. The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 ºC. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and the fuel was sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

Steven D. Herrmann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Bench-Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004360 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will evaluate the Hot Carbonate Absorption Process (Hot-CAP) process with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping. The Hot-CAP is an absorption-based, post-combustion CO2 technology that uses a carbonate salt (K2CO3 or Na2CO3) as a solvent. The process integrates a high temperature (70-80°C) CO2 absorption column, a slurry-based high pressure (up to 40atm) CO2 stripping column, a crystallization unit to separate bicarbonate and recover the carbonate solvent, and a reclaimer to recover CaSO4 as the byproduct of the SO2 removal.

50

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

Hulburt, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A bench scale study of a one-step dissolution process for treating contaminated fiberglass filters  

SciTech Connect

High efficiency mist eliminators (HEME) and high efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA) made of High fiberglass will be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove particulate matter from offgases generated during melter feed preparation and vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These filters will be contaminated with high-level, radioactive species and also with various high-boiling organic compounds. For this reason, a process was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) that will dissolve the spent filters so that the residues may be recycled to the HLW tanks for eventual vitrification. This process involves boiling the filters sequentially in NaOH, HN0{sub 3} and NaOH, while contained in a stainless steal wire mesh frame assembly. The objective of this communication is to present some of the original preliminary work done by Ritter on the simple one-step dissolution process. The results from six bench-scale experiments are reported for the dissolution of an organically-fouled sample of HEME obtained from the Integrated DWPF Melter (IDMS) offgas filtration system. The preliminary effects of filter packing density, air sparging versus rotating basket agitation, fouling, and adding Triton X-405 as a dispersing agent are reported.

Policke, T.A.; Ritter, J.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Project Title: (0207-1609) Planar Energy - Solid-State All Inorganic Rechargeable Lithium Batteries Location: Florida Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recover), and Reinvestment Act: ~ Funding will support laboratory, bench scale, and pilot scale research and development on lithium battery manufacturing processes for use in electrical energy storage for transportation. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x ~ 83.6 Sitinglconstruct1onJoperationldecommlssloning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, smalJ..scale research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRIO 21 £::lli:klkrc

54

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations and process engineering. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

A program to investigate thermochemical water splitting has been under way at General Atomic Company (GA) since October 1972. This document is an annual progress report of Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored process development work on the GA sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. The work consisted of laboratory bench-scale investigations, demonstration of the process in a closed-loop cycle demonstrator, and process engineering design studies. A bench-scale system, consisting of three subunits, has been designed to study the cycle under continuous flow conditions. The designs of subunit I, which models the main solution reaction and product separation, and subunit II, which models the concentration and decomposition of sulfuric acid, were presented in an earlier annual report. The design of subunit III, which models the purification and decomposition of hydrogen iodide, is given in this report. Progress on the installation and operation of subunits I and II is described. A closed-loop cycle demonstrator was installed and operated based on a DOE request. Operation of the GA sulfur-iodine cycle was demonstrated in this system under recycle conditions. The process engineering addresses the flowsheet design of a large-scale production process consisting of four chemical sections (I through IV) and one helium heat supply section (V). The completed designs for sections I through V are presented. The thermal efficiency of the process calculated from the present flowsheet is 47%.

Caprioglio, G.; McCorkle, K.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Rode, J.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Simultaneous removal of H2S and COS using Zn-based solid sorbents in the bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system integrated with a coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system using Zn-based solid sorbents was developed to remove H2S and COS simultaneously in a 110 Nm3.../h of real coal-gasified syngas. The bench-scale unit, which...

Young Cheol Park; Sung-Ho Jo; Ho-Jung Ryu…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with Tri-Ethylene Glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. The report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). Models were developed for both processes and used to calculate mass and energy balances. Capital costs and energy penalty were calculated for both systems, as well as the increase in cost of electricity. The amino-silicone solvent based system demonstrates significant advantages compared to the MEA system.

Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reactivity during bench-scale combustion of biomass fuels for carbon capture and storage applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Reactivities of four biomass samples were investigated in four combustion atmospheres using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under two heating rates. The chosen combustion atmospheres reflect carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications and include O 2 and CO 2 -enrichment. Application of the Coats–Redfern method assessed changes in reactivity. Reactivity varied due to heating rate: the reactivity of char oxidation was lower at higher heating rates while devolatilisation reactions were less affected. In general, and particularly at the higher heating rate, increasing [ O 2 ] increased combustion reactivity. A lesser effect was observed when substituting N 2 for CO 2 as the comburent; in unenriched conditions this tended to reduce char oxidation reactivity while in O 2 -enriched conditions the reactivity marginally increased. Combustion in a typical, dry oxyfuel environment (30% O 2 , 70% CO 2 ) was more reactive than in air in TGA experiments. These biomass results should interest researchers seeking to understand phenomena occurring in larger scale CCS-relevant experiments.

S. Pickard; S.S. Daood; M. Pourkashanian; W. Nimmo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bench-Scale Synthetic Optimization of 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane (APO-Link) Used in the Production of APO-BMI Resin  

SciTech Connect

The diamine reagent 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane is no longer commercially available but still required for the synthesis of the bismaleimide resin, APO-BMI, used in syntactic foams. In this work, we examined the hydrolysis of benzothiazole followed the by reaction with dichloroethane or dibromoethane. We also studied the deprotonation of 2-aminothiophenol followed by the reaction with dibromoethane. We optimized the latter for scale-up by scrutinizing all aspects of the reaction conditions, work-up and recrystallization. On bench-scale, our optimized procedure consistently produced a 75-80% overall yield of finely divided, high purity product (>95%).

Hilary Wheeler; Crystal Densmore

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily demonstrated. In addition to the experimental studies, the technical challenges pertinent to fouling of slurry-handling equipment and the design of the crystallizer and stripper were addressed through consultation with vendors and engineering analyses. A process flow diagram of the Hot-CAP was then developed and a TEA was performed to compare the energy use and cost performance of a nominal 550-MWe subcritical pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plant without CO{sub 2} capture (DOE/NETL Case 9) with the benchmark MEA-based post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC; DOE/NETL Case 10) and the Hot-CAP-based PCC. The results revealed that the net power produced in the PC + Hot-CAP is 609 MWe, greater than the PC + MEA (550 MWe). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the PC + Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} transportation and storage, is 120.3 mills/kWh, a 60% increase over the base PC plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The LCOE increase for the Hot-CAP is 29% lower than that for MEA. TEA results demonstrated that the Hot-CAP is energy-efficient and cost-effective compared with the benchmark MEA process.

Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O'Brien, Kevin

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bench-Scale Test for Separation of Sr2 and Nd3 from HLLW Using TiBOGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research and Development Program (Aqueous Separations: Thermodynamics and Kinetics) of Office of Nuclear

Tian, Guoxin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of a bench-scale, inert-gas, oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heating rates and maximum temperatures on the redistribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium into the shale oil, retort water, and offgas of a 6-kg bench-scale retort. A Green River shale (western) from Colorado and a New Albany shale (eastern) from Kentucky were heated at 1-2{degree}C/min to a maximum temperature of 500{degree}C. The eastern and western shales were also heated at 2{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C and at 10{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C. Real-time monitoring of the offgas stream for mercury was accomplished with Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy or a microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy. Microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy was also used to monitor for arsenic in the offgas during retorting; little or no arsenic was observed in the offgas. Mass balance calculations for arsenic and selenium accounted for essentially 100% of those elements in the spent shale, shale oil, and retort water. The mass balance calculations suggest little offgas component for arsenic and selenium. This agrees with the results of the MPD monitoring of the offgas. These results indicate the potential pathway for mercury to enter the environment is from the offgas. Arsenic and selenium preferential redistribution into the shale oil may present problems during the upgrading process.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Fruchter, J.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Three bacteria, Clostridium ljungdahlii and isolates ERI-8 and 0-52, have been utilized in CSTR studies in order to directly compare the performance of the bacteria in continuous culture in converting synthesis gas components to ethanol. C. ljungdahlii is able to produce higher concentrations of ethanol than the other bacteria, largely because medium development with this bacterium has been ongoing for 2--3 years. However, both of the ERI isolates are quite promising for ethanol production and, therefore, will be studied further in the CSTR. A comparison of the energy costs for various ethanol recovery techniques has been made for use in the bench scale system. The techniques considered include direct distillation, extraction with various solvents followed by distillation, air stripping followed by distillation, pervaporation followed by distillation, reverse osmosis and temperature swing extraction. Extraction with a solvent possessing a relatively high distribution coefficient for ethanol and a high separation factor (relative ability to extract ethanol in favor of water), followed by distillation, is the most desirable technology.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents which can reduce the sulfur in coal gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. This report summarizes the highlights and accomplishments of the October slipstream test run of the Zinc Titanate Fluid Bed Desulfurization/Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (ZTFBD/DSRP) Mobile Laboratory at the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Although the run had to be shortened due to mechanical problems with METC`s gasifier, there was sufficient on-stream time to demonstrate highly successful operation of both the zinc titanate fluid bed desulfurization and the DSRP with actual coal gas.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, MeHg levels decreased on the time scale of days to weeks. • Capping materials should sequester MeHg produced and not contribute to the production of MeHg.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

73

CX-008860: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection-Richland Operations Office Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposes to conduct 1) bench-scale research projects, 2) conventional laboratory operations, 3)...

74

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Ag  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project T Project T itle: (02 06- 1565) Columbia - Biofue ls from C02 using Amm onia-Oxid izing Bacte ria in a Reve rse Microbi a l Fue l Cell L ocati on: New Y ork Pr oposed Action or Proj ect Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: D Funding will support in-lab R&D activities involving liquid biofuel production from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Proposed work consists of (1) initial testing and genetic modification of ammonia-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria used to produce liquid biofuel and (2) development and optimization of a reverse microbial fuel cel l. All proposed work will take place on the Columbia University campus in New York, NY. Categorical Exciusi on(s) Applied: x - 83.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and developme

75

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture. Manufacturing Plan for Aminosilicone-based CO{sub 2} Absorption Material  

SciTech Connect

A commercially cost effective manufacturing plan was developed for GAP-1m, the aminosilicone-based part of the CO{sub 2} capture solvent described in DE-FE0007502, and the small-scale synthesis of GAP-1m was confirmed. The plan utilizes a current intermediate at SiVance LLC to supply the 2013-2015 needs for GE Global Research. Material from this process was supplied to GE Global Research for evaluation and creation of specifications. GE Global Research has since ordered larger quantities (60 liters) for the larger scale evaluations that start in first quarter, 2013. For GE’s much larger future commercial needs, an improved, more economical pathway to make the product was developed after significant laboratory and literature research. Suppliers were identified for all raw materials.

Vogt, Kirkland

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Hot Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same

77

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

78

Experimental Investigation of Natural Coke Steam Gasification in a Bench-Scale Fluidized Bed: Influences of Temperature and Oxygen Flow Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, natural coke was restricted in application and research due to its hot burst, difficult ignition, and abradability. ... disordering as a cause is now a real possibility on the basis of correlated optical and x-ray diffraction data from samples analyzed from within a thermal aureole of a Tertiary dyke emplaced in Permian coal-bearing strata. ... The thermal characteristics of natural coke steam gasification in a fluidized bed were three-dimensionally (3D) simulated based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method using Fluent code. ...

Wen-guo Xiang; Chang-sui Zhao; Ke-liang Pang

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquification of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Technical report, July 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

In 1994 extensive tests were conducted in the Exxon Research and Engineering Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The work conducted in 1994 explored a variety of dispersed iron molybdenum promoted catalyst systems for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide subbituminus coal. The goal was to identify the preferred iron system. We learned that among the catalysts tested, all were effective; however, none showed a large process advantage over the others. In 1995, we tested dispersed molybdenum catalysts systems for direct coal liquefaction on a second subbituminous coal, Black Thunder. Catalyst properties are shown in Table 1. We also checked a molybdenum promoted iron case, as well as the impact of process variables, such as sulfur type, hydrogen treat rate, and catalyst addition rate, as shown in Table 2. In 1995, we ran 18 material balances over a 7 week period, covering 7 conditions. This report covers the 1995 operations and results.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Revised final report, [October 1992--October 1993]: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The main advantage of the project is that it allowed PTI to gain knowledge and experience about the proper approach, methods and hardware required to properly optimize and control column flotation performance. Many operational problems were incurred during the project, some of that PTI was able to solve during the project and other that must be overcome as the technology is further developed and commercialized. The key operating problems experienced with the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column that must be further researched and overcome include: (1)The low concentrate solids content which limited the throughput capacity of the column, due to high froth washing requirements. The low concentrate solids content also lead to difficulty obtaining accurate On-Line Monitor measurements, due to the poor measurement sensitivity obtained with low solids content samples (particularly less than 5.0 wt %). (2) The higher-than-anticipated reagent dosages that undoubtedly contributed to the low solids content listed above, and also caused foaming problems within PTI`s On-Line Monitor. A defoaming reagent addition (Nalco 7810) was required to provide consistent sample size and reproducible On-Line Monitor counts for the concentrate samples collected within the circuit. PTI and UK`s CAER staff will continue to research alternative column design, particularly alternative air bubble generation and air distribution systems, to try to maximize column concentrate solids content while reducing reagent dosage requirements. In addition to the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column operation there were also a number of hardware problems with PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor that must be remedied for future commercial installations.

Not Available

1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DR Cook, January 2011, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-052 iii Contents 1.0 General Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Contacts ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.1 Mentor .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.2 Instrument Developer ................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Deployment Locations and History ...................................................................................................... 2

84

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

84 84 UC-400 Annual Report 1999 Computing and Information Sciences R. A. Bair, Deputy Director and the Staff of the Computing and Information Sciences Directorate June 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

85

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hongbin Chen, Si-Chee Tsay, Wei-Chyung Wang, Chris Kumemerow, Graeme Stephens, Wesley Berg, Surabi. Menon, Yangang Liu, Mark Miller, Beat Schmid, Connor Flynn, Zhien Wang,...

86

Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report  

SciTech Connect

A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

87

CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE BENCH-SCALE CALORIMETRY REVISITED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effective heat of combustion, thé mass loss rate, thé time to ignition12 . The standard Cône Calorimeter has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 7 3. Results of a Decade-long Control Simulation Using Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model at a Resolution 250 km, Including a...

91

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 The QCRad Value Added Product: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control Testing, Including Climatology Configurable Limits C.N. Long and Y. Shi September 2006 Work supported...

92

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

boundary condition data will be important for the success of future integrated Earth system models (e.g., for the coupling of atmospheric system components with vegetation and...

93

CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory

94

CX-011846: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bench-Scale Research Projects & Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/26/2014 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Princeton Site Office

95

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16) Penn State Univ. - 16) Penn State Univ. - Development of Rhodobacter as a Versatile Microbial Platform for Fuels Production Location: Pennsylvania Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovcf)' and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on a rhodobacter fuel production platform for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transportation fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x w 83.6 SiUng/constructionloperationldecommission!ng of facilities for bench-scale research, convenUooallaboratory operations. small-scale research and development and pilot projects O+~For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFRIO 21 ('tick Here

96

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) Regents of the Univ. of California - 3) Regents of the Univ. of California - Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols Location: California Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on electro-autotrophic synthesis for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transpcrtatlon fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 SitingJoonstructlonfoperationldecommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventionallaboralory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRlO 21 Click I !ere

97

CX-001381: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

381: Categorical Exclusion Determination 381: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001381: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office All proposed actions will be indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations conducted in existing buildings at Argonne. Specifically, bench-scale chemical, biological, and physical studies, experiments and related activities including the assembly/disassembly of experimental instrumentation and research equipment are within the scope of the proposed actions. However, construction work including the installation of utilities and minor modifications in existing laboratory spaces needed to prepare for bench-scale research must be

98

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities NETL researchers are seeking technical solutions to pressing problems related to fossil fuel extraction, processing, and utilization. To this end, laboratory-scale facilities are used to prepare, test, and analyze sorbents and catalysts used in fixed-, moving-, and fluid-bed reactors — three types of reactors often used in advanced fossil-fueled power plants. Equipment in these facilities is also available for standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) attrition tests, crush measurements, and particle size analysis to confirm the suitability of the sorbents and catalysts for their intended applications. NETL researchers use these facilities in conjunction with facilities for sorbent/catalyst bench-scale testing and for in-situ (in-place) reaction studies. In 2000, NETL received an R&D 100 Award for its RSV-1 Regenerable Desulfurization Sorbent. The process for preparation of this sorbent has been patented, licensed, and published.

99

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location: Location: New York Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on aero-thermodynamic Inertial separation for use in carbon capture processes.' Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 Siting/constructiOnloperationtdecommissioning of facilities for benctrscale research, conventionallaboralory operations, small-scala research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Euyironmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRIO 21 [lkk Here lois action vr'Ould not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or pennit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including OOE andlor Executive Orders;

102

Status of health and environmental research relative to coal gasification 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect

Health and environmental research relative to coal gasification conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE sponsorship is summarized. The studies have focused on the chemical and toxicological characterization of materials from a range of process streams in five bench-scale, pilot-plant and industrial gasifiers. They also address ecological effects, industrial hygiene, environmental control technology performance, and risk assessment. Following an overview of coal gasification technology and related environmental concerns, integrated summaries of the studies and results in each area are presented and conclusions are drawn. Needed health and environmental research relative to coal gasification is identified.

Wilzbach, K.E.; Reilly, C.A. Jr. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2014 Annual AFN Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The AFN Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. In addition to the memorable keynote speeches, the expert panels and special reports, the Convention features several evenings of cultural performances known as Quyana Alaska.

104

CX-010526: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

526: Categorical Exclusion Determination 526: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010526: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Ames Site Office All proposed actions will be bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations conducted in established buildings at Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University as well as offsite collaborations with other State and Federal entities. Specifically, bench-scale chemical, biological, physical and theoretical studies, experiments, and related activities including the assembly/disassembly of experimental instrumentation and research equipment are within the scope of the proposed actions. CX-010526.pdf More Documents & Publications

105

Base program on energy related research. Quaterly report, February 1, 1997--April 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Progress in four major research areas is summarized in this report. In the area of oil and gas, subtasks reported on are miscible-immiscible gas injection processes, development of a portable data acquisition system and coalbed methane simulator, tank bottom waste processing using the TaBoRR Process, and bench-scale testing and verification of pyrolysis concept for remediation of tank bottoms. Advanced systems applications research includes design, assembly, and testing of a bench-scale fuel preparation and delivery system for pressurized application using coal fines. Five subtasks are reported on for the environmental technologies research area: (1) conditioning and hydration reactions associated with clean coal technology ash disposal/utilization, (2) remediation of contaminated soils, (3) the Syn-Ag Process: coal combustion ash management option, (4) the Maxi-Acid Process: in-situ amelioration of acid mine drainage, and (5) PEAC value-added project. Under applied energy science, heavy oil/plastics co-processing activities and fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas are described. Information supplied for each subtask includes an account status report, which includes budget and schedule data, and a brief project summary consisting of research objectives, accomplishments, and activities scheduled for the next quarter. 2 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Brown University - Metcalf Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brown University - Metcalf Research Brown University - Metcalf Research Lab - RI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Brown University (Metcalf Research Lab.) (RI.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Providence , Rhode Island RI.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 RI.01-1 Site Operations: Research/Development on the preparation of pure halides of heavy metals, Bench Scale Process, and Sample & Analysis. RI.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination from small quantities of radioactive material is considered remote RI.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium RI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

107

Conventional Strategic Deterrence  

SciTech Connect

The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world's only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Conventional Strategic Deterrence  

SciTech Connect

The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world`s only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period October 1 - December 31, 1994, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johnson, E.S.; Lee, L.K. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal. Second quarterly report, 1 January 1993--31 March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report covers activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the period January 1--March 31, 1993, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994. The overall objective of the program is to produce liquid fuels from direct coal liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of bench-scale results. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Experimental Stability of SDMs AES 124th Convention, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2008 May 17­20 Page 2 of 15­20 Amsterdam, The Netherlands The papers at this Convention have been selected on the basis of a submitted

Reiss, Josh

112

ConventionConventionConventionConvention InformaInformaInformaInformation Guidetion Guidetion Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternatio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidetion Guide International Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and SolidsInternational Convention on Shapes and Solids 13131313----17 June 2005, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA #12;Information Guide International Convention

Reuter, Martin

113

ATNI Mid-year Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

114

NCAI 71st Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Save the date for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) 71st Annual Convention at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta.

115

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title: Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Title: Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations (?)AS0 NEPA track in^ No. ASO-CX-265 (?)Tv~e of Funding: DOE, WFO. or CRADA Replaces AAO-CX- 160 B&R Code J?IIdentifvin~ number: NIA WFO proposal # CRADA proposal # Work Project # ANL accounting # (item 3a in Field Work Proposal) Other (explain) f?)Proiect Manager: n/a Signature: Date: J?)NEPA Owner: D. Haugen Signature: Date: < / $ b / ! & h 7 J?)NEPA Owner: G. Dyrkacz Signature: Date: :/3@?0/0 J?)NEPA Owner: R. Riel Signature: ,ate: 3/30/d0/6 ANL NEPA Reviewer: M A. Kaniva signatu&:',^ .Q - Date:3 1 3 r, 1 t s I. (?)Description of Proposed Action: All proposed actions will be indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations conducted in existing buildings at Argonne. Specifically, bench-scale chemical,

116

Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

117

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 120th Convention 2006 May 20­23 Paris. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Parametric Representation of Multichannel Audio Based on Principal Component

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 114th Convention 2003 March 22 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Real Time Object Based Coding Paul M. Brossier1 , Mark B. Sandler1 and Mark D

Plumbley, Mark

119

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 122nd Convention 2007 May 5­8 Vienna be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Plumbley, Mark

120

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 112th Convention 2002 May 10­13 Munich. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Intelligent Audio Source Separation using Independent Component Analysis

Mitianoudis, Nikolaos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 135th Convention 2013 October 17­20 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Sound identification from MPEG-encoded audio files Joseph G. Studniarz

Maher, Robert C.

122

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 127th Convention 2009 October 9­12 New be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Joseph Fourier Grenoble-I, Université

123

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 128th Convention 2010 May 22­25 London be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 117th Convention 2004 October 28­31 San for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. AES Technical Committee on Signal Processing Educational CD Project Robert C

Maher, Robert C.

125

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 134th Convention 2013 May 4­7 Rome. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. On the Informed Source Separation Approach for Interactive Remixing in Stereo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 120th Convention 2006 May 20­23 Paris. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Acoustic Rendering for Color Information Ludovico Ausiello1 , Emanuele

Ferri, Massimo

127

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 125th Convention 2008 October 2­5 San be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Jackson, Philip JB

128

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 129th Convention 2010 November 4­7 San be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

129

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 124th Convention 2008 May 17 be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Reiss, Josh

130

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 130th Convention 2011 May 13­16 London be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering

Reiss, Josh

131

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Frequency-Based Coloring of the Waveform Display to Facilitate Audio Editing

Rice, Stephen V.

132

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. A Web Search Engine for Sound Effects Stephen V. Rice1 and Stephen M. Bailey2

Rice, Stephen V.

133

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 116th Convention 2004 May 8­11 Berlin. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding Tilman Liebchen1 , Yuriy Reznik2 , Takehiro

Wichmann, Felix

134

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 119th Convention 2005 October 7­10 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. The MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding (ALS) Standard - Technology and Applications

Wichmann, Felix

135

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 118th Convention 2005 May 28 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Improved Forward-Adaptive Prediction for MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding Tilman

Wichmann, Felix

136

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 115th Convention 2003 October 10­13 New for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. MPEG-4 Lossless Coding for High-Definition Audio Tilman Liebchen1 1 Technical

Wichmann, Felix

137

TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--____ --____ R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal/Storage a Research Organization a Government 0 Other Sponsored i F[fa' tty ------__------__ I Prime 5 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit p CgNTRACTING PERIOD: L.&G , PX& & cx LFkoL ~~~~~~~~~----------_ __ _______ OWNERSH; P: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT CONTRACTOR Cot+ "ACTOR OWNED LEASED ----- -----_ w!ET) C_EtlSLE ~~s!_NE!?~~ z L ACZD -------- - LANDS a BUILDINGS 0 EQUIPMENT u ORE OR RAW MATL FINAL PRODUCT f i ; : ' 0 WASTE .% RESIDLIE q 0 G G &EC/NED INVOLVEtiE?4T AT SITE .--------_------___~~~~~~~-- ,I

138

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The transformative concept of this research program is to use cyanobacteria as biocatalysts using solar energy and CO2 to produce fatty acids that the cyanobacteria secrete, without major increases in cyanobacterial biomass. Fatty acids are then used for fuel production. Therefore, a major part of the absorbed solar energy and fixed CO2 will be used for fuel production rather than for biomass production, and energy losses are kept to a minimum. This research program will yield a path toward very efficient solar energy conversion to fuel, and at scale will have a

139

NAIHC Convention and Trade Show  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC) most longstanding Annual Event, the 39th Annual NAIHC Convention and Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about tribal housing, attend...

140

Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ITCN 49th Annual Convention  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. will be hosting its 49th Annual Convention, themed "Making a Difference for Nevada Tribes," December 8-11, 2014 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget in Sparks, Nevada.

142

Microsoft Word - 25A5311 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange membranes, the high-performance hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs) are a truly innovative technology and radically different from the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) that have been intensively researched and developed in the past two decades. The most exciting ability of HEMFCs is to solve fundamentally the PEMFCs' serious problems of catalysts cost and durability, while achieving PEMFCs' high power and energy density simultaneously. What has been critically missing for HEMFCs is a polymeric hydroxide

143

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

144

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The activity includes installation of a solar energy generation system at the proposed Spokane Tribe Child Development Center. The Child Development Center has already been designed with the "Add Alternate" construction bid option to include the solar energy generation system for lighting, but the Tribe did not have the funds to include this option. The EECBG funds will now allow this "Add Alternate" option to be incorporated into the Center. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation Renewable Energy Technologies (Solar) on Government Buildings

145

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects Koniag, Inc. proposes to create a Power Storage Facility (hereafter "the facility") on Camp Island in Karluk Lake which will house a 6KW inverter system with a battery bank capable of storing and distributing 28,000 watts of electricity created from renewable solar systems. Current camp structures (tribally owned buildings) will be equipped with latest technology solar panels to supply the storage facility. The system would be designed so that future needs can be met by simply adding additional components to the existing system. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants

146

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects 1) Biodiesel tank, 2) municipal solar installations on multiple buildings (roof tops, carport, and ground mount; less than 60 kW each), 3)"Home upgrade, carbon downgrade" program. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Program Biodiesel Tank Installation, Solar Installations, and Home Upgrades Chula Vista California Dec 14, 2009 Print Form for Records Submit to Website Submit via Email Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland DN: cn=Billie Newland, o=Energy Enterprise Solutions, ou, email=Billie.Newland@hq.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.03.16 11:25:29 -04'00'

147

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The proposed action would involve the purchase and installation of a roof-mounted, grid-tie solar energy system at Gakwiyo Garden, the Cayuga Nation's vegetable farm, located on the Cayuga Nation Reservation in Seneca Falls, NY. Primary components of the proposed system include: 72 SunPower SPR-210 Black frame modules and 3 SunPower 5000M Inverters, and SunPower SPR SM Racking. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Cayuga Nation's Renewable Energy Technology - Wind Cayuga Nation New York Nov 2, 2009 Jane Summerson Print Form for Records Submit via E-mail Billie Newland

148

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects A recent solar electric analysis performed in early June has suggested that the Tribe could reduce its energy reliance by as much as 14.1% by installing an 18.5 kW photovoltaic system. The project visualized in this EECBG Activity would test the validity of that number by installing a partial system of 4.03 kW solar power array. This demonstration system is estimated to offset approximately 3% of the annual electric usage for the Medical Clinic and would become a component of a future larger system. The demonstration solar power array would be connected to a micro-

149

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The Tribe proposes to install solar panel systems for the (1) to be constructed Tribal Convenience store, (2) Tribal Head Start School, (3) Tribal Administration Building, and (4) Tribal Senior Center. The solar panel systems on the aforementioned buildings are intended to generate electricity from renewable resources in order to reduce energy consumption from non-renewable sources. Inspection of installation will follow to provide ensure system reliability. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation Renewable Energy Technologies - Solar

150

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The proposed action would involve the installation of a 5-6 kW ground mounted monopole design photovoltaic system adjacent to the security kiosk within the road shoulder at the west entrance to the Morongo Reservation (near the terminus of Morongo Road at the intersection of Hargrave Road in the incorporated City of Banning). Panels would be installed in a roadside ditch adjacent to rangelands. This size of system would account for approximately 30-40% of the energy consumption for the kiosk. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo Reservation RE Technology - Solar

151

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 114th and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Monteiro, Edmundo

152

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

___________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper Presented at the 111 and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Reiss, Josh

153

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION Treatability of Complex Effluents in High-Throughput and Bench Scale Microbial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The efficiency was calculated using only recovered hydrogen and combined hydrogen and methane, using the heat of combustion to calculate the energy contained in the gas. Figure S13. Open circuit gas production and COD

154

Results with a bench scale downdraft biomass gasifier for agricultural and forestry residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small scale fixed bed downdraft gasifier system to be fed with agricultural and forestry residues has been designed and constructed. The downdraft gasifier has four consecutive reaction zones from the top to the bottom, namely drying, pyrolysis, oxidation and reduction zones. Both the biomass fuel and the gases move in the same direction. A throat has been incorporated into the design to achieve gasification with lower tar production. The experimental system consists of the downdraft gasifier and the gas cleaning unit made up by a cyclone, a scrubber and a filter box. A pilot burner is utilized for initial ignition of the biomass fuel. The product gases are combusted in the flare built up as part of the gasification system. The gasification medium is air. The air to fuel ratio is adjusted to produce a gas with acceptably high heating value and low pollutants. Within this frame, different types of biomass, namely wood chips, barks, olive pomace and hazelnut shells are to be processed. The developed downdraft gasifier appears to handle the investigated biomass sources in a technically and environmentally feasible manner. This paper summarizes selected design related issues along with the results obtained with wood chips and hazelnut shells.

Hayati Olgun; Sibel Ozdogan; Guzide Yinesor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Bench scale testing - Phase I, Task 4. Topical progress report, September 1994--January 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

158

ISG X-Conventional Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WG-4 Conventional Facilities Home Conventional Facilities Conf. room (Bldg. 281) Corvin, Enomoto, Kuchler Tuesday, June 17 13:00 - 15:30 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 -TT Bldg 214 15:30 - 16:00 Break Orange Room 16:00 - 18:00 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 - FA, TM Bldg 214 18:00 Adjourn Wednesday, June 18 09:00 -12:00 Status - Japan, California, Illinois, HI CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 California Warm Mechanical Design CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn to BBQ Slac Cafeteria 18:30 BBQ Dinner Picnic Area Thursday, June 19 09:00 - 12:00 Drawing, Design & Cost Estimates CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 FY' 2004 Planning - Plans CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn

159

CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: 06022010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on...

160

Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21) The Ohio State Univ. - 21) The Ohio State Univ. - Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels Location: Ohio Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recover)' and Reinvestment Act: IZI Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on engineering hydrogen bacteria for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transportation fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 Sitinglcoostructlonloperationldeoommissloning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small·scale research and development and pilot prOjects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFRIO 21 Click fic!.Q

163

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48) Texas A&M Univ. - 48) Texas A&M Univ. - Stimuli-responsive Metal-Organic Frameworks Location: Texas Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: ~ Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on metal-organic framework-based molecular sieves for use in carbon capture processes. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 SitingIconstructlonioperalionldecommlssioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects *-Forthe complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of IO CFRIO 21 ('lick Here lois action would not: threaten a violation ofapplicable statutoI)'. regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including OOEandlor Executive Orders;

164

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

551) ReVolt Technology LLC - 551) ReVolt Technology LLC - Zinc Flow Air Battery Metal-Air Battery System for EV's Location: Oregon Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: ~ Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on zinc flow air batery systems for use in electrical energy storage for transportation. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - B3.6 Siting/construcllonJoperatlontdecommissiooing of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, smalJ.sca!e research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFRIO 21 Click !-It'le 111is actioll would not: threaten a violation ofapplicablc statutory, regulatory, or pennit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE andlor Executive Orders;

165

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39) Harvard Medical School, Wyss Inst. - 39) Harvard Medical School, Wyss Inst. - Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell Location: Massachusetts Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: [8] Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on bacterium engineering for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transportation fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x -83.6 Sitlngfcoostructionloperationldecommlsslonlng of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations. small-scale research and development and pilot projects *·For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFRI0 21 ~'Jick !Jere

166

CX-003116: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

support laboratory and bench scale research and development on electro-autotrophic synthesis for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transportation fuels from...

167

I HEHORANDIJH I TO{ FILE DATE SUti.lECTa I O&R(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OF OPERATION --- - ---- Research & Development 0 Facility Type Production scale testing Pi lot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical Studies *i Sample & &balysis a Hanuf...

168

TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

if yes, date contacted IYPLOE-OPERxION 9 Research & Development q Production scale testing I? Pilot Scale Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis q...

169

Anaerobic Digestion Optimization for Enhanced Renewable Biomethane Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The scope of this research project was to operate suspended growth, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digesters at the bench-scale level to evaluate improved… (more)

Stover, Ted Ross

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

Laughlin, Robert B.

171

Chapter 2 Conventional refining processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses conventional refining processes. Refining is a very elaborate operation by which crude oil is transformed into a series of products such as, gases, fuels, solvents, lube oils, etc. Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons (HC) of different C/H ratio and molecular structures. The different classes of HC molecules comprise paraffins, olefins, cycles, aromatics, resins, asphaltenes, and other poly-unsaturated molecules. In addition to hydrocarbons, crude oils also contain some other compounds composed by other atoms (heteroatoms) than carbon and hydrogen. Those moieties consist of sulfur (S), nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and heavy metals. Crudes are usually classified in terms of their specific gravity as very light, light, median, heavy, and extra heavy. An empirical set of units for the crude gravity, defined by the American Petroleum Institute (API), is currently used in oil industry. Their appearance varies from transparent liquids to black solids, going from light to heavy. Light oils have lower specific gravity and larger API gravity, while for heavy oils vice versa. Their composition also changes, and so the concentration of those heteroatomic compounds typically increases from light to heavy. The crude oils are also categorized in terms of their chemical composition, as for instance, sour crude oils, those presenting high acidity, paraffinic, naphthenic, and aromatic.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Bunker Convention : International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollition Damage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the thesis is to examine the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage – the Bunker Convention – that… (more)

Ringås, Cassia Ribeiro Naegele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

AFN Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention October 23, 2014 8:00AM AKDT to October 25, 2014 5:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one representative per 25 Native residents in the area and delegate participation rates at the annual convention typically exceed 95%. Each year, the AFN Convention draws between 4,000-5,000 attendees. The proceedings are broadcast live via television, radio and webcast reaching a diverse audience from Barrow to Ketchikan, from the Aleutian Chain to the Canadian border. During the convention, the entire state of Alaska is blanketed with discussion on current events and issues. International

174

ENERGY STAR Success Story: San Diego Convention Center | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Diego Convention Center San Diego Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

175

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

176

Research guidance studies. First quarterly progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to provide research guidance and quantification of research progress in the areas of direct and indirect coal liquefaction, coal/waste coprocessing, refining of coal-derived liquid fuels, and natural gas conversion. Specifically, the work is divided into two subtasks that relate to whether the technology application is direct or indirect. In subtask (a), Direct Coal Liquefaction technology is the subject of the analyses, and in subtask (b), Indirect Liquefaction, technologies will be evaluated in accordance with the priorities of the COR. Mitretek Systems has been developing detailed computer simulation models of direct and indirect coal and natural gas conversion systems for several years. These models are constantly being updated and improved as more data and better cost information becomes available.. These models also include detailed refinery models based on bench-scale upgrading -data of coal derived liquid fuels to specification transportation fuels. In addition to the simulation models of actual conversion system configurations, Mitretek is able to simulate innovative process configurations for coal and gas conversion to fuels, power, and chemicals. To supplement these system models and to provide a context to investigate expected energy use scenarios when alternate coal and natural gas based fuels will be needed, Mitretek`s staff has also developed world and country by country energy supply and demand models. This work will be accomplished by using the existing models where appropriate and by extending and modifying the system models where necessary.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G. [Mitretek Systems, McLean, VA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cotton Insect Pests and Natural Enemies in Conventional and Conservation Tillage Systems at AG-CARES, Lamesa, TX, 2003.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TITLE: Cotton Insect Pests and Natural Enemies in Conventional and Conservation Tillage Systems Research Scientist, Research Associate, Graduate Research Assistants (TAES). INTRODUCTION: Cotton aided to sustainable cotton production in Texas. Adoption of the minimum tillage (conservation tillage

Mukhtar, Saqib

178

Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

When comparing LED lighting performance to conventional lighting, buyers will want to consider energy efficiency, operating life and lumen depreciation, light output/distribution, color quality,...

179

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

180

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention: Countering the Threat from Biological Weapons Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs By Command of Her Majesty April 2002 Cm 5484 £5.00 #12;3 STRENGTHENING THE BIOLOGICAL AND TOXIN WEAPONS CONVENTION

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8648  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8648 Presented at the 132nd Convention 2012 April 26 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Time domain performance of decimation filter architectures for high

Reiss, Josh

182

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 9012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 9012 Presented at the 135th Convention 2013 October 17 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Evaluating iBall - An intuitive interface and assistive audio mixing

Reiss, Josh

183

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8892  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 8892 Presented at the 134th Convention 2013 May 4­7 Rome. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42 of the Audio Engineering Society. Implementation of an intelligent equalization tool using Yule

Reiss, Josh

184

NCAI Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Convention Annual Convention NCAI Annual Convention October 21, 2012 8:00AM PDT to October 26, 2012 5:00PM PDT Sacramento, California The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the California tribes will host the organization's 69th Annual Convention & Marketplace in Sacramento, California this October. The national meeting will serve as the beginning of a yearlong celebration of the organization's 70 years of work since it was founded in 1944. This year's Annual Convention will also host a Constitutional review. Over the course of six days, events and celebrations will focus on the rights and sovereignty of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. Throughout the week NCAI will convene it's General Assembly, educational breakout sessions, and cultural celebrations, all with the purpose of

185

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

186

Research and development of CWM technology toward clean coal use  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, three subjects were presented from among our technical efforts to develop clean coal applications to improve environmental quality. The three subjects are briefly summarized as follows: development of technology aimed at producing and utilizing exclusively low ash CWM; development of technology to produce CWM from various pond coals; development of technology to upgrade LRC and utilize CWM for both a boiler fuel and a gasification feedstock. We are fully convinced that the first and second of the above technologies have reached the level of practical use through demonstration tests. As to the third, we have almost finished a 10 kg/h coal slurry bench-scale test and have a plan to construct an upgrading pilot plant of 350 kg/h which will be completed in the fall 1994. We will hopefully establish upgrading technology through pilot-scale demonstration testing in 1995. With this technology, not just utilization of LRCs will be expanded, but also highly efficient use of coal will be accelerated. Thus, C0{sub 2} emission will also be strongly reduced. In ending, we would like to stress our efforts on research and development of environmentally friendly technologies as well as COM and CWM technologies based on bituminous and steaming coals.

Shibata, Kazuhiro

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Monthly research and development topical report, March--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress made by Gilbert/Commonwealth at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the U. S. Department of Energy in the provision of research and development support services under Task Orders 30.00 and 32.00 to contract No. DE-AC22-89PC88400 as well as Subtask 3.04, safety activities provided under that contract, and Subtask 7.01, Coal Conversion/Bench Scale Design. The report period runs from March 1 to April 30, 1993.The objective of the R&D Support Services and Ancillary Services Tasks is to provide technical support for the in-house R&D effort at PETC. This comprises the necessary management, supervision, qualified personnel, facilities, training, technical expertise and services to support the operation of the individual test units, of the analytical chemistry laboratories and of ancillary equipment and utilities assigned to G/C responsibilities. This work is organized into twelve subtasks, seven concerned with operation of test units, and five concerned with general support services.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Monthly research and development topical report, March--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress made by Gilbert/Commonwealth at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the U. S. Department of Energy in the provision of research and development support services under Task Orders 30.00 and 32.00 to contract No. DE-AC22-89PC88400 as well as Subtask 3.04, safety activities provided under that contract, and Subtask 7.01, Coal Conversion/Bench Scale Design. The report period runs from March 1 to April 30, 1993.The objective of the R D Support Services and Ancillary Services Tasks is to provide technical support for the in-house R D effort at PETC. This comprises the necessary management, supervision, qualified personnel, facilities, training, technical expertise and services to support the operation of the individual test units, of the analytical chemistry laboratories and of ancillary equipment and utilities assigned to G/C responsibilities. This work is organized into twelve subtasks, seven concerned with operation of test units, and five concerned with general support services.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

190

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

191

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are hosting their 59th Annual Fall Convention in Pendleton, Oregon. The DOE Office of Indian Energy is sponsoring a workshop for tribal leaders and...

192

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

193

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The STCW Convention and related instruments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial instrument, i.e. the 1978 Convention, prescribed for the first time minimum standards on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers in response to the need to have uniform rules at the ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 5484  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

___________________________________ Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper 5484 Presented and remittance to Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10165-2520, USA; also see without direct permission from the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Combining confinement and conventional beef production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF AGRICULTURE December, 1985 Major Subject: Animal Science Department of Animal Science COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Approved as to style and content by: Chairman, Advzso ommit ee...

Gregg, Michael Ronald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Two techniques for verifying conventional reductions  

SciTech Connect

Conventional forces, long the forgotten stepchild of the arms control process, have recently taken on an unprecedented importance. In the United States, the Bush administration has placed the question of the conventional balance in Europe at the top of its negotiating agenda. And the NATO summit meeting in May 1989 resolved a difficult intra-alliance dispute on nuclear modernization by pledging to reach a conventional reductions agreement with the Eastern bloc in the short span of one year. The author attempt here to develop two approaches to minimize data exchanges - the envelope scheme and tagging - which could be applied in the event of conventional arms control agreements in Europe. In this context, they confine themselves to a scenario imposing restrictions on the levels of certain categories of weapon systems used for waging offensive warfare or mounting surprise attacks. NATO and the Warsaw Pact have already agreed at Negotiation Conventional armed Forced in Europe (CFE) that such treaty-limited items (TLIs) would include tanks, artillery, armored troop carries, combat aircraft, and helicopters, though precise definitions are still to be worked out. The emerging CFE agreement is expected to cover troop levels as well, but this article will focus on verification of armaments.

Maxfield, R.; Meerburg, A.J.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if conventional oil production was no longer able to satisfy demand? Fuels from non-conventional oil resources would then become the backstop fuel. These resources involve higher CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced than conventional oil as they require... ?EMUC ? GDPgrowth ?POPgrowth? ? (13) r is the consumption discount rate (% per year) EMUC is the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption (no unit) ptp is the pure time preference rate (% per year) GDPgrowth is the growth of GDP (% per year...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

199

Conventional Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. The medical screening exam offered by the FWP evaluates an employee's health as it relates to their potential occupational exposures to hazardous agents. The FWP uses a customized medical screening protocol that was developed by a team of independent physicians specializing in occupational

200

October 1st Hamilton Convention Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 1st & 2nd , 2010 Hamilton Convention Centre 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton ON ANGELA SILLA, EventMaster University, Hamilton Brian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC Professor Division of Hematology & Thromboembolsim Department of Medicine McMaster University, Hamilton Peter Powers, MD, FRCPC Associate Professor Division of Hematology

Hitchcock, Adam P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Policy message A narrow focus on conventional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

often prevents improvement of sanitation in poor settlements. n Simple, affordable, effective techPolicy message n A narrow focus on conventional sanitation technologies and top- down planning studies featured here were conducted in: Lao PDR, Tanzania, and Nepal Local solutions for sanitation Urban

Richner, Heinz

202

Microsoft Word - CX-Covington_Substation_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kerry Cook Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Perform research of groundwater drainage and flooding issues at Covington Complex through the installation of four groundwater monitoring wells PP&A Project No.: PP&A-1772 Budget Information: Work Order #00246440 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.6 Siting/ construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects. Location: Covington Substation in King County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

203

Audio Engineering Society Convention PaperPresented at the 111th Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention PaperPresented at the 111th Convention 2001 September 21 for the contents. Additional papers may be obtained by sending request and remittance to Audio Engineering Society of the Audio Engineering Society. Bayesian Harmonic Analysis for Audio Testing and Measurement Thomas J. Loredo

Loredo, Thomas J.

204

Waste acid detoxification and reclamation: Summary of bench-scale tests for FY 1986 and FY 1987  

SciTech Connect

Processes to reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acid are being demonstrated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Two precipitation processes and a distillation process are being developed to minimize waste from fuel fabrication operations, which comprise a series of metal-finishing operations. Waste process acids such as HF-HNO/sub 3/, etch solutions containing Zr as a major metal impurity, and HNO/sub 3/ strip solution containing Cu as a major metal impurity are detoxified and reclaimed by concurrently precipitating heavy metals and regenerating acid for recycle. Acid from a third waste acid stream generated from chemical milling operations will be reclaimed using distillation. This stream comprises HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing U as the major metal impurity. Distillation allows NO/sub 3//sup -/ to be displaced by SO/sub 4//sup -2/ in metal salts; free HNO/sub 3/ is then vaporized from the U-bearing sulfate stream. Uranium can be recovered from the sulfate stream in a downstream precipitation step. 10 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

Stewart, T.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollutants into the atmosphere. Amongst the various air pollution control techniques available, biological provides a new and inexpensive tool for comparative studies in biotrickling filtration for air pollution: biofilters and biotrickling filters. In biofilters, humidified polluted air is passed through a packed bed

206

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

207

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention...

208

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Monitoring technologies in conventional arms control verification: The CFE (Conventional Armed Forces in Europe) context  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the challenges of evaluating conventional military capabilities during the rapidly changing political conditions in Europe. Recommendations are made for the implement new technology to require and process date about current military conditions. (FSD)

Pounds, T.J.

1990-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Rev. 1 4 Rev. 1 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International- Proposed Actions for CY 2013 Scheduled To Take Place Under ex B3.6, "Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions ·e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International Inc. (ATL) will perform indoor bench-scale & small-scale research & development projects, conventional laboratory operations, & pilot projects to verify proof-

211

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

methods Associated research and development Support industry opportunities and new markets emerging in the traditional energy sector This is one in a series of Office of...

212

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description The project group proposes to systematically assess the structural controls of geothermal systems in the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Phase I (Year 1) involves a broad inventory of structural settings of geothermal systems in the Great Basin, Walker Lane, and southern Cascades, with the aim of developing conceptual structural models and a structural catalogue of the most favorable structural environments. The regional stress field will be used to evaluate slip tendency on faults in the various tectonic provinces and thus determine which faults are most likely to accommodate dilation and slip in each setting. This overview will permit selection of representative sites (5 or 6 total) for more detailed studies in Phases II and III (Years 2-3). Sites will be selected on the basis of quality of exposure, apparent potential for geothermal development, and general type of system, so that all major types of systems can be evaluated and compared in this project (e.g., magmatic vs. nonmagmatic). The detailed investigations will include geologic mapping, kinematic analysis, stress determinations, gravity surveys, integration of available geophysical data, slip tendency analysis, and 3D modeling. In Year 3, the detailed studies will be completed and data synthesized to a) compare structural controls in various tectonic settings, b) complete the structural catalogue, and c) apply knowledge to exploration strategies and selection of drilling sites.

213

Non-conventional sources for ethylene  

SciTech Connect

Two processes for conversion of methanol to ethylene are reviewed as to economic attractiveness at about 1990. The processes are homologation of methane to ethanol with dehydration to ethylene and direct catalytic cracking of methanol to ethylene using Mobil zeolite catalysts. For the economic projections, synthesis gas is assumed to be available from a large leverage-financed, synthetis gas unit based on a pressurized, entrained bed, coal-gasifier, built on the US Gulf Coast in 1990 at a cost of $0.19/m/sup 3/, and methane is valued at $650/metric ton in 1990 based on continuous operation of natural gas-based methanol plants in the US. The economics of ethylene production via conventional steam cracking of naphtha/gas oil are compared with those of the new technology. The methanol homologation/ethanol dehydration route to ethylene is more attractive than catalytic cracking at 40% carbon selectivity to ethylene. At higher selectivities, the methanol cracking scheme becomes economically competitive. However, with an assumption of a price of $650/metric ton for methanol in 1990, neiter methanol-based route is competitive with conventional steam cracking on the Gulf Coast in 1990. A methanol price of $500/metric ton would make the methanol-based oriduction routes attractive. 23 references.

Leonard, J.P.; Weiss, L.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DECONTAMINATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

During the five plus years this Cooperative Agreement existed, more than 45 different projects were funded. Most projects were funded for a one year period but there were some, deemed of such quality and importance, funded for multiple years. Approximately 22 external agencies, businesses, and other entities have cooperated with or been funded through the WVU Cooperative Agreement over the five plus years. These external entities received 33% of the funding by this Agreement. The scope of this Agreement encompassed all forms of hazardous waste remediation including radioactive, organic, and inorganic contaminants. All matrices were of interest; generally soil, water, and contaminated structures. Economic, health, and regulatory aspects of technologies were also within the scope of the agreement. The highest priority was given to small businesses funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and Department of Energy (DOE) involved in research and development of innovative remediation processes. These projects were to assist in the removal of barriers to development and commercialization of these new technologies. Studies of existing, underdeveloped technologies, were preferred to fundamental research into remediation technologies. Sound development of completely new technologies was preferred to minor improvements in existing methods. Solid technological improvements in existing technologies or significant cost reduction through innovative redesign were the preferred projects. Development, evaluation, and bench scale testing projects were preferred for the WVU research component. In the effort to fill gaps in current remediation technologies, the worth of the WVU Cooperative Agreement was proven. Two great technologies came out of the program. The Prefabricated Vertical Drain Technology for enhancing soil flushing was developed over the 6-year period and is presently being demonstrated on a 0.10 acre Trichloroethylene contaminated site in Ohio. The SpinTek Centrifugal Membrane System was a unique separation process introduced through the Agreement that is now being used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on the cost to the USDOE for both technologies and considering their usefulness in cleaning up contaminated sites, no other technologies developed through USDOE provide or have the propensity to provide as great a return on investment and impact on environmental remediation. These technologies alone make the $10.3 million USDOE investment in the WVU Cooperative Agreement a tremendous investment.

Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., PE.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Sixth quarterly report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal twelth quarterly report for the period 1 July 1995--30 September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench- scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint  

SciTech Connect

Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

Hasan, M.Z. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Foo, M.L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Cava, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

220

Advances in the integration of solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pollution and increasing fuel prices are the main focus for governments today. The main cause of pollution is existing electricity power plants that use huge quantities of fossil fuel. A new strategy should be applied in the coming decades based on the integration of existing power plants with renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. Hybridization of existing power plants with solar energy is one proven option to overcome the problems of pollution and increasing fuel prices. In this paper, a review of the previous studies and papers for integrating solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants was carried out. The focus on hybrid solar conventional power plants includes: the review of studies of hybrid solar–steam cycle power plants, integrated solar combined-cycle systems (ISCCS) and hybrid solar–gas turbine power plants, while for hybrid solar non-conventional power plants the focus of study is hybrid solar–geothermal power plants. The most successful option is ISCCS due to their advantages and the plans for implementation at various power plants in the world like in Tunisia, Egypt, Spain, and Iran.

M.S. Jamel; A. Abd Rahman; A.H. Shamsuddin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

222

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

223

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

224

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

225

NCAI 71st Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NCAI 71st Annual Convention NCAI 71st Annual Convention October 26, 2014 12:00PM EDT to October 31, 2014 9:00PM EDT Atlanta, Georgia http:www.ncai.orgconferences-events...

226

Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells  

SciTech Connect

Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Research Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

228

Conventional arms control and East-West security  

SciTech Connect

This book addresses some of the key conceptual issues related to the NATO-Warsaw Pact Vienna talks on Conventional forces in Europe (CFE). The chapters presented include: Constraints in Europe, Nuclear weapons and conventional arms control, and Approaches to conventional arms reductions.

Blackwill, R.D.; Larrabee, F.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles  

SciTech Connect

This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) Place Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 521 157 Sector Biomass Product AP-based, biomass project developers References Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) is a company located in Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Veeraiah_Non_Conventional_Power_Projects_Ltd_VNCPPL&oldid=352749"

232

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Water Power Program supports the development of technologies that harness the nation's renewable hydropower resources to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diver- sion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. The program's conventional hydropower activities focus on increasing generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, adding hydroelectric generating capacity to exist- ing non-powered dams, adding new low impact hydropower, increasing advanced pumped-storage hydropower capacity, and reducing potential environmental impacts of conven- tional hydropower production. The program's research and

233

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2000.

Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects The tribe proposes to install a 4.0 kW (16 210-kW panels) grid-tied solar array to fully power the tribal community hall with electricity and thereby lessen the tribe's overall dependence on diesel fuel to meet electrical demand. The array would be installed as a solar tracker mounted on a concrete footer (3' diameter x 10' deep) in a parking lot approximately 75' across from the community hall. An electrical conduit line would be trenched between the array and the hall. A new 60 volt power line 150 feet in length across the upper village road would also be installed as part of

236

ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center Since opening 20 years ago, San Diego's bayside convention facility has been a green industry leader and continues to receive accolades for environmental stewardship. The San Diego Convention Center Corporation (SDCCC) joined the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR program as a partner in 2008. Using the EPA's online energy management and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager, the SDCCC tracked its energy consumption and has improved the facility's overall performance. Since then, the San Diego Convention Center has become a model for other convention and meeting facilities demonstrating the value of benchmarking to improve efficiency and to save money. . The Convention Center is managed and marketed by the SDCCC, a non-profit public

237

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CIGNLCommentsDOECSCRulemaking11-30-10.doc DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

238

American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

great organization. From electing new leaders to voting on resolutions that set the foundation of AMVETS, the National Convention sets the stage for the coming year. Contact...

239

SciTech Connect: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

240

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,,"...

242

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding...

243

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

244

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding...

245

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - 64.7 64.7 - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 86 Energy Information...

246

EM's Acting Assistant Secretary Selected to Lead Joint Convention...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear and non-nuclear, particularly South Asia, the Pacific Region, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East - to ratify the Joint Convention. There are currently 69...

247

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCCCapture Division FY14-15 1012013 - 9302015 Steve Mascaro Research Triangle Park, Durham, NC Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for...

248

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

HEHORANDUU SUBJECT:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

if yes, dets contacted IKLE-PEEnILm q Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale q Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0...

250

Effects of aluminosilicate minerals in clay soil fractions on pore water hydroxide ion concentrations in soil/cement matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and, consequently, metal attenuation characteristics of soiUcement/waste matrices is necessary to accurately translate bench-scale test results to full-scale applications. Research on soil stabilization indicates that pozzolanic reactions can occur...

Cook, Evan Russell

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala Department plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having

Kushner, Mark

252

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast Studies on Physiology Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 #12;Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production in several ethanol production plants, which nevertheless had a high efficiency in one of the monitored

253

Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CONVENTIONALLY REINFORCED CONCRETE COUPLING BEAMS A Thesis by AJAY SESHADRI SHASTRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams Copyright 2010...

Shastri, Ajay Seshadri

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 Hardwood Markets in 2003-2005 American Hardwood Export Council 12th Annual Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 by Ed Pepke, Project Leader Forest Products Marketing Programme UN Economic

255

Audio Engineering Society Convention e-Brief 151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Engineering Society Convention e-Brief 151 Presented at the 136th Convention 2014 April 26. Reproduction of this paper, or any portion thereof, is not permitted without direct permission from the Audio Engineering Society. APE: Audio Perceptual Evaluation toolbox for MATLAB Brecht De Man, Joshua D. Reiss Centre

Reiss, Josh

256

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country" was held March 1, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The forum focused on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The forucm provided an opportunity for tribal

257

An Economic Comparison of Conventional and Narrow-Row Cotton Production--Southern Plains of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JUN ~ 3 1977 Texas A&M University June 19' An Economic Comparison of Coventional and Narrow-Row -- Cotton Production-Southern High Plains of Texas The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, J. E. Miller, Director' The Texas A&M University... interest in adopting narrow-row sys tems for cotton production in the Southern High Plains of Texas prompted an economic comparison of these new systems with conventional production sys tems for cotton. Previous experimental research in dicated...

Young, Kenneth B.; Adams, James R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments In an effort to assist the Department of Energy in its development of regulations pursuant to section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), the DOE General Counsel's office issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in July 2010. The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) provides for a global nuclear liability regime assuring prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the creation of an international fund to supplement the amount of compensation available for nuclear damage resulting from such incidents. Section 934 of the EISA authorizes the Secretary of Energy to

259

2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Federation of Natives Convention Alaska Federation of Natives Convention 2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention October 18, 2012 - 12:49pm Addthis Anchorage, Alaska October 18 - 20, 2012 During the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention held October 18-20 in Anchorage, the DOE Office of Indian Energy and the EERE Tribal Energy Program presented a preconference workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development." The workshop was designed to help tribal leaders and staff understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities, and also covered project development and financing for clean energy projects. Download the Alaska workshop presentations. Addthis Related Articles

260

Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Convention Center Solar Power Plant Convention Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant Facility Atlantic City Convention Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Pepco Energy Services Location Atlantic City, New Jersey Coordinates 39.3642834°, -74.4229266° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3642834,"lon":-74.4229266,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Convention for Preservation of Man's Cultural Heritage in the Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...special merit and may be enlarged if so required. The territorial ambit of the convention is prescribed with a view to avoiding any...convulsive, and divisive" events. Rampant inflation, the energy crisis, public mistrust of government, and unresolved racial...

F. M. Auburn

1974-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

AutoCAD discipline layering convention. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a user`s guide to establishing layering standards for drawing development. Uniform layering standards are established to exchange of AutoCAD datasets between organizations and companies. Consistency in the layering conventions assists the user through logical separation and identification of drawing data. This allows the user to view and plot related aspects of a drawing separately or in combination. The use of color and Linetype by layer is the preferred layering convention method, however to accommodate specific needs, colors and linetypes can also be assigned on an entity basis. New drawing setup files (also identified in AutoCAD documentation as Prototype drawings) use this layering convention to establish discipline drawing layers that are routinely used. Additions, deletions or revisions to the layering conventions are encourage.

Nielsen, B.L.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE published a Notice of Inquiry in the Federal Register (75 Fed. Reg. 43,945) requesting public comment on issues related to the funding obligations under the Convention on Supplementary...

264

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fact #648: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fuel Price Report is a quarterly report that tracks prices for conventional and alternative fuels in the U.S. The graph below shows the nationwide average price for each...

266

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention March 13, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities. Be sure to visit the Office of Indian Energy booth! Learn more on the NIGA website. Addthis Related Articles Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Byron Washom, Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego, poses with an electric vehicle and some of the solar panels that cover UCSD's campus.| Photo courtesy of UCSD Q&A With Byron Washom of the University of California at San Diego

267

Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102813_dod 102813_dod 10/28/2013 Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead for the DoD Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LLNL served as technical lead and integrator on an important test to assess a new conventional warhead designed by the Lab. Dave Hare, Livermore's program manager of the test, called it an "unequivocal success." Below is the press release from the Department of Defense Defense Department successfully conducts warhead sled test The Defense Department announced recently the successful testing of an advanced conventional precision effects warhead, a critical part of a national effort to establish a conventional prompt strike capability. This capability will contribute to the country's ability to defend its interests

268

File:EIA-conventional-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conventional-gas.pdf conventional-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 3.25 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2009-04-08 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:54, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:54, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (3.25 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

269

Determination of plate efficiencies for conventional distillation columns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COIUMNS A Thesis By Thomas Raymond Harris Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub)ect t Chemical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PLATE EFFICIENCIES FOR CONVENTIONAL DISTILLATION COLUMNS A Thesis Thomas Raymond Harris Approred as to style and content bye Chairman of ommittee Head...

Harris, Thomas Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

Conventional machining methods for rapid prototyping and direct manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The material and product accuracy limitations of rapid prototyped products can often prevent the use of rapid prototyping (RP) processes for production of final end-use products. Conventional machining processes are well-developed technologies with the capability of employing a wide range of materials in the creation of highly accurate components. This paper presents an overview of how conventional machining processes can be used for RP and direct manufacturing processes. The methodologies of computer numerical control machining for rapid prototyping (CNC-RP) and wire electronic discharge machining for rapid prototyping (WEDM-RP) are presented in this paper. A general discussion of selection criteria and cost comparisons among both current additive RP and conventional machining approaches to rapid manufacturing are also presented.

Zhi Yang; Richard A. Wysk; Sanjay Joshi; Matthew C. Frank; Joseph E. Petrzelka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impact of force withdrawal on options for conventional defenses  

SciTech Connect

Soviet withdrawal from the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO) could open new defensive options. This report gives some background on those options from post-war nuclear and conventional strategies and the quantitative Soviet threat tot he role of firepower, close air support, and battlefield attrition. Withdrawal under the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty could provide a buffer between opposing armies that aggressor armies drop the bridges and disrupt the roads and rails that would have to be used. If forces were brought into battle piecemeal, they would be annihilated. That would permit effective use of advanced and prepositioned weapons, which would favor the defense. 9 refs.

Canavan, G.H.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program  

SciTech Connect

. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

Lu, Yongqi

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS  

SciTech Connect

Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is injected into the pressurized waste stream, and the air/liquid mixture is preheated to the required reactor inlet temperature. The reactor provides sufficient retention time to allow the oxidation to approach the desired level of organic decomposition. Typical reaction time is about 30-120 minutes. Heat exchangers are routinely employed to recover energy contained in the reactor effluent to preheat the waste feed/air entering the reactor. Auxiliary energy, usually steam, is necessary for startup and can provide trim heat if required. Since the oxidation reactions are exothermic, sufficient energy may be released in the reactor to allow the WAO system to operate without any additional heat input. After cooling, the oxidized reactor effluent passes through a pressure control valve where the pressure is reduced. A separator downstream of the pressure control valve allows the depressurized and cooled vapor to separate from the liquid. Typical industrial WAO applications have a feed flow rate of 1 to 220 gallons per minute (gpm) per train, with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) from 10,000 to 150,000 mg/L (higher CODs with dilution). Note that catalysts, such as homogeneous copper and iron, their heterogeneous counterparts, or precious metals can be used to enhance the effectiveness (i.e., to lower temperature, pressure, and residence time as well as increase oxidation efficiencies) of the WAO reaction if deemed necessary.

Adu-Wusu, K

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Increasing desalination by mitigating anolyte ph imbalance using catholyte effluent addition in a multi-anode, bench scale microbial desalination cell.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A microbial desalination cell (MDC) uses exoelectrogenic bacteria to oxidize organic matter while desalinating water. Protons produced from the oxidation of organics at the anode… (more)

Davis, Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALJ,SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMEN...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct small-scale research and development projects, conventional laboratory operations,...

278

Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre-IEA Cooperation | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AgencyCompany Organization Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre, International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable...

279

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the Transition Years Fabián Menalled weed management tool is located between your ears www.forages.oregonsate.edu #12;Today, we'll talk more about principles than specific practices #12;Outline for Today's Presentation Transitioning to organic

Maxwell, Bruce D.

280

PLANT RESISTANCE Conventional Screening Overlooks Resistance Sources: Rootworm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANT RESISTANCE Conventional Screening Overlooks Resistance Sources: Rootworm Damage of Diverse.g., landraces, populations, inbreds) for native resistance to western corn rootworm is labor.However,wehaverecentlyobservedthattopcrossed(hybrid) materials tend to have reduced western corn rootworm damage. To formally test whether rootworm damage

Flint-Garcia, Sherry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

282

Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Japanese ratification of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) marks an important milestone towards creating a global nuclear liability regime that will assure prompt and meaningful compensation in the event of a nuclear accident and will facilitate international cooperation on nuclear projects such as ongoing clean-up work at the Fukushima site."

283

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the addition of water/lixiviant is generally collected by air pollution control mechanisms, which return as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines

284

Nov/Dec 2006 2006 CSBA Convention Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 2006 CSBA Convention Once, again, we cheated winter and had only a little rain water on the highway the opening ceremonies and committee reports, Keynote Speaker, Dr. Jamie Ellis, from the University of Florida be reused by forcefully washing off the slime and letting the combs dry out. Probably, the portion of t

Ferrara, Katherine W.

285

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions Surface Current · Data are located on disc 1 of which are located in the directory FLOATS on disc 1. In summary, the files included in this CD-ROM set on which that file resides.) #12;Technical questions regarding the CD-ROMs should be addressed to: National

287

Geologic research of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--March 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the period from October 1, 1992 to March 1, 1993. The overall goals of the program task are to provide a final synthesis of six deep seismic reflection profiles and other geological and geophysical data from the southern Washington Cascades region where a probable extensive deep sedimentary basin has been discovered. This deep sedimentary basin is hypothesized from geological, regional magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, magnetic , and seismic reflection data as described in the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) article by Stanley and others (1992). This report analyzed three seismic reflection profiles acquired by the Morgantown Energy Technology Centers in combination with the extensive MT and other data to outline a probable geological model for a thick conductive section of rocks in the southern Washington Cascades (called the Southern Washington Cascades conductor, SWCC). Earlier MT models suggested that the section consisted of an east-dipping package that extended to depths of as much as 20 km but appeared to surface in the Bear Canyon area near Morton, Washington and along the axis of the Carbon River and Morton anticlines. Interpretation of the first three DOE seismic reflection approximately confirmed the MT interpretation and added new information on anticlinal structures and detailed stratigraphy. In this quarterly report, we summarize the progress over the first two quarters of the program for FY93, and project the possible findings during the remainder of the project. A milestone chart for the first two quarters has been submitted separately, along with cost reports, but a copy of these items are attached for completeness.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

ENERGY STAR Success Story VA Beach Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Success Story: STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Located in Virginia's most populous city, the Virginia Beach Convention Center (VBCC) comprises more than 516,000 square feet and typically hosts 400 events a year. Fully opened in 2007, the VBCC has served as the anchor for the successful revitalization of Virginia Beach's old beach district. With historical references and maritime themes integrated into the structure's modern design, the Center features many technological advances that make it a prime location for meetings, conferences, and trade shows. However, even with a newly constructed building, the VBCC has demonstrated an important energy management principle: all buildings, regardless of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas

289

Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SLAC-TN-03-072 November 2003 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

290

Cost performance comparisons of equivalent conventional and 100% solar houses  

SciTech Connect

The sixth design of ALL SOLAR HOUSE and the equivalent conventional house had detailed performance and item by item cost checks made. Surprisingly the active solar comes out to lower cost than the passive. A further suprise, the passive comes out as more efficient than the active. The conventional house has slightly more uniform temperature and has comparable cost. All these designs are thermostated to the 20+/sup 0/C (70+/sup 0/F) range. All have the same volumetric efficiency. The line of descent for ALL SOLAR HOUSE is: Experimental Manor, All glass house, Peterson's, Binghamton, Loraine, and now Keene. The last on speculation for the low cost market as a prototype for wide spread use. Several of the specially engineered components have been used that they are offered commercially.

Saunders, N.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Verifying conventional stability in Europe: An overview. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Verifying the obligations in the prospective Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty will be far harder and more expensive than verifying those in the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty, or in other previous arms control agreements. This Note presents a qualitative overview of conventional arms control verification issues, including (1) monitoring force levels calibrated in major items of equipment and personnel, in a large production area that makes concealment possible; (2) watching force withdrawals, restructuring, or disbandments involving removal, reexport, or destruction of thousands of heavy equipment items; (3) monitoring the post-agreement status of the largest and most complex force concentration in peacetime history; and (4) meshing these observations with the concurrent need to monitor unilateral Warsaw Pact force reductions and force changes on a massive scale.

Hirschfeld, T.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

U.S. DEPARTl\IENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT M ANAGE M EN T CENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTl\IENT OF ENERG Y U.S. DEPARTl\IENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT M ANAGE M EN T CENT ER NEPA DETERl-IINAIION PROJECT TITLE: EECBG: Solar PV installation at Knoxville Convention Center Page 1 of2 STAT E: TN Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000013 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOO00954.001 NEPA Control Number CID Number o Based on my review orthe informatio n concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undu DOE O rder 45 1.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation , and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

293

Segmented vs conventional numerals: legibility and long term retention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environmental chamber. Sub jects The subjects were thirty male students between the ages of 1g and 27 from the Industrial Engineering department at Texas A&M University. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10. Procedure Exposure time and number... December 1971 Ma]or Subject: Industrial Engineering SEGMENTED VS CONVENTIONAL NUMERALS: LEGIBILITY AND LONG TERM RETENTION A Thesis STEVE EDGAR HILL Approved as to style and content by: Elias Chairman of Committee) r. A. W. ortham (Head...

Hill, Steve Edgar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

295

J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

Palazzi, Mauro [Department of Radiotherapy, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D. [Unit of Medical Physics, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cerrotta, Annamaria [Department of Radiotherapy, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Potepan, Paolo [Department of Radiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Quattrone, Pasquale [Department of Pathology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cantu, Giulio [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPA-E Environmental Questionnaire Attached ARPA-E Environmental Questionnaire Attached X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects Phononic Devices is commercializing advanced thermoelectric semiconductor materials and devices designed to convert waste heat from industrial and commercial processes into usable electric power and cooling. Despite the national security risks and pollution concerns associated with fossil fuel consumption, the Department of Energy estimates that 50-60% of all the energy consumed in the US per year is wasted as heat. Thermoelectric designs that efficiently capture and utilize this waste heat are an intense area of research and investment interest. Developed in

298

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPA-E Environmental Questionnaire Attached ARPA-E Environmental Questionnaire Attached X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects Phononic Devices is commercializing advanced thermoelectric semiconductor materials and devices designed to convert waste heat from industrial and commercial processes into usable electric power and cooling. Despite the national security risks and pollution concerns associated with fossil fuel consumption, the Department of Energy estimates that 50-60% of all the energy consumed in the US per year is wasted as heat. Thermoelectric designs that efficiently capture and utilize this waste heat are an intense area of research and investment interest. Developed in

299

Transportation Research Board 94th Annual Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 94th Annual Transportation Research Board Meeting will be held January 11–15, 2015, in Washington, D.C. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The event covers the entire transportation...

300

Trade Associations - The Chemical Alliance; Dyestuff Convention; American Drug Manufacturers Association.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trade Associations - The Chemical Alliance; Dyestuff Convention; American Drug Manufacturers Association. ...

1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Prospects for conventional arms reduction in Europe: CFE and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an edited version of an address given by the Minister of Defence of the Netherlands to a symposium held by the Technological and Aerospace Committee of the Western European Union Assembly in Rome, 27 March 1990. The Minister argues that there is a role for a European satellite surveillance system to help verify adherence to conventional forces reduction agreements and to support United Nations peacekeeping efforts. If its technical and financial feasibility are demonstrated, further steps in the direction of an independent European system should be taken as quickly as possible.

A.L. ter Beek

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DOE cost comparison study: industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail-shippable, fluid-bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/h each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. This single unit is capable of producing 250,000 lbs/h. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler used in conjunction with a C-E Air Quaity Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. The FBA-16 and FBV-16 fluid bed designs were found to be competitive with the conventional unit. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. A substantial cost reduction can be realized for plant capacities less than 180,000 lbs steam/h by incorporating a single FBA-16 type boiler. The operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design. Some potential design modifications are outlined. Extensive design and background research was prformed to increase the validity and relevance of this report.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

Conventional and advanced exergoeconomic analyses of geothermal district heating systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study deals with analyzing, assessing and comparing conventional and advanced exergoeconomic analyses to identify the direction and potential for energy savings of a geothermal district heating system in future conditions/projections. As a real case study, the Afyon geothermal district heating system in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey, is considered while its actual operational thermal data on 8 February 2011 are utilized in the analysis, which is based on the specific exergy costing method. In this study for the first time, based on the concepts of avoidable/unavoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts, cost rates associated with both exergy destruction and capital investment of the geothermal district heating system are determined first, and the obtained results are then evaluated. The results indicate that the internal design changes play a more essential role in determining the cost of each component. The cost rate of unavoidable part within the components of the system is lower than that of the avoidable one. For the overall system, the value for the conventional exergoeconomic factor is determined to be 5.53% while that for the modified one is calculated to be 9.49%. As a result, the advanced exergoeconomic analysis makes more sense given the additional information in splitting process of the components.

Ali Keçeba?; Arif Hepbasli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International- Proposed Actions For CY 2012 Scheduled To Take Place Under CX B3.6, "Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International Inc. (ATL) will perform indoor bench-scale & small-scale research & development projects, conventional laboratory operations, & pilot projects to verify proof- of-concept, on & near the Hanford Site during Calendar Year 2012. WRPS & ATL will perform

306

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERM DETERM INATION RECIPIENT:SUNY Morrisville State College PROJE(.T TITLE: Controlled Environment Agriculture and Energy Project Page 1 of2 STAT E: NY Funding Opportunity Announcement Number FY09CDP Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE-0002615 NEPA Control Number elD Number GFQ-1Q-S38 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I han made the following determinaUon: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis): small-scale research and development projects; and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than two years) oonducted

307

U.S. DEP.ARTlVIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARTlVIENT OF ENERGY ARTlVIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION RECIPIENT:Auburn University STATE:AL PROJECT Biomass to Liquid Fuels and Electric Power Research TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number CDP DE-EE0003115 GFO-0003115-00 1 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

308

PMC.EF2a U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERARNATION RECIPIENT:Cedar Falls Utilities STATE: IA PROJECT TITLE : Biomass Energy Generation Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number CDP DE-EE0000398 GFO-10-035 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); small-scale research and development projects; and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than two years) conducted

309

Chicago Office NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SGCH F 560-ACQ SGCH F 560-ACQ (11/05) Previous editions are obsolete. Chicago Office NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF SCIENCE -- CHICAGO OFFICE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM To be completed by "financial assistance award" organization receiving Federal funding. For assistance (including a point of contact), see "Instructions for Preparing SC-CH F-560, Environmental Evaluation Notification Form ". Solicitation/Award No. (if applicable): N/A Organization Name: New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) Title of Proposed Project/Research: GENERIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) FOR THE NBL: Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Total DOE Funding/Total Project Funding:

310

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota State University North Dakota State University PROJECT TITl,E: Center for Nanoscale Energy Page 1 of2 STATE: ND Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number COP DE·FGJ6.OG068160 GFO· ' 0-546 0 Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed action, 85 NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under 00 .. : Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, ":A, EI S APPENDIX AND NUMBER : Description: 83.6 Siting , construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); small-scale research and development projects; and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than two years) conducted

311

u.s. DEPARTl\IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IENT OF ENERGY IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\IINATION RECIPlENT:The Research Foundation of SUNY at SUNY ESF STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE: The Biorefinery in New York-Bio Butanol from Biomass funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number CDP DE-EE0003668 gfo-0003668-001 EEO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

312

U.S. DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETnu.fiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETnu.fiNATION DETnu.fiNATION RECIPIENT:Clemson University PROJECf TITLE: BioEthanol Collaborative Page 1 of2 STATE: SC Funding Opportunity Announ~ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number COP DE-FG36-08G088071 GFQ.08-140b GOO Based on my review oftbe information ~onc:erniDg tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A). I hne made the following deter-mination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); small-scale research and development projects; and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than two years) conducted

313

Argonne Site Office 9800 South Cass Avenue  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JAN 0 9 2012 JAN 0 9 2012 SUBJECT: NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) DETERMINATION FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ANL) The Argonne Site Office (ASO) has approved the following as a categorical exclusion (CX) under the category of "B 3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects". * Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) project at Advanced Photon Source" (ASO-CX-292) Therefore, no further NEPA review is required. However, if any modification or an expansion of the scope is made to the above project, additional NEPA review will be necessary. Enclosed please find a copy of the approved Environmental Review Form (ERF) for the project. If

314

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B5.1 Actions to conserve energy B5.1 Actions to conserve energy Solar PV on The Blue Barn, it is a 26,000 square foot complex that provides year round recreation to residents and non-residents alike. The EECBG grant will fund 16% of the purposed project. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Solar Panel Conversion on The Blue Barn Evesham New Jersey Jan 14, 2010 Print Form for Records Submit via E-mail Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland DN: cn=Billie Newland, o=Energy Enterprise Solutions, ou, email=Billie.Newland@hq.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.01.14 15:51:52 -05'00' X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects Add Attachment

315

Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Programs, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2002. The Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Project is designed to rapidly increase numbers of salmon in stocks that are in imminent danger of extirpation. Parr are captured in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River and reared to adulthood in captivity. Upon maturation, they are spawned (within stocks) and their progeny reared to smoltification before being released into the natal stream of their parents. This program is co-managed by ODFW, National Marine Fisheries Service, the Nez Perce Tribe and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

S&TR | Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Article title: Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention; article blurb: A Livermore team has discovered plenty of surprises in the first samples captured from a comet. Graphic of artist's conception of Stardust spacecraft. Photo of John Bradley at the Johnson Space Center. An artist's conception shows the Stardust spacecraft approaching Comet Wild 2. The spacecraft's cometary particle collector, filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam, is shown extended. The spacecraft is flanked by two solar panels. (Image courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA].) In the lower right photo, John Bradley gives the thumbs-up sign after scientists opened the Stardust sample return capsule in the clean room facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

317

Characterization of Organic and Conventional Coffee Using Neutron Activation Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Countries importing organic coffee are facing the difficulty of assessing the quality of the product to distinguish original organic coffee from other coffees, thereby eliminating possible fraud. Many analytical methods are matrix sensitive and require matrix-matching reference materials for validation, which are currently nonexistent. This work aims to establish the trace element characterization of organic and conventional Brazilian coffees and to establish correlations with the related soil and the type of fertilizer and agrochemicals applied. It was observed that the variability in element concentrations between the various types of coffee is not so large, which emphasizes the need for analytical methods of high accuracy, reproducibility, and a well-known uncertainty. Moreover, the analyses indicate that sometimes the coffee packages may contain some soil remnants.

E. A. De Nadai Fernandes; P. Bode; F. S. Tagliaferro

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

Improving Multigrid and Conventional Relaxation Algorithms for Propagators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practical modifications of deterministic multigrid and conventional relaxation algorithms are discussed. New parameters need not be tuned but are determined by the algorithms themselves. One modification can be thought of as ``updating on a last layer consisting of a single site''. It eliminates critical slowing down in computations of bosonic and fermionic propagators in a fixed volume. Here critical slowing down means divergence of asymptotic relaxation times as the propagators approach criticality. A remaining volume dependence is weak enough in case of bosons so that conjugate gradient can be outperformed. However, no answer can be given yet if the same is true for staggered fermions on lattices of realizable sizes. Numerical results are presented for propagators of bosons and of staggered fermions in 4-dimensional $SU(2)$ gauge fields.

Thomas Kalkreuter

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Pseudogap in a thin film of a conventional superconductor.  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting state is characterized by the gap in the electronic density of states, which vanishes at the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. It was discovered that in high-temperature superconductors, a noticeable depression in the density of states, the pseudogap, still remains even at temperatures above T{sub c}. Here, we show that a pseudogap exists in a conventional superconductor, ultrathin titanium nitride films, over a wide range of temperatures above T{sub c}. Our study reveals that this pseudogap state is induced by superconducting fluctuations and favoured by two-dimensionality and by the proximity to the transition to the insulating state. A general character of the observed phenomenon provides a powerful tool to discriminate between fluctuations as the origin of the pseudogap state and other contributions in the layered high-temperature superconductor compounds.

Sacepe, B.; Chapelier, C.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Sanquer, M. (Materials Science Division); (CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble); (A.V. Rzhanov Inst. Semiconductor Physics); (IMEC)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions The following definitions describe the criteria required to achieve a maximum rating or maturity value of 5. It should be assumed that maturity values of 1-5 represent a subjective assessment of the quality of definition and/or the degree to which the end-state or maximum criteria have been met, or the product has been completed in accordance with the definition of maturity values. Rating Element Criteria for Maximum Rating COST A1 Cost Estimate A cost estimate has been developed and formally approved by DOE and is the basis for the cost baselines. The cost estimate is a reasonable approximation of Total Project Costs, and covers all phases of the project. The estimate is prepared in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines: Task 2 Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Milestone Report NREL/MP-540-38643 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Analysis of Coconut- Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task Nos. WF3Y.1000 and FC02.0800 under an agreement between the U.S. Agency for International Development

322

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological Warfare Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological DUPLICATION Graham S Pearson HSP Advisory Board The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) was opened biological weapons and prohibit their development, produc- tion, stockpiling, acquisition and retention

Sussex, University of

323

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San José McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Rhetoric and heresthetic in the Mississippi Freedom Party controversy at the 1964 Democratic Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Democratic Convention. Specifically, the focus is on the rhetorical discourse presented by the members of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Fannie Lou Hamer in particular, at the Credentials Committee two days before the onset of the actual Convention...

Battaglia, Adria

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Eleventh quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period April 1 - June 30, 1995, at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Dietary fiber and cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in axenic (germfree) and holoxenic (conventional) rats. — III.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(conventional) rats. — III. Effect of non-sterilized pectin E. SACQUET, C. LEPRINCE, M. RIOTTOT P. RAIBAUD-en-Josas, France. Summary. Axenic (germfree) and holoxenic (conventional) rats were given a pectin- containing diet and large intestine of both germfree and conventional rats. Pectin decreased the absorption coefficient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Non-conventional passive sensors for monitoring tritium on surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe development of small passive, solid-state detectors for in-situ measurements of tritium, or other weak beta-emitting radionuclides, on surfaces. One form of detector operates on the principle of thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE), the other by discharge of an electret ion chamber (EIC). There are currently two specific types of commercially available detector systems that lend themselves to making surface measurements. One is the thin-film BeO on a graphite disc, and the other is the Teflon EIC. Two other types of TSEE dosimeters (ceramic BeO and carbon doped alumina) are described but lack either a suitable commercially available reader or standardized methods of fabrication. The small size of these detectors allows deployment in locations difficult to access with conventional windowless gas-flow proportional counters. Preliminary testing shows that quantitative measurements are realized with exposure times of 1--10 hours for the TSEE dosimeters (at the DOE release guideline of 5,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for fixed beta contamination). The EIC detectors exhibit an MDA of 26,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} for a 24 hour exposure. Both types of integrating device are inexpensive and reusable. Measurements can, therefore, be made that are faster, cheaper, safer, and better than those possible with baseline monitoring technology.

Gammage, R.B.; Brock, J.L.; Meyer, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). \\{TLDs\\} were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, \\{CTDIvol\\} 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients \\{ESDs\\} values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

K. Alzimami; A. Sulieman; E. Omer; I.I. Suliman; K. Alsafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment  

SciTech Connect

The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps.

Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

New Brunswick Laboratory CX Determinations | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Brunswick Laboratory CX Determinations New Brunswick Laboratory CX Determinations Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Categorical Exclusion Determinations Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Larry Kelly U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 P: (865) 576-0885 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations New Brunswick Laboratory CX Determinations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Categorical Exclusion Determination Documents (CX Determinations): * Determination Date Name of Action: Description Categorical Exclusion Number External link 06/08/2012 NBL-17 GENERIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) FOR THE NBL: Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations .pdf file (617KB) B3.6

332

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

s, s, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERM INATION RECIPIENT:University of Central Florida PROJECf TITLE : Florida Hydrogen Initiative· 3 letter of Interest (LOI) Projects Page I of2 STATE: Fl Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number COP Renewal DE·FC36-04G014225 GF0-04-221e G014225 Based on my review orlbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.IA), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B 3.6 Siting. construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

333

P"I.'!)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I.'!) I.'!) u .s . DEPARnIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEMEN T CEN TER NEPA DEIEmlINATION RECIPIENT:Gas Technology Institute PROJECf TITLE: Developing Thennal Conversion Options for Biorefinery Residues Page 1 of2 STATE: AL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number COP DE· FG36-01G011082 GFO-GOll082-OO3 G011082 Based on my review oBhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I ban made the following detennination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

334

J-e  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J-e r- 2 Pe k75 5 f* 1-2 tY ( r. PMC-F.F2a -U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Clemson University STATE: SC PROJECT TITLE : BioEthanol Collaborative Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number Not applicable DE-FG36-08G088071 GF0-08-140a GOO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), 1 have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting. construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

335

New Brunswick Laboratory Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations | U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New New Brunswick Laboratory Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov New Brunswick Laboratory Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Categorical Exclusion Determination Documents (CX Determinations): * Determination Date Name of Action: Description Categorical Exclusion Number External link 06/08/2012 NBL-17 GENERIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) FOR THE NBL: Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations .pdf file (617KB) B3.6

336

PNIC.F.F2a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F.F2a F.F2a (2.0 COI) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Microlink Devices STATE: IL PROJECT High Efficiency, Low-Cost, Multijunction Solar Cells Based on Epitaxial Liftoff and Wafer Bonding; NREL TITLE : Tracking No. 09-041 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number GO-09-041 G010337 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

337

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERIVIINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERIVIINATION DETERIVIINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:INFINIA CORPORATION STATE: WA PROJECf TITLE: Innovative Phase Change Thennal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOO104 DE-EEOOO3585 GFO-10-490 G03585 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Campliance Officer (authori7.ed under DOE Order 45I.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboralory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

338

DEPARTMENT OF FNERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DI!TERJ.fiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FNERGY FNERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DI!TERJ.fiNATION RECIPIENT:University of Minnesota Page 1 of2 STATE: MN PROJECT TITLE: Production and economics of perennial-based woody and herbaceous biomass crops under alley- cropping systems I"unding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number CDP G088073 GFO-G088073-033 0 Based on my review ofthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autborized undu DOE Order 4SLIA), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

339

MC- F. F2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

( el% ( el% MC- F. F2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1,10602) SERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERMINATION RECIPIENT:SiGNa Chemistry STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE : NaSi and Na-SG Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-08G088108 G088108 GF0-08-136a G088108 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), 1 have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

340

NEPA DETERM1.I"{ REClPIENT:Abengoa Solar Inc STATE: CO PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF::ENEROY OF::ENEROY 6flR:EPROJECT MANAGEMBNTCENTER NEPA DETERM1.I"{ REClPIENT:Abengoa Solar Inc STATE: CO PROJECT Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FC36-08G018038 FC36-08G018038 GFO-G018038-001 G018038 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 63.6 Siting. construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PMC·EF2. U.S. DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EF2. EF2. U.S. DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETFIU.UNATION RECIPIENT:lllinois Institute of Technology PROJECT T ITLE : Mixed Conducting Corrosion Resistant Materials for PEM fuel cells Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instr umen t Num ber NEPA Control Number C ID Number DE-PS36-08G098OO9 OE-EE0000461 GF0-10-478 0 Based on my Ryiew orthe information concerning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autbori7.ed under DOE Order 4SLIA), 1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUM BER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation , and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

342

RECII'IENT:Solazyme, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solazyme, Inc Solazyme, Inc u.s. DEPi..R.TlVlENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT IvlANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETER1\UNATION PROJECT TITLE: Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery (SzIBR): Diesel Fuels from Heterotrophic Algae Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-EE0000096 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number EE0002877 GFO-0002877-002 EE2877 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning affacilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

343

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Siting, Construction, Operation and Decommissioning of Microbiological and Biomedical Facilities CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office

344

PN1C.EF2a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C.EF2a C.EF2a (.0 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERI1 ITNATION RECIPIENT:Parker Hannifin STATE: IN PROJECI TITLE : Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number CDP DE-EE0000412 GFO-10-043 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

345

u.s. Dl!PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIINATION RECIPIENT :University of California San Diego PROJECT TITL.E: San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology Page 1 of2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instnlment Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEOOO3142 GF0-10-582 EE3142 Based on my review ortbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorukd under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting . construction (or modification), operation, and deoommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analYSIS):

346

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENTER NEPA DEIERJ\lINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.1I0:. 1.1I0:. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENTER NEPA DEIERJ\lINATION RECIPIENT:Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah PROJECf TITLE: Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems Page 1 of2 STATE: UT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Numbu NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-EEOOOOO75 DE-EEOOO2768 GF0-10-354 0 Based on my Tn'icw oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordcr45I.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

347

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 24380 of 26,764 results. 71 - 24380 of 26,764 results. Download CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008817-categorical-exclusion-determination Page Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS... http://energy.gov/em/services/communication-engagement/long-term-stewardship-resource-center Download Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities

348

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Brunswick Laboratory | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Brunswick Laboratory New Brunswick Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Brunswick Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by New Brunswick Laboratory. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 8, 2012 CX-008816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renovations and Maintenance Activities for Buildings, Structures, Infrastructures and Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.3, 61.4, 61.5, B1.11, B1.15, B1.16, B1.17, 81.22, B1.27, 62.1, B2.2, B2.3, 62.5 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory June 8, 2012 CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory December 10, 2009

349

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.eU) , .eU) , u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT: Parker Hannifin, Aircraft Wheel and Brake Diy PROJECT TITl.E: Wind Turbine Electric Brake project Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pro<:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number COP DE-EEOOOO296 GF0-10-053 0 Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer- (autboriztd under DOE Order 4SI.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting. construction (or modification). operation . and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

350

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 13, 2012 June 13, 2012 CX-008465: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Prototype Commercial Gasifier Sensor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/13/2012 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 13, 2012 CX-008464: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Prototype Commercial Gasifier Sensor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/13/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 8, 2012 CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory June 4, 2012 CX-008474: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the

351

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NllPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NllPA DETERMINATION NllPA DETERMINATION REClPI[NT:General Molors LlC Page I 0[2 STATE: MI PROJECf TITLE: Investigation of Micra.andMacro-scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Proc:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE·PS36-08G098OO9 EE0000470 GF0-10-353 EE470 Based on my review orthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA},1 have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (fOf example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analYSIS);

352

DEP.-lliThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

!AUll !AUll u.s. DEP.-lliThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIP1ENT: Texas Engineering Experiment Station PROJECf TITLE: Novel Mechanical Pretreatment for Ugnocellulosic Feedstocks Page I of I STATE: TX t'unding Opportunity Announctment Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbu CID Numbtr Oe-FOA-0000337 EEOOO500S GFO-OOO5005-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (a ulhori7.ed under DOE Order 451.1A).1 haH' made the followinll: detumination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Descriptio n: 8 3.6 Siting. construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facinlies for Indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical sta

353

J.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t t J. RECIPIENT:City of Toledo u.s. DEPARTIlIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\llNATION Page I of2 STATE: OH PROJECT TITL.E: Toledo City ARRA- EECBG Act 1-Collins Parl< Sotar Photovottaic Project - 1 Megawatt Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEOOOO707 DE·EEOOOO707 GFD-OOOO707-OO3 0 Based on my uview of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Off"tcer (authorized under DOE Order 4SLIA),1 have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: De~ription: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation. and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

354

PMC**F2a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PMC**F2a PMC**F2a 12.0 02 T.T.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Rochester Institute of Technology STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE : Hyperspectral Polymer Solar Cells Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-08G088110 GFO-09-025-001 G088110 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), 1 have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

355

""'..",. U.S. DEP.~TlIIEN'I OF ENERGY I"'''. ' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'..",. U.S. DEP.~TlIIEN'I OF ENERGY '..",. U.S. DEP.~TlIIEN'I OF ENERGY I"'''. ' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA Dl1TEIU.llNATION RECIPIENT:General Atomics STATE: CA PROJECT T ITLE : Novel Heterotrophic Algae Reactor Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE·FOAOOOO337 DE· EEOOO5004 GFO-OOO5004-001 0 Based on my nview of the informalion tORCrrRing the proposed action, as N£PA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

356

CX-007975: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007975: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions and Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International- Proposed Actions For Calendar Year 2012 Scheduled To Take Place CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/13/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) and Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International Inc. (ATL) will perform indoor bench-scale and small-scale research and development projects, conventional laboratory operations, and pilot projects to verify proof of- concept, on and near the Hanford Site during Calendar Year 2012. WRPS and ATL will perform all activities in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) limitations

357

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETEIU.llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

llNATION llNATION Rt:CIPIENT :Sapphire Energy, Inc. PROJECT TITL.E; The Development of Value-Added Products from Algae Residual Biomass Page I of2 STATE: NM Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO393 GF().OOO()393-001 0 Based on my review orlhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I ha ~'e made the following determination: ex, EA, t:IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); small-scale researd'l and development projects: and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than two years) conducted

358

U.S. DEPARThfENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETElUrINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

q q U.S. DEPARThfENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETElUrINATION RECIPIENT: Marquette University PROJECT TITLE : Anaerobic Biotechnology for Renewable Energy Page 1 of2 STATE; WI Funding Opportunity Annoum::emcnl Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Numbt>r NA EEOOO1000 GF0-10-091 EE1000 Based on my uview of the information <:onc:erning the proposed aetion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Orde ... 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.6 Siting, oonstruction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparatIOn of chemical standards and sample analysis):

359

RECIPIENT: Mayateriats, INC. U.S. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mayateriats, INC. Mayateriats, INC. U.S. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!P A DETl!lU.llNATION PROJECT TITLE: Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural Byproducts Page 1 of2 STATE: MI Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pro(:unmtntlnSlrumenl Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-PS36-07G097025 DE-FG36-08G018009 GFO-G018009-001 0 Based on my review oftbe informalion concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research prOjects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

360

PMC*EF2a U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 ba,Ad PMC*EF2a U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:University of South Dakota STATE: SD PROJECT TITLE : USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number EE0000270 GFO-10-019 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

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361

EERE I'ROJECTMANAGEMENTCENTER NEPA DFl'FR}.llNATlON  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Port of Benton Port of Benton u.s. DEPARThIFNT OFI!NERG¥ EERE I'ROJECTMANAGEMENTCENTER NEPA DFl'FR}.llNATlON Page 1 of2 STATE: WA PROJECT TITLE: Production of Infrastructure - Ready fuels from Agricultural Biomass Reserch and Development Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrCH.'urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-EE()()()()391 GF()'()()()()391-OO3 EE391 Based on my review ollbe Information concerning the proposed aclion, a§ NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), J bave made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 63.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation. and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

362

RECIPIENT:Semprius  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Semprius Semprius u.s. DEPARTr-IEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMEN T CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: NC PROJECT TITLE: SAl Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-based Module Array; NREl Tracking No. 09- 036a Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procur~mtnt Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number NREL-09-036a G010337 Based on my review of the information concuning the proposed action, as Nf:PA Compliance Officer (authorized undcr DOE Order 45 I. IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX ANI) NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

363

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 3, 2013 June 3, 2013 CX-010527: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renovations and Maintenance Activities for Buildings, Structures CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Ames Site Office June 3, 2013 CX-010526: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Ames Site Office June 3, 2013 CX-010512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Blackfeet Energy Efficiency Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010507: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of Smart Grid Inverters for High-Penetration Photovoltaic Applications

364

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.**.* :. .**.* :. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\llNATION RECIPIENT:General Motors lLC PROJECT TITLE; High-Activity Dealloyed Cathode Catalysts Page 1 of2 STATE: MI fo'unding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-P$3608G098009 EEOOOO458 GFO-10-332 EE458 Based on my review oflhe information concC'rning tbe proposed action, as N[PA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made tbe following determination: ex, ":A, EIS APP .. ;N DIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting. construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

365

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 24440 of 31,917 results. 31 - 24440 of 31,917 results. Download CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006067-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006071: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocation and Operation of Machinery and Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006071-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006072: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disconnection of Utilities CX(s) Applied: B1.27

366

DEPARTlVffiNT OF ENERGY ~' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page 1 of2 u.s. DEPARTlVffiNT OF ENERGY ~' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER '~ ' . . NEPA DETElUttllNATION ~ RECIPIENT: Abengoa Solar Inc STATE: eo PROJECT Development of Advanced Polymeric Reflector for esp Applications TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-07G097028 DE-FC36-08G018036 gfo-g018036-004 G018036 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.1 A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

367

Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes have been developed from bench-scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full-scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt % nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt % for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt % incinerator fly ash have been formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %.

Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes have been developed from bench-scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full-scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt % nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt % for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt % incinerator fly ash have been formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %.

Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlI'IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERlI'IINATION DETERlI'IINATION Page I of2 RECIPIENT: eSolar, Inc. STATE: CA PROJECf TITLE : Modular & Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design & Feasibility Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE·FOA.{)()()()104 Pro<:unmenf Instrument Number DE-EEOOO3595 NEPA Control Number GF().10-464 elO Number o Based on my rtview of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4St.IA), I have made the follo~·ing determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of faci lities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

371

RECIPIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"~ , ,~ "~ , ,~ . RECIPIENT :Solexant Corp US. DEP .. UUlIlFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEITlUUNATION Page 1 of3 STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE: Sinlered eZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foit; NREL Tracking No. 11-017 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procu~menllDstTument Number NEPA Control Number em Number NREL-11-017 G010337 Based on my review oflbe information (oDeeming the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autborized under DOE Order 451.IA). I bave made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

372

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CIl.o~) CIl.o~) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Vennont Sustainable Jobs Fund PROJECT TITLE : Vennont Siofuels Initiative: Carbon Harvest 3 Page 1 af2 STATE: VT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-FG36-08G088182 GFO-G088182-025 G088182 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE O rder 451.1A).1 have made tbe following determination; cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER; Description: 63.6 Siting. oonstroctlon (or modification). operation. and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research prOjects and conventional laboratory operabons (for example, preparabon of chemical standards and sample analYSIS);

373

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-006069: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011

374

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 3560 of 29,416 results. 51 - 3560 of 29,416 results. Download CX-001381: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001381-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000788: Categorical Exclusion Determination 200 Area Chilled Water Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 01/25/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000788-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 73, No. 36- Feb. 22, 2008 Federal Register Notice in Vol 73 No 36 of Application from Baja Wind U.S

375

The Armament Research and Development Establishment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston, now a part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The part played by conventional weapons has been greatly affected by the development ... and the mechanics of fluids and solids. Much of the research done falls within the ambit of the physical sciences, and applications outside the armament field often occur.

1960-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

Research Items  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... was commenced in June 1923 by the Wear Flint Glass Works; the manufactured articles include teapots, cooking utensils, and such like, besides the more conventional test-tubes, beakers, ...

1925-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

Upgrading of low-rank coals for conventional and advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Low-rank coals, subbituminous, lignitic, and brown coals, have a ubiquitous presence in the world, being found in all continents. Close to half of the world`s estimated coal resources are low- rank coals. Many countries have no alternative economic source of energy. In the lower 48 states of the United States, there are 220 billion tons of economically recoverable reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal. Add to this quantity 5 trillion tons of predominantly subbituminous coal in Alaska, and the combined amount represents the largest supply of the lowest-cost fuels available for generating electric power in the United States. However, to use these coals cost-effectively and in an environmentally acceptable way, it is imperative that their properties and combustion/gasification behavior be well understood. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) takes a cradle-to-grave approach (i.e., mining, precleaning, combustion/gasification, postcleaning, and reuse and disposal of residues) for all aspects of coal processing and utilization. The environmental impact of these activities must be matched with the appropriate technologies. Experience over many years has shown that variations in coal and ash properties have a critical impact on design, reliability and efficiency of operation, and environmental compliance when low-rank coals are burned in conventional systems. This chapter reviews the significant technical issues of beneficiation, which includes reduction in moisture as well as ash (including sulfur), in relation to low-rank coal properties and their impact on conventional and advanced power systems. Finally, the development and utilization of low-rank coal resources are briefly discussed in view of policy, economic, and strategic issues.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.; Jones, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

379

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

380

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

382

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

383

In-Cylinder Imaging of Conventional and Advanced, Low-Temperature...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vessels, which have been extensively modified for optical access. * Newly-developed laserimaging techniques in these facilities have provided new insight into conventional...

384

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production… (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

386

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

387

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

388

Research Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

389

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers published research in 2007 that addressed assumptions in the ability of diesel exhaust organic aerosols to mix with organic aerosols from tree evaporate. This new...

390

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

391

Research Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

392

Research | JCESR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research banner researcher908 Today's electrical energy storage approaches suffer from limited energy and power capacities, lower-than-desired rates of charge and discharge,...

393

Fabrication of microstructures on glass by imprinting in conventional furnace for lab-on-chip application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imprinting micro structures on glass in conventional furnace instead of vacuum chamber was carried out using a nickel alloy mold which was fabricated by diode-pumped solid state laser writing. The layout is designed to serve for DNA analysis. In the ... Keywords: Conventional furnace, Glass imprinting, Laser direct writing, Ni alloy mold

Qiuling Chen; Qiuping Chen; Gabriele Maccioni; Adriano Sacco; Sergio Ferrero; Luciano Scaltrito

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs aircraft such as those that serve regional routes. We thus explore the optimal aerodynamic shape of both a blended wing-body and conventional tube-and-wing regional aircraft through high-fidelity aerodynamic shape

Zingg, David W.

395

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

396

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures S ABSTRACT Cereal Chem. 76(1):96-99 A corn wet-milling process in which alkali was used was studied as an alternative to the conventional corn wet-milling procedure. In the alkali wet-milling process, corn was soaked

397

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparison of Wind Turbine Load Statistics for Inflow Turbulence Fields based on Conventional for a utility-scale 5MW wind turbine. Load statistics, spectra, and time-frequency analysis representations utility-scale wind turbines. The present study takes on this question by making use of conventional

Manuel, Lance

398

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 8 FIRE of New York State National Institute of Standards and Technology National Fire Protection Association, corresponding to the ring pentants. 8.2.2 Fire Protection System #12;8-2 Part 3: Conventional Facilities Scope

Ohta, Shigemi

399

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

Grill-Spector, Kalanit

400

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 6 MECHANICAL ­ HVAC SYSTEMS 6.1 Design Criteria 6.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards have adequate capacity and head, no chilled water pumps #12;Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC

Ohta, Shigemi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically interfaced-signal modelling of a micro-grid system that includes conventional (rotating machine) and electronically interfaced deviations in the overall system model and provides a methodology for the analysis of autonomous micro-grid

Lehn, Peter W.

402

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

Laughlin, Robert B.

403

Research Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities collaborationassetsimagesicon-collaboration.jpg Research Opportunities Partnering with respected universities, LANL Centers provide exceptional educational...

404

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

405

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

406

The role of non conventional oil in the attenuation of peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the possible substitution of conventional with non conventional oil is studied using system dynamics models. The model proposed in this paper is based on geological, economic and technological aspects, and it fits approximately the behaviour observed by Hubbert. A first validation of the model has been made with the USA oil production data. These USA data show that there is a good coincidence between our model and the reality. This model has been expanded in order to include the substitution of the conventional oil with the non conventional one for the World. Two models with different ways to treat the contribution of non conventional oil have been developed and tested: a base model (business as usual), which extrapolates the last two decades’ growth of this type of oil into the future, and a model that explores how much non conventional oil would be needed in order to avoid a peak and decrease in the global non renewable fuel production. The results show that, even under some hypotheses that we consider optimistic, the attenuation of the peak oil decline requires more than 10% of sustained growth of non conventional oil production over at least the next two decades.

Carlos de Castro; Luis Javier Miguel; Margarita Mediavilla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Engineering process and cost model for a conventional corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts (germ, gluten, fiber and steep liquor). The total starch produced by the wet milling industry in the USA in 2004 equaled 21.5 billion kg, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production. Process engineering and cost models for a corn wet milling process (for steeping and milling facilities) have been developed for a “generic” processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). The process includes grain cleaning, steeping, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer®) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn and other wet milling coproducts. We have also used the model to conduct a variety of sensitivity studies utilizing modifications such as feedstock costs, corn compositional variations, and the sale of wet corn gluten feed. The model is also being used as a base-case for the development of models to test alternative processing technologies and to help in the scale-up and commercialization of new wet milling technologies. This model is available upon request from the authors for educational, non-commercial and research uses.

Edna C. Ramirez; David B. Johnston; Andrew J. McAloon; Winnie Yee; Vijay Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

university-research The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total...

409

Research Highlights  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE partners with leading researchers from industry, academia, and national laboratories to accelerate advances in solid-state lighting (SSL). These researchers have made dramatic progress in just a few years, achieving several world records as well as national recognition.

410

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Thermodynamics Affect Radiative Impact of Deep Convective Cloud Systems Submitter: Jensen, M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric...

411

Microbiological Research ] (  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) or to expand on previous research addressing the fate of nitrogen from agrochemicals (Bichat et al., 1999

Sims, Gerald K.

412

An overview of TPV research activities in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research activity in Japan has prospered from the second half of the 90s. In this paper we will present an overview of TPV research activities in Japan. TPV technologies have been surveyed by research committees in NEDO as a part of the research activity of the New Sunshine Project. The TPV is considered as a new application of non?conventional solar cells and the situation of TPV technologies especially TPV cells in USA and EU is surveyed. Systematic investigative research on TPV systems was performed by ENAA on FY1997 and 1998. In this investigative research on potential market for a TPV power source in Japan has been focused on how TPV can contribute to energy conservation and environmental protection and harmony compared with conventional engine or turbine generators and underdeveloped power generation technologies such as fuel cells or chemical batteries etc. In addition to the investigative research the technical research activities are introduced in this paper.

Hiroo Yugami; Masafumi Yamaguchi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal By-Products Laboratories Coal By-Products Laboratories As part of NETL's focus on clean fossil power systems, the Coal By-products Laboratories are dedicated to resolving environmental issues associated with residues and by-products from coal combustion. These facilities provide valuable data about Coal Utilization By-products (CUB) from both conventional and advanced power plants. Data from these laboratories are able to show improvements inherent in new combustion technologies compared to conventional plants, with respect to the nature of combustion residues and CUBs. Under current practice, power plant operators collect residues and safely dispose of them or recover them for sale and re-use. Developing more effective procedures for using and disposing of these materials requires accurate information on the potential for these materials to leach into soil after disposal, and the chemical and physical characteristics of the residues. The data NETL has collected through this research has provided important science that supports regulatory decisions related to CUB.

414

Neuroimaging Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

415

Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM supported DOE in its role as the lead technical agency to produce a report recently for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management.

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaheim convention center Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fax www.nist.govsrm srminfo@nist.gov NEW SRMsRMs Summary: October 25-29, 2009 David L. Lawrence Booth 314 Convention Center Pittsburgh, PA Chem Show November 17......

418

Making Translation Work BIOTECHNOLOGY'S LARGEST GLOBAL EVENT, THE BIO INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION, CONVENES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Translation Work BIOTECHNOLOGY'S LARGEST GLOBAL EVENT, THE BIO INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION- tunities and discussing industry trends, investments, and policies meant to better the world.The gathering reasonable protection of commercial interests within strictly defined domains of joint activity, while

Mullins, Dyche

419

Non-Conventional Plasma Assisted Catalysts for Diesel Exhaust Treatment: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the application of pulse discharges along with catalysts in treating the exhaust gas at higher temperatures. In the present work a plasma reactor, filled with catalysts, called as plasma catalytic reactor, is studied for removal of oxides of nitrogen, total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experiments are conducted on an actual diesel engine exhaust at no-load and at different temperatures starting from room temperature to 300°C. The removal efficiencies of these pollutants are studied. The experiments are carried out with both conventional and non-conventional catalysts. The idea is to explore the pollutant removal efficiency characteristics by non-conventional catalysts. The efficiency results are compared with that of conventional catalysts. The experiments are carried out at a constant pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. Both pellet and honeycomb type catalysts are used in the study.

B S Rajanikanth; P K Srinivas Kumar; V Ravi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ISC Conventional Reading Rooms | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Larry Kelly U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 P: (865) 576-0885 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) ISC Conventional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Low gas-liquid ratio foam flooding for conventional heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recovery of heavy oil by water flooding is 10% lower than that of conventional crude oil, so enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is of great significance for heavy oil. In this paper, foam flooding with a gas-liqu...

Jing Wang; Jijiang Ge; Guicai Zhang; Baodong Ding; Li Zhang…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional septic tanks have been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of septic tank/drain field systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

424

2014-02-06 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Conventional Cooking Products; Request for Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information and notice of document availability regarding energy conservation standards for residential conventional cooking products, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 6, 2014.

425

Indoor atmospheric corrosion of conventional weathering steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One year indoor atmospheric corrosion examinations have been carried out on two conventional weathering steels for a year, at two test sites, Tocumen and Sherman Breakwater in Panama. They are environmentally cla...

Juan A. Jaén; Josefina Iglesias; Olga Adames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Conventional wisdom and challenges to the threshold behavior of two-electron escape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The threshold behavior of two-electron escape and the complementary characterization of doubly-excited resonances have been the subject of investigation for forty years. The conventional view of the physics of...

M. S. Lubell

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Use of Internet and Intranet In American Convention and Visitors Bureaus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emergence of the Internet/Intranet offers new promise to American Convention and ... extent of the various capabilities of the Internet/Intranet are used by CVBs to augment marketing ... directors have not re...

Y. Y. Yuan; D. R. Fesenmaier; L. Xia…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

429

Agency for Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Jump to: navigation, search Name Agency for Non-conventional Energy and Rural Technology (ANERT) Place Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India Zip 695004 Product Kerala state's nodal agency responsible for identification, promotion and development of non-conventional energy sources. Coordinates 8.50838°, 76.94773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":8.50838,"lon":76.94773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

A review of ash in conventional and advanced coal-based power systems  

SciTech Connect

Process conditions are briefly described for conventional and advanced power systems. The advanced systems include both combustion and gasification processes. We discuss problems in coal-based power generation systems, including deposition, agglomeration and sintering of bed materials, and ash attack are discussed. We also discuss methods of mitigating ash problems and anticipated changes anticipated in ash use by converting from conventional to advanced systems.

Holcombe, N.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

NREL: Biomass Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Below are news stories related to NREL biomass research. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. August 21, 2013 Can "Drop-In" Biofuels Solve Integration Issues? Lab works to create biofuels indistinguishable from conventional

432

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cotton-Ball Clouds Contained Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

433

Research Highlight  

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a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection with CuP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

434

Research Highlight  

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the First Aerosol Indirect Effect in Shallow Cumuli Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

435

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research:...

436

Research Help  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology Nuclear Science & Technology Plutonium Science Physics Renewable Energy Space Sciences Research Help Looking for Library resources? How to Find can assist you in...

437

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y Qian, and JE Penner. 2012. "Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L15709, doi: 10.1029...

438

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change Download a printable PDF Submitter: Maseyk, K. S., Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6 Area of Research: Surface...

439

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curve Captures Cloud System Variability Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud...

440

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference:...

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441

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Kelly, JT, CC Chuang, and AS Wexler. 2007. "Influence of dust composition on cloud droplet...

442

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tests of Single-Column Models with ARM Data Submitter: Randall, D. A., Colorado State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column ModelsParameterizations...

443

Research Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards are intended to be an avenue for significant energy efficiency and renewable energy innovation. To enable the participant's creativity as they conduct their...

444

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

algorithms from the research domain to operational applications. But while the standardization of algorithms is an important concern of the radar community, an awareness of the...

445

Research Topics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Postdoctoral Research Awards are intended to be an avenue for significant energy efficiency and renewable energy innovation. The EERE Postdoctoral...

446

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather Prediction and Climate Simulation: a Meeting of the Models Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single...

447

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Plains site to evaluate three major Numerical-Weather-Prediction reanalyses (ERA-Interim, NCEPNCAR Reanalysis I, and NCEPDOE...

448

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBL Cloud Properties Derived from the Azores-AMF Observations Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

449

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Glaciation Temperature of Deep Convective Clouds with Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud...

450

Research Highlight  

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A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

451

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schween, J. H., Inst. of Geophysics and Meteorology Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference:...

452

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S,...

453

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

454

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Maryland Sawyer, V. R., University of Maryland Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

455

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Khain, A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Area of Research:...

456

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie...

457

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Insight on the Atmosphere's Tiniest Particles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Smith, J., NCAR McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

458

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Properties of the 1997 TWP Smoke Event Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal...

459

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Radiation...

460

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Estimates of Cloud Optical Thickness, Simple Equation Is Good Enough Submitter: Barnard, J. C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Research | NREL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy grid integration. Learn More National Bioenergy Center National Center for Photovoltaics National Wind Technology Center Publications Data & Resources Research Highlights...

462

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

463

Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO2 Sequestration Â… Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* NREL/TP-510-32575 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 January 2004 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann Prepared under Task No. BB04.4010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

464

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

465

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

466

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Earlier Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earlier Events Earlier Events 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 April 2000 Ionizing Radiation Science and Protection in the 21st Century, NCRP, April 5-6, Arlington, VA. RADIATION RESEARCH 2000, Association for Radiation Research, April 10-12, Bristol, UK. Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society Spring 2000 Meeting, Gainesville, FL, April 13-14. 47th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society, April 29-May 3, Albuquerque, NM. May 2000 IRPA-10 International Congress 2000, May 14-19, Hiroshima, Japan. IRPA-10 Secretariat, c/o Japan Convention Services, Inc., Nippon Press Center Building, 2-2-1, Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan. Phone: 81-3-3508-1214. Fax: 81-3-3508-0820. irpa10@convention.jp. 4th International Non-Ionizing Radiation Workshop, May 22-25, Kyoto,

467

Desalination Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... for the United States for discussions with the Office of Saline Water. The Committee on Desalination Research had considered a research programme in conjunction with industry, and the Atomic Energy ... the Atomic Energy Authority had undertaken work on the use of nuclear energy for a desalination plant. The Committee and the Authority had watched closely work in the United States ...

1965-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in organic and conventional farming systems in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic agriculture is often considered to contribute to reducing energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, also on a per unit product basis. For energy, this is supported by a large number of studies, but the body of evidence for \\{GHGs\\} is smaller. Dutch agriculture is characterized by relatively intensive land use in both organic and conventional farming, which may affect their performance in terms of energy use and GHG emissions. This paper presents results of a model study on energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic and conventional farming systems. Energy use per unit milk in organic dairy is approximately 25% lower than in conventional dairy, while GHG emissions are 5-10% lower. Contrary to dairy farming, energy use and GHG emissions in organic crop production are higher than in conventional crop production. Energy use in organic arable farming is 10-30% and in organic vegetable farming 40-50% higher than in their respective conventional counterparts. GHG emissions in organic arable and vegetable farming are 0-15% and 35-40% higher, respectively. Our results correspond with other studies for dairy farming, but not for crop production. The most likely cause for higher energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic crop production is its high intensity level, which is expressed in crop rotations with a large share of high-value crops, relatively high fertiliser inputs and frequent field operations related to weeding.

Jules F.F.P. Bos; Janjo de Haan; Wijnand Sukkel; René L.M. Schils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Disarmament: The role of conventional arms control in national security strategy. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disarmament, Conventional Arms Control, Negotiations on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE), Confidence- and Security-Building Measures (CSBM), Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), Armored Combat Vehicles, tanks, artillery, combat aviation, personnel ceilings, sub-zones, NATO, Warsaw pact, Neutral and nonaligned. In this textbook the authors address significant conventional arms control history; development of U.S. and NATO objectives for the talks; pertinent issues which had to be resolved; the role of partial disarmament in National Security Strategy; and conclude with a full discussion of CFE and CSBM proposals, data, and the military implications of a successful agreement. The authors provide answers to the important questions: How close are we to an agreement. Can conventional arms reductions be verified. What does the post arms reduction world look like. What is the future of the alliances in Europe. Will we have to change national security strategy. Is arms control still relevant, considering the changes in Eastern Europe. How can we agree on answers before events change them. This book is somewhat unique since it incorporates the work of practitioners, academics, and actual members of our U.S. conventional arms control negotiating teams.

Hallenbeck, R.A.; Shaver, D.E.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

471

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

472

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

473

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

474

Preface Vice Rector for Research The research strategy of the TU Vienna for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable and low emission mobility 11 Climate neutral, renewable and conventional energy supply systems 12 and to improve our international appearance, as well as build- ing cooperation at all levels. We would like organisations and with the economic and private sectors. The research focus point "Energy and Environ- ment

Szmolyan, Peter

475

,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

476

,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

477

Comparative study of the performance of conventional and column flotation when treating coking coal fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations were carried out on coking coal fines by conventional cell and column flotation techniques. The effects of different operating parameters were evaluated for both conventional and column flotation. The coal fines were collected from Bhojudih washery, India. These coal fines averaged 24.4% ash, 19.8% volatile matter and 53.8% fixed carbon on a dry basis. A commercial grade sodium silicate, light diesel oil and pine oil were used as depressant, collector and frother respectively. The flotation performance was compared with release analysis. The conventional flotation results indicated that a clean coal with 14.4% ash could be obtained at 78.0% yield with 88.4% combustible recovery. The ash of the clean coal could be further reduced to 10.1% at 72.0% yield with 85.6% combustible recovery by using column flotation. The column flotation results were close to those obtained by release analysis.

M.S. Jena; S.K. Biswal; S.P. Das; P.S.R. Reddy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

479

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con-parameter experiments in RERAF. Systems Analysis Department The objective of the research is to de- velop and apply are systems reliability, organisation, toxi- cology, informatics, simulation methods, work studies, economics

480

NV Energy Solar Integration Study: Cycling and Movements of Conventional Generators for Balancing Services  

SciTech Connect

With an increasing penetration level of solar power in the southern Nevada system, the impact of solar on system operations needs to be carefully studied from various perspectives. Qualitatively, it is expected that the balancing requirements to compensate for solar power variability will be larger in magnitude; meanwhile, generators providing load following and regulation services will be moved up or down more frequently. One of the most important tasks is to quantitatively evaluate the cycling and movements of conventional generators with solar power at different penetration levels. This study is focused on developing effective methodologies for this goal and providing a basis for evaluating the wear and tear of the conventional generators

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench-scale research conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Life Cycle Comparison of Coal Gasification by Conventional versus Calcium Looping Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After separation of H2, the remaining gas is used as fuel in a boiler to produce steam that is used in a steam turbine to produce electricity. ... Note that, as described in Section 2.1, the conventional process has nonzero GHG emissions due to combustion of the gases remaining after CO2 and H2S removal, while CLP does not have any GHG emissions. ... The conventional process with CO2 recovery from flue gas was compared with the calcium looping process based on their life cycle land use, water use, and GHG emissions. ...

Berrin Kursun; Shwetha Ramkumar; Bhavik R. Bakshi; Liang-Shih Fan

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Comparative Environmental and Economic Analysis of Conventional and Nanofluid Solar Hot Water Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Domestic solar hot water heaters for residential use in the Phoenix metropolitan area, as well as throughout the state of Arizona, are eligible for tax rebates at the state and federal level, in addition to incentive programs through local utilities. ... All of these studies have focused on utilizing solar hot water heaters in European countries, with most focusing only on the environmental aspect (8-10) and very limited prior works examining both the economic and environmental impacts (7). ... The nanofluid collector is expected to have the same lifetime as the conventional solar collector since it utilizes the same material technologies as a conventional collector. ...

Todd P. Otanicar; Jay S. Golden

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

483

The Conventionality of Synchronization and the Causal Structure of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring velocities requires the synchronization of spatially-separated clocks. Because this synchronization must precede the determination of velocities, no system of clock synchronization--such as that based on Einstein's presumption of light-speed isotropy--can ever be founded on an experimentally-validated velocity. I argue that this very old observation, which lingers in the philosophical literature under the heading ``Conventionality of Synchronization,'' suggests an explanation of why ``spooky'' quantum correlations can transfer no information at any speed, superluminal or otherwise. This work constitutes the first application of the Conventionality doctrine outside of Relativity itself.

James Carrubba

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

485

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL helps industry partners develop the next generation of energy efficient, high performance vehicles and fuels. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. NREL conducts research on the full range of vehicle types, from light-duty passenger cars to heavy-duty freight trucks. NREL's credible transportation research is grounded in real-world data. NREL's integrated approach links automotive technology advances to the full spectrum of renewable energy solutions. NREL researchers examine infrastructure, market conditions and driver behavior, as well as fuels and vehicles. NREL helps put fuel-efficient, low-emission cars and trucks on the road through research and innovation in electric vehicle, biofuel, and conventional automotive technologies. Researchers collaborate with industry

486

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

487

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

488

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

489

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schumacher, C., Texas A&M University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

490

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fielding, M. D., University of Reading Area of Research:...

491

Ultramicroscopy 103 (2005) 6781 Conventional and back-side focused ion beam milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared using the more conventional `trench' FIB geometry. The use of carbon coating to remove specimen is used, then the local intensity and spacing of the interference fringes that form in the overlap region as it provides direct access to the electrostatic potential in the specimen (projected in the electron beam

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

492

Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations at stopping and post-exercise times on d 28 when compared to d 0. However it was only following interval training that this increase in aerobic capacity response was repeated on d 31. On d 31 of the conventional protocol, plasma lactate...

Haney, Elizabeth anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Chapter 13: Conventional Facilities 13-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and operation Sustainable design Section of the Ring Building available for accelerator installation by July-II Conceptual Design Report Brookhaven National Laboratory Table 13.1.1 NSLS-II Gross Area. Building Component: Conventional Facilities 13-5 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 13.2 SITE ANALYSIS 13.2.1 Building Site

Ohta, Shigemi

494

Persistence of seeds from crops of conventional and herbicide tolerant oilseed rape (Brassica napus)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modified Herbicide Tolerance project (BRIGHT) (Sweet et al...glufosinate (Bayer Crop. Science, Liberty Link) and by conventional...for the first 2 years of the project. The appropriate herbicide...regulatory constraints on the BRIGHT project meant that at most sites all...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Identification and Interpretation of Differences in the Transcriptomes of Organically and Conventionally Grown Potato Tubers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Identification and Interpretation of Differences in the Transcriptomes of Organically and Conventionally Grown Potato Tubers ... ppb, c4-heptenal enhanced overall earthy, potato-like flavors in freshly boiled mashed potatoes, but these levels caused stale flavors in reconstituted dehydrated potatoes. ... Boiled potato off-flavor is a cardboard-like note, that develops within hours when boiled potatoes are stored. ...

Jeroen P. van Dijk; Katarina Cankar; Peter J. M. Hendriksen; Henriek G. Beenen; Ming Zhu; Stanley Scheffer; Louise V. T. Shepherd; Derek Stewart; Howard V. Davies; Carlo Leifert; Steve J. Wilkockson; Kristina Gruden; Esther J. Kok

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

496

EIGHTH SESSION OF THE CONFERENCE OF STATES PARTIES TO THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EIGHTH SESSION OF THE CONFERENCE OF STATES PARTIES TO THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Declaration Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction adopted by the EU Heads of State and Government at the Thessaloniki European Council on 20 June 2003 which stresses that the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

Sussex, University of

497

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban 1 MAY 2003 and Former Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Chemical Weapons Conference on Disarmament PRESENTATIONS Chemical Weapons Destruction CHEMICAL WEAPONS DESTRUCTION IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: Sergey Baranovsky

Sussex, University of

498

Preliminary comparative study of small amplitude helical and conventional ePTFE arteriovenous shunts in pigs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conventional ePTFE arteriovenous shunts in pigs Colin G Caro 1 Nick J Cheshire 2 Nick Watkins 1 Author for correspondence ( c.caro@ic...overall, but marked at eight weeks) would seem to merit reporting. It would seem indicated, furthermore...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Astigmatism: Risk factor for postoperative corneal haze in conventional myopic photorefractive keratectomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To retrospectively assess risk factors other than high myopia for corneal haze in patients who had conventional photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) without mitomycin-C (MMC). Setting Department of Ophthalmology, Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, California, USA. Methods This retrospective study comprised 362 eyes of 193 military members who had conventional PRK with the Star excimer laser system from 2004 to 2006. Study inclusion criteria were myopia less than ?6.0 diopters (D) spherical equivalent with or without astigmatism, no MMC applied, and at least 3 months of postoperative data available. Results Nine eyes had grade 2 corneal haze or greater. Of these eyes, 5 had greater than 2.0 D of astigmatism and 4 had no identifiable risk factors. Clinically significant postoperative corneal haze was associated with the level of preoperative astigmatism (P<.001). Conclusions Preoperative astigmatism was significantly associated with the development of corneal haze after conventional PRK without MMC. Based on these data, surgeons should consider prophylactic MMC use during conventional PRK procedures for patients with moderate to high levels of astigmatism (approximately ?1.25 D).

Karin E. Thomas; Tyson Brunstetter; Spence Rogers; Mark V. Sheridan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.